Actinic Keratosis On Face

The skin is certainly a primary part of our human body. This can give protection from ultra-violet rays, fungi, injury, and in addition heat. It could also help in controlling the body's temperature and accumulate the body fat, vitamin D, as well as water. The skin consists of multiple various cellular layers; the actual two significant cellular layers are epidermis as well as skin. Many times, dermis many forms of cancer is likely to start| on the skin.

Epidermis cancer tumor is a real terrible ailments based on on location type and intensity and also spot of the the actual disease. This specific is the several recognizable type of most cancers, which unfortunately is presently recognized in many individuals. Generally from these types of ailment are treatable however, if they diagnosed in early phases and dealt with extremely quickly.

Skin most cancers can come into two categories those to be: non-melanoma and melanoma. Generally epidermis cancers starts in the epidermis of skin and additionally then becomes one of the three types of cancers. They are: Basal Cell Carcinoma, melanoma and squamous Cell Carcinoma. The actual the majority of intense and harmful within the specific 3 types is certainly the melanoma.

Treatments for precancerous skin lesions and skin cancers known as the actinic keratosis that varies based on the type, location, depth and size of most lesions. Normal epidermis malignancies usually are restricted to the epidermis surface area, which may likely not need to have proper treatment a lot more as compared to an primary biopsy of skin to remove the actual complete advancement.

If extra treatment is required, and then the options consist of:

Excisional Surgery: This kind of treatment is appropriate designed for every single style of cancer. In this particular process the specialist cuts the actual dangerous tissue as well as also adjacent perimeter of the healthful epidermis. As part of quite a few cases, a wide resection may be required.

Freezing: When it comes to this particular technique doctor will eradicate some bit of premature skin malignancies and keratosis by freezing them through the particular liquid nitrogen. As soon as this task softens typically the deceased tissue sloughs off.

Mohs surgery: This specific technique is for re-curring, greater or difficult to treat cancers, which consist of both the squamous cell and basal cell carcinomas. The specialist eliminates the specific growth along with this skin area level-by-layer, and inspects every membrane with microscope, till no unhealthy tissue continue being. This sort of treatment enables the dangerous cell which can turn out to be reduced while not consuming excessive amount of healthy skin.

Laser Treatment: A strong intense, specific beam of laserlight light vaporizes the exact development, usually along with a small injuries towards the particular around tissues. The surgeon could make use of this specific kind of therapy to cure unique type of of skin cancers.

Radiation therapy: This specific could possibly be practiced in conditions while surgical procedure is not necessarily thought-about as an option.

Biological Therapy: This treatment encourages patient's body's immune system process to kill the cancer cells. These medications tend to be made use of to deal with particular skin cancers, which include interleukin-2 and interferon.

Chemotherapy: In this therapy, some drugs are simply being put to use to kill the cancer cells. For certain cancers which usually happen to be limited to topmost area of the skin, lotions and lotions and creams containing the very anti-cancer ferment can be hand-applied directly on the skin. The systemic chemotherapy is used in order to treat the skin cancers, which get increased on to other entire body parts.

Mohs surgery Orange County offers you effective cancer treatment services to satisfy all your needs. If you notice any abnormal skin conditions, you should immediately consult dermatologist Orange County .

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Is a small rough patch of skin always Actinic Keratosis?
    I'm 19, very pale, and stay away from the sun a LOT.
    There's a patch of skin on my face about the size of my pinky nail, and it feels dry/rough.
    There's no discoloration but I can see the skin in the area is dry.

    Does that mean it's actnic keratosis? Is this something I should be in a panic about to go to a dermatologist?

    • ANSWER:
      I agree with Abs. Actinic keratoses are caused by sun exposure and aren't necessarily rough--my husband has then on his face.
      The chances you've already developed AK are pretty much nil.

      My best guess is eczema. It causes what you're describing, and is usually treated with a corticosteroid cream, like hydrocortisone. It should be used sparingly as it thins the skin after a while.

      If you have any questions, the condition persists after treating it with either a good moisturizer (fragrance free, as they contain alcolol which itself is drying) or a cortisone cream, see a doc for proper diagnosis.
      Start with just a good quality moisturizer. You could even try olive oil.

  2. QUESTION:
    Does tanning in the sun lead to cancer or not?
    Is there any way to get a safe, natural tan without having a risk of getting cancer?
    If I have really pale skin is it even a better chance that the sun will do damage to my skin? Do I need to wear a ton of sunblock?

    • ANSWER:
      YES!

      -----------------------------------------------------------------------
      Sun Exposure and Skin Cancer
      Many people love the warm sun. The sun's rays make us feel good, and in the short term, make us look good. But our love affair isn't a two way street: Exposure to sun causes most of the wrinkles and age spots on our faces. Consider this: One woman at age 40 who has protected her skin from the sun actually has the skin of a 30-year-old!

      We often associate a glowing complexion with good health, but skin color obtained from being in the sun – or in a tanning booth – actually accelerates the effects of aging and increases your risk for developing skin cancer.

      Sun exposure causes most of the skin changes that we think of as a normal part of aging. Over time, the sun's ultraviolet (UV) light damages the fibers in the skin called elastin. When these fibers breakdown, the skin begins to sag, stretch, and lose its ability to go back into place after stretching. The skin also bruises and tears more easily -- taking longer to heal. So while sun damage to the skin may not be apparent when you're young, it will definitely show later in life.

      How Does the Sun Change My Skin?
      Exposure to the sun causes:

      Pre-cancerous (actinic keratosis) and cancerous (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma) skin lesions - caused by loss of the skin's immune function
      Benign tumors
      Fine and coarse wrinkles
      Freckles
      Discolored areas of the skin, called mottled pigmentation;
      Sallowness -- a yellow discoloration of the skin;
      Telangiectasias -- the dilation of small blood vessels under the skin;
      Elastosis -- the destruction of the elastic tissue causing lines and wrinkles.
      What Causes Skin Cancer?
      Skin cancer is the most prevalent form of all cancers in the U.S. and the number of cases continues to rise. It is the uncontrolled growth of abnormal skin cells. This rapid growth results in tumors, which are either benign (noncancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

      There are three main types of skin cancer: basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma. Basal cell and squamous cell cancers are less serious types and make up 95% of all skin cancers. Also referred to as non-melanoma skin cancers, they are highly curable when treated early. Melanoma, made up of abnormal skin pigment cells called melanocytes, is the most serious form of skin cancer and causes 75% of all skin cancer deaths. Left untreated, it can spread to other organs and is difficult to control.

      Ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun is the number one cause of skin cancer, but UV light from tanning beds is just as harmful. Exposure to sunlight during the winter months puts you at the same risk as exposure during the summertime.

      Cumulative sun exposure causes mainly basal cell and squamous cell skin cancer, while episodes of severe sunburns, usually before age 18, can cause melanoma later in life. Other less common causes are repeated X-ray exposure and occupational exposure to certain chemicals.

      Go read more!

  3. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever heard of a skin disorder with two words, last one being Keratosis?
    I can't remember the first word but it looks and feels like small round rough patches on the surface of my skin, worse on my legs, ankles and top of my feet. I also have problems with skin tags on the underside of my upper arms, inside thighs and a few on my back. I am only a few lbs overweight so it's not due to that. My dermatologist told me what it was a couple of years ago and I cannot remember, he's not in practice now. If someone else has this or if you're a derm, I'd love to hear from you.
    I searched and now I'm pretty sure the name of this disorder is Seborrheic Keratosis. Anyone out there know anything about it?

    • ANSWER:
      I had a quick search and found this:
      SEBORRHEIC KERATOSIS
      A seborrheic keratosis is a benign skin growth that is very common among people over 40 years of age. The growths resemble flattened or raised warts, but have no viral origins and may exhibit a variety of colors, from pink or yellow through brown and black. Because only the top layers of the epidermis are involved, seborrheic keratoses are often described as having a "pasted-on" appearance.

      Because the tumors are rarely painful, treatment is not often necessary. There is a small risk of localized infection caused by picking at the lesion. If a growth becomes excessively itchy, or if it is irritated by clothing or jewelry, cryosurgery has been found to be highly effective in their removal. The main danger associated with seborrheic keratoses lies in their resemblance to malignant melanomas, which has sometimes led to a misdiagnosis of the cancerous lesions. If there is any doubt, a skin biopsy will allow a physician to make a correct diagnosis. A mutation of a gene coding for a growth factor receptor (FGFR3), has been found in 40% of seborrheic keratosis.

      I also found SOLAR KERATOSIS
      What is a solar keratosis?

      A solar keratosis is a small, rough, bump which develops on the skin. It is caused by a lot of exposure to the sun over many years. One or more may develop. It is sometimes called an actinic keratosis.

      What does a solar keratosis look like?

      Each one can range from the size of a pinhead to 2-3 cm across. Their colour can be light, dark, pink, red, the same colour as your skin, or a combination of these. The top of each one may have a yellow-white crust. They feel rough and dry, and are slightly raised from the surface of the skin. You can often feel them more easily than see them. Some redness may develop in the surrounding skin.

      Sometimes a finger-like growth of hard skin appears to come out of a solar keratosis (a 'cutaneous horn').

      Several solar keratoses may develop at about the same time, often in the same area of skin. Sometimes several join together and form a large flat-ish rough area of skin.

      Solar keratoses usually develop on areas of skin which have been exposed to the sun a lot. For example, on the face, neck, bald patches on the scalp, and the backs of the hands. They may appear in other areas in people who do a lot of sunbathing.

      There are usually no other symptoms. Rarely, you may get an itchy or pricking sensation from affected areas of skin.

      I hope that these help

  4. QUESTION:
    Is it ok to remove the skin of your lips?
    I've heard it's cancerous.

    • ANSWER:
      I have a friend that does that too. And so do I. When I peel the skin, it only makes dark red marks and sometimes it turns brown. Maybe it's embarrassing to look at others with a wounded lip because it takes about 2-4 days to regenerate.

      There's this disease called actinic keratosis which can be caused by the cracking or peeling of the lower lip that is not helped by lip balm or petroleum jelly.

      Here are some ways to prevent lip peeling:
      1. Drink plenty of water.
      2. Use lip balm. Wax-based products like Chapstick provide a protective covering to the lips to prevent free radicals, the environment, and the weather from taking their toll on this sensitive area.
      3. Apply sunscreen to your lip area, too. Wear makeup, including lipstick, with an SPF of 45 or higher.
      4. Avoid hyperallergenic lipstick or lip liner.
      5. Stay away from environmental factors that can damage your skin. Smoking cigarettes or chewing tobacco, drinking alcohol, working with heavy-duty chemicals or fumes, and other factors may irritate your lips and lead to peeling or cracking. Wear a face mask when you're around strong smells or emissions. Don't wash your face with strong or harsh soap. Treat your lips gently to help care for this delicate skin.

  5. QUESTION:
    i have a zit that won't go away, and fear its cancer?
    I've had this pimple for a week or so almost two, and I've gotten pimples that have come and go, new ones already fading but for some reason, this one is still on my face. its round and bright red, probably about a couple millimeters in diameter. i fear its actinic keratosis, but i don't know, im only sixteen.

    • ANSWER:
      Talk to your parents, and consider going to a dermatologist. Only a doctor can diagnose you.

  6. QUESTION:
    Anyone know about keratosis on the neck?
    i got a keratosis breakout on my neck and theyre really red and swollen, is there anything that could either relieve the redness or get rid of the breakout?

    • ANSWER:
      What is it?
      An actinic keratosis (AK), also known as a solar keratosis, is a scaly or crusty bump that arises on the skin surface. The base may be light or dark, tan, pink, red, or a combination of these. . . or the same color as your skin. The scale or crust is horny, dry, and rough, and is often recognized by touch rather than sight. Occasionally it itches or produces a pricking or tender sensation. It can also become inflamed and surrounded by redness. In rare instances, actinic keratoses can even bleed.

      The skin abnormality or lesion develops slowly and generally reaches a size from an eighth to a quarter of an inch. Early on, it may disappear only to reappear later. You will often see several AKs at a time.

      An AK is most likely to appear on the face, ears, scalp, neck, backs of the hands and forearms, shoulders, and lips - the parts of the body most often exposed to sunshine. The growths may be flat and pink or raised and rough.

      Why is it dangerous?
      AK can be the first step in the development of skin cancer. It is thus a precursor of cancer or a precancer.

      The most common treatment for AK, it is especially effective when a limited number of lesions exist. No cutting or anesthesia are required. Liquid nitrogen is applied to the growths with a spray device or cotton-tipped applicator to freeze them. They subsequently shrink or become crusted and fall off. Some temporary swelling may occur after treatment, and in dark-skinned patients, some pigment may be lost.

  7. QUESTION:
    I have Sun Damaged skin on my face?
    I have sun damage on my face. I heard it leads to cancer. I am worried its the first time i got sun damage that was noticeable. Should i be worried?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes. The skin damage from the sun is accumulative. When you get older, it turns into actinic keratosis. Some progress to squamous cell carcinoma. Very nasty.

      Use sunscreen every day. Don't intentionally stay out in the sun. Never go to a tanning bed.

  8. QUESTION:
    Can you help me with a French to English translation?
    This French video, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bCtVt8z5Zg4, runs 3:39. Can someone please provide me an English transcript? Thanks in advance to anyone who can help.

    • ANSWER:
      A recent survey has demonstrated that Canadians don't associate some lesions to skin cancer. In fact, while more than half of them are worried of getting skin cancer, the large majority, that is 86%, has been unable to visually identify a pre-cancerous actinic keratosis lesion. Dr Joël Claveau, dermatologist, explains us the importance of early screening and treatment of this common skin infection.

      - Actinic keratosis, also named solar keratosis, is a usually unknown lesion, but it is important to recognize it since it's a precursor of spino-cellular and it's a sign of exposition to sun. Skin cancer screening is an increasingly important phenomenon. It is a problem that we, dermatologists, encounter every day in our offices, no matter the time of the year. Of course we tend to hear more abour skin cancer screenings when summer arrives or when we hold a prevention campaign, but it is important to be aware of that problem all year long, especially those who go to southern destinations during winter, or, for example, people who spend six months in Florida.

      Actinic keratosis lesions usually develop on the body parts that are the most exposed to the sun, such as baldness areas, forehead, face, ears, neck and hands. The lesions can be 3D, scaly or rough, and look like red stains, crusts or wounds. They usually show up on people older than 40 years old who have light skin, hair and eyes, or on people who have a history of bad sunburns or exposure to artificial UV radiation, for example, in tanning salons or under tanning lamps.

      - It's been years since dermatologists encourage people to examine themselves, to do a self-exam of their skin. So, a few times a year, it's good to examine yourself, to search for signs of carcinomas or melanomas. Then, when you have a suspect lesion, it is important to talk to your doctor or to a dermatologist. 75% of skin cancers are initially discovered by patients or their spouse. Different treatments available for actinic keratosis are liquid nitrogen for local lesions, chemotherapy creams, thepary with light and treatment to stimulate the immune system with a new formula of imiquimod.

      Zyclara is a new topical cream available with prescription approved by Health Canada for treatment of adults with multiple actinic keratosis lesions on the face or baldness areas.

      - Zyclara is a new imiquimod formula and its goal is to stimulate the immune system to get rid of the pre-cancerous lesions. The advantage of this treatment is that it can treat apparent lesions and non-apparent, under-the-skin lesions. Advantages of treating solar keratosis with a cream is that it allows the patient to treat himself at home, A new imiquimod formula allows a shorter, well-tolerated treatment.

      Dr Claveau adds that early screening and treatment of the actinic keratosis are the key to avoid its evolution into skin cancer. Canadians should keep an eye on their skin all year long. For more information about actinic keratosis and skin cancers with benign melanomas risks, contact your doctor.

  9. QUESTION:
    If the doctor says you have sun damage on your face....does that mean it is skin cancer?
    I have been having a problem with a rash on my cheek and around my lips for about 3 months now. When I asked the doctor about it he looked at it and said it looked like sun damage. He has referred me to a dermatologist with a diagnosis of unspecified disorder of skin and subcutaneous tissue. My appointment is in 2 weeks.

    • ANSWER:
      The two most common skin cancers are basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma. They are typically red and may be bumpy or scaly or may be crusted and bleed. Usually not described as a rash, but some may be. Actinic keratosis are areas of sun damage that are red and rough or scaly and are precancerous. Melanoma is the most well known, but less common type of skin cancer. It is more dangerous and appears like a brown spot most commonly. Don't worry for now.

  10. QUESTION:
    A 60 year old farmer presents with multiple patches of discoloration on his face.?
    biopsy of lesional skin reveals actinic keratosis. which of the following terms best describes the response of the skin to chronic sunlight exposure?

    Atrophy
    dysplasia
    hypertrophy
    metaplasia

    • ANSWER:
      Look at your study notes and your textbook. This is not a cheating service.

      But because I'm so nice, I'll narrow your choices: it's not atrophy or hypertrophy.

  11. QUESTION:
    Best treatment for scarring/dark spots?
    Hi! Can someone please give suggestions for dark marks on the skin left from acne? Make up suggestions, cleanser, etc. Also if you could give your personal experience with products youve used that were and arent affective. Thankyou and 10 points for best answer and no teasing please!!

    • ANSWER:
      Believe it or not there are a small number of products out there that can really help you in your case. Trouble is finding the right one. I myself experimented for years before I found the right product.

      Salicylic Acid 20% Gel Peel is the best product that I have found and would recommend to anyone.

      What it treats: Acne, Acne Scars, Blackheads/Whiteheads, Dry Skin, Sun-damaged Skin, Blotchy Pigmentation, Fine Wrinkles, Loss of Elasticity, Large Pores, Bumps, Age Spots, Eczema, Seborrheic Keratosis, Hyperkeratosis, Actinic keratosis, and Rosacea.

      How to use: Apply twice a week for six weeks, and then pause for one month. Leave on face 3 to 5 minutes depending on your skin's sensitivity.

      The main thing to keep in mind is that "IT TAKES TIME" with any product or procedure that you decide to try. But make sure to hang in there and be persistent. Use this product just as directed and you will see results.

      Also keep in mind that you are beautiful no matter what, don't forget that!!! ;-)

  12. QUESTION:
    Best treatment for scarring/dark spots?
    Hi! Can someone please give suggestions for dark marks on the skin left from acne? Make up suggestions, cleanser, etc. Also if you could give your personal experience with products youve used that were and arent affective. Thankyou and 10 points for best answer and no teasing please!!

    • ANSWER:
      Believe it or not there are a small number of products out there that can really help you in your case. Trouble is finding the right one. I myself experimented for years before I found the right product.

      Salicylic Acid 20% Gel Peel is the best product that I have found and would recommend to anyone.

      What it treats: Acne, Acne Scars, Blackheads/Whiteheads, Dry Skin, Sun-damaged Skin, Blotchy Pigmentation, Fine Wrinkles, Loss of Elasticity, Large Pores, Bumps, Age Spots, Eczema, Seborrheic Keratosis, Hyperkeratosis, Actinic keratosis, and Rosacea.

      How to use: Apply twice a week for six weeks, and then pause for one month. Leave on face 3 to 5 minutes depending on your skin's sensitivity.

      The main thing to keep in mind is that "IT TAKES TIME" with any product or procedure that you decide to try. But make sure to hang in there and be persistent. Use this product just as directed and you will see results.

      Also keep in mind that you are beautiful no matter what, don't forget that!!! ;-)

  13. QUESTION:
    Removal of Actinic Keratosis (sun spots)?
    I had some sun spots frozen for removal, but one on my face was sort of big and they cut it away from the skin. Well I guess some of the skin had to be cut too and now I have a small indentation. Has anyone had this done and did the skin grow back? I plan on calling the dr. when the office reopens. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Actinic Keratosis

      Actinic keratosis (also called solar keratosis, sun spots or AK) is a pre-cancerous condition of thick, scaly or crusty patches of skin (actinic – caused by sunlight; keratosis – thickened scaly growth). AK is common in fair-skinned people and caused by long-term sun exposure. AKs may progress to invasive squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and are by far the most common lesion with malignant potential to arise on the skin. In the United States, AK represents the second most frequent reason for patients to visit a dermatologist. The frequency of AKs is directly related to sun exposure and skin type. AK can occur in patients as young as 20 or 30 years of age in areas of high sun exposure but is more common in patients aged 50 years and older.

      http://www.magenbiosciences.com/pages/actinic-keratosis.html

  14. QUESTION:
    mole removal..... is it possible?
    Hey guys,
    So, I have this mole on the side of my face. Its light brown in color, raised and a little bigger than the size of an eraser. I have been annoyed by this mole for too long. It's very noticeable and I catch people looking at it all the time. I always wear my hair down because of it ( since its far back enough that my hair mostly covers it). I'm turning 21 soon and I want to get it removed.
    I made an appointment at a dermatology place. Its this wednesday (appointments are very hard to get), I've been waiting for months now. ONLY thing is... I was looking through their website and they say they "provide evaluation and removal of warts, cysts, keloids, benign lesions (such as skin tags and seborrheic keratosis), pre-cancerous skin lesions (such as actinic keratosis), and skin cancer." The issue is... it dosent say they remove moles. Do you think that since they do other skin growths they do moles anyway? And can I get a removal on the same day as my appointment?

    • ANSWER:

  15. QUESTION:
    what is chryotherapy?
    i went to a GP because i wanted to remove a mole on my face.that doctor told me to make an appointment for chryotherapy which is done once every month in that GP.i got home and googled a bit about chryotherapy and i got confused about it because none of the website mentions 'mole' but they are only talking about some fluid coming out and cervix and all.
    should i just go to surgery clinic to remove it?but it costs heaps of money :(

    • ANSWER:
      I think the doctor meant "cryotherapy" which is the use of extreme cold to remove warts, skin tags etc.

      Here is an extract from Mosby's Dental Dictionary:
      cryotherapy
      (krī´ōther´əpē); n

      a use of cryosurgery in the treatment of cutaneous tags, warts, actinic keratosis, and dermatofibromas. The agent is usually liquid nitrogen, applied briefly with a sterile cotton-tipped applicator.

      This answer was provided by Enquire, a 24-hour, live question answering and enquiry service offered by public libraries across England and Scotland in collaboration with partners in the United States. If you liked our answer and would like us to help you find another, you can chat with one of us right now by clicking on Enquire on the People’s Network site at
      http://www.peoplesnetwork.go.uk

  16. QUESTION:
    Do vitamin d pills make you pee?
    I was wondering if they do

    • ANSWER:
      Vitamin D is a vitamin. It can be found in small amounts in a few foods, including fatty fish such as herring, mackerel, sardines and tuna. To make vitamin D more available, it is added to dairy products, juices, and cereals that are then said to be “fortified with vitamin D.” But most vitamin D – 80% to 90% of what the body gets – is obtained through exposure to sunlight. Vitamin D can also be made in the laboratory as medicine.

      Vitamin D is used for preventing and treating rickets, a disease that is caused by not having enough vitamin D (vitamin D deficiency). Vitamin D is also used for treating weak bones (osteoporosis), bone pain (osteomalacia), bone loss in people with a condition called hyperparathyroidism, and an inherited disease (osteogenesis imperfecta) in which the bones are especially brittle and easily broken. It is also used for preventing falls and fractures in people at risk for osteoporosis, and preventing low calcium and bone loss (renal osteodystrophy) in people with kidney failure.

      Vitamin D is used for conditions of the heart and blood vessels, including high blood pressure and high cholesterol. It is also used for diabetes, obesity, muscle weakness, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, bronchitis, premenstrual syndrome (PMS), and tooth and gum disease.

      Some people use vitamin D for skin conditions including vitiligo, scleroderma, psoriasis, actinic keratosis, and lupus vulgaris.

      It is also used for boosting the immune system, preventing autoimmune diseases, and preventing cancer.

      Because vitamin D is involved in regulating the levels of minerals such as phosphorous and calcium, it is used for conditions caused by low levels of phosphorous (familial hypophosphatemia and Fanconi syndrome) and low levels of calcium (hypoparathyroidism and pseudohypoparathyroidism).

      Vitamin D in forms known as calcitriol or calcipotriene is applied directly to the skin for a particular type of psoriasis.

      If you travel to Canada, you may have noticed that Canada recognizes the importance of vitamin D in the prevention of osteoporosis. It allows this health claim for foods that contain calcium: "A healthy diet with adequate calcium and vitamin D, and regular physical activity, help to achieve strong bones and may reduce the risk of osteoporosis.” But the US version of this osteoporosis health claim does not yet include vitamin D.

      How does it work?
      Vitamin D is required for the regulation of the minerals calcium and phosphorus found in the body. It also plays an important role in maintaining proper bone structure.

      Sun exposure is an easy, reliable way for most people to get vitamin D. Exposure of the hands, face, arms, and legs to sunlight two to three times a week for about one-fourth of the time it would take to develop a mild sunburn will cause the skin to produce enough vitamin D. The necessary exposure time varies with age, skin type, season, time of day, etc.

      It’s amazing how quickly adequate levels of vitamin D can be restored by sunlight. Just 6 days of casual sunlight exposure without sunscreen can make up for 49 days of no sunlight exposure. Body fat acts like a kind of storage battery for vitamin D. During periods of sunlight, vitamin D is stored in fatty fat and then released when sunlight is gone.

      Nevertheless, vitamin D deficiency is more common than you might expect. People who don’t get enough sun, especially people living in Canada and the northern half of the US, are especially at risk. Vitamin D deficiency also occurs even in sunny climates, possibly because people are staying indoors more, covering up when outside, or using sunscreens consistently these days to reduce skin cancer risk.

      Older people are also at risk for vitamin D deficiency. They are less likely to spend time in the sun, have fewer “receptors” in their skin that convert sunlight to vitamin D, may not get vitamin D in their diet, may have trouble absorbing vitamin D even if they do get it in their diet, and may have more trouble converting dietary vitamin D to a useful form due to aging kidneys. In fact, the risk for vitamin D deficiency in people over 65 years of age is very high. Surprisingly, as many as 40% of older people even in sunny climates such as South Florida don’t have enough vitamin D in their systems.

      Vitamin D supplements may be necessary for older people, people living in northern latitudes, and for dark-skinned people who need extra time in the sun, but don’t get it.

      ~Kevin.

  17. QUESTION:
    I have flaky skin on my nose, but it's not dry skin. Help please?
    The skin on my nose and around my upper lip area is really flaky, but it's not dry skin. The skin on my nose peels off in patchy layers, so I never have even looking skin on my nose. I've tried microdermabrasion scrubs which help a little but not enough. I don't use soap on my face but use a facial cleanser. I also don't want to put lots of moisturizer on my nose because then it looks oily. I'm 39 and I've had this condition most of my adult life, but in the past year it has gotten really bothersome. Serious advice only, please.

    • ANSWER:
      You should first make sure that this is not a pre-cancerous condition called an actinic keratosis. See a dermatologist. If it is, it can be treated with liquid nitrogen. If not, the dermatologist can determine if it should best be treated with an emolient or a low dose steroid cream.

  18. QUESTION:
    what type of cancer is Kertosis. My mother has been told this is what is on her legs?

    • ANSWER:
      i'm sure that they told her what kind of keratosis but here is some info for you the rest can be found on the website listed in sources. I wish the best for your mother.

      An actinic keratosis (AK), also known as a solar keratosis, is a small crusty, scaly, or crumbly bump or horn that arises on the skin surface. The base may be light or dark, tan, pink, red, or a combination of these... or the same color as your skin. The scale or crust is horny, dry, and rough, and is often recognized by touch rather than sight. Occasionally it itches or produces a pricking or tender sensation. It can also become inflamed and surrounded by redness. In rare instances, actinic keratoses can bleed.
      The skin abnormality or lesion develops slowly and usually reaches a size from an eighth to a quarter of an inch (2mm to 4mm) but can sometimes be as large as one inch. Early on, it may disappear only to reappear later. You will often see several AKs at a time. An AK is most likely to appear on the face, lips, ears, scalp, neck, backs of the hands and forearms, shoulders and back — the parts of the body most often exposed to sunshine. The growths may be flat and pink or raised and rough.
      Why is it dangerous?
      AK can be the first step in the development of skin cancer. It is thus a precursor of cancer or a precancer.
      If treated early, almost all AKs can be eliminated without becoming skin cancers. But untreated, about two to five percent may progress to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), the second most common form of skin cancer. In fact, some scientists now believe that AK is the earliest form of SCC. Although SCCs are usually not life-threatening when detected and treated in the early stages, they can grow large and invade the surrounding tissues. On rare occasions, they metastasize or spread to the internal organs.
      Another form of AK, actinic cheilitis, develops on the lips and may evolve into a type of SCC that can spread rapidly to other parts of the body.
      If you have AKs, it indicates that you have sustained sun damage and could develop any kind of skin cancer — not just squamous cell carcinoma. The more keratoses that you have, the greater the chance that one or more may turn into skin cancer. People may also have up to 10 times as many subclinical (invisible) lesions as visible, surface lesions...

  19. QUESTION:
    anyone know anything about taking extra vitamin d's and how it helps?
    ive been doing this for a month now, for yrs i was getting cracking joints all the time and it kept happening more and more often, till it was happening all the time, and im not talking about the kind thats like gas cracking, im talking about brittle bones, i could never get any help for it cause my dexa scans would come out normal, when i asked a question about this on another answersite someone suggested vit d so i researched it and realized my multi only had 400 and puritan's pride says an adult needs 2000 iu's so i decided to try it, its a gradual thing but now they rarely do that and i think i couldve broken my foot about a month or two ago cause i could barely put it down to walk on it, yrs ago i broke my ankle just by barely moving it, ive tried to talk to doctors about it and they all say its part of getting older, ive had two hip surgeries and a knee one about a yr ago all within a yr, i used to drink diet cokes all the time but for the last 4 yrs i havent had a soda at all, for the past month ive been taking 2000 iu's of d's every day and now they rarely crack and pain is starting to go away and im getting more of my mobility back and even my knee is starting to heal from surgery, it couldnt before cause it kept cracking, next month sometime when i run out of statins i have to get my cholesterol checked again and im going to ask my doctor to check my d levels , i just wanted to do them both at the same time, i heard taking d's can lower cholesterol too, anyone else know about the benefits of extra d's and anyone else go thru this? i know i have to be careful about overdosing on it but i think i was too low on it so im not too worried about that now, any suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      My answer is longer than your question
      Vitamin D is a vitamin. It can be found in small amounts in a few foods, including fatty fish such as herring, mackerel, sardines and tuna. To make vitamin D more available, it is added to dairy products, juices, and cereals that are then said to be “fortified with vitamin D.” But most vitamin D – 80% to 90% of what the body gets – is obtained through exposure to sunlight. Vitamin D can also be made in the laboratory as medicine.

      Vitamin D is used for preventing and treating rickets, a disease that is caused by not having enough vitamin D (vitamin D deficiency). Vitamin D is also used for treating weak bones (osteoporosis), bone pain (osteomalacia), bone loss in people with a condition called hyperparathyroidism, and an inherited disease (osteogenesis imperfecta) in which the bones are especially brittle and easily broken. It is also used for preventing falls and fractures in people at risk for osteoporosis, and preventing low calcium and bone loss (renal osteodystrophy) in people with kidney failure.

      Vitamin D is used for conditions of the heart and blood vessels, including high blood pressure and high cholesterol. It is also used for diabetes, obesity, muscle weakness, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, bronchitis, premenstrual syndrome (PMS), and tooth and gum disease.

      Some people use vitamin D for skin conditions including vitiligo, scleroderma, psoriasis, actinic keratosis, and lupus vulgaris.

      It is also used for boosting the immune system, preventing autoimmune diseases, and preventing cancer.

      Because vitamin D is involved in regulating the levels of minerals such as phosphorous and calcium, it is used for conditions caused by low levels of phosphorous (familial hypophosphatemia and Fanconi syndrome) and low levels of calcium (hypoparathyroidism and pseudohypoparathyroidism).

      Vitamin D in forms known as calcitriol or calcipotriene is applied directly to the skin for a particular type of psoriasis.

      If you travel to Canada, you may have noticed that Canada recognizes the importance of vitamin D in the prevention of osteoporosis. It allows this health claim for foods that contain calcium: "A healthy diet with adequate calcium and vitamin D, and regular physical activity, help to achieve strong bones and may reduce the risk of osteoporosis.” But the US version of this osteoporosis health claim does not yet include vitamin D.

      How does it work?
      Vitamin D is required for the regulation of the minerals calcium and phosphorus found in the body. It also plays an important role in maintaining proper bone structure.

      Sun exposure is an easy, reliable way for most people to get vitamin D. Exposure of the hands, face, arms, and legs to sunlight two to three times a week for about one-fourth of the time it would take to develop a mild sunburn will cause the skin to produce enough vitamin D. The necessary exposure time varies with age, skin type, season, time of day, etc.

      It’s amazing how quickly adequate levels of vitamin D can be restored by sunlight. Just 6 days of casual sunlight exposure without sunscreen can make up for 49 days of no sunlight exposure. Body fat acts like a kind of storage battery for vitamin D. During periods of sunlight, vitamin D is stored in fatty fat and then released when sunlight is gone.

  20. QUESTION:
    tanning injection 'epitan melanotan'? AVAILABLE IN HONG KONG?
    i have heard about an injection you can get that creates more melanin in your skin and makes you tan more easily and safely.

    - Does it work?

    - Does anyone know you can get epitan in Hong Kong?

    - I have freckles on my arms, face and shoulders, will epitan help even out my skin?

    • ANSWER:
      What you are referring to are peptides known simply by the name "melanotan". Yes, they work. There are two versions (melanotan one and II). What they do is allow your body's own tanning system to create a tan (by increasing natural melanin production). This allows individuals who ordinarily would not tan and just burn to actually be able to tan when getting limited UV exposure. The "Epitan" part of what you've heard about is the former name of a company now known as "Clinuvel" which is out of Australia. Clinuvel is developing the first version of melanotan (under the name "afamelanotide") to treat symptoms of a series of skin diseases that respond favorably to folks' skin becoming tan (like polymorphous light eruption (PMLE) and actinic keratosis (AK)) . It is possible that the peptides would allow the appearance of your skin to even out but there have been reports from a limited number of individuals that at least initially the peptides have increased the noticeability of freckles and moles (but with continued usage this tends to go away). There's a helpful site that has a large quantity of good information and a forum with folks discussing their experiences in using the peptides where you'll be able to ask questions and get responses as well as find suppliers for it. The site is found at http://melanotan.org/ . You can find before and after photos as well as the steps involved in using the peptides, etc.

      Hope that helps,

      -:- Mel

  21. QUESTION:
    Small reddish-brown dot on face?
    I just noticed that I have a small, pin-sized dot right next to my left cheek bone.
    It's been hurting.. & kind of has a tingly feeling.
    it's not itchy, and it's pretty flat... like its a stain on my skin.
    anyone know what this could be?

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      It could be just a broken blood vessel or some sort of temporary blemish, but it could also be a cancerous or pre-cancerous lesion (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, actinic keratosis, seborrheic keratosis). These are usually very easily treated. I recommend you show it to a good dermatologist.

  22. QUESTION:
    Sun damage or rosacea?
    I am 17 with fair hair, Ive had acne since i was 12, when i was was 13 i started scrubbing my face every mornin and steam sometimes( like i had ocd or somethin), sometimes i would scrub my face until it stung. When i was 14 i was given antibiotics and isotrexin gel for my acne which made little difference; one possible side effect of antibiotics was increased sun sensetivity(it said so on the instructions) and the gel made my whole face burn. This was in the summer time, I never wore sunscreen and got burnt a few times, I carried on like this for a year. When i was 15 people started commenting, asking if id been in the sun and i realised my face was quite pink. Since then ive stopped takin the antibiotic sand steaming my face, but i couldnt break the habit of scrubbing my face and using the gel, until a couple of months ago. the acne is almost gone now but my whole face is still quite pink, could i have rosacea or really bad sun damage? sorry if i dont make sense

    • ANSWER:
      The pinkness of your face may fade over time. You have been exfoliating it quite strongly for years. It would be wise to give your skin a break for awhile. It unlikely that you have rosacea.
      As for sun damage there is no question you need to watch your skin for the rest of your life for actinic keratosis (AK), which appears as rough, red or brown scaly patches on the skin. AK is known as a precancerous condition because it sometimes develops into cancer.
      Check out this site. It has sections on sun protection, acne and exfoliation.
      http://www.healthyu-skin.org/index.htm
      Good Luck

  23. QUESTION:
    does anyone know enough about freckles to answer this?
    Hi, I need some good opinions. my friend is a 25 year old guy and ive known him for many years, he is very fair skinned with dark red hair, up until the age of 18, 19 he didnt have many freckles, just some on his nose, upper cheeks and very light coating on his arms, not noticeable at all. Since then in the 6 years that have followed he has gotten covered in freckles. He hasnt done anything differently that he wasnt doing for his whole life. He has always worn shorts and t shirts in the spring and summer but put on a lot of sunscreen, he covers up in the winter. He has actually gotten some more freckles on his face from the ages of 19-25 and his arms and elbows are completely covered in tons of brown freckles. He also has some larger, darker brown freckles near the bend of his elbow. Today i saw him for the first time in about a month, weve both been busy. i tried doing an eye test for myself, to see if i noticed anything different than last time and i was so surprised, but it seemed he had more freckles than before. his freckles now extend past the bend in his elbow and they are creeping up his upper arm, he also has more on the top of his hand and fingers, its been winter and he wears long sleeves to go out, he only wears short sleeves indoors, yet the freckles keep coming, i wanted to talk to him about it, to see what his opinion is, but i didnt bring it up, i just closely took account of how it looked. should i have a talk with him about it and suggest he should see a dermatologist or should i leave it alone. its surprising to me that at his age(25) and during the winter he seems to be getting more freckles. could it be genes or something glandular inside him that is producing the freckles even without exposing himself in the sun? My question is, is this usual for an adult guy to go thru? Is it typical or has anyone else heard or seen a case like this with someone else? Should he go seem a dermatologist based on what you know from my story? Thanks in advance for answers, any helpful and useful opinions are appreciated and maybe needed. how should i go about this? thanks so much.

    • ANSWER:
      everyone should see a dermatologist at least once a year. they will let him know what to look for. everyone has spots. everyone has been in the sun even if they are very good about sunscreen now does not mean they were in the past. (most of the damage to your skin was done in the past that is now coming out) most people have had sun burns. the red hair is a factor that the doctor will take inconsideration along with the family history. skin cancer is the most common type of cancer. so why not have a doctor who is trained at looking at moles and "freckles". it just might take awhile to get in to a dermatologist, but again everyone should have one. if he cant get in soon to a dermatologist then have him see his family doctor. if there is anything they are worried about they then can try to get him in sooner. good luck and keep up the sun screen ( all year long!!)

      you can look up the A,B,C,D,E of melanomas, basel cell carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma all which are skin cancers( melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer) also actinic keratosis (pre cancer)

  24. QUESTION:
    I have really bad KP. Can someone help me?
    I have really bad, bad, keratosis pilaris, and I get really self conscious about it. I have tried mineral foundation and such, but it's just getting to the point where I'm sick of it and I just want to be ride of it, or cover it up without looking like a doll. I want to look a bit more natural, so that when people see me without makeup they don't go OMFG...SHE'S SO UGLY...I don't get acne, thank God, because of it, but the doctor said people usually grow out of it when they're ADULTS. I can't wait that long...I just need some tips and tricks to cover it up and get rid of it once and for all. The creams and treatments are really expensive, some of them, and I haven't found one yet that works for me. Thanks so much for your help, in advance.

    Don't know what KP is?
    http://www.ahealthyme.com/Imagebank/adam/2693.jpg
    Mine looks sort of like that, but a less red.
    My skin os pretty dry too, btw.
    Again, I do not have acne. not one zit, pimple, blackhead. Nothing, nothing, nothing. Keratosis Pilaris is passed down by your genes. So to the people who reply with acne solutions, i'm sorry lol but it will not work for me, because KP is really quite different.

    • ANSWER:
      Foundation powders say they are minerals, but some minerals are POISONS!! Lead is a mineral for example. They never say WHAT minerals they are talking about. I would not put this makeup crap of any sort on my face. It is blocking the pores even more. Yes it covers up, but maybe better to wash your face often with a mild soap and water or special acne product like ProActive or similar product. Take a multiple vitamin and mineral to support overall health. Zinc in vitamins is supposed to be good for acne.

      Here is a link to clinical trials for actinic ketosis, if that is the same thing? Hit the map tab for local trials.
      http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?term=keratosis

  25. QUESTION:
    can someone help me with anatomy??please?
    a worker in a furniture refinishing establishment fell into a vat of pain stripper, but quickly removed his clothes and risned off in the saftety shower. were his safety measures correct? what vital organs migh suffer early damage from poisoning through skin by organic solvents?

    mr> BEllazono, a fisherman in his late 60's coms to the clinic to complain of small ulcers on the both forearms as well as on his face and ears. although he has had them for several years, he has not had any other porblems. what is the likely diagnosis and what is the likely cause?

    • ANSWER:
      1) Kidney, and liver would be the first two internal organs, but the skin is a pretty vital organ also.

      2) Difficult to say, where does this scenario take place? Can be anything from contact dermatitis, to parasite to squamous cell carcinoma (or the earlier version actinic keratosis) The last one would be my first guess, if it is for a test.

  26. QUESTION:
    Dermatologists-spot that wont heal?
    I have a spot on my nose that the dermatologist removed over 1 year ago by freezing as she called it suspicious. I do see a cancer specialist as I have had a malignant melanoma about 7 years ago. this spot on my nose will not heal. It remains red and scaly and if I scratch the scale off, it looks like a scratch that has not healed. Is this something that I should have re-checked before my next appt?

    • ANSWER:
      Spots that don't heal should always be looked at; but from your description, it sounds more like an actinic keratosis than a melanoma. If that's the case, then your doctor didn't freeze deeply enough to kill the cells (on the nose, they tend to go deeper, because the cells follow the hair follicles, which reside deeper on the nose than other places on the face.

  27. QUESTION:
    I have some scaly brown marks on hands!!?
    They have been appearing and spreading too I tried to scratch them off and it looks like a scar do I have thrush they are on the back of my hands and a few on my arms the first time I saw them was the day after I got in a pool do I have cancer or something

    • ANSWER:
      There are several possible causes.

      Age or Liver Spots
      Age and liver spots are a type of hyperpigmentation that cause brown to black spots on the face and other areas of the body. The brown spots are caused by an increase in melanin, the pigment that gives skin its color. Genetics plays a part in developing age or liver spots, but ultraviolet rays or sun exposure is the most common cause of age spots. Age increases the chances of developing brown spots as most individuals produce more melanin as they get older.

      Keratosis
      Actinic and seborrheic are types of keratosis that cause spots or discoloration on the skin. Actinic keratosis symptoms include rough or scaly patches or bumps with a red to brown appearance and may be painful or easily irritated. Actinic keratosis is caused by sun exposure and is often a precursor to skin cancer, but can be treated effectively when caught early. Seborrheic keratosis is common in adults and has a brown mole or wart-like appearance. Other than genetics, the exact cause of seborrheic keratosis is unknown, but the spots are considered harmless and may be removed for cosmetic reasons.

      Melasma
      Melasma causes brown or grey skin discoloration on the skin. The spots may show up individually or cover large areas. Melasma is more common in women than men. Hormonal changes, certain medications and genetics are factors in developing melasma and sun exposure may exacerbate the problem. Melasma caused by hormonal changes such as pregnancy, birth control or hormone therapy often resolves itself after pregnancy or when medication is stopped.

      Phototoxic Medication
      Phototoxic medications may cause skin to become sensitive to sunlight. Initially, the symptoms of phototoxic light sensitivity appear much like a sunburn or rash. The results of this "sunburn" may include hyperpigmentation or brown spots on the skin. Some drugs associated with phototoxic reaction include tetracycline, sulfonamides, acne medications, some antihistamines and certain arthritis medications such as quinine.

      Brown spots are often treatable via medication, dermatology treatments or excision. Age spots and melasma and other hyperpigmentation conditions may be treated with oral or topical medications, laser therapy, chemical peels or dermabrasion. Raised lesions such as moles or keratosis spots are usually removed by freezing, excising or laser treatments.

      Most brown spots are preventable. Sun exposure is the most common culprit in skin discoloration. Sun damage may not show up until later in life, but too much sun even as a child can significantly increase the chances of developing hyperpigmentation. The best defense against brown spots or more serious skin conditions is covering the skin as much as possible when outdoors. This includes longer sleeves, hats and sunglasses. Sunscreen should be applied as a part of a daily regime, especially on the face where sun exposure is most prevalent.

  28. QUESTION:
    sunbeds.... im confused about the information?
    Hi there

    I tend to fake tan at the weekends and I dont use the sunbeds but I decided to have a few sessions before my holiday in August. I knew they were dangerous and today it was released that they definately so give you a greater chance of cancer. It was compared to smoking.
    Someone that smokes for two weeks before holiday arent typically likely to get cancer so without sounding thick.... if i have up to ten sessions a year is this still very dangerous...

    thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Well- I've got an awful lot of actinic keratosis spots on my face and I only live in crappy Ireland where the sun hardly ever shines. Even if you don't get cancer it ruins your skin and gives you these witch-like growths that look like warts
      Sunblock is yer only man

  29. QUESTION:
    I have solar keratosis... what does that mean?

    • ANSWER:
      Solar Keratosis or Actinic keratosis is a skin condition characterized by rough, scaly patches on the skin of your face, lips, ears, back of your hands, forearms, scalp and neck. The cause is frequent or intense exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays, typically from the sun. Many doctors consider actinic keratosis to be precancerous because it can develop into skin cancer.

      Actinic keratoses, also known as solar keratoses, grow slowly and usually cause no signs or symptoms other than patches or small spots on your skin. These lesions take years to develop, usually first appearing in older adults. Left untreated, about 2 percent to 5 percent of actinic keratoses develop into a serious form of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma.

      You can reduce your risk of actinic keratosis by minimizing your sun exposure and protecting your skin from UV rays.

      If treated early, almost all actinic keratoses can be eliminated before developing into skin cancer. However, if left untreated these spots or patches may progress to squamous cell carcinoma, a serious form of skin cancer, in a small percentage of people with normally functioning immune systems.

      An actinic keratosis may be the earliest form of squamous cell carcinoma. This type of cancer usually isn't life-threatening if detected and treated early. However, actinic keratoses can grow to be large and invade surrounding tissues, some spreading (metastasizing) to other parts of your body. The more keratoses you have, the greater your chance of developing skin cancer.

      Treatment
      It's impossible to tell exactly which patches or lesions will develop into skin cancer. Your doctor or a dermatologist can discuss with you which treatment is appropriate for you.

      Actinic keratosis treatment options may include:

      Freezing (cryotherapy). An extremely cold substance, such as liquid nitrogen, is applied to skin lesions. The substance freezes the skin surface, causing blistering or peeling. As your skin heals, the lesions slough off, allowing new skin to appear. This is the most common treatment, takes only a few minutes, and can be performed in your doctor's office.

      Creams or ointments. Some topical medications contain fluorouracil, a chemotherapy drug. The medication destroys actinic keratosis cells by blocking essential cellular functions within them. Another treatment option is imiquimod (Aldara), a topical cream that modifies the skin's immune system to stimulate your body's own rejection of precancerous cells.

      Chemical peeling. This involves applying one or more chemical solutions — trichloroacetic acid (TCA), for example — to the lesions. The chemicals cause your skin to blister and eventually peel, allowing new skin to form. This procedure may not be covered by insurance, because it's considered cosmetic.

      Scraping (curettage). In this procedure, your surgeon uses a device called a curet to scrape off damaged cells. Scraping may be followed by electrosurgery, in which a pencil-shaped instrument is used to cut and destroy the affected tissue with an electric current.

      Photodynamic therapy. With this procedure, an agent that makes your damaged skin cells sensitive to light (photosensitizing agent) is either injected or applied topically. Your skin is then exposed to intense laser light to destroy the damaged skin cells.

      Laser therapy. A special laser is used to precisely remove the actinic keratoses and the affected skin underneath. Local anesthesia is often used to make the procedure more comfortable. Some pigment loss and scarring may result from laser therapy
      .
      Retinoids. Drugs in this class include orally administered isotretinoin (Accutane), and topically applied adapalene (Differin) and tretinoin (Vesanoid). These medications may be effective at both treating and preventing actinic keratosis. However, isotretinoin is recommended only in high-risk cases because it may cause serious side effects, such as inflammation, bone spurs and hair loss, and birth defects if taken during pregnancy.

      Dermabrasion. In this procedure, the affected skin is removed using a rapidly moving brush. Local anesthetic is used to make the procedure more tolerable.

      Talk to your doctor about your treatment options. The procedures have various advantages and disadvantages, including side effects, risk of scarring, and the number of treatment sessions required. Actinic keratoses are usually very responsive to treatment. Afterward you'll likely have regular follow-up visits to check for new patches or lesions.

      In the future, limit time you in the sun, especially between the hours of 10am & 4pm when it is most dangerous. Always wera sunscreen. Never use tanning beds or use tanning accelerator products.Be aware of sun-sensitizing medications. Some common prescription and over-the-counter drugs can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight like:

      some antibiotics
      certain cholesterol, high blood pressure meds
      diabetes medications
      birth control pills
      nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others)
      acne medicine isotretinoin (Accutane)

      Always ask your Dr. or Pharmacist if any medication prescribed causes any sun-sensitivity.

      My husband was diagnosed with this 2 years ago & he used a topical cream, had some minor redness and skin peeling & has never had anymore problems. He used Solaraze Gel, you can get this by prescription from your Dr. If you have insurance this helps, as it is a bit expensive, but it really works! Hope this info helps, Good luck!

  30. QUESTION:
    What is on my lip?
    I have this small rough patch of skin on my upper lip. It feels weird, so I dug the dry skin off and now it HURTS. I have no idea what this is, but I really would like to know. It doesn't seem a cold sore or anything like that though, even though I've never had one. Any ideas?
    P.s. It is NOT herpes kids, if you don't have a REAL idea, don't answer. If I had herpes, I'd know, i'm pregnant too. They test you for EVERYTHING when your pregnant.

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like it might be actinic keratosis.You're most likely to develop actinic keratosis if you have one or more of these risk factors:

      A history of frequent or intense sun exposure or sunburn
      Pale skin
      Blond or red hair, especially when coupled with blue, hazel or green eyes
      A tendency to freckle or burn when exposed to sunlight
      ____________________

      The signs of actinic keratosis include:

      Flat to slightly raised, scaly patches on the top layer of your skin
      Lesions on your skin ranging in color from pink to red to brown, or flesh-colored

      Patches or lesions caused by actinic keratosis usually are 1 inch or less in diameter and primarily are found on areas exposed to the sun, including your face, lips, ears, back of your hands, forearms, scalp and neck. There may be a single lesion or several lesions.

      This condition also known as solar keratoses, grows slowly and usually cause no signs or symptoms other than patches or small spots on your skin. These lesions take years to develop, usually first appearing in older adults. Left untreated, about 2 percent to 5 percent of actinic keratoses develop into a serious form of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma.

      I would suggest making an appointment Monday with a Dermatologist & getting a diagnosis confirmation. If it is actinic keratosis, the doctor will most likely prescribe a cream or gel like Solaraze for easiest treatment. If you would like to read more about this condition: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/actinic-keratosis/DS00568/DSECTION=1

  31. QUESTION:
    Skin Cancer Symptoms?
    What are the symptoms of skin cancer?

    Ive got this mole-like spot near my wrist area, i first noticed it three years ago. I have scratched/picked it off countless times (I have a habit of scratching off scabs, etc.) Its kind of a mishaped oval, and the same color as my skin. My mother doesnt think anything about it, but im getting a little scared because skin cancer runs in the family.

    • ANSWER:
      Skin cancer — the abnormal growth of skin cells — most often develops on skin exposed to the sun. But this common form of cancer can also occur on areas of your skin not ordinarily exposed to sunlight.

      Skin cancer develops primarily on areas of sun-exposed skin, including the scalp, face, lips, ears, neck, chest, arms and hands, and on the legs in women. But it can also form on areas that rarely see the light of day — your palms, beneath your fingernails, the spaces between your toes or under your toenails, and your genital area.

      Skin cancer affects people of all skin tones, including those with darker complexions. When melanoma occurs in those with dark skin tones, it's more likely to occur in areas not normally considered to be sun-exposed.

      A cancerous skin lesion can appear suddenly or develop slowly. Its appearance depends on the type of cancer.

      Basal cell carcinoma
      This is the most common skin cancer. It's also the most easily treated and the least likely to spread. Basal cell carcinoma usually appears as one of the following:

      * A pearly or waxy bump on your face, ears or neck
      * A flat, flesh-colored or brown scar-like lesion on your chest or back

      Squamous cell carcinoma
      Squamous cell carcinoma is easily treated if detected early, but it's slightly more apt to spread than is basal cell carcinoma. Most often, squamous cell carcinoma appears as one of the following:

      * A firm, red nodule on your face, lips, ears, neck, hands or arms
      * A flat lesion with a scaly, crusted surface on your face, ears, neck, hands or arms

      Melanoma
      This is the most serious form of skin cancer and the one responsible for most skin cancer deaths. Melanoma can develop anywhere on your body, in otherwise normal skin or in an existing mole that turns malignant. Melanoma most often appears on the trunk, head or neck of affected men. In women, this type of cancer most often develops on the arms or legs.

      Warning signs of melanoma include:

      * A large brownish spot with darker speckles located anywhere on your body
      * A simple mole located anywhere on your body that changes in color, size or feel or that bleeds
      * A small lesion with an irregular border and red, white, blue or blue-black spots on your trunk or limbs
      * Shiny, firm, dome-shaped bumps located anywhere on your body
      * Dark lesions on your palms, soles, fingertips and toes, or on mucous membranes lining your mouth, nose, vagina and anus

      Less common skin cancers
      Other, less common types of skin cancer include:

      * Kaposi sarcoma. This rare form of skin cancer develops in the skin's blood vessels and causes red or purple patches on the skin or mucous membranes. Like melanoma, it's a serious form of skin cancer. It's mainly seen in people with weakened immune systems, such as people with AIDS, and in people taking medications that suppress their natural immunity, such as people who've undergone organ transplants.
      * Merkel cell carcinoma. In this rare cancer, firm, shiny nodules occur on or just beneath the skin and in hair follicles. The nodules may be red, pink or blue and can vary in size from a quarter of an inch (about 6 millimeters) to more than 2 inches (about 50 millimeters). Merkel cell carcinoma is usually found on sun-exposed areas on the head, neck, arms and legs. Unlike basal and squamous cell carcinomas, Merkel cell carcinoma grows rapidly and often spreads to other parts of the body.
      * Sebaceous gland carcinoma. This uncommon and aggressive cancer originates in the oil glands in the skin. Sebaceous gland carcinomas — which usually appear as hard, painless nodules — can develop anywhere, but most occur on the eyelid, where they're frequently mistaken for benign conditions.

      Precancerous skin lesions, such as an actinic keratosis, also can develop into squamous cell skin cancer. Actinic keratoses appear as rough, scaly, brown or dark-pink patches. They're most commonly found on the face, ears, lower arms and hands of fair-skinned people whose skin has been damaged by the sun.

      Not all skin changes are cancerous. The only way to know for sure is to have your skin examined by your doctor or dermatologist. -

  32. QUESTION:
    dose any1 no the side affects for...............?
    dose any1 no the side affects that aldara cream causes or if you have used it did you have any problems thanks for your help

    • ANSWER:
      Aldara
      Side Effects & Drug Interactionsfont sizeAAAAldara™
      (imiquimod) Cream

      For topical use only

      DRUG DESCRIPTION
      Aldara™ (imiquimod 5%) Cream is an immune response modifier for topical administration. Each gram contains 50 mg of imiquimod in an off-white oil-in-water vanishing cream base consisting of isostearic acid, cetyl alcohol, stearyl alcohol, white petrolatum, polysorbate 60, sorbitan monostearate, glycerin, xanthan gum, purified water, benzyl alcohol, methylparaben, and propylparaben.

      Chemically, imiquimod is 1-(2-methylpropyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]quinolin-4-amine. Imiquimod has a molecular formula of C14H16N4 and a molecular weight of 240.3. Its structural formula is:

      INDICATIONS
      Actinic Keratosis
      Aldara Cream is indicated for the topical treatment of clinically typical, nonhyperkeratotic, nonhypertrophic actinic keratoses on the face or scalp in immunocompetent adults.

      Superficial Basal Cell Carcinoma
      Aldara Cream is indicated for the topical treatment of biopsy-confirmed, primary superficial basal cell carcinoma (sBCC) in immunocompetent adults, with a maximum tumor diameter of 2.0 cm, located on the trunk (excluding anogenital skin), neck, or extremities (excluding hands and feet), only when surgical methods are medically less appropriate and patient follow-up can be reasonably assured.

      The histological diagnosis of superficial basal cell carcinoma should be established prior to treatment, since safety and efficacy of Aldara Cream have not been established for other types of basal cell carcinomas, including nodular and morpheaform (fibrosing or sclerosing) types.

      External Genital Warts
      Aldara Cream is indicated for the treatment of external genital and perianal warts/condyloma acuminata in patients 12 years or older.

      Limitations of Use
      Aldara Cream has been evaluated in children ages 2 to 12 years with molluscum contagiosum and these studies failed to demonstrate efficacy. [see Use in Specific Populations].

      Unevaluated Populations
      The safety and efficacy of Aldara Cream in immunosuppressed patients have not been established.

      Aldara Cream should be used with caution in patients with pre-existing autoimmune conditions.

      The efficacy and safety of Aldara Cream have not been established for patients with Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome or Xeroderma Pigmentosum.

      DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION
      The application frequency for Aldara Cream is different for each indication.

      Aldara is not for oral, ophthalmic, or intravaginal use.

      Actinic Keratosis
      Aldara Cream should be applied 2 times per week for a full 16 weeks to a defined treatment area on the face or scalp (but not both concurrently). The treatment area is defined as one contiguous area of approximately 25 cm2 (e.g., 5 cm x 5 cm) on the face (e.g. forehead or one cheek) or on the scalp. Examples of 2 times per week application schedules are Monday and Thursday, or Tuesday and Friday. Aldara Cream should be applied to the entire treatment area and rubbed in until the cream is no longer visible. No more than one packet of Aldara Cream should be applied to the contiguous treatment area at each application. Aldara Cream should be applied prior to normal sleeping hours and left on the skin for approximately 8 hours, after which time the cream should be removed by washing the area with mild soap and water. The prescriber should demonstrate the proper application technique to maximize the benefit of Aldara Cream therapy.

      It is recommended that patients wash their hands before and after applying Aldara Cream. Before applying the cream, the patient should wash the treatment area with mild soap and water and allow the area to dry thoroughly (at least 10 minutes).

      Contact with the eyes, lips and nostrils should be avoided.

      Local skin reactions in the treatment area are common. [see ADVERSE REACTIONS] A rest period of several days may be taken if required by the patient's discomfort or severity of the local skin reaction. However, the treatment period should not be extended beyond 16 weeks due to missed doses or rest periods. Response to treatment cannot be adequately assessed until resolution of local skin reactions. Lesions that do not respond to treatment should be carefully re-evaluated and management reconsidered.

      Aldara Cream is packaged in single-use packets, with 12 packets supplied per box. Patients should be prescribed no more than 3 boxes (36 packets) for the 16-week treatment period.

      Unused packets should be discarded. Partially-used packets should be discarded and not reused.

      Superficial Basal Cell Carcinoma
      Aldara Cream should be applied 5 times per week for a full 6 weeks to a biopsy-confirmed superficial basal cell carcinoma. An example of a 5 times per week application schedule is to apply Aldara Cream, once per day, Monday through Friday. Aldara Cream should be applied prior to normal sleeping hours and left on the skin for approximately 8 hours, after which time the cream sh

  33. QUESTION:
    Ummm...Help?
    How can you tell if something is skin cancer. I mean, what should you watch out for?

    • ANSWER:
      Basal cell carcinoma
      This is the most common skin cancer. It's also the most easily treated and the least likely to spread. Basal cell carcinoma usually appears as one of the following:

      A pearly or waxy bump on your face, ears or neck
      A flat, flesh-colored or brown scar-like lesion on your chest or back
      Squamous cell carcinoma
      Squamous cell carcinoma is easily treated if detected early, but it's slightly more apt to spread than is basal cell carcinoma. Most often, squamous cell carcinoma appears as one of the following:

      A firm, red nodule on your face, lips, ears, neck, hands or arms
      A flat lesion with a scaly, crusted surface on your face, ears, neck, hands or arms
      Melanoma
      This is the most serious form of skin cancer and the one responsible for most skin cancer deaths. Melanoma can develop in otherwise normal skin or in an existing mole that turns malignant. Although it can occur anywhere on the body, melanoma appears most often on the upper back or face in both men and women.

      Warning signs of melanoma include:

      A large brownish spot with darker speckles located anywhere on your body
      A simple mole located anywhere on your body that changes in color, size or feel or that bleeds
      A small lesion with an irregular border and red, white, blue or blue-black spots on your trunk or limbs
      Shiny, firm, dome-shaped bumps located anywhere on your body
      Dark lesions on your palms, soles, fingertips and toes, or on mucous membranes lining your mouth, nose, vagina and anus
      Less common skin cancers
      Other, less common types of skin cancer include:

      Kaposi sarcoma. This rare form of skin cancer develops in the skin's blood vessels and causes red or purple patches on the skin or mucous membranes. Like melanoma, it's a serious form of skin cancer. It's mainly seen in people with weakened immune systems, such as people with AIDS and people taking medications that suppress their natural immunity, such as people who've undergone organ transplants.
      Merkel cell carcinoma. In this rare cancer, firm, shiny nodules occur on or just beneath the skin and in hair follicles. The nodules may be red, pink or blue and can vary in size from a quarter of an inch to more than 2 inches. Merkel cell carcinoma is usually found on sun-exposed areas on the head, neck, arms and legs. Unlike basal and squamous cell carcinomas, Merkel cell carcinoma grows rapidly and often spreads to other parts of the body.
      Sebaceous gland carcinoma. This uncommon and aggressive cancer originates in the oil glands in the skin. Sebaceous gland carcinomas — which usually appear as hard, painless nodules — can develop anywhere, but most occur on the eyelid, where they're frequently mistaken for benign conditions.
      Precancerous skin lesions, such as an actinic keratosis, also can develop into squamous cell skin cancer. Actinic keratoses appear as rough, scaly, brown or dark-pink patches. They're most commonly found on the face, ears, lower arms and hands of fair-skinned people whose skin has been damaged by the sun.

      Not all skin changes are cancerous. The only way to know for sure is to have your skin examined by your doctor or dermatologist.

  34. QUESTION:
    Rough Spot on Ankle?
    on one of my ankles for years regardless of whether it is summer or winter I have this small patch of skin that looks darker than the rest of my skin but when I scratch at it it turns really white n flaky... For a while I was really devoted to getting rid of it so I scrubbed at it and used lotion everyday but it didn't go away so I gave up... what is it? and what's causing it?

    • ANSWER:
      When skin is exposed to the sun constantly, thick, scaly, or crusty bumps appear. The scaly or crusty part of the bump is dry and rough. The growths start out as flat scaly areas, and later grow into a tough, wart-like area.

      You could possibly have keratosis which is described in wikipedia as follows:
      "An actinic keratosis site commonly ranges between 2 and 6 millimeters in size, and can be dark or light, tan, pink, red, a combination of all these, or have the same pigment as the surrounding skin. It may appear on any sun-exposed area, such as the face, ears, neck, scalp, chest, backs of hands, forearms, or lips."

      I have several of these patches which I've had treated croyosurgery, e.g. with liquid nitrogen, by "freezing off" the scaly patches. It's best if you see a dermatologist to confirm a diagnosis.

  35. QUESTION:
    skin cancer chemo...and hair loss.?
    My dad has a type ofskin cancer, and he has to take a chemotherapy. Its in cream form. Will he lose his hair?
    Sorry....the drug is called Efudex.

    • ANSWER:
      He might lose portions of his hair for a short time. This type hair loss will not be comparable to the mass hair loss experienced after IV chemo. Side effects from Efudex can be dialed back by simply skipping a day or two of applications if your skin gets too painful. Efudex makes your skin bright red, a little tender and some scaling as treatments progress. Efudex is highly effective for actinic keratosis, small basal and squamous cells. Make sure and wear sunscreen and a wide brimmed hat while his face is inflamed and afterward because second skin cancers become more likely after the first ones are cured.

      http://www.chemocare.com/bio/efudex.asp

  36. QUESTION:
    pllleeeaaassseeee!!! help me im so worry!!!?
    ok yesterday i saw a mole that hav 2 color (black on top and pinkish around the bottom) on my dad's shoulder. im really worry cause i dont want my dad to have skin cancer. so pleasssee tell me is it ok? just tell me the truth plleeassee! thank you so so much!!!
    p.s. he have that mole when he was born so its not a new mole
    and it is a raise mole

    • ANSWER:
      Has this mole always been there? If if has i wouldnt worry unless it has changed. I have a black mole similar to the one you described and mine is fine. He can get it removed if that would make him more comfertable.

      Hope this helps

      Signs and symptoms

      Basal cell skin cancer
      Squamous cell cancer
      Melanoma
      Skin cancer develops primarily on areas of sun-exposed skin, including the scalp, face, lips, ears, neck, chest, arms and hands, and on the legs in women. But it can also form on areas that rarely see the light of day — the palms, spaces between the toes and the genital area. Skin cancer affects people of all skin tones, including those with darker complexions.

      A cancerous skin lesion can appear suddenly or develop slowly. Its appearance depends on the type of cancer.

      Basal cell carcinoma
      This is the most common skin cancer. It's also the most easily treated and the least likely to spread. Basal cell carcinoma usually appears as one of the following:

      A pearly or waxy bump on your face, ears or neck
      A flat, flesh-colored or brown scar-like lesion on your chest or back
      Squamous cell carcinoma
      Squamous cell carcinoma is easily treated if detected early, but it's slightly more apt to spread than is basal cell carcinoma. Most often, squamous cell carcinoma appears as one of the following:

      A firm, red nodule on your face, lips, ears, neck, hands or arms
      A flat lesion with a scaly, crusted surface on your face, ears, neck, hands or arms
      Melanoma
      This is the most serious form of skin cancer and the one responsible for most skin cancer deaths. Melanoma can develop in otherwise normal skin or in an existing mole that turns malignant. Although it can occur anywhere on the body, melanoma appears most often on the upper back or face in both men and women.

      Warning signs of melanoma include:

      A large brownish spot with darker speckles located anywhere on your body
      A simple mole located anywhere on your body that changes in color, size or feel or that bleeds
      A small lesion with an irregular border and red, white, blue or blue-black spots on your trunk or limbs
      Shiny, firm, dome-shaped bumps located anywhere on your body
      Dark lesions on your palms, soles, fingertips and toes, or on mucous membranes lining your mouth, nose, vagina and anus
      Less common skin cancers
      Other, less common types of skin cancer include:

      Kaposi sarcoma. This rare form of skin cancer develops in the skin's blood vessels and causes red or purple patches on the skin or mucous membranes. Like melanoma, it's a serious form of skin cancer. It's mainly seen in people with weakened immune systems, such as people with AIDS and people taking medications that suppress their natural immunity, such as people who've undergone organ transplants.
      Merkel cell carcinoma. In this rare cancer, firm, shiny nodules occur on or just beneath the skin and in hair follicles. The nodules may be red, pink or blue and can vary in size from a quarter of an inch to more than 2 inches. Merkel cell carcinoma is usually found on sun-exposed areas on the head, neck, arms and legs. Unlike basal and squamous cell carcinomas, Merkel cell carcinoma grows rapidly and often spreads to other parts of the body.
      Sebaceous gland carcinoma. This uncommon and aggressive cancer originates in the oil glands in the skin. Sebaceous gland carcinomas — which usually appear as hard, painless nodules — can develop anywhere, but most occur on the eyelid, where they're frequently mistaken for benign conditions.
      Precancerous skin lesions, such as an actinic keratosis, also can develop into squamous cell skin cancer. Actinic keratoses appear as rough, scaly, brown or dark-pink patches. They're most commonly found on the face, ears, lower arms and hands of fair-skinned people whose skin has been damaged by the sun.

      Not all skin changes are cancerous. The only way to know for sure is to have your skin examined by your doctor or dermatologist.

  37. QUESTION:
    What is this next to my lip?
    so back in late september i got checked for STDs, came back clean on EVERYTHING. at the end of october i got a small bump underneath my skin by my lip. since then it hasnt gone away. it has pussed at some point but never again. also i have put neosporin on it everyday for the last 3 weeks and it has yet to heal.

    as for docotrs, ive gone to the doctor twice. 1st doctor classified it as a ingrown hair, didnt believe it came back for a second opinion.
    2nd doctor said it is milia, small oil glands in skin. i have milia by my eye, and it looks nothing like this, the skin is inflamed for some odd reason has yet to go away.

    ive made appointment with dermatologist and the next availible visit is in 2months, i cannot wait this long, i need more opinions!!

    http://img607.imageshack.us/img607/5757/img7303k.jpg

    pic if i stretch it out with my toungue
    http://img713.imageshack.us/img713/8140/img7305i.jpg
    as for the Actinic Keratosis. seems like older people get that. im 24 years old

    also the doctor said it didnt look like pre cancer at all..

    • ANSWER:
      If you have a sore that won't heal it could be Actinic Keratosis, which is technically a pre skin cancer. Basil Cell Carcinoma also presents by a sore that won't heal. You should get it checked out to be safe. It's not normal to have a sore on your face for that long that won't heal. Or it could be a pimple maybe even a cyst which needs extraction by a doctor, cysts typically disappear and then reoccur. It's impossible to know for sure what it could be.These are JUST possibilities, I hope this helps you to ease your mind. Just try not to get yourself all worked up over it until you know for sure.


actinic keratosis on face