Treatments For Seborrhea

Hair loss is a common problem among people of all ages. Premature fall is a tendency in certain families. Temporary loss may occur following a fever or some prolonged illness. The hair usually returns after the patient recovers from the illness. Sudden loss of hair in certain areas, a condition called alopecia areata, may sometimes follow extreme nervous shock.

Hair loss occurs due to insufficient nutrition. Diet lacking in essential vitamins, minerals and iron may result in hair loss. Other causes responsible for include heredity, age, and stress, lack of sleep, hormonal imbalance and intake of medication. If you notice bald patches on your scalp, it is an alarming sign that you are suffering from alopecia. Other scalp disorders include dandruff, itching, excessive split end which is another cause for hair loss, etc. One can easily get rid by eating a well balanced diet, cleaning properly and drinking lots of water.

The scalp is covered with loose dry scales in dandruff. When the hair is combed or brushed, or when the scalp is scratched, these scales fall like white flakes on the shoulders. Often, there is itching as well and the scalp may be red from scratching.

Seborrhoeic dermatitis is another skin problem seen on the scalp. The true cause is not known. Inflammation begins on the skin behind the ears, and later whole scalp may be involved. Many chemical lotions and shampoos containing harmful chemicals are available in the market for hair problems, which may give you temporary solution for your problem. Natural remedies help in getting rid without producing any side effects. Some important natural remedies are listed here:

Mix six teaspoons of water with two teaspoons of vinegar and apply it on the scalp at night. Tie your hair with a towel to avoid staining of pillow and wash in the morning. Use your regular shampoo and use this technique for a week regularly to get desired results.

Take a teaspoon full of lemon juice and add two teaspoonfuls of vinegar to it. Massage your scalp with this mixture and then wash with regular shampoo to get beneficial results.

Soak fenugreek seeds in water overnight and grind them in the morning to form a paste. Apply this paste on your scalp one hour before washing. It gives rid of hair fall, dandruff and itching of the scalp.

Prepare a mixture by adding amla, shikakai and dry neem leaves. Apply this mixture on scalp and leave it for half an hour before washing hair. It will give you long and healthy hair by regular use.

Make a mixture at home of amla, shikakai and dry neem leaves, apply on scalp and leave it on for an hour before washing.

Eating lots of fruits also help to prevent hair fall as fruits consist of necessary vitamins and minerals that are required for growth.

Drink plenty of water during the day for proper hydration of the skin.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    what treatment worked to heal seborrhea dermatitis for you?
    have been given prescriptions for olux and FS Oil for seborrhea on scalp that seem to help but also allergic to perfumes and dyes can't seem to find a shampoo that doesn't irritate scalp and then cause flareups of dermatitis -- any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      The main cause of SD is overreaction of the immune system. Identifying certain foods, chemicals, etc can be very helpful in battling this disease. I try to avoid soy and milk products which trigger my flare-ups.
      After using number of prescription drugs I've turned to the natural treatments.
      Now I use herbal remedies from serenaskin.com, which aim at the root of the disease - the immune system, and are steroid-free.
      After about 2 weeks of using ointment and spray my scalp has been cleared up and now I just continue with anti-eczema extract, which controls the immune system. My scalp has been clear for months now.
      It is the only treatment I have found that provides me complete relief when I use it as directed.

  2. QUESTION:
    How often should I have an oil treatment for my hair?
    I have semi dry frizzy hair...how often should I get an oil treatment? And is it ok to massage conditioner on my hair roots?

    • ANSWER:
      Oil treatments can be done once a month, and when your doing an oil treatment at home, only apply it to your mid-lengths to ends, which is where your hair really needs the oil. Never put it on your roots, your roots are closer to the seborrhea glands which produce the natural oil called sebum. This oil is nutrient rich and moisturising for the scalp and hair. There are 2 types of treatments you can do to your hair:

      * Protein (Protein oils to make hair strong - the solution to breakage/damage)
      * Moisture (The solution for dry frizzy hair to add moisture)

      One thing that will make the world of difference to your hairs moisture condition is to Get a shampoo and conditioner designed to replace moisture like this product I use: http://www.salononly.com.au/site/products/?page=1

      You need a lot of moisture in your hair, not oil. You have curly hair, I can tell easily without you needing to mention it). Curly hair is notorious for frizzing and drying out. The cuticle (the hundreds of scales on the surface of every hair) are all open, so your hair doesn't reflect light as well as straight haired people's does and because your hair's cuticles are open, your hair is prone to losing moisture. When you wash your hair, only wash it once or twice a week. Shampoo your hair twice for a good clean since you're not doing it frequently. Apply a good quality moisture rich conditioner to the mid-lengths to ends of your hair, not your scalp or roots. Wrap your hair in plastic wrap and leave it in your hair for 10-15 mins, then rinse it thoroughly and I mean THOROUGHLY in a downwards stroking motion, then run cold water through your hair to close off the cuticles of your hair (you'll have to use your intelligence to work out how to do that without subjecting yourself to the freezing temperature. Shampoo's open cuticles, and conditioner and cold water closes them. Then wring your hair out by hand, put it up momentarily in a towel to soak up the dripping excess moisture, then immediately leave your hair down to air dry. the less you do to your hair the more your hair will respond to you and frizz will be a thing of the past!

      As for knots, Comb your hair with a wide toothed comb before you rinse out the conditioner, starting at the hairs ends and working your way up towards the roots. That should be the only time a comb touches your hair! Brushes should never be used to comb your hair, only styled with the aid of a hairdryer. Remember Moisture and sebum are life savers for your hair. Because of your dryness and frizz if you have to use a straightener always use a Heat Protectand Spray. Try and avoid too much heat styling ok?

      Hope that helps solve your problems
      Take care

  3. QUESTION:
    What is the latest and most effective treatment for face and scalp seborrhea dermatitis?
    I have suffered from this condition for almost all my life.
    Recently, I found out about "Aveeno 1% hidrocortizone" cream, it was working wonderfully for about 2 weeks until suddenly its stops to work and my condition got back to what it was before....
    If you know of any treatment that was successful for you or someone you know, please let me know.
    My dermatitis has affected my scalp, eyebrow, eye's skins area and the T-zone.
    I thank you all for your answers ;0)

    • ANSWER:
      A friend of mine is using Head and Shoulders for 10 yrs now
      very successfully.

  4. QUESTION:
    what are some treatments for dog warts and dry skin?
    Are there any treatments for dog warts and dry skin
    Thx!

    • ANSWER:
      What we commonly call dog warts are small skin tumors. These are usually (but not always) benign. Older dogs and white or light colored dogs seem to get a lot of these.

      Dry skin can have many causes. Sometimes it is the first symptom of seborrhea or some other skin ailment. If it is just plain dry skin, which I can't tell over the internet, you can do two things. (1) Start adding fish oil to the dog's diet or feed it some water packed sardines twice a week. (2) Use a moisturizing shampoo on the dog. Most oatmeal shampoos made for dogs are moisturizing shampoos.

      If the dry skin doesn't get better, after several shampoos and the fish oil or sardines, your dog may need a stronger shampoo or medication so you should see your vet. You can find lots of good dog shampoos on amazon.com and at Pet Edge online. Amazon.con sells many veterinary strength shampoos.

  5. QUESTION:
    What do you call the skin condition on your scalp?
    When your scalp produces too much oil and all these folds of skin grow out of the scalp. Often caused by stress. Also do you know what the best treatment for it is?

    • ANSWER:
      As you see above, could be several things. Psoriasis, seborrhea, dandruff (but probably not, too severe), alopecia. You need to be seeing a dermatologist. They say that stress makes these things worse, but my psoriasis has always been very bad, whether I was stressed or not.

      There are new treatments available for psoriasis if that is what you have. See a physician.

      You could try the over-the-counter shampoos for scalp conditions -- some may work for you. None work for me. What could give you some relief is to put oil -- baby, olive, vegetable -- all over the scalp, cover with a shower cap, and sleep. Oh, cover the pillow with a towel because some will leak out. Wash it out in the morning -- hard to do, but use a clarifying shampoo and shampoo two or three times until it is out of the hair. That will lubricate it enough to give you some relief.

      Again, see a doctor.

  6. QUESTION:
    How come people have Seborrhea?
    I have Seborrhea myself, and It itches and hurts. I get these bumps, or patches on my head and sometimes they occur on my veins. I get new ones every day. Usually one or two, and sometimes three. The bumps bleed easily and I get scabs. I wanted to know why people get Seborrhea. It is so itchy!

    • ANSWER:
      The main cause of Seborrheic Dermatitis is overreaction of the immune system. Identifying certain foods, chemicals, etc can be very helpful in battling this disease. I try to avoid milk products which trigger my flare-ups.
      After using number of prescription drugs I've turned to the natural treatments.
      Now I use serenaskin eczema herbal remedies , which aim at the root of the disease - the immune system, and are steroid-free.
      After about 2 weeks of using ointment and spray my skin has been cleared up and now I continue with eczema extract, which controls the immune system. My skin has been clear for months now.
      It is the only treatment I have found that provides me complete relief when I use it as directed.

  7. QUESTION:
    What layers of skin and tissue does Seborrhea affect?
    What layers of skin and tissue does Seborrhea affect?
    I need to know this please for a Biology paper, Thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      Seborrhoeic dermatitis is a skin disorder affecting the scalp, face and trunk causing scaly, flaky, itchy, red skin. It particularly affects the sebum-gland rich areas of skin. It shows up where and when the sebaceous glands in the skin are most active.

      Primary seborrhea is an inherited disorder of the skin in which the outer layer of the skin (the epidermis), the sebaceous glands, and part of the hair follicles are hyperproductive. The rate of cell turnover in these tissues is significantly increased, causing excessive production of scale (dry flakes of skin) and sebum (fatty lubricating substance). Seborrhea oleosa is the more greasy form while seborrhea sicca is a dryer form. Chronic waxy ear infections (otitis externa) also occur commonly as part of this disorder.

      In seborrhea, the sebaceous glands (found in or near hair follicles, whose normal function is to enrich the skin with oil secretions) increase the amount and quantity of their secretions.

      An abnormal turnover of the skin cells (keratinocytes) into dead scale (keratin) also occurs. Normally the cells in the skin are constantly dying and being worn off; new cells to replace them from deeper in the skin. So there is a constant migration of deeper cells moving to the surface, undergoing keratinization (making keratin and dying), and being sloughed off. This migration usually takes 3 weeks. This cycle is changed in animals with seborrhea. The migration is greatly accelerated and only takes several days. Thus there is a buildup of this keratin on the surface of the skin. This is why seborrhea is commonly termed a "keratinization disorder".

      Seborrhea can be broken down into two groups, based upon the cause. Primary seborrhea can be either genetic-based or caused by a keratinization disorder. Secondary seborrhea is a result of other disease processes such as allergies, parasites, nutritional disorders, and endocrine (hormonal) disorders such as hypothyroidism. To determine the best treatment, it is important to differentiate whether a dog has primary or secondary seborrhea

  8. QUESTION:
    Does ANY insurance company cover laser hair removal?
    I've been suffering from PCOS for many years, and the only "treatment" i've ever gotten was being put on birth control. Despite what the doctor said it was supposed to do, the pills were virtually useless. I have a very extreme case of PCOS and almost my entire body is covered with thick, dark hair. Recently, it's been affecting me a lot more than usual. So, my question is, is there ANY insurance company that covers laser hair removal under any SPECIFIC circumstances? If the answer is no, what is the typical cost to get the laser hair removal treatments?

    • ANSWER:
      I have PCOS too and did go through laser hair removal treatments to try to get rid of the dark, thick hair on my face.

      I can't answer the first part of your question because I only know the experience I had with my insurance company...no, they did not accept my claims (Blue Cross).

      Each treatment office will be different, but I was told that I would need 8 treatments total (and maybe a few follow-ups). I was charged about 0-300/treatment. They lasted between 15-30 minutes each.

      My suggestion to you is to really research the place you are thinking about using. It is best if they are specializing in laser hair removal and not just doing it as a side business. You can call around and ask them to give you an idea of their pricing. Most places will give you pricing based on a certain amount of treatments.

      I understand the desire to get rid of the excess hair, and I do not want to discourage you, but the laser treatments did not end up working for me at all. I have fair skin and dark hair...the perfect candidate, but it just didn't work. That is something else to consider. Can you afford to do it and have it not work? Maybe you should explore a few other options...

      I take spironolactone...

      it is frequently used to treat a variety of cosmetic conditions in which androgen hormones such as testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) play a role, including hirsutism, androgenic alopecia, acne, and seborrhea in females,[10] and male pattern baldness in either low doses

      I shave, a lot!

      I wax

      I've also heard about Vaniqa for hair...

      http://www.vaniqa.com/

      Just something to consider...

  9. QUESTION:
    How to Clear up scales from Seborrhea Dermitis?
    After over a month of chemical shampoos and creams, apple cider vinegar , sitting in the sun, finally cleared up this nightmare. Never had anything like this before & it ran wild. Now how do I clear up the scales left behind. Called nurse 2ce and she didn't respond. Anyone ever had this, please respond. It is a mess on my forehead, behind my ears, neck & 1 side of face.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, you can try one of the natural treatments from the Internet - some of them do actually work. For my seb derm. on scalp I use herbal cream by Champori quite successfully. It takes just a couple of weeks to clear the spots and they stay clear for months on end.
      Try it: champori is available without prescription and comes with money back guarantee so if it doesn't work for you - it's free.

  10. QUESTION:
    Ways to get rid of psoriasis/seborrhea on the scalp?
    I've had this before and used coal tar shampoo to get rid of it. I'm trying that again (2-3 times a week), but it doesn't seem to be working this time. Other than going to a dermatologist, is there any other way to get rid of it or at least lessen it? My next step is to try the salicylic acid shampoo, but I would like to hear about some natural, herbal remedies also.

    • ANSWER:
      I cleared my psoriasis with SerenaSkin herbal remedies. I used ointment and spray on the scalp, and took anti-psoriasis extract internally. This treatment cleared my scalp just in a couple of weeks. A year later it is still clear. It is the best natural treatment I've ever tried.

  11. QUESTION:
    What does it mean when eyelashes fall out?
    I don't use make-up, or rub my eyes.
    It's been happening a lot the past few months now that I think of it...
    I've been told that it could be stress, but would like to know more.

    • ANSWER:
      The medical term for eyelashes falling out is “madarosis”. It is defined as loss of eyelashes also known as ciliary madarosis. The term madarosis is derived from the ancient Greek word “madaros” meaning “bald”. Some causes of this problem include:

      Blepharitis Blip

      Inflammation of the eyelids known as blepharitis is one of the reasons for eyelashes falling out. Blepharitis may be due to infection, trauma, allergy, or seborrhea. It is best to avoid makeup when affected by this condition. Apply warm water compress to the lids for two minutes for relief. After cleaning the eyelids, spread a small amount of the prescribed antibiotic ointment along the lid fissure while eyes closed. This is best done at bedtime.

      Alopecia Areata (AA)

      AA is an autoimmune disorder in which the body attacks its own hair follicles and suppresses hair growth. Alopecia areata is a hair-loss condition which usually affects the scalp. It can, however, sometimes affect other areas of the body. This condition is not limited to eyelashes but involves hair loss in the entire body.

      D.folliculorum Fault

      An eye infection caused by the mite called D.folliculorum, which causes swelling and inflammation of the eyelash follicles, can result in eyelashes falling out.

      Thyroid Trouble

      Both the thyroid conditions – underactive and overactive – if left undiagnosed can result in the eyelashes falling out. With adequate treatment for the thyroid condition, the loss of eyelashes can be prevented. Eyelashes falling out are one of the early signs of hypothyroidism. The eyelashes become brittle, dull, and coarse causing breakages of eyelashes.

      Trichotillomania Tangle

      Trichotillomania is a psychiatric condition that refers to loss of eyelashes due to avulsion of hairs by the patient. This state of compulsive pulling of one’s hair is usually caused by stress or tension. The patient suffering from this problem has an irresistible urge before pulling or plucking out the eyelashes followed by immense pleasure or relief.

      Makeup Muddle

      The method of removing your makeup can also be one of the reasons for your eyelashes falling out. Wiping or removing your makeup with too much force is never going to help the cause of eyelashes. Wearing heavy mascara can weigh down the eyelashes causing them to fall out.

      http://www.eyelash-growth.com/articles/eyelashes-falling-out/

  12. QUESTION:
    How do you treat dandruff besides a dermatologist and Head and Shoulders?
    Had it for years and it only stopped once that i can remember.

    • ANSWER:
      T-Gel shampoo from Neutrogena. It's for seborrhea, psoriasis and bad dandruff. However, you would probably only want to use it once in awhile because its made with coal tar and can really dry out your hair. Another shampoo you might try is Head and Shoulders Intensive Treatment...it's orange colored but from what I've read...it works.

  13. QUESTION:
    What Can I Do to Prevent Red, Oily Skin!?
    In the morning my skin has a very nice complexion, but by the time I come home from school my makeup has worn off and my skin is very red and oily. Also, every night I use a spot treatment, and every morning I scrub my face. Any tips on preventing red, oily skin, or some makeup products?

    • ANSWER:
      I used to have the same problem. Taking care of oily skin is a round the clock job. Here are some things that you can do:

      1. Use a gentle gel cleanser. A creamy face wash may leave a residue on your skin, prompting a greasy feel and oily look.

      2. Wash twice a day -- no more. Too much washing can dry out your skin, causing it to produce even more oil.

      3. Tone carefully. Look for a toner without alcohol, which can cause skin to become dry. Instead, choose a toner with witch hazel or other soothing ingredients, and use after every wash.

      4. Don't skip sunscreen. Many women with oily skin forego face lotion. But everyone, no matter what her skin type, needs sunscreen. Use a gel SPF formula.

      5. Avoid moisturizing makeup. Foundation for older skin is usually formulated to be moisturizing, which means it contains oils and humectants that your skin doesn't need. Instead, choose an oil-free foundation.

      6. Use powder. A translucent powder applied after your foundation will help the base stay smudge-proof all day, and will help curb mid-day greasiness.

      7. Blot away shine. Use a blotting paper, made especially to absorb oil without ruining makeup, during the day when you need to squelch shine. Don't cake on lots of powder, which can settle into fine lines and look heavy.

      8. Try a mask. A clay-based mask, used once or twice a week, cleanses pores (which often become blocked on women with oily skin).

      9. Go for powdered makeup. Eye shadow and blush in powder form will stay put on your oily skin longer than cream- or pencil-based products.

      10. Rule out any skin conditions. If you notice your skin becoming more oily, flaky, or breaking out more often, see your dermatologist. He or she may diagnose you with a mild skin condition such as rosacea or seborrhea, which are easily treatable with prescription topical medications.

  14. QUESTION:
    Can a cat get a yeast infection from licking a yeast infection?
    I know this sounds like a gross question but, I had a yeast infection in my belly button (odd, I know, but the doctor confirmed it) and I woke up one morning to my cat licking my belly button!!! Gross. But anyway, is it possible that he will get a yeast infection in his mouth now? If so, how would I treat it or what signs do I need to look for to tell if he has one?

    • ANSWER:
      well one site says it's not a prolproblemhealthy cats, but the symptoms can be redness, hair loss, and etc...let me just copy n paste lol.

      The most common symptom of Malassezia (YEAST) infections in cats is hair loss. Chin acne, redness, and seborrhea can also occur.

      Treatment can be approached in several different ways. For a long-term solution to the problem the underlying condition must be properly treated, whether it is a bacterial infection, allergy, or seborrhea. Once all of the underlying conditions are addressed, then either localized or generalized treatment can begin.

      To provide an inhospitable environment for Malassezia, lipids on the skin need to be removed. Chlorhexidine shampoos that are 1% or stronger, and shampoos containing benzoyl peroxide and sulfur can be used. Human shampoos containing ketoconazole have also been used.

      For localized treatment of very small areas, miconazole cream is applied twice daily for several weeks.

      For cats with more severe cases, or in those that are resistant to topical treatment, oral ketoconazole or itraconazole can be administered for several weeks. A response is generally seen within 1-2 weeks, however, therapy needs to continue for an additional 3-5 weeks. Both of these oral antifungal drugs are very effective, but because of their potentially toxic side effects and expense they should only be used under direct veterinary supervision.

  15. QUESTION:
    Can dermatologists help will hair lost?
    I'm 26 years old and my hair is thinning. It's gotten worse over the past year. I actually have patches of bald spots. I was wondering if anyone knew if seeing a dermatologist can help. Maybe they can recommend treatment.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, go to a dermatologist. I had the same problem and a dermatologist solved my problem immediately. I had atypical seborrhea. An over the counter shampoo solved the problem. However, you may have a different problem. Make an appointment!

  16. QUESTION:
    How do I treat small bald spots caused by cradle cap?
    About three years ago, I was 13 and I had cradle cap. I went to the doctors and was given some shampoo stuff and also told to use baby oil to loosen it. It went quite quickly, however recently I have noticed, when i lift up my hair where i had cradle cap, there are very small bald spots and my hair is quite thin on the scalp. Is there anything I can do to treat this?

    • ANSWER:
      Cradle Cap
      Introduction:
      We are constantly making new skin cells at about the rate that we lose old, dry skin cells. The old skin falls off and we usually don't even notice the process. In many healthy infants, the skin cells on their scalp grow faster than they can fall off, leaving a layer of somewhat crusty, extra skin.
      What is it?
      Cradle cap is a crusting and scaling rash found on the scalps of many healthy babies. The sebaceous glands in their skin are hyperactivated often because of mom’s hormones that crossed the placenta just before birth. These glands pump out a greasy substance that keeps the old skin cells attached as it dries.

      Cradle cap is a specific timing and location of seborrhea.

      Who gets it?
      Cradle cap can occur in any baby, and most commonly begins sometime in the first 3 months.

      It is not common after the first year of life until the teen years when hormone levels rise and exuberant growth returns. Teens often have a similar scalp condition, but for them we call it seborrhea (though I think “cradle cap” when I see it, remembering how far they have come).

      What are the symptoms?
      Your adorable baby develops patchy scales and redness on the scalp, even though the early baby pictures showed beautiful baby skin. The scales may appear cracked, greasy, or even weeping.

      The same rash is often prominent around the ear or the eyebrows. It may appear in other locations as well, where it is called seborrheic dermatitis rather than cradle cap.

      Is it contagious?
      No

      How long does it last?
      In most children, cradle cap is gone by 8 to 12 months and often long before that.

      How is it diagnosed?
      Cradle cap is diagnosed by physical examination. If it has not improved with simple treatment, other diagnoses should be considered and other tests may be necessary.

      How is it treated?
      Generally, cradle cap does not need to be treated as long as it doesn’t bother you or the baby. Sometimes it itches.

      The gentlest treatment is to simply rub a small amount of baby oil or olive oil onto your baby's scalp. Wait several minutes for the oil to soften and loosen the scales, and brush them away with a soft brush or a dry terry-cloth washcloth.

      If the cradle cap is especially pronounced, or if your baby is over six months old, you could also wash the hair with a seborrhea shampoo, such as those containing selenium, salicylic acid, or tar. These shampoos don’t have the "no tears" factor, so be careful or your child may not like bath time as much as they usually do.

      If the cradle cap is especially reddened or inflamed, a small amount of over-the-counter cortisone cream may help.

      These measures may be needed, off and on, until your baby outgrows the condition. Nevertheless, if the cradle cap does not respond rapidly to these treatments, be sure to inform your pediatrician.

      How can it be prevented?
      Preventing the rapid scalp growth and active sebaceous glands of cradle cap is not easy (or desirable). Frequent gentle shampooing may prevent the build up of scales.

  17. QUESTION:
    how to cure seborrheic dermatitis rashes?
    I have red itchy rashes all over the face. Doctor has diagnosed it as seborrhea. What should be the skin care routine apart from the medicines? Should I moisturize the skin or let it remain dry after washing? Can applying hot oil before shampooing increase the problem? And what should be the ideal diet during treatment?

    • ANSWER:
      Multani Mitti face pack be applied over your face By adding 2 teaspoon turmeric powder & 5 ml Rose water to it. Apply it daily for 5 days & wash after drying.
      At bed time please apply GLYCERIN over your face & wash with water in morning for 5 days.
      You will get rid of your problem.

  18. QUESTION:
    What are these little bumps all over my skinnnn?
    they're mostly on my torso, back, and chest. some of them itch and some don't. we dont have fleas. annnd yeah. they make my body look retarded. so. what is it?

    • ANSWER:
      The location, appearance and color of a rash will help your doctor make a diagnosis. Look for care suggestions on this chart for common rashes and other skin conditions.

      SYMPTOMSDIAGNOSISSELF-CARE

      1. Is your face, chest or back covered in small, pus-filled sacs or pimples, blackheads or sore, red bumps?This may be ACNE, a common skin problem that often begins in adolescence.See your doctor if over-the-counter acne treatments, such as benzoyl peroxide, don't help. Gently washing your face with mild soap on a regular basis may be helpful. Sometimes prescription medicines, such as an antibiotic, may be prescribed by your doctor.

      2. Do you have a flushed appearance, perhaps with redness around your cheeks, chin, forehead or nose?
      This may be ROSACEA, a skin disease that affects the face.

      Treatment isn't usually needed, but antibiotics may be useful for moderate to severe symptoms.

      3. Do you have a painful red bump or a cluster of painful red bumps?This could be a BOIL. A cluster of boils is called a CARBUNCLE. These occur due to infection under the skin.Gently compress the boil with a warm cloth. Use antibiotic ointments if needed. Call your doctor if the boils don't come to a head, open and drain, or if the redness spreads.

      4. Do you have a small, boil-like infection around a hair shaft or pore?This could be FOLLICULITIS, an infection of the hair follicle.Most of these will heal on their own. Clean the area. Use antibiotic ointments if needed. See your doctor if the condition worsens or doesn't improve.

      5. Do you have red, tender and swollen areas of skin, perhaps around a cut or scrape?This could be CELLULITIS, an infection of the skin.Clean the area carefully with soap and water and apply an antibiotic ointment. Call your doctor if redness and pain increase.

      6. Do you have red, itchy bumps on your skin, and are they sprinkled randomly?These could be INSECT BITES.These aren't usually harmful. Use hydrocortisone cream, antihistamine and ice to relieve itching. If symptoms get worse or don't clear up, call your doctor. If new symptoms arise, such as difficulty breathing, dizziness or nausea, go to the emergency room right away.

      7. Do you have irregular, raised or flat red sores that appeared after taking medicine?This could be an ALLERGIC REACTION to the medicine.Call your doctor. Try an antihistamine for itching and rash.

      8. Have bumps formed suddenly on your face or body?These could be HIVES, a skin reaction to an allergen, medicine or infection. They can also appear in some people who are very nervous.Use an antihistamine and cool compresses for itching. If the hives don't go away on their own or are accompanied by other symptoms, such as swelling around the lips or trouble breathing, see your doctor or go to the emergency room right away.

      9. Do you have a red, itchy, scaly and oily rash, and does it affect the areas around your eyebrows, nose or the edge of your scalp?Go to Question 12.*

      10. Is the person an adult?This could be a sign of SEBORRHEIC DERMATITIS, a condition in which the sebaceous glands overproduce.
      Try using hydrocortisone cream or selenium sulfide shampoo on the sore areas. See your doctor if the symptoms continue or spread.

      11. Is the person a child and does the dry, scaly skin cover the head?This could be CRADLE CAP, a form of seborrhea in infants.Try gently scrubbing the scales to remove them. Hydrocortisone cream may also help. See your doctor if the rash doesn't go away or if the hair doesn't grow in that area.

      *12. Do you have a red, scaling rash, and did it begin after contact with clothing, jewelry or perfume?This could be IRRITANT CONTACT DERMATITIS. It's caused by a reaction to detergents, perfumes and other substances.Avoid whatever you think caused the symptoms and treat the area with hydrocortisone cream or other soothing lotions.

      13. Do you have a red, itchy rash, and are blisters forming?This could be ALLERGIC CONTACT DERMATITIS, caused by POISON IVY, poison oak or poison sumac. The oil from these plants causes an ALLERGIC REACTION.Wash the area with soap and water to remove any oil that remains on the skin. The rash will go away after about a week. To relieve itching, apply hydrocortisone cream or calamine lotion to the rash. See your doctor if the rash covers a large area of your body, does not go away, or if new symptoms, such as fever, appear .

      14. Are there red, swollen, tender bumps in your armpits or other areas where hair grows?This could be HIDRADENITIS SUPPURATIVA, inflammation of the sweat glands.See your doctor. Avoid using antiperspirants and deodorants.

      15. Do you have small red dots on your skin, or larger, bruise-like spots that appeared after taking medicine?This could be ALLERGIC PURPURA, a serious allergic reaction to a medicine, such as an antibiotic that can cause bleeding.See you

  19. QUESTION:
    about parkinson and the following step of this sickness ?
    When parkinson is at beginning the effects are so little, what
    are the next steps , and what is the end of this sickness?

    • ANSWER:
      You are correct, the onset of Parkinson's can actually begin far before diagnosis is made and the symptoms can be ones which you would not associate with PD. Symptoms such as the losing of the sense of smell, depression, pain in neck or shoulders, sleep disorders, a slight foot drag or lack of arm swing (in one arm only) slight tingling in a finger can be some of the precursor symptoms. Usually these symptoms are ignored by the patient and dismissed or treated individually by the doctor.

      Since there are no diagnostic tests other than observation, medical history of patient and family, and evaluation using the Universal Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) by a neurologist specializing in motion disorders, reaching a diagnosis traditionally occurs after there are a few more obvious symptoms such as a slight resting tremor on one side of the body. (Note that tremors may not appear in all patients.)

      Once PD is diagnosed, the next step is to decide upon a course of treatment and therapies. It is important to make neuroprotective steps and steps to fight oxidative stress. Since there are other exercise therapies that can be of value, all options should be discussed by the person with Parkinson's (PwP), the doctors and the family who will be caregivers. Interaction with the medical staff and proactive measures by the patient and caregiver are very important in the early stage of this disease.

      Because symptoms will vary as well as the progression, there is no way to predict the speed and general physical condition of the patient except to know that more dopamine neurons will degenerate and that the condition will become worse.

      List of PD motor symptoms:
      Automatic movements such as blinking, sweating - Brain
      Choking
      Constipation: Brain (muscle rigidity and slowed body responses)
      Difficulty starting or continuing movement: Freezing
      Dystonia/dyskinesia - often a result of medication wearing off
      Impaired balance of walking: Brain, muscular and skeletal systems
      Drooling: lack of ability to swallow - stiffening of muscles
      Foot drag
      Lack of arm swing
      Lack of facial expression: stiffening of muscles
      Loss of small or fine hand movements: muscles stiffen
      Muscle aches (myalgia) and joint aches from stiffening
      Problems with movement - sitting, standing, walking, getting into and out of bed
      Rigid or stiff muscles
      Shaking, tremors
      Shuffling gait: (part of muscle rigidity, lack of balance)
      Slowed movements:
      Slowed, quiet speech, monotone voice
      Slowed response time
      Stooped posture - postural instability
      Fainting: (orthostatic hypotension - blood pressure) medication side effects also
      Loss of muscle function or feeling
      Variations in heart rate
      Urinary problems: urinary frequency, urinary hesitancy, incontinence
      Sexual Dysfunction

      Non-motor symptoms include:
      Anxiety, stress, tension
      Dementia
      Depression
      Hallucinations (this is also a side effect of some meds)
      Memory Loss
      Loss of sense of smell/taste
      Vision disorders
      Sleep disorders
      Seborrhea or seborrheic dermatitis:
      Loss of cognitive skills:
      Liver is stressed and overstressed because many of the medications are processed by the liver.

      The best way to describe progression is by looking at two of the scales of Parkinson's disease and the diagnostic scale. Here is a link to all three scales. Two are specifically tasks and abilities for daily living and probably address your question in the best way.
      http://parkinsonsfocustoday.blogspot.com/2009/03/questions-about-parkinsons-disease-part_3744.html
      This is a copy of the Hohen andYahr scale, the shortest of the 3 scales; it shows you the direction of the disease:
      Hohen and Yahr Scale
      Stage one: Symptoms on one side of the body only.
      Stage two: Symptoms on both sides of the body. No impairment of balance.
      Stage three: Balance impairment. Mild to moderate disease. Physically independent.
      Stage four: Severe disability, but still able to walk or stand unassisted.
      Stage five: Wheelchair-bound or bedridden unless assisted

      Parkinson's disease begins when the dopamine neurons begin to degenerate while norepinehrine attempts to pick up the slack. Because dopamine is a norepinephrine precursor, there is less to contribute to the production of norepinephrine and it too begins to degenerate. By the time PD is diagnosed at least 60% of the dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta of the basal ganglia has died. More of this important neurotransmitter continue to die and the disease progresses.

      Treatments now attempt to compensate for this loss in a few different ways. One medication is known to slow the progression. Another relieves many of the symptoms. Neither is without other side effects. Treatment also includes nutritional supplements to repair damage caused by oxidative stress and vitamin and mineral deficiencies caused by the disease or possibly leading to the disease.

      One of the most comprehensive sites is the National Institutes of Health website for Parkinson's disease. It was just updated on 3/03/10 and provides links to the main PD organizations in the US.
      http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/parkinsons_disease/detail_parkinsons_disease.htm

      Many PwPs die of aspiration pneumonia caused by choking, improper swallowing; bronchitis and falls from movement problems.

      The end of the course of this chronic, progressive neurodegenerative disease is not pretty. The hope is that eventually there will be treatments to stop progression and cures to reverse the progression

  20. QUESTION:
    My dog really stinks, how can I make her smell better?
    Even after a bath. If she goes outside for 10minutes when we bring her back in shes really extra dog stinky. And no she is not out there rolling around in her poop.

    • ANSWER:
      have you had it checked by the vet?
      might have a skin problem?
      anal glands need emptied?
      bad teeth?
      You can get some dry shampoo
      bath in some of the nice smelling shampoos sold from vets
      try some talc a little dusted on its coat

      There are a number of reasons why a dog may acquire an unpleasant odor. He may have an ear infection, a dental disease, oily skin, or he may simply be dirty. It's fairly easy to tell if your dog is dirty, perhaps he rolled around in something stinky, in which case a bath is in order. If that's not the case, however, take a close look at your dog to find the source of the smell. Start by looking in his mouth. If his teeth are discolored or he has an odor worse than his usual doggie breath, you should have your veterinarian perform a dental checkup and any necessary treatment. Further, you should clean your dog's teeth on a regular basis.

      If the teeth appear fine, next check your dog's ears. Offensive odors can commonly occur from ear infections. Long-eared and floppy-eared dogs tend to be more prone to infections. If the skin inside your dog's ears is red or sore, if the ear has a bad odor, or if your dog reacts in pain when you examine his ears, you should have him checked by your veterinarian to see if an ear infection is present and to have it treated if there is.
      If both the teeth and ears are fine, your dog may have a skin disorder known as seborrhea. This is usually characterized by flaky dandruff or an oily, waxy feel to the coat and a strong odor. Your hands may feel slightly greasy after petting your dog. The odor can be prevented by frequently bathing your dog with a medicated shampoo that your veterinarian can recommend. Lastly, your dog's rear end may be to blame for the odor. Some longhaired dogs can have a soiled rear from defecating which can become stinky. Regular brushing can help, but you can also have the hair around the rear clipped on a monthly basis. Infection or anal gland problems can also lead to an odor, as well as discomfort, in which case your dog will need to be seen by your veterinarian.

  21. QUESTION:
    What is the treatment for seborrhea oleosa?

    • ANSWER:
      medicine

  22. QUESTION:
    How do I get my rat to stop picking at cut.?
    One of my pet rats recently got a small cut on the top of her head, she continually picks at it and the whole top of her head is bald and bloody. Iv been putting nerosporin on it to help with pain but it continues to get worse, any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      You can try an Elizabethan collar. They make them for the different rodents. Also, for rats they have two types available based on weight. One is fo rats weighing equal to or less than 450 g. The other is for rats weighing more than 450 g. The link is as follows:

      http://www.sai-infusion.com/Infusion-Equipment/Rodent-Infusion/Elizabethan-Rodent-Collar/Lomir-Elizabethan-Collars.html

      I have also found a site giving instructions on how to make your own Elizabethan collar. The link is as follows:

      http://ratballs.com/RatTails/Tails084.html

      Check with your exotic vet first before using the collar to get his opinion. You may need to hand-feed your rat until the wound is no longer a threat. Make sure, though, it is not infected or she may need an oral antibiotic and/or a topical antibiotic.

      ADDENDUM: I just wanted to add that one topical ointment my girls have been prescribed that works very well is called Animax. It is an:

      "...antimicrobial, antifungal, and corticosteroid used in the treatment of skin disorders characterized by inflammation and dry or exudative dermatitis caused by bacterial or candidal infections. It is also used in the treatment of eczema, seborrhea, and contact dermatitis..."

      http://www.1800petmeds.com/Animax-prod10321.html

      I used a q-tip to work the medicine into the area. After you apply it, keep your girl amused until you are sure it has a chance to get absorbed. I doubt you will even need the Elizabethan collar then, as that was suggested only if you were not having luck getting her to allow the Neosporin to work, but still wnted to try it. If the wound has gotten infected, though, you may still need an oral antibiotic in addition to a topical one. I shall give you a list of medicines typically prescribed for rats and mice for your reference. It is as follows:

      http://www.rmca.org/Articles/dchart.htm

      I hope your rat improves soon. If your exotic vet is the one who suggested the Neosporin, then you stand a good chance of picking up the RX(s) without an office visit.

  23. QUESTION:
    whats the best way to control facial dandruff?
    i have tried moisturizers but they wear off at night leaving my face dry so wats the most effective way to prevent facial flaking, which usually occurs at night?

    • ANSWER:
      Seborrheic Dermatitis, also known as "facial dandruff", is said to be a common inherited skin disorder. Found more often in men than in women. It is a chronic occurrence of inflamed skin believed to be caused by the build-up of a yeast-like organism in the sebaceous glands. The yeast-like organism is known as Pityrosporum Ovale.

      Treatment
      General Treatment Overview
      Hygiene issues play a key role in controlling seborrheic dermatitis. Frequent cleansing with soap removes oils from affected areas and improves seborrhea. Patients should be counseled that good hygiene must be a lifelong commitment. Outdoor recreation, especially during summer, will also improve seborrhea, although caution should be taken to avoid sun damage.

      Pharmacologic treatment options for seborrheic dermatitis include antifungal preparations (selenium sulfide, pyrithione zinc, azole agents, sodium sulfacetamide and topical terbinafine) that decrease colonization by lipophilic yeast and anti-inflammatory agents (topical steroids). Suggested products are listed in Table 1. For severe disease, keratolytics such as salicylic acid or coal tar preparations may be used to remove dense scale; then topical steroids may be applied. Other options for removing adherent scale involve applying any of a variety of oils (peanut, olive or mineral) to soften the scale overnight, followed by use of a detergent or coal tar shampoo.

  24. QUESTION:
    Can I use my 'for people' organic oatmeal wash on my dog, instead of dog shampoo?
    He is a chihuahua, doesn't shed almost at all but has dandruff. I figured oatmeal would be good for that, but could I use mine, or is it necessary to get his own?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes you can. Most pet shampoos tend to be less alkaline in nature then our shampoo. Just asses for itchy or dry skin. A rehydrater or creme rinse will be nessesary to lower the PH after your "human" shampoo. Rehydrater should sit on coat for at least 3-5 minutes before cool rinse. Leave in conditioners can also be healpful and often provide SPF.

      YOu may want to try Neutrogena T-Gel shampoo. This is an effective treatment for humans and canines. Get the one with Coal Tar and Sulfer. This is excellent for occasional use for treatment of seborrhea, dandruff, allergy, bacteria, fungus, and dermatitis of unknown origins.

      Keep shampoo out of eyes and ears.

  25. QUESTION:
    What are people's experiences with Pet Health Insurance?
    ASPCA sponsors one and there are other companies as well. We'd like to know how successful--or unsuccessful--buying health insurance to cover your dog's health has been.

    • ANSWER:
      ...at the time I was considering it, it wasn't available for pets older than eight years. Since at that time all of my animals were over that age tghat made it an easy decision. That has changed, but there are still a lot of exclusions. For example, VPI excludes hip displasia and a number of breed-specific illnesses. For a Shar-Pei for example, this includes Amyloidosis, Lens luxation, Synovitis, Shar-Pei fever, and Mucinosis, and for Chows, Dermatomyositis, Myotonia, Sebaceous adenitis, and Seborrhea (very common here in south Texas).

      Other excluded conditions include:
      Elective and cosmetic procedures
      Expression or removal of anal glands or anal sacculitis
      Breeding or conditions related to breeding
      Special diets, pet foods, vitamins, mineral supplements, boarding or transporting expenses, grooming costs
      Diseases that are preventable by vaccines
      Behavioral problems
      Diagnosis of, or treatment for, internal or external parasites
      Orthodontics, endodontics and removal of deciduous teeth
      Diagnostic tests and treatments for conditions excluded or limited by the policy or complications arising from conditions excluded or limited by the policy
      Routine examinations, vaccines, teeth cleaning and spay/neuter, unless the optional Pet Wellcare Protection℠ Coverage is purchased.

      I also have multiple animals and the monthly cost of Pet Insurance would be very high.

      Because my cats all live in the house and because my dogs only go outside the property on a leash with me, I have chosen to self-insure them. In essence I set aside the equivalent of the fees spent on pet insurance and ear mark it for use on the animals. I also have a maximum amount that I am willing to spend on a curative treatment of 00. I have had to do that only once in many years of living with pets.

      In addition, all but one of my animals have been mixed breeds, all apparently enjoying the proverbial hybrid vigor. They have had few health problems, which amazes me since all were rescues and, in some cases, vicitims of neglect or abuse.

      In the vast majority of cases I have had to spend little beyond the routine annual exams and vaccinations until my animals get to be very old. At that point usually the biggest question is quality of life and whether the expensive treatments would still allow the animal to enjoy itself.

      I do choose to buy premium pet foods and watch their weights carefully.

      My current animals are four dogs, aged 3, 8, 13 and 15 years, and 8 cats ranging in age from 2 years to 15 years. We lost a fifth dog this year, a Shar-Pei, aged 9, to a very fast-moving lymphoma. Treatment was not really an option as it was too virulent, so pet insurance wouldn't have helped much.

      I do recommend Pet Insurance if you have an animal that is likely to be involved in activities where accidental injury could happen, such as a hunting dog or one that competes in agility or other type of activity. Also, I have found that pure bred animals sometimes have more health problems. Itis also easier to get if you have a young animal. And finally, if you only have one animal it could be quite affordable.

      However, when I did the number-crunching, it turned out to not be cost-effective for me, but it might be for you.

  26. QUESTION:
    Is sweet almond oil the same as almond oil?
    I'm trying to make a homemade treatment for my scalp because my hair is natural and I suffer from Seborrhea Dermatitis.

    • ANSWER:
      Sweet Almond Oil is the same as almond oil and is particularily good properties for use in the skinscalp. It is very moisturising, rich in EFAs and vitamins A & E. Light both in odour and colour and is suitable for all skin types, is particularly useful for dry or sensitive skin.

      Hope this helps!

  27. QUESTION:
    Whats the difference between seborrhea dermatitis and scalp psoriasis?

    seborrheic*

    • ANSWER:
      It's really hard to diagnose because they are so similar, but the main difference is that s.d. is more slimy and yellowish while psoriasis is more flakey-like. I was diagnosed with seborrheic psoriasis, go figure. Dermatologists use the same treatments, so the slight difference doesn't really matter.

  28. QUESTION:
    what to use for seborrhea dermatitis in pregnancy?
    shampoos for seborrhea dermatitis are usually so strong and they can have ingredients that are not safe for baby.What can pregnant use for solve problem with seborrhea dermatitis in their hair?

    thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, you can try one of the natural treatments available on the Internet. Some of them do actually work. For my seb. dermatitis on scalp I use psoriasis herbal cream by Champori quite successfully. It takes just a couple of weeks to clear the spots and they then stay clear for months on end.
      Try it: Champori is available online without prescription and comes with money back guarantee so if it doesn't work for you - it's free.
      Best,
      Tami

  29. QUESTION:
    What can be a WORKING herbal treatment for seborrhea?
    Thx in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      I've never run across any info on a cure, other than addressing underlying health issues, but shampoos with tea tree or rosemary reportedly help some people. Coal tar isn't herbal and certainly isn't without controversy but it's quite effective for most people. Then there's just plain old vinegar. Just dilute it in water and use it as a last rinse.

      In my experience, coal tar works far better than any herbal remedy but if you decide to try herbal remedies try to switch them out every now and then. Perhaps you could use a tea tree shampoo for a week or two and then switch to a rosemary shampoo, etc. Best wishes.

  30. QUESTION:
    Treatment for seborrhea dermatitis?
    I have been struggling with this condition for about 6 mo. now and was wondering if there someone could help me. What over the counter treatments have you tried and found successful? I can't afford to go a dermatologist so I would appreciate any help I can get. I know all about this condition so I don't need info, just something that I can use to get rid of it. Thank you.
    I have it on my scalp.

    • ANSWER:
      Dermarest shampoo and itch cream is available at Wal-mart stores.

      Also consider this: that IF you use anti-bacterial soap--it has TRICLOSAN in it--it will leave a residue on your skin--and any itchy sores you have may be continually opened--and not heal as long as you use antibacterial soaps--and it should stop if you discontinue it

      I use Dermarest shampoo exclusively and it does work--and the cream will also treat seborrea dermatitis--as they will indicate this on the shampoo bottle and cream tube

  31. QUESTION:
    What is the best cream to use on a 5 wk old for dermitis???
    the Dr told me sorboline - no perfum -

    • ANSWER:
      There are three common rashes that babies can have in the first few months of life. Baby acne is very common and usually starts by about 3 weeks of age. In baby acne, you see red bumps that look like pimples. The bumps are on the cheeks, forehead, and temples. They do not cause any discomfort to the baby, though it often can look very distressing to parents. No treatment is needed for infant acne. It occurs because of the hormonal changes that are occurring in the baby after birth, and will go away on its own in several weeks. You don't need to put any special creams or lotions on it, and you definitely want to avoid any acne products made for teenagers and adults.

      Another common rash at this age is seborrhea, also known as seborrheic dermatitis. It usually starts by one month of age. When you begin to notice red bumps (usually smaller than the pimples of acne) and yellow crusty scales and flakes on the hair-bearing areas of the body, such as the eyebrows, eyelashes, and scalp. It also tends to affect the neck and shoulder. Its cause is not entirely clear, though it may be related to eczema. This is what it sounds like your baby has, given the yellow crusts that you describe on the eyebrows. It is not caused by allergy to what she is eating, and the breastfeeding is not contributing to it. While it will go away by itself eventually, it can be treated with certain types of steroid-based creams, if necessary.

      Infant eczema is also very common. It usually starts between 1 and 5 months of age. In eczema, you have red bumps and patches in various locations. Eczema often affects both cheeks, on the face only, but it can be much more diffuse, and some babies will have the rash all over as they get older. While it's true that some babies with bad eczema have allergies such as to milk, in the majority of infants a specific cause cannot be found, other than a tendency to have dry skin. Some infants who have eczema outgrow it as they get older, while others continue to have problems with it throughout childhood. Eczema is treated with moisturizing agents, and if it's severe, may also need to be treated with steroid creams or other prescription ointments.

      Mention the rash to your baby's doctor at her next visit. If it doesn't seem to be disappearing on its own, or it seems to worsen, I reccomend that you have the rash checked.

  32. QUESTION:
    What is the cause of facial hair in women?

    • ANSWER:
      Facial hair in women can be caused by many things, such as it being hereditary and also because of hormone levels. Here is some info I obtained from a Google search (hope it helps):

      Unwanted facial hair (UFH) in women is a common problem, and is most often a result of ethnic background or heredity. In a small percentage of women, it may be caused by androgen overproduction, increased sensitivity to circulating androgens, or other metabolic and endocrine disorders. Approximately 22% of women are affected by the presence of UFH growth on the mustache and chin area, and this can be a source of distress, leading to anxiety, depression and a reduced quality of life.

      It is very important to determine the underlying causes. Most are ethnic or hereditary; however, one must rule out any signs of androgen excess, e.g., an increase in body hair, irregular menstrual cycles, acne, alopecia, and seborrhea.

      Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is the most common cause of androgen excess, and 70%-80% of patients with androgen excess demonstrate hirsutism, though this sign may be less prevalent among women of Asian extraction. There is a strong familial predilection for hirsutism, primarily because the underlying endocrine disorders in this population and the factors regulating the development of hair growth have a strong genetic component.

      Patients should be adequately advised of the available treatment modalities for hair removal. No single method of hair removal is appropriate for all body locations or patients, and the one adopted will depend on the character, area and amount of hair growth, as well as on the patient's age and their personal preference.

  33. QUESTION:
    What is the best treatment of Seborrhic Dermatitis?

    • ANSWER:
      A disease of the sebaceous glands marked by an increase in the amount, and often an alteration of the quality, of the fats secreted by the sebaceous glands.

      TREATMENT
      Mild dandruff, a type of seborrhea, may be treated with a shampoo containing selenium sulfide or sulfur. Severe seborrhea is treated with a lotion or cream containing corticosteroids, rubbed into the affected areas two or three times a day.

  34. QUESTION:
    Why does my cat's fur feel and look oily?
    My cats fur feels and looks oily. She is an indoor cat and I have two others and their fur is not oily. I feel them Puriana One for Synsitive Systems. What causes oily fur in cats?
    she is nine years old. She also has white flakes in her fur on her back. Cat danderif?

    • ANSWER:
      do you give her flea treatments if so some of the oils can get on the cats fur and feel oily that happened to my aunts cat or it could be she is not cleaning herself that good i would not worry about it unless it has been there for a few day because the cat my aunt has the oils around her neck was gone the next day i would also clean her (if it doesn't get better ) about once a week that should let her know that she needs to clean her self better not that this should help but i would also get the food that says heathy coat Cats, like dogs, can get seborrhea, a skin condition where there is a problem with skin cell replacement and renewal. It is much less common in cats, however, compared to dogs. While it is possible for a cat to be born with this problem, most cases of seborrhea in cats occur secondary to some other skin condition. Some cases of seborrhea result in dry flaky skin, while others result in greasy, oily skin. Your vet needs to do a thorough work-up to try to find an underlying cause. Skin scrapings, bacterial and/or fungal cultures, blood tests, a feline leukemia test, and biopsies may need to be performed to try to diagnose the primary problem. A non-specific diagnosis of seborrhea should be made only after all other possible underlying causes have been ruled out. Treatment is usually very successful if underlying factors have been identified and corrected. If not, then treatment mostly consists of shampoo therapy with a good anti-seborrheic shampoo (one that contains sulfur, tar, or benzoyl peroxide). Dietary supplementation may also help manage the condition. Some of the ingredients in the shampoos can make cats feel a little sick, so this needs to be discussed with your veterinarian.Thay sell special shampoo for cats in stores like wal-mart, Mejier ect, and in most pet stores. just make sure that he doesn't start licking it off his fur.

  35. QUESTION:
    What can I use as a solution to put on my dog's neck, she has some irritation on her neck.?
    I just noticed my labrador scratching her neck under her chin. She seems to have irritated the skin there, and i would like to put something on it to help clean it, and then sooth it. Does anyone know what would help? She is currently on antibiotics, so I am hoping that will clear up the problem as well.

    • ANSWER:
      I know just what you need. A *WONDERFUL* product that I have used before for pet skin irritations is called M.E.D. Topical Solution and is made by a company called Best Shot. It is gentle but fast acting and will really work. You spray it on the affected area and it immediately stops any itching, promotes healing, and is also an antiseptic. Contains Aloe Vera gel, eucalyptus oil, and chamomile extract. It is used as a treatment for skin allergies, hotspots, exzema, seborrhea, etc. for problem skin. I show dogs and have tried everything; I SWEAR by this stuff. I buy this stuff from the vendor themselves at larger dog shows, but have also ordered it from them online...they have expedited shipping available in case you want it here NOW. http://www.bestshotpet.com/

      Price is roughly per 12 oz.spray bottle and a bargain for its quality. Can't recommend it or any of their products enough and sounds like it could help you.

      As a stop-gap effort until the product arrives, would recommend just plain old Bag Balm, applying a thin layer two or three times daily...it won't help with the itching but is a safe topical antiseptic that has been around forever and won't hurt anything.

  36. QUESTION:
    what salt pills are good for seborrhea?
    will this cure it forever?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, you can try one of the natural treatments available on the Internet (just google "natural treatment for Seborrhea") and take your pick. Some of them do work. For my seb. derm. on scalp I use herbal cream by Champori quite successfully. It takes just a couple of weeks to clear the spots and they then stay clear for months on end.
      Try it: Champori is available online without prescription and comes with money back guarantee so if it doesn't work for you - it's free.
      Cheers,
      Stella

  37. QUESTION:
    My 3 week old sheltie pup has scab like bumps on her body .You cant see the scabs just feel them,What is this?
    She started with a bump on the back of her knee and now they are on several spots on her,You cant see scabs but you can feel the bump.Her front legs do have a little red spot that looked like a scab.She is the runt of the litter.Only one other pup has a bumpy spot on him but just one.What could this be?What should I do?I took them to the vet at 3days old and the spots ont he leg he didnt seem to concerned.Could thes be scabies or flea bites and what signs and treatment is used to cure it?

    • ANSWER:
      this is likely to be impetigo, also known as "puppy pyoderma".
      while the puppies immune system is developing such skin infections can occur. it is usually nothing to worry about. it they persist beyond the next month you can use an antibacterial shampoo ( must use one designed for dogs) to help with the bacterial.
      depending on the breed it would still be rare for such a young puppy to have a bad skin disease if it is doing well otherwise.
      flea bites can look like this or seborrhea, but unless the puppy has fleas or is breed predisposed to seborrhea( still rare at this age) it should resolve with time.
      keep up his exams to track his progress.

  38. QUESTION:
    please tell me why my dog smells bad when i take him out side no matter how long he is out there?

    I GIVE MY DOG A BATH TWICE A WEEK , SO THATS JUST A DUMB ANSWER BUT THANKS ANYWAY . HE IS A LHASA APSA , AND HE ONLY SMELLS BAD FOR ABOUT 15 MIN. AFTER HE COMES IN.

    • ANSWER:
      Oh no – That sounds awful!

      There are a number of reasons why a dog may acquire an unpleasant odor. He may have an ear infection, a dental disease, oily skin, or he may simply be dirty. It's fairly easy to tell if your dog is dirty, perhaps he rolled around in something stinky, in which case a bath is in order. If that's not the case, however, take a close look at your dog to find the source of the smell. Start by looking in his mouth. If his teeth are discolored or he has an odor worse than his usual doggie breath, you should have your veterinarian perform a dental checkup and any necessary treatment. Further, you should clean your dog's teeth on a regular basis. If the teeth appear fine, next check your dog's ears. Offensive odors can commonly occur from ear infections. Long-eared and floppy-eared dogs tend to be more prone to infections. If the skin inside your dog's ears is red or sore, if the ear has a bad odor, or if your dog reacts in pain when you examine his ears, you should have him checked by your veterinarian to see if an ear infection is present and to have it treated if there is. If both the teeth and ears are fine, your dog may have a skin disorder known as seborrhea. This is usually characterized by flaky dandruff or an oily, waxy feel to the coat and a strong odor. Your hands may feel slightly greasy after petting your dog. The odor can be prevented by frequently bathing your dog with a medicated shampoo that your veterinarian can recommend. Lastly, your dog's rear end may be to blame for the odor. Some longhaired dogs can have a soiled rear from defecating which can become stinky. Regular brushing can help, but you can also have the hair around the rear clipped on a monthly basis. Infection or anal gland problems can also lead to an odor, as well as discomfort, in which case your dog will need to be seen by your veterinarian. Another thing you may try is washing your dog with the formula we commonly use when to wash dogs that have been sprayed by a skunk. The formula that I've used to de-stink skunked dogs is a mixture of one quart 3 percent hydrogen peroxide, 1-cup baking soda and one teaspoon liquid soap. Mix well. Apply to your dog, rub into the hair and allow this mixture to sit on your pet for about 10 minutes then rinse with tap water. Be careful not to get the solution in your dog's eyes.

  39. QUESTION:
    If Ketoconazole 1% shampoo doesn't work on seborrhea on face, will 2% cream work?

    • ANSWER:
      Are we talking about seborrhoeic eczema? Ketoconozole shampoo is definitely used as a treatment for that, and possibly cream on your face might do better. There are other treatments, I tend to use Daktacort on more difficult cases, which is a hydrocortisone/anti-yeast preparation, but there are lots of other similar products.

      I've linked a DermNet article about seborrhoeic excema, maybe you might find it useful?

      I'd speak to your doctor, if your treatment isn't working.

  40. QUESTION:
    What are symptoms of dandruff?
    when i scratch my head, flakes (sometimes non-visable) will come out and some flakes will be caught under the nails. but my hair isn't really oily or dry, my scalp isn't itchy and i shampoo every other day. is it dandruff or just regular flaking?

    • ANSWER:
      Flaking: It is the most embarrassing and common symptom of dandruff. It's a key signal that the skin cells on your scalp are shedding and being replaced at an accelerated rate.
      Itching: Another sign of dandruff is excessive itching in your head. Itching is actually a result of these dry flakes.
      Redness: The third sign occurs in more severe cases of dandruff is seborrhea. In this case, there is a visible redness on the scalp, which may even be accompanied with inflammation of the scalp.
      Get helpful information and tips to get rid of dandruff by checking this link;
      http://www.squidoo.com/dandruff-causes-dandruff-treatment

  41. QUESTION:
    How do you cure seborrheicn dermatitis? Has anyone experienced hair loss from it??
    I've tried tea tree oil, black soap, olive oil, sulphur, camphor, even some prescriptions and they haven't worked fully. I need more ideas!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder affecting areas of the head and trunk where sebaceous glands are most prominent. Lipophilic yeasts of the Malassezia genus, as well as genetic, environmental and general health factors, contribute to this disorder. Scalp seborrhea varies from mild dandruff to dense, diffuse, adherent scale. Facial and trunk seborrhea is characterized by powdery or greasy scale in skin folds and along hair margins. Treatment options include application of selenium sulfide, pyrithione zinc or ketoconazole-containing shampoos, topical ketoconazole cream or terbinafine solution, topical sodium sulfacetamide and topical corticosteroids

      Pharmacologic treatment options for seborrheic dermatitis include antifungal preparations (selenium sulfide, pyrithione zinc, azole agents, sodium sulfacetamide and topical terbinafine) that decrease colonization by lipophilic yeast and anti-inflammatory agents (topical steroids). Suggested products are listed in Table 1. For severe disease, keratolytics such as salicylic acid or coal tar preparations may be used to remove dense scale; then topical steroids may be applied. Other options for removing adherent scale involve applying any of a variety of oils (peanut, olive or mineral) to soften the scale overnight, followed by use of a detergent or coal tar shampoo.

      As a last resort in refractory disease, sebosuppressive agents such as isotretinoin (Accutane) may be used to reduce sebaceous gland activity.

  42. QUESTION:
    Does anyone have information on Polycystic Ovary Syndrome?

    • ANSWER:
      Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common cause of infertility in women , and is primarily characterized by ovulatory dysfunction and hyperandrogenism. The diagnosis of PCOS has life-long implications with increased risk for infertility, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and possibly cardiovascular disease. It should be considered in any adolescent girl with hirsutism, persistent acne, menstrual irregularity, or obesity.
      It is important to appreciate that PCOS is a syndrome, not a disease, reflecting multiple potential etiologies and variable clinical presentations. Adolescent girls with PCOS may present with hirsutism, menstrual irregularities, obesity, acanthosis nigricans, premature pubarche, and/or precocious puberty Any one of these findings may be the sole feature of the syndrome. Treatment-resistant acne, scalp hair loss, seborrhea, or hyperhidrosis also may be presenting chief complaints.
      ultrasonography appears to be helpful in diagnosis

  43. QUESTION:
    My ears itch soo bad from allergies, is there anyway to make them stop, or itch less?
    It's because my ears are draining. :( ;)

    • ANSWER:
      allergies are linked to toxin build up
      and do study nutrition

      so a detox may realy help you
      Assimilation and elimination
      These are the two key stones of what makes us tick in fact Edgar cayce said if we could control these aspects of the human form we could extend life to whatever we chose, that's how important these two
      principles are.

      Assimilation is defined as the measure of the ability of any body to utilize foods that we eat, some people think that having massive doses of food will give them all that they need, they could not be more
      wrong, it is all right shoving nutrition in but it is quite another thing if the body can absorb it and use it in that form.

      Typical assimilation rates might vary from 20% to 80% and nutrition supplied in some forms will not be absorbed at all. That means out of every 454 grams of food you might only absorb 20-80% of that

      What happens to the food after you swallow it depends to a large degree on the other three principles of your body namely circulation, relaxation and elimination. Circulation is crucial if assimilation is
      to maintained at high levels circulation is helped greatly by some important factors;

      Exercise, especially cardiovascular apparently something like 50 or so times as many blood vessels open up when exercising than just sitting .WE have something like 60,000 miles of vessels mostly
      capillary type so you can imagine the effect of increased blood flow means massage,

      hydrotherapy treatments and osteopathic adjustment because the blood stream carries the rebuilding forces to the body it is these channels which need to be clear and stimulated so that the blood will flow to feed the cells and tissues.

      Elimination
      Every thing which your body does, every activity produces waste and we get rid of that waste through the skin, the lungs, the kidneys and the intestines. Major problems start to occur when any of these important
      channels are stopped from doing their job, we start to accumulate waste, bacteria start growing at alarming rates which leads to all sorts of problems as we become toxic.

      Imagine not cleaning up the kitchen very often –leaving waste –what would happen, your kitchen would become literally alive with all sorts of creepy bacteria etc the same with our bodies. The fact that poor elimination's are the most cited cause of disease within the Edgar cayce research papers totaling over 14000 gives you some idea just how important this aspect really is. It gives you an idea of the importance of getting rid of toxins, rid of waste from our bodies.

      Some of the diseases which elimination problems either cause or play a big and major part include.

      Arthritis
      Acne
      Anemia
      Apoplexy-stroke
      Appendicitis
      Asthenia
      Asthma
      Atrophy
      Balding-poor circulation
      Bladder stricture
      Blepharitis
      Some cases of blindness
      Boils
      Brain tumors –poor circulation
      Bronchitis
      Bursitis
      Cancers and tumors
      Skin cancer
      Canker sores and herpes simplex
      Cataracts
      Cirrhosis
      Colds
      Colic-poor assimilation
      Colitis
      Colon impaction
      Complexion problems
      Cystitis
      Cysts
      Some cases of deafness
      Dermatitis
      Eczema
      Edema
      Enteritis
      Feet swelling
      Gall bladder –gall stones
      Haliosis-bad breath
      Headaches general
      Hemorrhoids
      Hepatitis
      Hernia
      Herpes zoster
      Unwanted hair
      Indigestion
      Insomnia
      Iritis
      Kidney problems
      Laryngitis
      Leukemia
      Lumbago
      Lupus
      Lymphangitis
      Malaria
      Measles
      Menopause problems
      Migraine
      Some cases of myopia
      Polyps
      Nephritis
      Neuritis
      Oophoritis
      Phlebitis
      Pneumonia problems
      Poison ivy
      Prostatitis
      Pruritus
      Psoriasis
      Purpura
      Pyorrhea
      Rheumatic fever
      Sarcoma
      Sciatica
      Rheumatism
      Scolliosis –eliminations were a cause and an effect
      Seborrhea
      Skin ulcers
      Female/ male sterile
      Streptococcus infection
      Tic douloureux
      Tonsillitis
      Torticollis
      Ulcers
      Vaginitis
      Varicose veins
      Vertigo-some cases
      Xeroderma

      Some other questions were asked of cayce such as

      (Q) What can be done to conquer the many allergies to certain fruits and vegetables that I am afflicted with? Is the cause psychological?
      (A) Cleanse the system! These arise from toxic conditions through the alimentary canal.

      (Q) What will stop the tendency to itching piles?
      (A) Clean the system! And then, whenever there is the necessity, use Pazo Ointment

      (Q) What causes night mares and lack of sleep?
      Toxic forces or poisons in the system.

      (Q) What causes swelling of knee?
      (A) Toxic poisons in the body, the lack of proper eliminations through alimentary canal.

      (Q) what causes the pain in my hip?
      (A) The unbalanced conditions through pressures from poisons in the system. As indicated, as the
      system is cleansed and the pressures are removed, with corrections in the cerebrospinal system, the whole of the way through, these disturbing conditions will disappear.

      (Q) What causes his fevers or slight temperature so often during each day, followed by sweats at night? (A) A natural effect of uric poisoning in the system, not

  44. QUESTION:
    Is there such thing as disorder where skin produces TOO MUCH oil?
    people with dry skin have eczema... I have the opposite problem...my face makes way too much oil...after 3 hrs of washing my face absorbs to FULL face blotting sheets worth fully.

    Is there a name for this condition? What can I do? dermatologist give me some kind of shot or meds? help please..
    I mean 3 hrs AFTER washing my face.

    sometimes my face needs 3 blotting sheets too! my body isnt oily

    • ANSWER:
      There are some diseases/disorders (such as thyroid disease) that cause the "sebaceous glands" to produce more "sebum" (oil.) The largest and most active of these glands on the face are around the nose.

      But I doubt you have a disease, just over-active sebaceous glands due to your age. Hormones, especially during puberty/adolescence stimulate the glands to produce more sebum/oil, one reason why so many youths have problems with acne.

      And just FYI...seborrhea is dandruff, not oily skin. See a dermatologist, there are methods/treatments to help control oily skin on the face.

      * Though the word seborrhea translates as "too much oil" the condition has little to do with having too much oil on the skin. The skin can actually look red and dry as, "seborrheic dermatitis" expresses itself as dandruff on the scalp and/or dry flakey areas on the skin, often in the eyebrows and/or lashes. But "seborrhea" has nothing to do with the over-active amount of oil on your face. Again, don't let the word fool you, see a doctor and your problem can be better explained.

      Read more about sebaceous glands...http://www.skincarerx.org/oily.html

  45. QUESTION:
    is there anything specific that i can use for my dog so he doesnt smell bad and not washing him everyday?

    • ANSWER:
      There are a number of reasons why a dog may acquire an unpleasant odor. He may have an ear infection, a dental disease, oily skin, anal gland problem (see vet, dog scoots and is in pain) or he may simply be dirty. It's fairly easy to tell if your dog is dirty, perhaps he rolled around in something stinky, in which case a bath is in order. If that's not the case, however, take a close look at your dog to find the source of the smell. Start by looking in his mouth. If his teeth are discolored or he has an odor worse than his usual doggie breath, you should have your veterinarian perform a dental checkup and any necessary treatment. Further, you should clean your dog's teeth on a regular basis.

      If the teeth appear fine, next check your dog's ears. Offensive odors can commonly occur from ear infections. Long-eared and floppy-eared dogs tend to be more prone to infections. If the skin inside your dog's ears is red or sore, if the ear has a bad odor, or if your dog reacts in pain when you examine his ears, you should have him checked by your veterinarian to see if an ear infection is present and to have it treated if there is.

      If both the teeth and ears are fine, your dog may have a skin disorder known as seborrhea. This is usually characterized by flaky dandruff or an oily, waxy feel to the coat and a strong odor. Your hands may feel slightly greasy after petting your dog. The odor can be prevented by frequently bathing your dog with a medicated shampoo that your veterinarian can recommend. Lastly, your dog's rear end may be to blame for the odor. Some longhaired dogs can have a soiled rear from defecating which can become stinky. Regular brushing can help, but you can also have the hair around the rear clipped on a monthly basis. Infection or anal gland problems can also lead to an odor, as well as discomfort, in which case your dog will need to be seen by your veterinarian.

      Source:
      http://www.bestfriendspetcare.com/Pet_tips/stinkydogs.cfm

      Good luck,
      Jim
      jollyjim@flash.net

  46. QUESTION:
    Woke up to a swollen face and small red splotches all over.....?
    I'm itchy randomly, and I don't know why. If its an allergic reaction, I don't know what it would be too. Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      I hope this chart can give you some information. If not go to the emergency room ASAP.beforee it gets worse. Here is the link or look at infor below. Good luck

      http://familydoctor.org/online/famdocen/home/tools/symptom/545.html

      SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS SELF-CARE

      1. Is your face, chest or back covered in small, pus-filled sacs or pimples, blackheads or sore, red bumps? This may be ACNE, a common skin problem that often begins in adolescence. See your doctor if over-the-counter acne treatments, such as benzoyl peroxide, don't help. Gently washing your face with mild soap on a regular basis may be helpful. Sometimes prescription medicines, such as an antibiotic, may be prescribed by your doctor.

      2. Do you have a flushed appearance, perhaps with redness around your cheeks, chin, forehead or nose? This may be ROSACEA, a skin disease that affects the face.
      Treatment isn't usually needed, but antibiotics may be useful for moderate to severe symptoms.

      3. Do you have a painful red bump or a cluster of painful red bumps? This could be a BOIL. A cluster of boils is called a CARBUNCLE. These occur due to infection under the skin. Gently compress the boil with a warm cloth. Use antibiotic ointments if needed. Call your doctor if the boils don't come to a head, open and drain, or if the redness spreads.

      4. Do you have a small, boil-like infection around a hair shaft or pore? This could be FOLLICULITIS, an infection of the hair follicle. Most of these will heal on their own. Clean the area. Use antibiotic ointments if needed. See your doctor if the condition worsens or doesn't improve.

      5. Do you have red, tender and swollen areas of skin, perhaps around a cut or scrape? This could be CELLULITIS, an infection of the skin. Clean the area carefully with soap and water and apply an antibiotic ointment. Call your doctor if redness and pain increase.

      6. Do you have red, itchy bumps on your skin, and are they sprinkled randomly? These could be INSECT BITES. These aren't usually harmful. Use hydrocortisone cream, antihistamine and ice to relieve itching. If symptoms get worse or don't clear up, call your doctor. If new symptoms arise, such as difficulty breathing, dizziness or nausea, go to the emergency room right away.

      7. Do you have irregular, raised or flat red sores that appeared after taking medicine? This could be an ALLERGIC REACTION to the medicine. Call your doctor. Try an antihistamine for itching and rash.

      8. Have bumps formed suddenly on your face or body? These could be HIVES, a skin reaction to an allergen, medicine or infection. They can also appear in some people who are very nervous. Use an antihistamine and cool compresses for itching. If the hives don't go away on their own or are accompanied by other symptoms, such as swelling around the lips or trouble breathing, see your doctor or go to the emergency room right away.

      9. Do you have a red, itchy, scaly and oily rash, and does it affect the areas around your eyebrows, nose or the edge of your scalp? Go to Question 12.*

      10. Is the person an adult? This could be a sign of SEBORRHEIC DERMATITIS, a condition in which the sebaceous glands overproduce. Try using hydrocortisone cream or selenium sulfide shampoo on the sore areas. See your doctor if the symptoms continue or spread.

      11. Is the person a child and does the dry, scaly skin cover the head? This could be CRADLE CAP, a form of seborrhea in infants. Try gently scrubbing the scales to remove them. Hydrocortisone cream may also help. See your doctor if the rash doesn't go away or if the hair doesn't grow in that area.

      *12. Do you have a red, scaling rash, and did it begin after contact with clothing, jewelry or perfume? This could be IRRITANT CONTACT DERMATITIS. It's caused by a reaction to detergents, perfumes and other substances. Avoid whatever you think caused the symptoms and treat the area with hydrocortisone cream or other soothing lotions.

      13. Do you have a red, itchy rash, and are blisters forming? This could be ALLERGIC CONTACT DERMATITIS, caused by POISON IVY, poison oak or poison sumac. The oil from these plants causes an ALLERGIC REACTION. Wash the area with soap and water to remove any oil that remains on the skin. The rash will go away after about a week. To relieve itching, apply hydrocortisone cream or calamine lotion to the rash. See your doctor if the rash covers a large area of your body, does not go away, or if new symptoms, such as fever, appear .

      14. Are there red, swollen, tender bumps in your armpits or other areas where hair grows? This could be HIDRADENITIS SUPPURATIVA, inflammation of the sweat glands. See your doctor. Avoid using antiperspirants and deodorants.

      15. Do you have small red dots on your skin, or larger, bruise-like spots that appeared after taking medicine? This could be ALLERGIC PURPURA, a serious

  47. QUESTION:
    My horse either had rain rot or scurf HELP?
    Searching the Internet for ages and only two things are like what my horse has got. It s either scurf or rain rot , sometimes called rain scold. Sorry, but just wondering if anyone knows the difference between them because I need her to get better ASAP!!! Thank you everyone xxxxx

    • ANSWER:
      They are two completely different skin conditions requiring different management. Scurf is equine seborrhea and rain rot is an infection by dermatophilus congolensis.

      Horses with sensitive skin are more prone to seborrhea, but it can develop in any horse as a secondary condition to skin infections or allergy, or it can indicate poor overall health status.
      Seborrhea can be either dry or oily. Dry seborrhea exhibits dry, flaky scales that can look like dandruff, and it is usually found mainly along the skin of the mane or tail.
      Oily seborrhea involves excessive secretion of sebum, which is the oily substance secreted by sebaceous glands in the skin. Thick, sticky crusts form on the skin and usually accumulate at the elbows or hocks. Washing affected areas with a sulfur-based shampoo once or twice a week can sometimes manage dry seborrhea. Depending on the severity of oily seborrhea, washing affected areas at least twice a week using a shampoo that contains tar or benzoyl peroxide to dry the oils, and then followed by a protective ointment to soften the crusts sometimes is effective.

      For dry seborrhea, adding a quarter to a half cup of corn oil to feed can help to improve sebaceous secretions, and I've had good results with omega Horseshine as well. Regular grooming to remove dirt and sweat and using a soft curry comb to stimulate the sebaceous glands to secrete more oils is also helpful.

      If your horse has actual scabs forming on her skin, then this might be rain rot which is an infection caused by an anaerobic bacterium that lives dormant in skin. The bacteria thrive in dark, moist, airless environments, and after 12 hours of continuous exposure to moisture on skin, the bacteria can become active, multiply and develop active infection forming lesions on skin. This is why it is called rain rot, even though rain has nothing to do with its cause. Sweating under a rain sheet is just as likely to bring it about. Anything that compromises skin integrity can bring on active infection, such as abrasions, cuts, hypersensitivities, or illness that lowers immune functions, and so on.

      Softening scabs using isotonic saline solution, very gently lifting and removing them, then patting dry the open sores beneath is all that is needed. I use cotton makeup removal pads for this. The scabs and pus are loaded with the bacteria, and this infection can be transmitted to humans, so be careful and dispose of them in sealed containers. The bacteria survive in those scabs for up to a year after they are removed. After the sores are cleaned and dried, just exposure to air will kill off any remaining bacteria. if you need to seal out flies and reduce itching, apply a very thin layer of Gordon's EMT collagen gel to the clean. dry sores. It adheres like glue and heals the sores almost overnight.

      I've studied and managed this infection in humans and horses for decades, and there is no clinical evidence that any topical disinfectant, chemical, soap, detergent, or topical antibiotic is effective to treat it. In fact, anything such as harsh chemicals like iodine solutions or other disinfectants that can damage skin integrity usually worsens it.

      You can buy saline solution at a drugstore, or make your own 0.9% isotonic saline by adding 3/4 teaspoon of table salt (no iodine) to a pint of boiled water. This will not compromise skin integrity, won't irritate the horse, and if this is rain rot, saline will work better than any other treatment advised to soften and lift scabs, remove bacteria, and promote rapid healing of lesions.

      If the skin is swollen and hot, there may be a secondary infection by staph or strep bacteria, or the bacteria may have invaded deeper layers of skin where topical treatment won't reach it. If that is the case, your vet can administer certain systemic antibiotics by injection to get it under control.

      Of course there are other skin conditions that this might be as well, and the best way to find out would be to have your vet come to perform an evaluation.

  48. QUESTION:
    how can i remove seborrhea?
    what can i do about seborrhea on my body?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, you can try one of the natural treatments from the Internet - some of them do actually work. For my seb derm. on scalp I use herbal cream by Champori quite successfully. It takes just a couple of weeks to clear the spots and they stay clear for months on end.
      Try it: champori is available without prescription and comes with money back guarantee so if it doesn't work for you - it's free.

  49. QUESTION:
    Can a skin fungus vanish(show no presence but is still there) when you put lotion on it?
    my parents think i have a fungus but i say it's not because i believe a fungus can't just vanish because you put some lotion on it
    i have near flawless skin, no pimples no nothing

    • ANSWER:
      depends on the fungus. I have seborrhea dermititis and basically I have hormones that make my skin react differently to yeast and makes my skin red and blotchy. I had to go to the doctor to get some selenium sulfide that I have to put on my skin overnight once a month and 10 minutes weekly. I used to cover up my condition with vaseline on my face because my skin looked so blotchy which would just cover up my blotchiness but would not treat it. But now I just use the selenium and I have a emollient called MD Lactin that works really well. Whenever I have an outbreak, I just put a little dab on my skin and it goes away.
      So I guess you should just talk to your dermatologist and see what treatment you can get and if they can prescribe you an effective emollient.


treatments for seborrhea

Keratosis Pilaris Research

Despite getting equal use of healthcare through military medical health insurance, black women with cancer of the breast are not as likely than whitened women to get certain aggressive remedies, based on the findings of new research.

The scientists, based at Walter Reed Military Clinic and also the National Cancer Institute, in comparison remedies for cancer of the breast among 2300 whitened ladies and nearly 400 black ladies who had medical health insurance with the Department of Defense, either as people from the military or as members' receivers.

Black and whitened women were equally prone to have whether breast-getting rid of surgery (a mastectomy) or perhaps a surgery that leaves a lot of breast intact.

However, black ladies who had growths which had spread at night breast were not as likely to get chemotherapy or hormonal therapy additionally towards the surgery.

Previous work has recognized racial differences among women with cancer of the breast, particularly, discovering that black women are not as likely to get aggressive treatment and more prone to die in the disease.

The reason why of these inequities vary from greater rates of poverty to reduce rates of medical health insurance to some greater probability of getting hypertension.

However in this situation, "you are able to remove the table use of healthcare," stated Colonel Craig Shriver, the main from the breast care center at Walter Reed Military Clinic and among the authors from the study. "Among the primary options that come with the military healthcare system...is access isn't a problem."

Shriver's group found, nevertheless, that whenever breast surgery, the black patients whose cancer had spread at night breast were 60 % not as likely to get chemotherapy and 50 % not as likely to get hormonal therapy than whitened patients concentrating on the same cancer.

Black ladies who had growths limited towards the breast were just like prone to receive chemotherapy and hormonal therapy as whitened women.

The research, that was released within the journal Cancer, didn't see whether these variations in treatment led to better or worse final results for that patients.

Shriver told Reuters Health he does not know why the therapy differed between your black and whitened patients with advanced cancer.

One potential explanation "is the fact that they are on offer the therapy, but they are not accepting it," Shriver offered.

For the reason that situation, cultural factors may be impacting on women's options.

"We ought to explore further what individuals might be," Shriver stated.

There's also the potential of an information collection problem. If your patient has private insurance additionally to insurance with the Department of Defense, the non-public insurance could be charged first, and Shriver's team wouldn't have the ability to track that woman's treatment.

Dr. Ismail Jatoi, a professor in the College of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, agreed that he'd want to see more research to probe the reason why for various cancer of the breast remedies.

"I believe you need to realise why we are seeing these kinds of versions," stated Jatoi, who had been not involved with this research. "It'll increase the to the widening understanding of healthcare differences and where you should be likely to reduce health differences."

More about women breast cancer , soy and breast cancer , metastatic breast cancer treatment

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What are some Over the Counter treatments for Keratosis Pilaris?
    From doing some research, and looking at pictures, I believe I have keratosis pilaris (on my thighs). What are some over the counter treatments that work well to cure keratosis pilaris?

    • ANSWER:
      Because it is hereditary, there is no way to cure or prevent keratosis pilaris. However, it may lessen over time with age.

      In some patients, the condition clears up on its own. When it does not, patients may choose to seek treatment for cosmetic reasons. There are several treatments aimed at softening the keratin deposits in the skin to improve its appearance. They include:

      Moisturizing lotions. Dry skin makes the condition worse, so applying moisturizer twice daily is important. Lotions that contain urea help the skin retain moisture and products that contain lactic acid or salicylic acid help to dissolve and exfoliate the keratin. Moisturizer should be applied immediately after bathing.

      Loofah sponges or brushes. Rubbing the affected areas after a long soak in a hot bath may help to unclog the plugged hair follicles.

      Topical retinoids. Class of chemical compounds that are chemically related to vitamin A. These drugs regulate skin growth but can be very irritating.

      These are just a couple of the available treatment for keratosis pilaris. Take a look at this site for some additional information that I think you'll find helpful : ) It's great that you're educating yourself!

      http://skin.health.ivillage.com/acneblemish/keratosispilaris.cfm

  2. QUESTION:
    What is the best product for Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris on my buttocks and I have been researching different products. There are quite a few and I don't know which to go with. There's Glytone, KP duty, Biotreatment. Has anyone had success with any of these or a better product? I have dark olive skin and I scar very easily...even without picking, so I'm hoping for a product that helps with that as well.

    • ANSWER:
      I know how you feel. I had Keratosis Pilaris too and always wore long sleeves even when it was really hot. I started using Paula's Choice 2% BHA and it cleared up completely within a few weeks. I don't know if it works for everyone, but it seems to work for a lot of people. I've told several people about it and it has worked for everyone I've told. It is a fairly common thing.

      I started with their liquid formula but I also have used their 2% BHA body lotion. I recommend the liquid to start. You can find out a lot more about KP and the various treatments and products here: http://cosmeticscop.paulaschoice.com/keratosis-pilaris-solutions.aspx

      Good Luck!

  3. QUESTION:
    How to reduce sight of Keratosis Pilaris?
    I've had red bumps on my arms for years now, and after much online research, I've come to the conclusion that these bumps are Keratosis Pilaris.

    I'm wanting to know how to reduce the sight of them. I've heard using a scrub with a loofah helps, but what kind of scrub? Also, I heard lotion helps, but I'm not sure what kind...Cetaphil, Eucerin, AmLactin, etc.

    I'd appreciate any advice! Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      I have had KP for a very long time and I have tried everything to get rid of it. But I have recently discovered a lotion called KP Duty. After two days, the red bumps were gone completely and the redness was reduced. It has been a week and the redness has been greatly reduced. However, the lotion is a bit pricey () but it does spread easily so you don't need a lot of it. Hope this helps. :)

  4. QUESTION:
    Anyone know how to get rid of the little white bumps on my arms?
    I have what i believe is "keratosis pilaris". I have researched and found medicines they say may work, but i was wondering if anyone has had this problem and if anything worked for you.

    • ANSWER:
      I believe you are right. My son has this, and his father did. I think it is or can be hereditary. They are probably located on your outer upper arms. I have read before that a salicylic acid body wash could help. If it were me, I would go to a skin clinic, not necessarily a dermatology clinic and ask them if having laser treatment would help get rid of them. They use it for facial acne and it would be more tolerable to have it done on your arms that the sensitive area that is your face. My son has developed MRSA from using to many antibiotics over the years and often prescribed for these bumps which did not help. A chemical peel could be another option

  5. QUESTION:
    Will there ever be a cure for Keratosis Pilaris?
    Keratosis Pilaris is a skin disorder which you are born with it. I am aware there are treatments, but I'm wondering will somebody make a cure for it to vanish off my skin forever?

    • ANSWER:
      Probably not. It is not life threatening. So most pharmaceutical companies wouldn't bother with the research to find a cure or develop more specific treatments. You could go to college and go into research yourself and make this a priority though. It often takes someone with a personal interest in something to find a breakthrough.

  6. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of my Keratosis pilaris?!?
    I'm 16 & i have Keratosis pilaris, I really hate it because im embarrassed to show my arms. Is there any creams or anything that will help me get rid of it or at least make it less noticeable?

    • ANSWER:
      I too, have KP, and you are totally right--it is embarrassing. Take heart, however, because something like 50% of us have it. Here are some treatment hints:

      --lotion may help improve the symptoms, because dry weather worsens them
      --DO NOT use OTC acne meds. KP is not acne, and the ingredients in these creams, etc. will only irritate and dry out your skin, making it even worse.
      --DO NOT pick at them! You'll be left with terrible scars.
      --if you go to the dermatologist, you'll probably be given a peel. This will help improve the condition temporarily, but since it's a chronic condition it won't be a cure. You can also buy products to help "stimulate turnover." The problem is that most of them are pretty expensive.

      I ended up doing a bunch of research and developed a product that has worked really well for me. You have to use it twice a day, but I've found an 85-90% improvement (and it started to work almost immediately). You can buy it here:
      http://www.etsy.com/listing/66157122/miracle-serum-20-oz
      I bottle should last you a few months, if you are using the right amounts.

      You can also try some of the products listed here:
      http://www.helpforkp.com/keratosis_pilaris_treatment_index.html
      but since I've not tried any of them, I can't vouch for them. Good luck!

  7. QUESTION:
    CHICKEN SKIN aka KERATOSIS PILARIS, how do I get rid of these suckers?
    Does anyone know how to reduce the appearence of chicken skin or also known as keratosis pilaris. I hate having chicken skin, it's so embarassing. I hate showing my arms and legs or any part that has it. ARRRGH! Anyone else have this problem? Please help, I need some magic lotion or something to get rid of them somehow.

    • ANSWER:
      I have it too & it sucks!! I have previously used Am Lactin or Lac Hydrin, Retin-A based creams, and KP duty. The KP duty used to work for me, but doesn't any longer. It might work you you & is available at Sephora.

      Check out http://www.keratosispilaris.org/

      I found this online and am going to give it a try.

      - First I use a thick loofah sponge or buff-puff on the affected areas. I do this daily and I only use Dove Nutrium Body Wash with my sponge. I have tried several moisturizing body washes, and this one has proven to be the best for me. It is a dual formula that contains a gentle cleanser and a moisturizing lotion at the same time. It works great. When using the sponge, scrub as hard as you can on the affected area, and in a circular motion. Exfoliation is very important, especially since the affected areas are so dry. (Note: Dove has also recently come out with a Dove Nutrium Bar! So now I use both, and they are great. They make my skin so soft and silky, and the moisturizers are very good for the keratosis pilaris.)

      - After I exfoliate with this body wash, I then apply an over the counter lotion that has worked wonders for my keratosis pilaris. Neutrogena makes this lotion and it’s called “Multi-Vitamin Acne Treatment”. I know what you are thinking; keratosis pilaris is not acne. No it’s not, but for some reason this stuff works. In my reading and research on the subject, I ran across a treatment that recommended using a moisturizer that contained a small amount of salicylic acid. This product contains both. It is full of vitamins and moisturizers that are great for your skin, and it also contains this salicylic acid. If you apply this lotion right after you have scrubbed with the Dove Nutrium, it will give you results within 2 or 3 days. It did for me!

      - I also apply the Neutrogena Multi Vitamin Acne Treatment at night before going to bed. So I am applying it twice a day, once after showering and exfoliating, and once at bedtime.

      - Adding a humidifier in your bedroom will also help to clear your skin. The moisture will hydrate your dry skin while you sleep at night and help in clearing up the keratosis pilaris.

      - This next “treatment” is one I have found on my own and doctors do not recommend it. I am not telling anyone to do this, I am simply telling you what has worked in clearing up my skin condition. Tanning in the sun or in a tanning bed/salon. I like to tan anyway, so by trial and error I found that it cleared my skin. I started going to a tanning bed 2 or 3 times a week at first, and then dropped down to once a week. Each time I would tan for 12 to 15 minutes. That is not a lot of exposure, and it cleared my skin better than ANYTHING else I have ever done. I still have occasional problems with my arms, but my legs cleared right up and those bumps have never returned to this day, and I have not tanned in over 6 months. So I am very pleased with these results.

      Again, I am not recommending or condoning tanning or sunbathing, but I am telling you that it has helped to clear up my terrible case of Keratosis Pilaris.

      Doing these things consistently has helped me tremendously, but if you miss a day, you pay! Consistency is the key.

  8. QUESTION:
    Is there any facial mask i can make at home easily?
    I have keratosis pilaris alba, which is rough bumpy skin, is there a facial mask i can make that will make it go away? I don't have coconut, orange juice, lemons, papaya, honey, tea, none of that stuff. Is there any facial mask that doesn't take that stuff that i can make myself?

    • ANSWER:
      I've been doing some research and I don't believe that there is a home remedy that will give you the results you're looking for. You may need medical treatment if you want it to fully go away. The simplest thing I found that meets your request was to just exfoliate you skin gently. Though if you want treatment with results, you might have to see your doctor. My sister has those bumps on her arms, so my mom took her to Sephora and bought her certain products to help it. Though she spent like 0 on everything, and my sister has those bumps still. In my opinon, I think they just tell you that it'll go away to make a quick buck. My sister just deals with it now.

  9. QUESTION:
    If I talk to my doctor about kp will she perscribe me something?
    I'm 13 and still go to a pediatrician, so will she prescribe me a cream or pill to get rid of them?
    By the way, in case you don't know, kp stands for keratosis pilaris, which are hard plugs in hair follicles that, frankly, look like pimples.

    • ANSWER:
      ya ok so im 14 and when I went to my doctor she gave me a bunch of things but in the end they didn't help at all. So i researched some more and it says its impossible to completely get rid of them but there are things that help like there're over priced creams and scrubs from the dema doctor some people said that dream cream from lush helped and others say 100% pure coconut oil worked for them but frankly non of these have worked for me .Some people even said that it was because they were allergic to certain food items or that people with kp are vitamin a deficient because r body's can't absorb it normally but we can't absorb it normally because we are missing essential oils in r body so i tried having omega supplements and vitamin a supplements but that didn't work either and i started getting really annoyed since i have it on my face arms and legs!! Also, apparently this vitamin a cream works rlly well but i haven't tried it since its 40 buck for a sample tube!! and it doesn't cure kp, it only makes it look better and after you stop using the vitamin a cream ur kp comes back after a week. i myself keep trying to find inexpensive ways to cure my kp but, it hasn't been going that well. what kinda works for me was dream cream from lush but it only made my skin smooth but the kp was still really visible and the h2o raspberry guava moisturizing body balm which has made my kp look dramatically less visible!!

      hope this helps!!

      ~Stephanie

  10. QUESTION:
    who knows about the skin disease called keratosis pilaris?
    ok, so i've done some research...
    and im pretty sure i have it,
    but i just don't get one thing...
    the disease causes bumps on the skin, but it's hereditary.
    so if the bumps go away,
    does that mean that they will always come back?

    • ANSWER:
      It seems like they will come back, since they are genetic. Retin-A has helped a friend of mine who had this on her shoulders. You could also use alpha-hydroxy stuff to prevent further stuff.

      My general impression is that if you don't exfoliate, it will come back.

  11. QUESTION:
    How can I get rid of Keratosis Pilaris on my arms?
    I know you can't get rid of it in a snap.
    But what are good ways to reduce it so your arms don't look so..... Bumpy, Red and gross?

    • ANSWER:
      Jonbeha,
      There is no available cure, miracle pill, or universally effective treatment for KP. It sometimes clears completely by itself without treatment. The exact cause of KP is unknown. There seems to be a problem with overproduction of the keratin part of the skin called hyperkeratinization. KP is thought to be partly inherited (genetic) in origin. Many treatment options and skin-care recipies are available for controlling the symptoms of KP. Many patients have very good temporary improvement following a regular skin-care program of lubrication. As a general rule of thumb, treatment needs to be continuous. Since there is no available cure or universally effective treatment for KP, the list of potential lotions and creams is long. It is important to keep in mind that as with any condition, no therapy is uniformly effective in all people.

      ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED.

      It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms.

      The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions.

      Hope this helps
      matador 89

  12. QUESTION:
    What helps keratosis pilaris?
    I have these little, skin-colored; some pink, bumps all over my upper arms. They have been there for most of my childhood and throughout my teenage years. I have done research and found that is is keratosis pilaris. I've heard that most people outgrow it and that there is no real "cure." But, if anyone has had an experience with pilaris, and knows some solutions; PLEASE help me out. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      this is a difficult one my son has been diagnosed with this after almost a year of trying to get rid of these bumps with scrubs, sun exposure. our gp referred him to a dermatologist and she has prescribed a 3 month course of Lymecycline (an antibiotic) and Retinol gel to be applied twice a day. hes only been using it a week so difficult to see any improvement yet .

  13. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris people----did you ever grow out of yours? How long/when did you find out you have it? ?
    I really want to get rid of it. Even though i am using
    Carmol 20, and it does an amazing job at getting the bumps away, the redness on my arms and the very bottom of my face still shows. :(

    Anyone have any succes/failure stories? I'd be interested to hear about anything regarding this.. :)

    • ANSWER:
      I have a little on my arm too so I did some research and supposedly girls can make it less visible then guys. I don't think their is a success story since there is no known way to get rid of it.

  14. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of keratosis Pilaris and scaring?
    I have had kp since I was 6 months old, I am now 14! It didn't used to bother me to much when I was younger, it wasn't that noticeable. I have it on my upper arms my tighs and my face, it's liveable not so red more bumpy than anything, but with certain scrubs and the occasional pick they have scabbed and I always pick them so they have scarred that was about a year ago, so that's only on my upper arms, I then went on holiday couple months after and they tanned, I have used bio oil since then and it's defiantly less visible but I was wondering firstly how to get rid of kp tried everything and then how to get rid or make scarrs less visible ? Thanks x

    • ANSWER:
      Sorry to hear about your condition. Apparently, it goes away when you get older, but of course, you'd wanna be relieved off it as much as you could before then.

      I'm guessing you've already done some online research, but lemme just share some info I found, in case you haven't come across them yet.

      According to Dr. Myers in this article from Mind, Body, Green, KP is a symptom/sign of gluten intolerance http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-7482/10-signs-youre-gluten-intolerant.html

      Have you heard about this, and tried improving your diet? High-gluten food (if you go through the whole article) isn't really healthy for anyone anyway, so try cutting out or reducing your intake of food with any wheat or flour. That might make you sad, but lots of people are doing that and their skin problems dramatically improve, not to mention experience a big improvement in having more energy & weight-loss. The typical American food has so much processed & refined starches. It's best to avoid or cut back on eating them (less bread, pasta, baked goodies, fast food, junk food, etc) and eat more fresh, whole foods that's not so processed.

      One of the best sites to explore on health is http://www.naturalnews.com/ There's a search field there you can use. A few articles that came up under KP talked about lots of skin problems, and there are reports of people having good results using Coconut Oil (virgin, organic -- I get mine from Trader Joe's cuz they sell things cheaper there than any other natural-products store) on their skin. It generally helps heal skin, so it could be good for KP & new scars. Tea Tree Oil also came up as an effective remedy to treat or reduce KP symptoms.

      For scars, I recommend aloe vera, coconut oil, cocoa butter, & vitamin e oil. There are also skin care products for scars. I use a homeopathic scar control medicine oil for my scars/keloids, while others use store-bought creams with dimethicone (a silicone oil that reduces scars). Wish I could help you find & get these, but good luck.

      Hope this helps...

  15. QUESTION:
    What are good treatments for keratosis pilaris?
    Hey, I have KP on my arms and a little on my face, (but not so much to really notice)..but I can't say the same for my arms,(they're pretty noticeable) soo..I was wondering if there are any GOOD TREATMENTS because unfortunately there is NO CURE!!!

    Oh and Im 13 soooo I would really like to wear a swim suit without being self-consious about my arms...

    Thanks a lot:)

    • ANSWER:
      Hi! ohmygosh, I had the exact same question about a week ago. Im 16, and Ive never really thought too much about KP, until I found out im taking a trip to california in a couple weeks, and I want to try really hard to look good in a bikini as well!

      The appearance of KP can be decreased by these main ingredients: urea, lactic acid, glycolic acid, salicylic acid, tretinoin, or vitamin D These are all keratosis fighting substances that rid your skin of those pesky little keratosis-clogged pores.

      the first four can be found in moisturizers. My tip to you would be to find a moisturizer high in one or several of these ingredients (that means anywhere from 5% of an ingredient to 15%). Vitamin D is found in sunlight, so being in the sun will help a lot (Just don't get sunburned, lol) When I went to taiwan a year ago, I noticed that along with my tan, my kp was completely gone! my skin was baby smooth, and it had never been that way before. I didn't know why, but after some research, I realized Vitamin D helps a lot with KP.

      I have been struggling with KP for almost my entire life, so i can understand the frustration and embarrassment you might experience from having this condition.

      Along with moisturizing day and night with lotions high in those ingredients, I also follow the advice given in this youtube video:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_5S3gmUrXk

      I've only been using her treatment for about 2 days, but my appearance of KP has already decreased tons! Im thinking that by another week, it'll be completely gone :). Oh, and in the video, the girl mentions clearasil's ultra exfoliating scrub. Unfortunately, that product was only available in Canada, so i was pretty disappointed. But then I realized that clearasil's ultra acne scrub is the same thing as the exfoliating scrub. It just has a different name I guess because of different locations.

      Anyways, good luck! I hope this helps with your KP, and that we both look good in time for bikni season :)

  16. QUESTION:
    I need help with keratosis pilaris?
    I have bad keratosis pilaris on my butt and thighs. And mildly on my chest, arms and legs but only because i'm tan. I need to know good things to do like what products to use or what vitamins to take. I already know that it's a genetic condition with no cure and i've already been to the dermatologist but it wasn't much help. Any info. would help. Thanks.
    everything has a cure but they aren't all discovered yet. Cancer doesn't have a cure yet.

    • ANSWER:
      I am a student of Sports Medicine and a future practitioner, so I might be able to give you some useful information. Research has not shown vitamins to be useful in treating keratosis pilaris. However, Vitamin A deficiency has been shown to lead to symptoms similar to those of keratosis pilaris. But it's unlikely that supplementing with Vitamin A will help, and it is possible to supplement with so much Vitamin A that it becomes toxic, so be careful if you decide to try that route. Otherwise, I would suggest gentle exfoliation to loosen the dead skin cells that may be entrapping the keratin at the opening of the hair follicles--you could do this with a loofa or a pumice stone. Use gentle, soap-free cleansers or body wash products. It may help to use some sort of moisturizer as well, i.e. Vasaline. You can treat it but can't cure it with these things---however, over time, it should disappear, especially if you are in adolescence or early adulthood.

  17. QUESTION:
    Can someone tell me what I can use to get rid of or reduce the appearance of keratosis pilaris?
    I've had the problem for a few years and its really affecting my confidence any advice? I know there is no cure for it but Ive tried Vaseline aloe vera, diprobase, emulsifine etc

    • ANSWER:
      Hello,

      I am not a doctor, but wanted to let you know what did, and did not work for me.

      I’ve always had “gross” arms. The back of them always seem to have a smooth rash of purple or red dots/patches. (I wouldn’t call them ‘bumps’.) During the summer, when I tan, the rash disappears and a more pleasing “freckle” look appeared. I later found out the “rash” was KP. I would say I have a moderate case.

      I did the research to find what would help reduce it, even though I know there is no cure. Here is what I have found:

      What works:

      Prescription MOMETASONE FUROATE CREAM USP, 0.1%. I was prescribed this ointment for another rash. (Ugh! I have every skin ailment you can imagine, it seems.) Trained through years of hopeful trying, I also applied it to my KP just to see. And, it worked! The rash visibly lightened, to the point that, if you’re not looking, you may not know it’s there! Thank goodness! I’d say I STARTED to results in a week (7 days, no-fail applying.)

      I recently ran out of the ointment, and the KP has come back. So it’s definitely not a cure, it just keeps it at bay.

      Don’t get all hopeful and think the ointment is miraculous – the KP is still definitely there, but it has lightened so much that I would gladly wear a tank top or sleeveless dress/top without being self conscious.

      What HASN’T worked:

      I’ve done a lot of research, and have found a lot of suggestions. The following suggestions haven’t worked for me (but, may work for you.)

      Exfoliating (lightly) with Neutrogena Oil-Free Acne Wash Cleanser Contains salicylic acid. (With “MicroClear Technology,” no less! What does that even mean?! Last time I checked, have a “clear” product didn’t require groundbreaking technology! Ha!)

      Cleansing and lightly exfoliating with Clean and Clear Continuous Control acne cleanser.

      Paula’s Choice Exfoliating 2% BHA Lotion.

      MG127 Medicated tar ointment (I use this for psoriasis.)

      Prescription Ammonium Lactate Cream, 12%.

      I hope this information has helped you! This condition is such a bummer! I hate it! Again, I’m not a doctor, and am not even making any recommendations. I just have listed what has worked for me!

  18. QUESTION:
    Since keratosis pilaris is caused by a vitamin A deficiency, would eating food with vitamin A clear it?
    Like carrots, eggs, milk, etc? Would it help at all?

    • ANSWER:
      Aeris,
      I feel sure that if you would kindly publish your source for the statement that – “Keratosis pilaris is caused by a vitamin A deficiency,” all of us in the medical profession would be most grateful and interested to amend our present knowledge. I was under the impression, up until now, that the exact cause of Keratosis pilaris – KP, is unknown. It presents as a problem with overproduction of the keratin part of the skin called hyperkeratinization. An excess of the protein known as Keratin, accumulates within the hair follicles forming numerous tiny rough bumps on the skin. Sometimes, these bumps can become irritated causing the follicles to redden excessively. KP, up until now, has been thought to be partly inherited (genetic) in origin. About 50%-70% of patients with KP have a known genetic predisposition and a high rate of affected family members. Many individuals have a strong family history of KP or "chicken skin." The underlying cause may partly be related to hypersensitivity reactions and overall dryness of the skin. KP is also closely related to ichthyosis vulgaris, dry skin, allergies, seasonal allergies, rhinitis, asthma, eczema, and atopic dermatitis. So to learn that it is a vitamin A deficiency is both enlightening and pleasing. I look forward to your imminent post with the details and link and/or address and name of trhe medical establishment where this discovery was made, and the medical personnel responsible for this breakthrough.

      ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED.

      It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms.

      The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions.

      Hope this helps
      matador 89

  19. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of the annoying red bumps on the outsides of my arms?
    I have developed these clusters of red bumps on the outside of my arms, how can I get rid of them?

    • ANSWER:
      it's probably keratosis pilaris if they don't hurt or itch. They are very common. alot of teens have it. Some adults too. there's no cure. Sorry, but there's not. I have it too and it sucks. Try exfoliating a few times a week and you could try oil pulling. Some people say it cures there KP.

      Do some research online to see if it's what you have or not

  20. QUESTION:
    Is Keratosis Pilaris pretty much what razor bumps looks like?
    Award best detailed answer. Please use much detail. It's for personal research.

    • ANSWER:
      No not really, it tends to be not as red as razor bumps can be. Also the bumps are much smaller. It can almost look like small goosebumps. Maybe other people have it where it gets really red, probably because they scratch it a lot, but mine never gets too red.

      Just look up some images on Google.

  21. QUESTION:
    What are these bumps on my arms and how do I get rid of them?
    I have these weird bumps all over my upper arms and they're starting to spread to my forearms. I've always had them. They're red and sometimes white. I can scratch them off, but it doesn't do any good--there are too many and scratching doesn't really get rid of them. What are they? Can I get rid of them? My mom said they might be from not getting enough vitamins, but I don't think that's it. One of my sisters has them too I think, but no one else in my family does.

    • ANSWER:
      There is a large variety of skin conditions; so large that no one here can answer you so easily, at least without pictures. The best thing you can do is use Google to extensively research the symptoms. Such as, "red/white bumps, skin condition, itches" or whatever is the exact case. When you find a list of possible things it could be, look at them and look for pictures. Compare. If it looks like it's possibly it, use google image search on the terms you find.

      Or just go to a doctor who may refer you to a specialist.

      It sounds like this may be it:
      http://beauty.about.com/od/skinflaws/f/whitebumps.htm

      Keratosis Pilaris. This is google's image search results.

      http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&source=hp&q=keratosis+pilaris&gbv=2&aq=f&oq=&aqi=g9

      Unfortunately, it says it is incurable as it is hereditary. But it is treatable.

      Good luck.

  22. QUESTION:
    whats the difference between salycilic acid and benzoyl peroxide and which one is better?
    what do each do? Which one is more effective in acne clearing?

    • ANSWER:
      Salicylic acid is the chemical compound with the formula C6H4(OH)CO2H, where the OH group is adjacent to the carboxylic acid group. This colorless crystalline organic acid is widely used in organic synthesis and functions as a plant hormone. It is probably best known as a compound that is chemically similar but not identical to the active component of aspirin. The name derives from the latin word for the willow tree (Salix), from whose bark it can be obtained.

      Contents

      * 1 Medicinal and cosmetic uses
      * 2 Other uses
      * 3 See also
      * 4 References
      * 5 External links

      [edit] Medicinal and cosmetic uses

      Also known as beta hydroxy acid (compare to AHA), salicylic acid is the key additive in many skin-care products for the treatment of acne, psoriasis, callouses, corns, keratosis pilaris and warts. It treats acne by causing skin cells to slough off more readily, preventing pores from clogging up. This effect on skin cells also makes salicylic acid an active ingredient in several shampoos meant to treat dandruff. Use of straight salicylic solution may cause hyperpigmentation on unpretreated skin for those with darker skin types (Fitzpatrick phototypes IV, V, VI), as well as with the lack of use of a broad spectrum sunblock.[1][2]

      The medicinal properties of salicylate (mainly for fever relief) have been known since ancient times. The substance occurs in the bark of willow trees; the name salicylic acid is derived from salix, the Latin name for the willow tree. [3]
      Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid)
      Enlarge
      Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid)
      Cotton pads soaked in salicylic acid can be used to chemically exfoliate skin
      Enlarge
      Cotton pads soaked in salicylic acid can be used to chemically exfoliate skin

      Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid or ASA) can be prepared by the esterification of the phenolic hydroxyl group of salicylic acid.

      Subsalicylate in combination with bismuth form the popular stomach relief aid known commonly as Pepto-Bismol. When combined the two key ingredients help control diarrhea, nausea, heartburn, and even gas. It is also very mildly anti-biotic.

      Toxicological effects of 100% salicylic acid, however, are mostly harmful. It is harmful by ingestion, inhalation, and through skin absorption. It acts as an irritant, and chronic effects have shown 100% salicylic acid to have mutagenic effects (DNA damage), and act as a sensitizer (allergic reactions after repeated exposure). This is why most acne treatment medication uses a percent range of 2-5 in solution.

      Other uses

      * Salicylic acid is toxic if ingested in large quantities, but in small quantities is used as a food preservative and antiseptic in toothpaste. For some people with salicylate sensitivity even these small doses can be harmful.

      Benzoyl peroxide, like most peroxides, is a powerful bleaching agent. Contact with fabric (including clothing and bed linens) or hair can cause permanent color dampening almost immediately. At high concentrations, benzoyl peroxide is highly flammable and explosive and should be handled with care. In the United States, the monograph for benzoyl peroxide is 2.5% to 10% for both prescription and over the counter use.

      [edit] Uses

      Benzoyl peroxide is effective in the treatment of most forms of acne. It is typically placed over the affected areas in gel or cream form, in concentrations of 2.5% increasing through the usually effective 5% to up to 10%. Research suggests that 5 and 10% concentrations are not significantly more effective than 2.5% and 2.5% is usually better tolerated.[1][2] It commonly causes initial dryness and sometimes irritation, although skin tolerance usually occurs after a week or so. A small percentage of people are much more sensitive to it and liable to suffer burning, itching, peeling and possibly swelling[3]. It is sensible to apply the lowest concentration and build up as appropriate. Once tolerance is achieved, increasing the quantity or concentration a second time and gaining tolerance at a higher level usually gives better subsequent acne clearance. Benzoyl peroxide works as a peeling agent, increasing skin turnover and clearing pores, thus reducing the bacterial count there as well as directly as an antibacterial.

      Other common uses for benzoyl peroxide include dyeing hair, and as an active ingredient in teeth whitening systems. It is also used in the preparation of flour, and can be used as an initiator and catalyst for polyester thermoset resins (as an alternative to the much more hazardous methyl ethyl ketone peroxide).

  23. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of bumpy skin?
    The upper half of my arms is quite bumpy. They feel like small pimples, but they are not lol.
    Are there any NATURAL remedies to get smooth skin?
    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      You have what's called keratosis pilaris, research it a bit. It is hereditary and there is not a cure for it.
      About 40 to 50 percent of the world has it. IT IS TREATABLE. Lot's of people in my family have it. My cousin told me that she used this mineral called ALUM to treat it. When I looked at her arms there wasn't a trace of the bumps anywhere!!! I use alum too, as a face mask. Alum can be bought at almost any store that sells spices and stuff( I got mine at this Afghan market) or order it online:)
      It is usually in a rough powder form when you buy it. I grind up the alum so it becomes softer and then mix it with water so it is like a watery paste like thing. Then I apply it on my face,once it drys on your skin it will be flaky. I sleep with this mask on and then in the morning I wash it off with face wash.
      It does tend to whiten skin a bit. Do the same thing I did except put it on your arms. Alum can be used for more than just keratosis pilaris, so research that as well, it is very useful. Hope this helps.

  24. QUESTION:
    How do i get rid permanently of red dry bumpy skin?
    ever since i was little i have had this type of skin on the sides of my face, all over my arms, and some parts of my chest and i want it gone. ive tried everything, can someone plz recommend something to make it go away

    • ANSWER:
      You might have Keratosis Pilaris.

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris:
      1. Keratosis pilaris rubra: red, inflamed bumps
      2. Keratosis pilaris Alba: rough, white, bumpy skin
      3. Keratosis pilaris rubra faceii: reddish rash over the cheeks

      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris. However, there are effective treatments available that make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Most of the available treatments are purely symptomatic; the one thing they all have in common is need for repetition and ongoing commitment. Some seeking treatment with the disorder may be prescribed Tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream, often by request.

      Triamcinolone, most commonly sold under the trade name Aristocort, is a synthetic corticosteroid medically approved as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of eczema, which also reduces the amount of keratin in pores. It may be of most help to those with keratosis pilaris by reducing red, inflamed bumps. Triamcinolone is typically applied three times a day.

      Tretinoin, most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by causing the outer layer of the skin to grow more rapidly, which decreases the amount of the protein keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. As keratosis pilaris is manifested through excess keratin in the skin, Tretinoin forms a more effective and core approach to treatment than Triamcinolone, which forms a largely symptomatic approach. Tretinoin is typically applied once a day before bed.

      An alternative treatment is Adapalene, a retinoid medication that is a more stable compound, is less sunlight-sensitive, has fewer general side-effects, and may be just as effective as Retin-A. Treatment of KP with Adapalene would be considered an "off-label" use of the medication.

      As with Triamcinolone, Tretinoin or any other treatment, once therapy is discontinued, the condition reverts to its original state. However, skin treated with Tretinoin may take several weeks or more to revert to its pre-treatment condition, but may, at the same time, take several weeks or more to show optimal results, with the condition commonly worsening initially, as underlying keratin is brought to the surface of the skin. Tretinoin is considerably more expensive and dispensed in smaller quantities than Triamcinolone and other treatments. Although it may be the most effective treatment for keratosis pilaris, it is not considered the first line of treatment.

      Keratosis pilaris has not been clinically researched for treatment in an unbiased manner, with all claims of success or improvement being purely marketed or anecdotal. The condition is often dismissed outright by practitioners as being presently untreatable, giving mere moisturizing suggestions or reassurance that the condition will improve or cease with age, typically after 30. General practitioners are often unable to identify the condition. Ignorance, accompanied with the price, availability, quantity dispensed, time taken for optimal results to be achieved, more serious side-effects, adverse reactions, and worsening of the condition in the initial treatment phase - coupled with the cheaper, safer, and easier availability of other treatments - has hindered Tretinoin from showing its potential in the treatment of this condition.

      exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, creams, and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Beta hydroxy acids may help improve the appearance and texture of the afflicted skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to their containing lactic acid, a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may be helpful in moderation. Coconut oil may also be helpful if applied to afflicted areas while in the shower. Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, and, in many cases, will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing, such as tight-fitting jeans, is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

  25. QUESTION:
    How do you take care of bumps on arms and legs.?
    I have these bumps on my arms and legs and they drive me nuts! I just want to have clean smooth arms. Please somebody help me! I a dying here!

    • ANSWER:
      Do they feel like goosebumps except that they're there all the time? If this is the case then it's most likely keratosis pilaris. I've had this and it has been an absolute pain! I did some research on it online and with different doctors and estheticians and I've found out that there is, unfortunately, no cure :(
      There are treatments for it though. I have a rough loofah that I only use on my problem areas (only on those areas though, since it is too aggressive for the rest of the skin), and I use it every 4 days or so (again, no more than that since it is aggressive). I also use special lotion on those areas too, and it contains an ingredient called lactic acid. You can buy it over the counter at any drugstore. The best one I can suggest is called amlactin. I use this once or twice a week where the skin is rough, but no more since lactic acid is also somewhat aggressive and can cause damage when overdone.
      If you wax your legs instead of shaving, stop waxing for a while. This is something else I've tried while searching for the answer. Keratosis is actually caused by the inflamation of the hair roots, so anything you can do to calm your skin down will help.
      I had a pretty serious problem with this for a while, and it was at a point where I couldn't wear skirts or short sleeves 'cuz I was that embarassed. Now, though, I don't have any sign of it any more so I think that at least one of the things I mentioned above worked. I can't tell you specifically which one though since I kind of did them all at once :/ lol. Good luck!

  26. QUESTION:
    Will the goose bumps on Arms and legs ever go away?
    Me and some friends and my brothers have luke these goosebumps on our legs and arms that don't go away. So am I doing something wrong?Will they ever go away?

    • ANSWER:
      Not much of a description, but sounds like Keratosis Pilaris. You can find info about it here: http://www.keratosispilaris.org

      You can use face scrubs and exfoliate often, or try using lotion two or three times daily. They're very hard to get rid of. Some people say if you get a lot of sun they'll go away, but I've never had much luck with that. Try researching it online, there are tons of methods. Good luck!

  27. QUESTION:
    how do i get rid of these red dots on the back of my arms ( around the tricep area )?
    I dont really know what they are theyre just red spots very small but alot of them. Ive seen other people with them so it shouldnt be anything bad, if youve had these before can you tell me what they are and how to get rid of them?

    • ANSWER:
      Its a skin disease called Keratosis Pilaris. Its from your body producing to much Keratin. Research it. It usually goes away with age. Use lots and lots of lotion on it. Buy a loofah (Its a scrubber thingy lol) take a hot bath and scrub your arms in a circular motion with soap. Sleep with a humidifyer. There is no cure just treatments that can help. Just research it.

  28. QUESTION:
    I am African-American and I have this unattractive dots on my leg...?
    I've been researching what the dots could be and I came across keratosis pilaris. Does anyone [of any other race] also have these random dots?

    • ANSWER:
      it can happen to people of other races, but it is more common in darker skinned people. which is why many african americans have this problem.

  29. QUESTION:
    There should be a cure for Keratosis Pilaris by now?
    You would think that if 40% of the WORLD population, about 2.4 BILLION people, have KP, that's a good enough reason to research a cure for it am I right? Come on, it's not like we're trying to cure cancer here, KP is just a skin disorder...

    • ANSWER:
      I have found a cure that works for me!! Other people need to try it to see if it works for other people too... I've been applying pure coconut oil for a few days (the stuff you eat) and my arms are completely smooth for the first time EVER!!! So excited

  30. QUESTION:
    Question about my Keratosis Pilaris?
    Okay, well, i have been wondering about my skin condition, Keratosis Pilaris. I did some research, and it says its mostly found on arms and thighs. My question is, I have it on my cheeks. Its not rosacea, because it is not red. Can anyone give me a diagnosis? And if possible what can treat it?

    • ANSWER:
      Even if it's on your face, it's still keratosis pilaris. The research did say it's MOSTLY found on arms and thighs, right? So that doesn't mean it can't be anywhere else. Anyway, the most common treatment is cream from a drugstore or even a doctor. Don't worry, it's common.
      :)

  31. QUESTION:
    What can I do for my keratosis pilaris? (KP)?
    Are there any moisturizers that work well? Home remedies? Something topical? Any help appreciated. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Uhh I know, I have it 2. I just researched it for u (u're welcome, lol) and I saw that taking a lofa and general soap (Baby Johnson Works good for me since I have sensitive skin) and rubbing it on your arms in the shower helps.

  32. QUESTION:
    How do i get rid of "chicken skin" on my arms?

    • ANSWER:
      Its called keratosis pilaris I believe. They sell this stuff called KP duty, research it as it has helped me with them as well. Also do not shave them, and next time you.shower, exfoliate gently to release the hairs trapped undet the skin.

  33. QUESTION:
    I have red cheeks with small bumps on them? How to get rid of them?
    Currently I'm using Aveeno's Clear Complexion foaming facial cleanser, and PONDS dry skin cream. I don't wear any face makeup as well. I was just wondering how to get rid of these small bumps (like little pimples, but really small) and it's dry. My skin would be almost pretty if I didn't have this. I really need help!
    Thanks:)

    • ANSWER:
      I use to have tiny bumps on the lower part of my cheek as well but after a while it completely went away. I'm not exactly sure what I did because it seemed to have gradually disappeared on it's own but I think you should try exfoliating your cheeks and moisturizing.

      I did some research before and I found this skin condition called Keratosis Pilaris which causes small, acne-like bumps. Maybe you could try to find out more about it? Definitely go to a dermatologist if you want to find out for sure though.

      Best of luck! (:

  34. QUESTION:
    can girls answer this for me really quick?
    ive been gettin this pimple like things that have nothing inside when i squich them and ive been researching and i found keratosis pilaris and im scared it could be that.how ever this started happened after i started birth control which i only took for 4 days and stopped.what could this be?

    • ANSWER:
      I think you should go see a doctor. You could have had some reaction to the birth control.

  35. QUESTION:
    Does keratosis pilaris go away?
    I noticed these bumps on my upper arms probably 2 or 3 months ago (they look like this http://www.pharmacy-and-drugs.com/illnessessimages/keratosis-pilaris1.jpg ). I thought they were acne at first but I found out about keratosis pilaris and I think that's what it is. They don't itch or hurt or anything, they're just kind of hard bumps. And I've had the same bumps for months now and they just stay there. How do you get rid of it?

    • ANSWER:
      If they are hard bumps (maybe the skin feels a bit rough), then yes, there's a good chance that you have keratosis pilaris. You should read as much as you can about kp, and look into treatment options (many of which not only cost you nothing, but you could start using them today!).

      New research has shown that diet can significantly improve kp bumps, also exercising, taking fish oil every day and not getting too much sun exposure (use a high SPF sunscreen).

  36. QUESTION:
    Does anybody have keratosis pilaris, if you do, how do you get rid of it?

    • ANSWER:
      To the brain child above---it's a SKIN CONDITION you don't die from it---GEEZ do some research before you answer a question....!!!!!! I have it, it is CHRONIC which means, no, you cannot get RID of it... Products used to treat keratosis pilaris include: Glycolic Acid (AHA), Lactic Acid, Urea, Vitamin A Treatments, Microdermabrasion. Other Recommended Treatments for Keratosis Pilaris Include:

      Glycolic Acid: MD Formulations Hand & Body Creme, Philosophy Soul Owner, MenScience Daily Body Wash, ZENMED™ AHA/BHA Complex,

      Kiss My Face Alpha and Aloe Oil Free Moisturizer, ZENMED™ Stretta

      Lactic Acid: AmLactin 12%, Epilyt Lotion, Aquaphor Baby Healing Ointment, LactiCare Lotion

      Urea: Carmol 10 Lotion, Carmol 20 Cream

      Vitamin A Treatments: Afirm 3X, SkinCeuticals Retinol 1.0 Microdermabrasion: Dermanew, L'Oreal ReFinish Chest, Arms & Hands, Neutrogena At Home MicroDermabrasion Body System

      Scar Treatments: Mederma, Cellex-C High Potency Serum, ZENMED™ Scar Treatment Kit

      Other: Tend Skin, Olay Complete Body Wash with Vitamins and Shea Butter for Extra Dry Skin, St. Ives Medicated Apricot Scrub, Peter Thomas Roth Silica Face & Body Polish, CLARISONIC Skin Care Brush, Juara Skincare Candlenut Body Polish

      Prescription Treatment

      » Salex 6% Cream & Lotion - keratolytic used to aid in removing excessive keratin in certain skin conditions.

      Cosmetics and Corrective Make-up

      » Dermablend » Sheer Cover

      I am rather lucky---I have a mild case---it is on my elbows and under my arms and on my thighs and inside my legs and various other places but on me it only looks like small red goosebumps

  37. QUESTION:
    Why do doctors keep saying that there is no cure for ANY disease?
    AIDS- no cure
    Diabetes- no cure
    Cancer- no cure
    Alzheimers-no cure
    Acid Reflux-no cure
    Autism - no cure
    Acne-no cure
    Keratosis Pilaris- no cure
    Exzema- no cure

    • ANSWER:
      I used to have bad eczema and I was prescribed a cream by my doctor that worked wonders and I no longer get eczema break outs, even in the winter time which was the worst. I always used to get raw, inflamed and flaky patches on my neck and arms but not anymore.

      I have a theory that there is a cure for most of those diseases but because charities are profitable, the money goes directly back into "research" and the cycle continues. Ever hear of a US president in this day and age dying of cancer or any other disease for that matter? I have no proof, it's just a theory.

      Daisy: I'm sure the people who died or had serious reactions because of thalidomide, TGN1412, Vioxx, Eraldin, Chloramphenid, Ibufenac, Flosint, Zipeprol, Zomax, Accutane, Benedectin, Phenformin and hundreds of other drugs that tested safe on animals are real thankful. Nothing that is tested on an animal is reliable until tested on a human: Fact. 750,000 people die every year because of reactions to common, over the counter medicines that test safely on animals. The majority, and I mean the overwhelming majority, of animal experiments lead absolutely no where. Here is an example of the things you support when you support animal testing:

      Beagles being forced to inhale radioactive material:
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19138039

      Plutonium dioxide being pumped into the lungs of beagles:
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8927705

  38. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris cream?
    Hi i've researched my skin issue and discovered what it is (Keratosis Pilaris) and was wondering if anyone knos the treatment? What type of creams are used? Please don't say go to your doctor, i only go once a year and would rather not waste a trip. Anyone know?

    • ANSWER:
      I use hommade body scrubs (sea salt, olive oil, body wash) twice a week before my shower. Exoliate every day. After, use lotion WITH the grain of your hair (downward motion). I've been told to use lotions with salsylic acid, but that hasn' done much for me. I little sun exposure seems to help (but I have read that it gets worse for some)

      You'll have random outbreaks here and there, but these things reduce them!

  39. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris?? Help!?
    Help! I have been researching about Keratosis Pilaris because I have some spots on my upper arms, I have learned that Keratosis pilaris causes RED bumps and patches on skin, "chicken skin", but when I observe my skin, the spots are not red, they are dark looking, not red, I only have them on my upper arms, and i used to have them on my thighs but now I dont, i have clear skin on my thighs, I went to the doctor and she told me they were sweat bumps? I tryed exfoliating but it doesnt seem to work. What ever they are I need some Help, advice, opinions, remedies or information that can be essential, stories from people who have had this? ALSO i learned that keratosis is hereditary, i asked my mom and she told me no one in my family has that! Well thanks alot!

    • ANSWER:

  40. QUESTION:
    Lotions for keratosis pilaris?
    I have this condition on all of my arms and legs since I was little and have been so embarrassed by it. I can never wear and t-shirts or shorts. I didn't know the name of what I have but finally I do: keratosis pilaris.
    I did many research and learned that keratosis pilaris cannot be cured but can be kept at bay. People are saying to use a loofah, moisturizers, and lotions and even to change your lifestlye (like staying away from dairy and wheat products and eating more things with vitamin a ).
    Can anybody tell me what kind of moisturizers and lotions that I can get that isn't prescribed by a doctor? So far I got names like Aveeno, Amlactin, Eucerin and Cocoa butter.

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      You're right that KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured, although it can be made less noticeable. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre…
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co…

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture in, such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin.
      Check out this site for some great, inexpensive, homemade exfoliants you can try anywhere on your body;
      - http://www.skinway.com/

      Do not scrub the affected areas too harshly. It's not the amount of pressure you apply to the area that matters, as much as it's the consistency of gently exfoliating those affected areas daily. Also, you would not want to bruise your sensitive skin.

      The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers (Hot water tends to dry out the skin) and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when the lower humidity tends to dry out the skin.

      Vaseline and other such petroleum-based products are NOT generally recommended as a moisturizer, because petroleum-based products actually suffocate the skin. Skin needs to breathe to heal. As well, if there's any bacteria on your skin when the Vaseline is applied, it makes a perfect breeding ground for the bacteria to grow.

      The moisturizers you've mentioned are good. You could also add olive oil to that list. Olive oil is a natural oil that will help moisturze but will not clog your pores.

      Make sure to be drinking more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc… And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3’s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3’s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 – 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-…

      Check out the sites below for more information....

  41. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris. I've done some research, and I found this product:

    http://skincarerx.com/review_box.html?pid=383

    My one concern is, will it be okay to tan if I use this?

    • ANSWER:
      You could try AmLactin or Lac Hydrin: Lactic acid provides a gentle peeling/sloughing effect - maybe you'll notice the tan doesn't last as long in areas where you use it. I don't think it makes your skin photo-sensitive. Be careful in the sun with glycolic acid based products:

      http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/ahaguid2.html#sunburn

  42. QUESTION:
    how do i get ride of karatosis polaris?
    i have it extremely bad and i try exfoliating and moisturizing and it wont even lighten up :( its soooo ugly please help me

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis Pilaris is not a pigment condition, so I am confused as to why you say "it wont even lighten up".

      Exfoliation is the key to treating KP, but I need to know which exfoliant you are using? Physical or chemical?

      Chemical exfoliant like salicylic acid or glycolic acid has better performance and research.

      Recommendation:

      Alpha Hydrox AHA Enhanced Lotion with 10% glycolic acid
      Glytone Body Lotion with 17.5% glycolic acid
      Any Paula's Choice exfoliant.

      Heavy lotions and moisturizers can clog pores and worsen KP. Careful.

  43. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris cured by Zithromax?
    My son was dx'd with keratosis pilaris at 6 months of age. When he was 13 months old he had to take Zithromax for an unrelated illness. This immediately cleared up his skin completely. I'm not a doctor, but if an antibiotic clears up a skin condition wouldn't that indicate that it is caused by a bacteria? He took other antibiotics after that, but none of them cleared his skin...just Zithromax. I have brought this to his doctor's attention twice and basically get a "huh, that's weird" answer and nothing else. I have to be on top of every little thing, b/c he also has autism and I need to always wonder if there is a relationship between all of these things. Any thoughts? I will be taking him to a ped. derm. soon, but thought I'd see if anyone had a similar experience first.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello , its not such a mystery to me , I believe that autism is an infection ,i have researched the subject for the last 6 years my conclusions are in my web site

      http://www.yeast-candida-infections-uk.co.uk/

      i hope you will have time to read it ,I have recently uploaded information that spells out how pathogens are trans-located from the gut to other organs .. The skin is the bodies largest organ [look in clinical evidence section of my site] I hope this helps ..if you can contact me if you wish through my site [contact us] Good health Paul

  44. QUESTION:
    Skin becomes raised and red when lightly scratched/rubbed..does any one have any idea what this could be?
    Hello all *
    I am doing some research for a friend of mine who has had this going on for years...he doesnt know what to do...i told him i would look into it for him...but im not finding much...symptoms are similar but not exact to Lichen nitidus and keratosis pilaris....so it could be a vitamin A deficiency....Has anyone ever heard of this???
    Help would be greatly appreciated...
    thank you so much in advance **

    • ANSWER:
      nothing is wrong with your friend...its normal.happens to me all the time

  45. QUESTION:
    keratosis pilaris diet?
    i have kp for 5 years now...... and i have done some research and i found out that some people got rid of their keratosis pilaris by changing their diet.......but i dont know what i can eat....

    help please

    • ANSWER:
      Many people with KP have found that different diets work for different people. But the main categories for diets are all protein, vegatarian-or all raw uncooked food, and no wheat or dairy. Again those are all seperate diets.

      Some people combined no meat eating with no dairy or wheat eating and found this to be very helpful.

      Also, you could try a gluten free way of eating. There are many gluten free diet books and many restaurants offer glutten free meals with gluten intolerance growing in our nation.

      Whatever you choose to do, you must hold to the diet each day and be on it for at least 5-6 months to see if it is working for you.

      There are also creams/lotions for KP.

      Hope this helps.

  46. QUESTION:
    Possibly Keratosis Pilaris?
    Okay, for as long as I can remember, I've had really big red bumps on my upper arms, thighs, shins, and lower back. I think they're red, at least; they might be red because my skin color is red, or maybe they'd be red anyway.

    Right. Anyway, I went to some doctors and they gave me cortizone shots with absolutely no effect, so they said there was nothing they could do. Now, I find out that I might have Keratosis Pilaris. Only one problem- KP is pretty common, but I have never seen anyone with what I have.

    It's like I have little shells where my hair follicles should be. Seriously, you can't cut me where the bumps are- it just glances off and scratches me (unless I get stabbed or something, I'm sure). It doesn't break skin.

    It's pretty ugly. I can pick them and release the hair inside, but it just grows back. This seems like KP on steiroids, because KP is, according to my research, mostly UNDER the skin, not on top of it.

    Could it be something else?

    • ANSWER:
      Yep, that sounds like KP. I have it also with eczema. I've learned to get used to it. Before I would pick at it to see if it would go away, but it won't. Just don't worry about it and accept it as part of who you are. To lessen the appearance of redness, moisterize the areas.

  47. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris?
    I'm 14 and i noticed these tiny little reddish bumps all over my arms especially at the back of my upper arm. my doctor told me it was keratosis pilaris but there was no cure for it.
    its pretty ugly to be honest and quite noticeable. ive researched it on the interent and its known as quite a hard thing to treat.but some people have found that some things like exfoliation work.
    what do you recommend? ive tried exfoliating it when i can and using a deep moisturizer. plus ive done a bit of sunbathing which is supposed to help but it made some of them go white! i tried putting on E45 which is for dry skin but still no luck. ive had it for a while now and it is really annoying!

    any help would be good. i live near boots and chemists. (im asthmatic) (some asthmatic people cant use certain creams my doc said apparantly but generally they are all fine)

    thanks for your help!

    • ANSWER:
      KP is very common, I have it as well. I also work for a dermatologist. The best thing for your arms would be a 6% salisylic acid lotion like Salex. It really softens up the skin and makes it much better which can be used once or twice a day. Occasionally you can use a 40% urea cream that will really soft it up but you would want to use that sparingly. Unfortunatly those are both perscription only. I don't think you can get much help from over the counter products good luck.

  48. QUESTION:
    tiny pus filled lumps on my arms?
    on the upper parts of my arms there are these things that resemble small pimples. They've been there all my life or at least since i was like 4. In the area where they occur the hair grows in pretty strange and sort of patchy so could it be a bunch of ingrown hairs or clogged pores?

    • ANSWER:
      It could be keratosis pilaris. It happens when your skin produces too much protein and you get small pimple like bumps on your skin.
      I suffered from it for a long time until I did some research and found out what it was. Now i exfoliate the area everyday and apply coconut oil.
      You can buy coconut oil at your local health store and make sure it's 100% virgin, organic coconut oil. After you exfoliate and before you get out of the shower, apply the oil to your wet skin and then pat your skin dry with a towel rather than wiping it across your skin.
      Also, coconut oil solidifies at room temperature so put the jar in the shower so the hot water will melt it and make it easier to apply to your skin.

  49. QUESTION:
    i have little red bumps all over my legs and thighs. what are these?
    i've had them for a while now. maybe a couple of months. they dont itch or anything. and i dont shave my legs. what are these? and whats wrong with me?

    • ANSWER:
      it is probably keritosis pilaris. I have it to and after reading TONS on it, i can give you some knowledge:)!

      (STIVES.COM-
      Q. How can I get rid of red bumps on my upper arms?

      A. This is probably keratosis pilaris, which is a condition in which there’s a buildup in the upper layer of skin around the hair follicle. To help treat this condition, I recommend regular washing with a hydrating body wash such as the Mineral Therapy body wash, as well as gentle exfoliating to reduce the buildup of dead skin cells.)

      i know it says upper arms, but its everywhere!
      KP is genetic, and its uncurable. It does get better with age. There are many cremes and lot of them do not work. After months of research this is the best cure-

      1) Use a lootfah sponge and use a moisturizing body wash. Use some of the body wash and move the sponge in a circular motion.
      2) There are only two cremes i have ever heard of that work. They are by paulas choice. Apply to dry, clean skin.
      3) Dont skip out on a day!

      (most reccomended)
      http://shop.paulaschoice.com/product/weightless-body-treatment/body-hair-care

      (next reccomended)
      http://shop.paulaschoice.com/product/255/3

      Good luck, and go see a dermatoligist just to be sure! :)


keratosis pilaris research

Malignant Melanoma

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Why do health insurance companies deny life ins coverage to people who have a history of malignant melanoma's?
    I was just denied life insurance coverage due to a health history of malignant melanoma = 10 years ago, 2 squamous cell carcinoma's = 5 years ago, and 3 displastic nevi removed 6 months ago by my dermatologist. I get skin exams whenever I see anything suspicious. I take all the necessary precasions. I am almost 45 years old; fair complected, and a female.

    • ANSWER:
      Well, there are two answers. You're looking for standard rates. Once you have a malignant melanoma, you no longer QUALIFY for standard rates - the odds are just MUCH higher that you won't live as long as someone who hasn't had any melanoma.

      The second answer is, if price is no object, you CAN buy life insurance. You need to talk to a high risk life agent in your area. You're just going to pay through the nose for it - maybe even close to payout value.

  2. QUESTION:
    What is basal cell carcinoma? and How does it compare with malignant melanoma?
    What is basal cell carcinoma? and How does it compare with malignant melanoma?

    • ANSWER:
      Basal cell carcinoma is mildest form of skin cancer with tendency for only local spread.Most commonly occures in face(Area above a line from tip of nose to ear lobule)
      Surgical wide excision is treatment of choice with very good prognosis.
      On the other hand-
      Malignant Melanoma is most aggressive and virulent form of skin cancer with tendency for early loco regional and distant spread.
      With all modality of treatment,prognosis is very poor.

  3. QUESTION:
    Can PLX4032 be given to stage 4 malignant melanoma patients whose cancer has spread to the brain?
    Hi,

    Can PLX4032 be given to malignant melanoma cancer patients who cancer has spread to the brain (grew back, spread to different spots after brain surgery)? Some doctors are not allowing it to be used because PLX4032 might accelerate the spreading of the brain tumor.

    Your help is appreciated.

    L.

    • ANSWER:
      This is a good site to read up on.. It's got some good news and some bad.

      http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/199002.php

      Here's another good one...

      http://bayarea.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/02/26/the-story-of-plx4032-a-berkeley-companys-cancer-therapy/

  4. QUESTION:
    If we get through this first round, what are the chances of malignant melanoma recurring?
    Husband has what we believe is an early malignant melanoma on his back. Its the spreading kind? When they removed the mole they said he had a tiny lesion that went from the first layer to the second layer of skin. Doctors said they got it early and he should be OK. He tends to freckle, and has many on his arms and back. Is he more likely to develop another melanoma?

    • ANSWER:

  5. QUESTION:
    Why malignant melanoma is more common in Caucasian then darker-skinned individuals?
    Propose an explanation for why malignant melanoma is more common in Caucasian individuals, and why when darker-skinned individuals do develop this cancer, it tends to occur in lightly-pigmented regions such as the nailbeds.

    • ANSWER:
      The melanin in their skin helps to prevent this cancer, Caucasian people have the smallest amount of melanin, that is why they burn easily in the sun. Melanin absorbs the sun's rays and turns dark when it does, so some people are darker than others

  6. QUESTION:
    What is the best treatment for vaginal malignant melanoma stage 2c ?
    i have a vaginal malignant melanoma. the tumor is 2.5 cm. with ulceration. I made a surgery where ovaries, uterus, the posterior wall of the vagian and the rectum where removed. my doctor said i am of high risk of recurrence. he told me there is no treatment available now except interferon and he is not really sure about its proficiency. the recommended dose he suggested is 3 million to be injected under the skin three times a week. Please help me if there are other treatments and ,if not, is the 3 million interferon dose effective or not. i did the surgery two months ago. no lymph nodes were affected. waiting for your replies. thanks everyone.

    • ANSWER:
      I'd go for the interferon therapy for at least a year or longer. I'd want to get started asap. Interferon is a very strong drug and can make you depressed but it has incredible anti-tumor potential plus it is your best option for avoiding another melanoma. 3million units is a rather low dose for melanoma. I'd ask about doing 5 or 10 million units 3X week. Cost will be the same for the higher dosage. I hope you have good drug insurance as interferon is very expensive. If you do not, I'd look into the Patient Assistance programs and maybe you can receive the meds for no cost if you have a very limited income. Your Dr should have already gone through all this with you. Be aggressive with taking care of yourself and in seeking out additional treatment. Remember the squeaky wheel gets the grease - or in this case the interferon.

      The advice about starting an antidepressant at the same time as the interferon is good. Also know that interferon side effects can be minimized by taking ibuprofen or Tylenol a couple hours after each interferon injection. Expect to be tired and need to sleep a lot. Give yourself permission to rest and take things easy. In some people the side effects decrease as time goes by. Since you had no nodal involvement you have a chance to be healed and even if the interferon treatment is very difficult, being healed has a great upside compared to doing nothing to prevent a second melanoma or recurrence. good luck

      http://www.cancer.med.umich.edu/cancertreat/skincancer/interferon_treatment.shtml

      http://www.cancer.gov/clinicaltrials/results/high-dose-interferon1001

      http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/430326

      http://jco.ascopubs.org/cgi/content/full/22/1/7

  7. QUESTION:
    Safe to get pregnant with history of Malignant Melanoma/Skin Cancer?
    I have been in remission for Malignant Melanoma 2 years as of this month!! It did spread to some of my lymph nodes and my surgeries/treatments are complete and I am under close observation.
    Does anyone know anyone who got pregnant after fighting melanoma? My doctor says after you have been cancer free for a few years the risk of relapse is lower, but there isn't really anyway to know for sure.
    Any suggestions or stories to share?
    My husband and I are looking into our options.

    • ANSWER:
      If you become healthy, there is no reason not to have a baby.

      Take up where your doctor leaves off. Become proactive in your prevention of cancer, too.

      Get parabin free sun screens, because the parabins actually increase cancer risks when exposed to the sun.

      The National Cancer Institute launched a 6 million dollar project to study phytochemicals because they snuff out cancer before it begins. Phytochemicals are the pigments on raw fruits and vegetables. Especially cruciferous vegetabls and fiberous fruits, like kiwi, papaya, pineapple, and mango.

      Folic acid is plentiful in raw fruits and veggies, too, which is known to prevent birth defects. It aids in the normal development of the fetus.

      Because, you and I are no different in the amount of cancer cells that we form every day. Its your immune systems job to keep it at bay every second and it must be fed with healthy things to recover and prevent it from coming back.

  8. QUESTION:
    Is malignant melanoma curable? What are the treatment options?
    My mother went to her doctor because of a vaginal bleeding. The doctor found a big lump in the front of the vagina and she took a part and sent it to the lap. The bad news came my mother has malignant melanoma in her vagina. My mother is really scared. They advised her to make a surgery. I wish you can help her .

    • ANSWER:
      The first choice of treatment is the surgical removal of the tumour. If the tumour has already reached the lymphatic system, a surgical removal of the whole lymph node may be required to minimize the risk of the melanoma spreading to other parts or organs of the body. If the melanoma has already spread to other body organs (eg. brain, liver) these tumours should also be removed if possible. If surgery is impossible, radiotherapy or chemotherapy might be suitable treatments. Immunotherapy is a therapy that helps to support the immune system. Usually the drug called interferon alpha or interleukin-2 is injected underneath the skin. This treatment might last quite a long time (up to a year or even longer) and is often used in combination with surgical removal of the tumour, radiotherapy or chemotherapy. Unfortunately this therapy is connected with several disturbing side effects e.g. flu-like symptoms such as fever, drowsiness and nausea. Sometimes it may also cause a reduction of white, sometimes even red blood cells. These are the basic treatment options, there are more and, as dealing with skin cancer can be very frightening you would be advised therefore, to seek the advice of a dermatologist whom you trust, and discuss every aspect of your mother's disease openly with him/her.
      I add a link with details of this subject

      http://www.mayoclinic.org/
      melanoma/

      Hope this helps
      matador 89

  9. QUESTION:
    Does having a history of a one time diagnoses of melanoma permenantly disqualify you from joining the military?
    AR 40-501 chapter 2-31 b. Says,"current or history of malignant tumors (v10) does not meet standard. Skin cancer (other than malignant melanoma) removed with no residual, is not disqualifying. Im being told that the regs are up to different interpretation. So with having melanoma 6 years ago and being cured since still disqualify me from joining the military?

    • ANSWER:
      No, it won't be a DQ.

  10. QUESTION:
    What happen after one had a minor surgery to cut MELANOMA out?
    My mum had what she thought was a big mole bleading. when it was cut out it turned out to be a tumor - doctor did a good job cutting so everything around and underneath it was tumorfree. It was then tested in a lab and turned out to be a malignant melanoma.

    I wonder what needs to happen next - what are the prosedings??
    the doctors in Ukraine say there is nothing else to be done and my mum can go on with her life.

    • ANSWER:
      You are not giving enough information to know. What kind of melanoma was it? How big was it? How far did it invade? How thick was it? Was it ulcerated? The answers to these questions are what determine treatment and prognosis. Typically the initial biopsy is done with close margins of just a few millimeters. This is to prevent problems with sentinel lymph node mapping. Later a second biopsy is done to be sure the margins are clear.

  11. QUESTION:
    How to tell the difference between a "skin barnacle" and melanoma?
    I have a lesion on my skin which concerns me as my father died of a brain tumor secondary to malignant melanoma. My primary care doctor believes it is a skin barnacle and benign, although she is sending me to a dermatologist to have it checked out.

    I looked up pictures on the internet of both skin barnacles and melanomas. They look alike to me. So, if it is a skin barnacle, and I get another, should I run to the dermatologist or ignore it?

    • ANSWER:

  12. QUESTION:
    what does residual melanoma mean in a pathology report?
    I was diagnosed with malignant melanoma. Had a wide re excision that came back with residual melanoma. The primary tumor was 1.98 mm. Invasive. Nodular. What does it mean if there is residual melanoma?

    • ANSWER:
      It means that they found melanoma cells outside of the main tumor. It is one of the reasons they cut out such a large section.

  13. QUESTION:
    What's the best treatment for vaginal malignant melanoma stage 2-c ?
    I have a vaginal malignant melanoma. the tumor is 2.5 cm. with ulceration. I made a surgery where ovaries, uterus, the posterior wall of the vagian and the rectum where removed. my doctor said i am of high risk of recurrence. he told me there is no treatment available now except interferon and he is not really sure about its proficiency. the recommended dose he suggested is 3 million to be injected under the skin three times a week. Please help me if there are other treatments and ,if not, is the 3 million interferon dose effective or not. i did the surgery two months ago. no lymph nodes were affected. waiting for your replies. thanks everyone

    • ANSWER:
      There is no cure for cancer, only treatment (that may lead to cure) . . so the fact that you are doing so well right now is a positive sign.

      It is difficult for people unfamiliar with this disease to give you any type of advice. The best thing is to locate a support group with patients who have the same disease and ask them these questions.

      You can try two different email support groups at ACOR (Association of Cancer Online Resources):

      The Gynecological Cancers Online Support Group
      http://listserv.acor.org/archives/gyn-onc.html

      Melanoma Support Group
      http://listserv.acor.org/archives/melanoma.html

      People Living with Cancer: Vaginal Cancer
      http://www.plwc.org/portal/site/PLWC/menuitem.034b98abc65a8f566343cc10ee37a01d/?vgnextoid=0296ea97a56d9010VgnVCM100000f2730ad1RCRD

      MD Anderson: Melanoma
      http://www.mdanderson.org/diseases/melanoma/

      Cancer Care may also be able to guide you:
      http://www.cancercare.org/get_help/help_by_diagnosis/diagnosis.php?diagnosis=vaginal

      Good luck.

  14. QUESTION:
    What foods and beverages are best to give with cancer/chemo related nausea and vomiting?
    My father is undergoing chemo for malignant melanoma that has spread to liver/lungs/kidneys. He has constantly nausea and vomits at the drop of a hat. How do I get some nutrition into him? What would help other than prescription meds which he is already on?

    • ANSWER:
      I went through this with my dad - it's different for everyone. You have to be ready with whatever sounds good to him at the moment - if he has to wait too long for it, the opportunity may pass and he's nauseous again. It's not easy - on him or on you - sorry there isn't a magic answer, but you're wonderful for being there for him. My thoughts and prayers are with you.

  15. QUESTION:
    How to make my friend feel better during interferon treatments?
    My best friend is 47 and taking interferon for malignant melanoma; 46 more weeks of treatment. She is exhausted, sleeps a lot, has chills, aches, like she has flu and is miserable all the time. Spends most of her time in bed. All of this is expected side effects. So can anyone tell me any little tips or tricks to make her feel better, make life easier, for her since she has so much more to go ? :-(

    • ANSWER:
      I am so sorry to hear that. I have no idea, but I'm sure having a devoted friend by her side is a lot of help.

  16. QUESTION:
    What is a good song to play a my fathers funeral?
    My dad was recently diagnosed with malignant melanoma, its too far along. Doctors gave him 2-7yrs to live. And I was thinking I should play a song for him when he dies, for his funeral. I need some suggestions for a song to play on acoustic guitar. I was thinking "You'll Be in my Heart" by Phil Collins. Anyone got any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      queen- another one bites the dust
      i will survive- Gloria Gaynor
      Don’t Fear the Reaper~ Blue Oyster Cult

      any of these will do quite well

  17. QUESTION:
    Why is basal cell carcinoma the least invasive of all cancers?
    Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC) can develop into large unsightly skin tumors but the cells rarely metasize or spread to distant sites like malignant melanoma, lung cancer, colon cancer etc.
    Is it that only certain genes are involved in BCC which mean they fail to become completely immature like other tumor cells, or is it they are more liable to be attacked by the immune system? Any other ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      Simon - Great question! Sorry that the answer is not yet known. Most cancer research efforts have been directed towards the malignant tumors which rapidly invade the blood vessels and lymph channels making their spread easily, but not malignant basal cells of basal cell carcinoma (BCC). It may be genetic, as you mention, or the BCC cells may lack certain genes and/or enzymes which would allow the cells to survive in other body locations. It is NOT likely to be related to the immune system as microscopic examination of BCC lesions do not show the tissue changes of immune-type cells adjacent to or invading the BCC as they do with other tumors. Hence, the BCC spreads by ever-widening direct growth from the primary tumor without metastases but able to invade the toughest of nearby tissues, even bone. Might you be interested in such a research career in dermatopathology?

  18. QUESTION:
    How long do the effects of Chemo last?
    My wife was diagnosed with cancer and just started Chemotherapy, after they told her it would do her no good, due to the type of cancer she has (metastatic malignant melanoma). Against our better judgement, we allowed them to start the treatment. One treatment into it and she's losing her hair (like they told her she would).

    Now she's just sicker all the time and miserable, so we stopped it. Are the effects reversible? If so, how long should it take?

    • ANSWER:
      Without chemotherapy it is likely that she will progress death sooner that she might without.

      She should recover her counts and function as much as possible within the scope of her diagnosis in the first few months off of treatment, but then she will begin to experience pain, tiredness, and other symptoms your oncologist should have outlined, as her disease progresses.

      It is not likely she will experience any significant period of pain-and-fatigue free function.

  19. QUESTION:
    Is there an at home remedy or over the counter remedy for removing moles? Is it safe?
    I need to know if there is a product I can use over the counter that can get rid of moles I have a bunch I would like toget rid of, but the only one the doctor wil remove is the only one changing colors I have about 2 dozen all over my body. Most of the moles are on the same excat arm that the changing mole is on. I am scared. I was wonderingif I can get rid of them at home safely with no concerns of Malignant Melanoma. Keep in mind I am going to make her get rid of as many as I can, but could I do something at home to get rid of the rest? Thank You!

    • ANSWER:
      Sorry the article I was trying to post isnt being accepted by Yahoo or something :o) my apologies. Here is the link to the same article please read it carefully :- http://www.hpathy.com/diseases/moles-symptoms-treatment-cure.asp

      Once again my apologies for the blank answer I should have checked afterwards which I did'nt.

      Take Care and God Bless you.

  20. QUESTION:
    Is there a high chance of me getting cancer?
    My mom's had basil cell and malignant melanoma. My younger sister had a mole that they had to remove because it was close to turning into cancer. My grandma has had breast cancer, and my grandfather had lung cancer.

    Since these are all different types of cancer, will they all increase my chances of any type of cancer? Or do they only increase my chances of getting that specific type of cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      Cancer is a dreadful illness and one that puts dread into everyone at sometime in their life, and whilst sometimes cancer can be genetic, which then it would be one specific time like breast cancer, it does not mean that because your mother had it and thankfully recovered that you will get it too. To call breast cancer genetic in your family, it would have to strike down at least 4 close relatives, so try not to worry about that.

      Moles are something most of us have, and again sometimes they can change for no reason, but often its the sun and being out in the sun to much with out protection that causes that, So always make sure you use sun block and a strong one too. Sun blocks do not stop people tanning, it just takes a little longer with them, that's all. So knock that one out of your mind too. And of course last but not least your grandfather having lung cancer, well statistics prove if 10 people get lung cancer, then 9 of them were or had been smokers, so again you can remove that worry from your mind. If you smoke then yes it time to seriously think about stopping.

      Eat red meat in moderation, chicken is fine. Eat lots of vegetables and fruit, look after your general health, drink water to keep the system flushed, and the high chances are you will never never get cancer.

      I hope this has put your mind at rest.
      Good Luck
      Billie UK.

  21. QUESTION:
    What could this red mark on my areola be?
    Hello.
    About 2 months ago, I noticed a red, circular mark on my left areola. There is not a lump underneath it and it is not painful. It seems to have gotten a little bigger. It does not cause irritation - it's just there.
    I'm only worried because I have had malignant melanoma before and cancer runs very strong in my family.
    Any help is appreciated. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      if today you hear his voice
      harden not your heart.

  22. QUESTION:
    will your life insurance still pay if you refuse treatment for cancer?
    If you have malignant melanoma, and refuse treatment, will your life insurance still pay when you die?

    • ANSWER:
      Of course they have nothing to do with each other.
      Unless of course you have a clause that states they will not if you die of cancer within a certain amount of time,.

  23. QUESTION:
    How much Medication does John McCain take?
    "McCain has never been publicly vetted about what and how much medications he is taking. Aside from his anger and arthritic pain issues, McCain has had reoccurring bouts of malignant melanoma, a deadly form of cancer that can spread quickly throughout the body."

    Is he going to be OK?
    He's being treated for serious ailments and he is 71 years old. It's an important question.

    • ANSWER:
      Doesn't matter. You don't take medication for malignant melanoma anyway. Malignant melanoma is a form of skin cancer which a lot of people get and if you catch it in the early stage it doesn't spread throughout your body. My brother had it when he was 23 and he has been fine since then, he just had it removed.

  24. QUESTION:
    what is the cure for thrombosis when a patient is paralysed?
    a patient of 70 with recurrent malignant melanoma has deep vein thrombosis and has developed bed sores. how can it be treated?she has partial immobility.pls help

    • ANSWER:
      She has a pretty complex medical history, so a doctor will have to take several factors into consideration. DVTs (deep vein thrombosis) aren't really treated, but usually the person will take prophylactic medication to prevent more from forming. Or, if the person cannot tolerate that medication, then a special filter can sometimes be placed to "catch" any clots that could break off from the legs before they travel to the lungs.
      If she already has the diagnosis of a DVT, then hopefully she is already receiving the proper medical care.

  25. QUESTION:
    what is the best treatment for vaginal malignant melanoma stage 2c ?
    i have a vaginal malignant melanoma. the tumor is 2.5 cm. with ulceration. I made a surgery where ovaries, uterus, the posterior wall of the vagian and the rectum where removed. my doctor said i am of high risk of recurrence. he told me there is no treatment available now except interferon and he is not really sure about its proficiency. the recommended dose he suggested is 3 million to be injected under the skin three times a week. Please help me if there are other treatments and ,if not, is the 3 million interferon dose effective or not. i did the surgery two months ago. no lymph nodes were affected. waiting for your replies. thanks everyone.

    • ANSWER:
      You didn't say which type of cancer this is, squamous cell or adenocarcinoma. If you are under 30 years of age, it's likly adenocarcinoma. If you're older, squamous cell carcinoma. However, the standard treatment for both at Stage IIc (the c means spread to the ovaries) is a combination of brachytherapy and EBRT (external-beam radiation therapy) to deliver a combined dose of 70-80Gy. Elective radiation therapy of 45-50Gy is given to the pelvic and/or inguinal lymph nodes. You already had the resection which is also standard. Speak to your oncologist about the feasibility of this.

  26. QUESTION:
    Which of the following is false of malignant melanoma?
    A) It can metastasize quickly
    B) If caught late, it can kill a person within months of diagnosis
    C) It is the least common form of skin cancer
    D) It is identified by asymmetry, border, contrast and diameter

    According to my notes all four of these are characteristics of malignant melanoma, but I could be wrong

    • ANSWER:
      none of the above.

  27. QUESTION:
    I was told I have biilirubin disease. Can that lead to anything? What should I do about it, and what should I?
    Does it have anything to do with malignant melanoma?
    Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      There isn't any such thing as bilirubin disease, but increase in bilirubin is due to liver disease. There are a lot of different liver diseases, so you need very careful monitoring from a Dr. Liver disease is very very serious.

  28. QUESTION:
    Malignant melanoma and lymph node removal?
    My dad has malignant melanoma. Recently he had his lymph nodes removed and drained. Please can someone tell me some more information about why this procedure is done and if it will increase his chances of survival.

    • ANSWER:
      If this was carried out after the original operation to remove the tumour it suggests that the glands have enlarged since then. This suggests that his doctors feel they need to exclude the possibility that tumour has spread to nodes which drain the area.

  29. QUESTION:
    is a blood discharge from the vagina cancer of the cervix?
    i have had cancer malignant melanoma in the leg I now have severe ne is Comag from ann s and can barley walk. I am not a drinker My mobiity is gwtting qow and osw, WhAG CN i XO GO HELP MY SELF. i CAN barelywalk. I have haterectomy and the bleeding. Do I hav cncer of the cervix?

    • ANSWER:
      You MUST see a doctor.

      You are not going to get the kind of advice you need from anonymous amateurs on line.

  30. QUESTION:
    is a blood discharge from the vagina cancer of the cervix?
    i have had cancer malignant melanoma in the leg I now have severe ne is Comag from ann s and can barley walk. I am not a drinker My mobiity is gwtting qow and osw, WhAG CN i XO GO HELP MY SELF. i CAN barelywalk. I have haterectomy and the bleeding. Do I hav cncer of the cervix?

    • ANSWER:
      A bloody discharge always needs investigating, you need to see your Doctor so he can run more tests.

  31. QUESTION:
    my aunt (mother's sister) had a malignant melanoma in her eye. does that mean i or my mum carry the gene?
    is there a bigger chance of me or my mum getting a malignant melanoma in my eye now because of my aunt having it?

    • ANSWER:
      No it doesn’t mean that at all. Less than 10% of all cancers are hereditary and there is no reason to believe your aunt’s is. Genetic testing is very expensive and it would not be on her path report. You are at a higher risk for melanoma if you have two or more first or second degree relatives with it, but that does not mean you will get it. It is only one of several risk factors. Therefore her having melanoma is not a risk factor for you.

  32. QUESTION:
    I am being refused hip replacement surgery for problem with cellulitis after cancer surgery in leg and lymph n?
    I had malignant melanoma in my leg 20 years ago. I had removal of lymph nodes in the leg causing lymphodema. I am now being refused hip replacement surgery in that leg because of danger of infection. I am to get another op to help. Has anyone any idea what the other operation may involve?

    • ANSWER:
      Your doctor recommended another operation and you didn't ask him to explain what the operation involved? You shouldn't be asking people here; you should be asking the doctor who is recommending the surgery! Doctors don't want to do joint replacements on patients who are vulnerable to cellulitis because that bacterial infection tends to migrate to the replaced joint. It can infect the joint so that the patient either needs to have a new hip replacement or needs the hip joint removed entirely. Go back to your surgeon and ask him to explain in detail the operation that he is proposing to do. Ask a lot of questions such as: Why is he recommending this particular operation rather than a standard hip replacement? What are the benefits of this type of surgery? How long is the recovery period? What kind of pain medication will be used to control the pain afterwards? How long will you need physical therapy after the operation? Will you be able to walk again? What are the potential side effects? How many of these operations has the surgeon performed in the past year? In the past 10 years? (You want a surgeon who is trained and skilled in the type of surgery he is recommending.) What are the possible side effects of this kind of surgery? What are the most common side effects? Has he ever lost a patient doing this kind of surgery? The more informed you are as a patient, the more likely you are to get better surgical care.

  33. QUESTION:
    Are there any sites online where skin cancer survivors can talk with each other?
    I had malignant melanoma two years ago (I'm in remission now) and I'm just looking for a place to talk with people who understand what I've been through. I'm 22 years old and most of my friends don't get it. They still go tanning even though they know what happened to me and I just feel alone sometimes. If someone could point me in the right direction, it would mean a lot. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Hello Mallory, it's good to hear that you are in remission. I'm very sorry that you have to deal with what should be a disease of old age at the tender age of 22. Life is unfair sometimes. I understand why you feel alone and your friends don't get it. A cancer diagnosis means having to learn a whole new language and those who have not experienced it first hand or in someone very close to them can never speak that language. You will find support at www.acor.org the Association of Cancer Online Resources. They have a lists for common and rare cancers and welcome people from around the world. In addition to providing online support they may be able to suggest a local support group in your neighbourhood. I don't know how I would cope without the fantastic support I get from the wonderful people on ACOR and I hope they can make you feel less isolated too. Best wishes.

  34. QUESTION:
    Do you think that sunscreen causes skin cancer?
    if you go to google and type in sunscreen scam, tons of articals come up all saying that sunscreen dosen't help you aginst skin cancer, and that it acually causes it. Everybody is always telling me to use sunscreen or I'll get skin cancer. After reading some of thiose articals, i'm gald that i didn't listen to them. But i need some other ppls opionon on this; do you think sunscreen helps prevent aginst skin cancer, (and by skin cancer i'm talking malignant melanoma, the most deadly kind, not the other two) or acually causes it?
    if you do the math, it even shows that all of this couldn't be caused by tanning beds and the ozone layer alone, because melanoma rates started to rise long before ozone layer became a issue.

    • ANSWER:
      I agree with the previous answerers. Also consider this - tanning ages the skin. If you want to look older really fast keep tanning. You'll lose the elasticity in your skin and the wrinkles and dry skin will be there faster than normal aging.

  35. QUESTION:
    malignant melanoma and hot spots on bone scan?
    i am stage 3 metastatic malignant melanoma suffering diplopia of the eye, mastoiditis and inflammation of the adenoid. My bone scan showed up hot spots on my knee and pelvis but i am suffering severe headaches with inflammation behind my ear too and have had a grommit put in my ear to drain the fluid. I want to know how long i will live as my diagnosis is looking grim. Serious answers only please as i am desperate. Is melanoma taking over my body?

    • ANSWER:
      I am really really sorry, but nobody can tell you how long you have to live.
      3rd stage is pretty bad, as you probably know, and sometimes melanoma moves very fast.
      The best thing you can do is to get your affairs in order, make a will and also a living will, to say whether you want to be kept alive at the end of your life at all costs, or whether you want to be allowed to drift away under large doses of pain relief. The do as the best consultant advises you.
      If you get cancer in your liver, and the surgeons offer to operate ( the liver can regenerate itself, actually) you may have quite a few months left. If you get liver secondaries,and they are not operable, you haven't got more than a very few months, unless you are extremely lucky.

  36. QUESTION:
    Do people with almost black complections need to wear sunscreen?
    Does the melanin in their skin protect them from the UV damage that causes malignant melanomas?

    • ANSWER:
      Not completely although the melanin is a safeguard. Anybody can suffer from UV damage and skin cancer.

  37. QUESTION:
    How many of you have heard this term before?
    Malignant Metastasized Melanoma
    Oops
    Forgot to mention--
    I know what it is, I was wondering if anyone else did.

    Question NUMBER 2!!
    Aren't you excited?

    Has anyone KNOWN anyone who had this?

    • ANSWER:
      Actually it appears that this person is NOT asking for the definition of this term, simply "how many" have heard it? Thanks all for the definition, anyways.

  38. QUESTION:
    Can malignant melanoma be treated by oncothermia?
    A friend of mine has recurrence melanoma which is recently removed surgically. The pet ct scan after the surgery was negative. His doctor suggested oncothermia 3 times a week for one month to destroy any remaining cancer cells. Has anyone hear about this method? Is it useful in this case? which is the best centre for such treatment? Thank you all.
    is there whole body oncothermia?

    • ANSWER:
      It is well known that cancer cells cannot tolerate high temperatures and are killed by a 42C or more temperatures. oncothermia is a smart way of delivering well controlled thermal energy to the tumor cells and spares the normal cell surrounding the tumor. I am an oncologist trained in the USA and licensed to practice in the USA. I am practising orthodox oncology in jordan I mean surgery next chemo next radiation according to the tumor and my patients are dying and i went to germany and they are experts in this new technology and i bought the machines to help my people an Jordan with this new technology.
      I can forward you to the best center in germany if you provide me with a medical report about your patient and his previous treatment.
      it is very effective and non toxic at all very friendly to the body
      khmc1234@yahoo.com

  39. QUESTION:
    how do you actually die from skin cancer?
    ive had a malignant melanoma removed 4 years ago and regular checkups,now ive had another one removed ,but wat i would like to know is how do people die from the skin cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      The melanoma cells can spred rapidly to a persons lympth nodes and to internal organs. What can happen is that if the melanoma goes untreated or undetected it will spred to the nearest lymph node. If the cancer cells enter the lymph node, it can than send melanoma cells throughout the body via the lymphatic system. This would be considered a stage IV disease. The most likely spots that melanoma cells can spred to include the lungs, liver, heart, pancreas, kidneys, and brain.

      You will need to stay vigilant to make sure the melanoma never returns.

      Good luck.

  40. QUESTION:
    Malignant Melanoma spread to soft tissue?
    My uncle has been diagnosed with Malignant melanoma on his face and ear all the way down his ear canal. They did surgery but were unable to remove it all. Now I hearing from the family that it has spread to his soft tissue and something about his lymph nodes. Everyone is really scared and they are making out wills etc. Unfortunately the whole family is not in the loop yet, I am not supposed to know about it but I overheard a conversation when he thought I was in another room. Can anyone tell me what this means. And is he dying? What are the time lines?

    • ANSWER:
      You didn't say your age but you sound mature enough to learn about Melanoma and your Uncle's condition. Some information you want to learn is that the definition of the stages and what the typical treatment is for each. If the lymph nodes are involved (have melanoma cells) or they suspect they do, involved lymph nodes is stage III.

      The treatment might be 1. the surgery to remove tumor (the one you describe), 2. a surgery called a dissection to remove the lymph nodes in that area. 3. PET/CT and MRI scans to see if the cancer has metastasized to other parts of the body (stage IV). If the first surgery did not remove all the tumor (sample margins not clear) then radiation might be one treatment. Also there will be another treatment either; chemotherapy, immunotherapy, or vaccine. These treatments are to try to kill any remaining melanoma cell in the body.

      If your uncle is going through any of these then he is fighting to live. Talk of dying and prognosis is not something you want dwell on. That information is between your Uncle and his doctor. Also most people here do not understand the statistics and paint too negative of a picture. Check out there website about melanoma www.cancer.gov www.mpip.org

  41. QUESTION:
    What exactly are the symptoms of metastatic melanoma?
    What exactly are the symptoms of metastatic melanoma, and in how much pain would someone be who suffers from it?

    Many thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Metastatic melanoma is by definition, a secondary cancer. You cannot have a metastatic melanoma without having a primary melanoma.

      Metastatic comes from the word "Metastasis." A Metastasis is the spread of cancer from its primary site to other places in the body. A good example would be someone who has malignant melanoma (a bad type of skin cancer)....this is the primary cancer. If that cancer spreads (metastasizes) to the lungs, then you now have a secondary cancer in the lungs which is called a metastatic melanoma.

      Having said that, there are really no clear cut symptoms for metastatic melanoma...the symptoms really depend on the location of the secondary cancer. For example, if your primary cancer spread to the brain, a symptom could be headaches and dizzyness. If you do not already have cancer, then you do not need to worry about metastatic melanoma. Best of Luck!

  42. QUESTION:
    Is there any link between a malignant melanoma and Deep Vein Thrombosis?? Im 23.?
    I had a Level 2 Malignant Melanoma removed in Nov 07, in my right calf, and was diagnosed with a blood clot (DVT) in my left calf at the end of Jan 08. Im only 23, and not sure if there is any link between the two?
    Any help would be appreciated!

    • ANSWER:
      they are related becoz any even the simplest dehydration can precipitate the immunoglobulins,and it starts a cascade of thrombus

  43. QUESTION:
    If I don't have any moles can I still get malignant melanoma?
    My understanding (based on what I'm not sure) is melanoma skin cancer develops in moles. Seeing as I do not have any moles does this mean I can't get this type of skin cancer? No one in my family has any moles either.

    • ANSWER:
      Moles are not always visible. I was told by my surgeon that everyone has around 30 - 40 moles visible or otherwise. The thing is with Malignant Melanoma that it can take up to 20 years from the time of getting sunburned to the Melanoma becoming active. This is not a disease that anyone should take a chance on whether they can see moles on their skin or not. I was diagnosed with it about 25 years ago and am so lucky to be here to tell you about it as I had the most deadly form so was not expected to survive more than a matter of weeks. No risks are worth taking, believe me. Look after your skin and show it the utmost respect.

  44. QUESTION:
    What are the odds of my cousin surviving melanoma?
    I just got news yesterday that my cousin has melanoma. He's physically in shape and only 25 years old. The cancer has spread some into his lymph nodes and I'm really nervous. He's currently at the Mayo Clinic and I was just wondering what his chances of survival are. I just really want to know. I've been really upset. Thanks. -Steven

    • ANSWER:
      Survival varies with the depth of invasion.
      You do not give us that information.
      Wiki is fairly good for this. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melanoma
      See the survival data for stage III - - 25 to 60% five year survival.
      You can see this is a wide range.
      The MAYO clinic info on Malignant melanoma doesn't give survival
      statistics that I see. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/melanoma/DS00439/DSECTION=treatments-and-drugs
      The Mayo Clinic is one of the best medical centers in the world.
      I spent two months there as a medical student. He is on good hands there.
      - - -
      Here is another reference with survival data that looks more hopeful.
      http://www.clevelandclinicmeded.com/medicalpubs/diseasemanagement/dermatology/cutaneous-malignant-melanoma/
      Again it would help to know the depth of invasion.
      You can see in this last reference a survival at ten years in the 60% range.

  45. QUESTION:
    How long should melanoma results take to return?
    I had a biopsy for melanoma 4 weeks ago and I was told by the surgeon that the results would take six weeks to return but other people have said that they have had their results back earlier and I was just wondering if six weeks is a normal waiting time or not.

    • ANSWER:
      Biopsies typically take 7-14 days to get back from the labs (depending on the pathologist). They would not wait 4 weeks to give you results if you have malignant melanoma.

      If it has been 4 weeks, call their office. That is not a normal waiting time.

  46. QUESTION:
    Does anyone have any info in regards to melanoma spreading to the lungs?
    My mom had a deep melanoma removed last year and underwent a year of interferon treatment. She just finished and had her follow up CAT scan to find out it has spread to the lungs...has anyone else been through this who can offer any advice...any news would be appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, I am a malignant melanoma patient who also has gone through interferon treatments. It is possible for melanoma to spread to any organ. My treatments were for lymph glands - and, as of now, it hasn't spread.

      If your mother is having breathing problems, it could be a cold, asthma, infection, etc. Your mother should call her doctor and let the doctor know her symptoms.

  47. QUESTION:
    specimen received from hospital clinic consists of black-brown tissue that was takes from the skin of a female?
    specimen received from hospital clinic consists of black-brown tissue that was takes from the skin of a female patients back. the lesion was 3 cm. Gross and microscopic surgical exam was performed. Impression Malignant melanoma. Can anyone help with this one?
    I know that the diagnosis is 171.7 for the malignant melanoma of the back nos, but the rest im out of ideas on how to code.

    • ANSWER:
      Ask your doctor.

  48. QUESTION:
    What is the survival rate for malignant Melanoma?
    I want to know what my chances are after it keeps coming back and it is now at stage 4 and in my lungs but the Dr's keep saying the same thing it is different in every body. Please someone be up front with me.

    • ANSWER:
      You already know that your prognosis is guarded. I am not a big believer in prognosis charts or statistics since the only percentile that really ends up mattering is whatever percentile you turn out to be. What happens to others has no real relevance to what happens with you and reading published poor prognosis statistics does not mean that your death is an impending certainty. Emedicine says the five year prognosis for stage four melanoma is 7-19% survival.

      http://www.emedicine.com/derm/topic257.htm

      If you are able I would try to enroll in the NIH clinical trials for melanoma which have produced amazing results in small numbers of patients. Clinical trials info for stage four melanoma is available here.

      http://www.cancer.gov/search/ResultsClinicalTrials.aspx?protocolsearchid=3314399

      The NIH is currently offering 164 stage four melanoma trials. I would try to get in any of the immunotherapy trials being run by Dr Steven A. Rosenberg. good luck

  49. QUESTION:
    How does the doctor do a biopsy if melanoma is on the head?
    My dad has Melanoma on the head...how the hell does the doctor get a biopsy off of it on his head?

    • ANSWER:
      It will depend on where on the head the melanoma is located and the best way to approach the biopsy . . it may be that they will attempt am excisional biopsy. Am excisional biopsy involves the complete removal of the lesion with a clear margins . . . Once the lesion is removed the pathologist will examine the tumor under a microscope to determine if it is malignant, what grade it is, and see if any cancer cells are in the margins. Or the doctor may for whatever reason elect to do a needle aspiration biopsy and just remove a sample of the suspected cells . . of course there is risk of missing the cancer cells totally with this type of biopsy.


malignant melanoma

How Do You Get Keratosis Pilaris

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Does birth control make Keratosis Pilaris any better?
    I've heard Keratosis Pilaris gets worse with hormones, and birth control decreases hormones so... Any ideas on whether it could help decrease the sight of it?

    I'm 16, i have horrible Keratosis Pilaris, but i'm only planning on going on the pill if it will help my KP.

    • ANSWER:
      I'm not sure. I'm 18 and also have keratosis pilaris, but it usually gets better as you age, or completely goes away. I've noticed that mine has gotten a lot better. It used to be really bad on my arms when I was around 14; now it's not that noticeable.

  2. QUESTION:
    What are the most affective treatments for Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have a mild case of Keratosis Pilaris on my forearms & biceps. I know there's no permanent cure for this skin condition, but I would like to clear it up for the most part.

    • ANSWER:
      I have keratosis pilaris on my upper arms, and I use Aveeno Daily Moisturizing Lotion. It works better than anything else that I've tried, and it's much cheaper than prescription creams! Keeping KP moist is key to reducing the bumps and redness. It works for me!

  3. QUESTION:
    What are some Over the Counter treatments for Keratosis Pilaris?
    From doing some research, and looking at pictures, I believe I have keratosis pilaris (on my thighs). What are some over the counter treatments that work well to cure keratosis pilaris?

    • ANSWER:
      Because it is hereditary, there is no way to cure or prevent keratosis pilaris. However, it may lessen over time with age.

      In some patients, the condition clears up on its own. When it does not, patients may choose to seek treatment for cosmetic reasons. There are several treatments aimed at softening the keratin deposits in the skin to improve its appearance. They include:

      Moisturizing lotions. Dry skin makes the condition worse, so applying moisturizer twice daily is important. Lotions that contain urea help the skin retain moisture and products that contain lactic acid or salicylic acid help to dissolve and exfoliate the keratin. Moisturizer should be applied immediately after bathing.

      Loofah sponges or brushes. Rubbing the affected areas after a long soak in a hot bath may help to unclog the plugged hair follicles.

      Topical retinoids. Class of chemical compounds that are chemically related to vitamin A. These drugs regulate skin growth but can be very irritating.

      These are just a couple of the available treatment for keratosis pilaris. Take a look at this site for some additional information that I think you'll find helpful : ) It's great that you're educating yourself!

      http://skin.health.ivillage.com/acneblemish/keratosispilaris.cfm

  4. QUESTION:
    How can I get rid of the appearance of Keratosis Pilaris?
    Ok so I've had keratosis pilaris for practically all of my life. Its been bugging me ever since. So today I went to the doctor and they said I indeed have keratosis pilaris, and gave me a prescription to buy this special lotion. I don't know how else can I resolve this quicker and make the bumps go away and feel smooth.

    • ANSWER:
      keratosis pilaris isn't curable, but this will diminish it's visibility..

      There is this new popular cream that people have been talking about.

      It was even televised on TV.

      It prevents future and existing acne, diminishes scars, and lightens skin and blemishes. Fast results too! (It's been claimed that major results can be seen within a week and no later than two weeks)

      Before and After photos are available at the given ebay site.

      This person is providing 1-3 week trial samples (Only for ONE DOLLAR.. definitely a deal) on ebay at:

      Search up "Cee En's Acne Solution" or "best acne solution ever" on ebay.

      First 100 customers can get the item for for one week trial and up to 3 weeks. Or you can purchase 1 month supply for or 6 month supply for 0

      It's expensive, but the product DOES work.

      My sister and cousin who both have major acne have tried the product and they both give it thumbs up. I have also heard many great feedbacks about this cream.

      I don't have a problem with acne, but it seems to have great results on my sister who has moderate to severe acne. Her acne swelling went away overnight.

      check the seller's feedbacks on the cream

      I hope this helps. =)

  5. QUESTION:
    What are some home remedies for keratosis pilaris?
    I have keratosis pilaris on my arms, legs, and back. My mum won't let me see a dermatologist because she things I do not have to, but the little red bumps (not acne they are keratosis pilaris) and red patches are so embarrassing especially with summer coming. Plz help. Thanx!

    • ANSWER:
      I just googled this myself earlier today and found there is actually quite a lot of information online from other sufferers talking about what helped or didn't help them. Mostly they suggest using a moisturising body wash and a loofa in a circular motion. Pat the skin dry and follow up by using a good moisturiser. Others are suggesting eliminating dairy or wheat from your diet. Some people say tanning or steam baths or saunas have helped them. I know how embarrassing this is for you as it really bothered me too as a teenager, but it isn't the end of the world. I think you should just google keratosis and try some of the things that others have suggested for yourself.

  6. QUESTION:
    What is the best product for Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris on my buttocks and I have been researching different products. There are quite a few and I don't know which to go with. There's Glytone, KP duty, Biotreatment. Has anyone had success with any of these or a better product? I have dark olive skin and I scar very easily...even without picking, so I'm hoping for a product that helps with that as well.

    • ANSWER:
      I know how you feel. I had Keratosis Pilaris too and always wore long sleeves even when it was really hot. I started using Paula's Choice 2% BHA and it cleared up completely within a few weeks. I don't know if it works for everyone, but it seems to work for a lot of people. I've told several people about it and it has worked for everyone I've told. It is a fairly common thing.

      I started with their liquid formula but I also have used their 2% BHA body lotion. I recommend the liquid to start. You can find out a lot more about KP and the various treatments and products here: http://cosmeticscop.paulaschoice.com/keratosis-pilaris-solutions.aspx

      Good Luck!

  7. QUESTION:
    Are there any inexpensive and affective treatments for Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris (chicken skin) and I haven't been able to find anything that really works. I've gotten lotions from my doctor but that doesn't completely help.
    Is there any inexpensive and affective treatment that really helps or helped you?
    Thanks in advance!

    • ANSWER:
      Try a loofah to exfolitate:

      To treat keratosis pilaris patients can try several strategies to lessen the bumps. First, the patient can supplement the natural removal of dry skin and papules by using a loofah or another type of scrub showering or bathing. A variety of different over-the-counter (OTC) lotions, ointments, and creams can also be applied after showering while the skin is still moist and then several times a day to keep the area moist. Medicated lotions with urea, 15% alphahydroxy acids, or Retin A can also be prescribed by the dermatologist and applied one to two times daily. Systemic (oral) medications are not prescribed for keratosis pilaris. However if papules are opened and become infected, antibiotics may be necessary to treat the infection.

      I hope using a loofah, or something similar, helps you. As you no doubt already knew (and can read in the article), keratosis pilaris is difficult to treat. Good luck.

  8. QUESTION:
    How can i get rid of Keratosis pilaris on my upper arm?
    keratosis pilaris is a skin condition and is in my whole family. I have poped the spots and tgere are now scabs. How can i get rid of the scabs and the spots.

    • ANSWER:
      watch this it might help http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_5S3gmUrXk&feature=related

  9. QUESTION:
    What are good treatments for treating Keratosis Pilaris on your face and arms?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris on my face and arms. I already drink lots of water, use some baby oil on my arms, and use a face cream/scrub. What would be a better alternative instead of using baby oil and face scrub. What is your favorite treatment. Btw, water helps a lot.

    • ANSWER:
      Scrubs containing AHA (glycolic acid)

  10. QUESTION:
    Does Acneticin really work for getting rid of Keratosis Pilaris?
    I'm 13 and have Keratosis Pilaris. I've heard of this pill called Acneticin. From the reviews all around the web, I guess it's like a miracle. How many of you have used this before and does it work?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, the Acneticin is an acne treatment that is for people that haven’t seen significant results from the many run of the mill topical treatments. Almost all of these topical treatments contain some form of ìcleansing agentî, usually benzoyl peroxide. These agents are very mild acids that ìburn awayî dead skin, allowing younger skin to rise to the surface and flourish.

  11. QUESTION:
    Are there any home cures for keratosis pilaris?
    Hi,
    My daughter (4) has keratosis pilaris. I would like to know if there are any home cures for that. My doctor told me it would go away on its own, but I would like to minimize it at least.
    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Try these...
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/keratosis-pilaris/DS00769/DSECTION=lifestyle-and-home-remedies
      http://beautyfashionandstyle.yuku.com/topic/937
      http://www.earthclinic.com/CURES/keratosis_pilaris.html
      I hope some of these can help her. Good-luck.

  12. QUESTION:
    How can i make my keratosis pilaris go away?
    I'm 14 and have keratosis pilaris on my arms, chest, back, stomach, legs and really bad on my thighs and butt. What are the best non prescription things that you found to work for you. And i already know that there is not permanent cure and it's hereditary and only cosmetic but what are ways that you know work for you and are relatively easy?

    • ANSWER:
      Aveeno lotions help me out a lot. I have like the whole line of products and they have helped me keep it under control for the most part.

  13. QUESTION:
    How to cover keratosis pilaris on arms with makeup for a day?
    My girlfriend wants to wear a sundress for a photo shoot but she has keratosis pilaris on her arms...google it if you don't know what it is and would like to know.

    She is mostly concerned with the redness.
    She already uses lotions etc. Doesn't help.

    Is there like a body makeup she can cover it with that will last ?

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Try the Dermablend Leg Cover... You can use it on arms as well.

      I have found 'Sheer Color'. It is the best for covering redness and leaving skin looking natural. I think it is only available through mail order. It was developed by dermatologists to hide redness, scars, and birth marks. It comes with a concealer. The makeup itself is mineral and gives good coverage, but it is light and natural.

      If her arms flare up, I have found a product that contains Extra Virgin Coconut Oil helps calm the redness down.

      You can also trry Pulse Dye Laser treatment. It is a little radical but it is long-lasting and helpful.

      Palladio is NOTHING compared to bareminerals from bare escentuals. The only thing I have to say is that they have poor costumer service and organization. The makeup will cover redness in a very natural way. It will look like you have no makeup on.

      One month ago I started using the Herbal wet & dry foundation and it is great. They are not very expensive, either. Well, on Amazon.com it is dollars but I found it in Puerto Rico at . :D

      I use eucerin 10% Urea lotion on my skin twice a day.

      I also use Everyday Minerals makeup. They have a mint concealer that is great for covering redness. Also another concealer is Bisque; it is quite pink in color but it somehow manages to cover redness very well. These are used under mineral foundation. You can get free samples, although you have to pay a bit for the postage.

      I am ignorant about UO, but this makeup is great for my skin! I bought it from the Sally Beauty Shop in the U.S. I think the mildness by being talc and rice may have something to do with it and I have found that titanium dioxide makes all my KP worse, whether on my face or arms (sunscreen) or what. It even has chamomile which I suspect is an allergen for me but maybe it's so little or it's tempered by other ingredients. I have even used it on my arms and legs when needed. O:)

      Try Roc Skin Foundation.

  14. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of redness from keratosis pilaris?
    I know you cant cure keratosis pilaris but is there anyway to get rid of the redness?Beause the bumps dont really bug me that much.

    • ANSWER:
      You could try a steriod or anti-inflammatory cream, this should take the redness away within a week - good luck :)

  15. QUESTION:
    I have Keratosis Pilaris, what kind of foundation do you recommend to cover redness?
    I have keratosis pilaris and I was wondering if anyone knows of a foundation that'll cover redness and will last throughout the day. Some brands work but after about an hour or so or when I get really hot the redness on my face shows through...I've tried max factor it works best so far. I've also tried mineral makeups they dont work at all for me. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      Do u get maybelline brands where u live??? Cos maybelline liquid to powder finish is xellent. It blends really well. Leaves skin flawless. Or else u buy a foundation which nearly matches ur skin tone or one which is a shade darker.This one is also gr8 for people with an oily complexion or a normal one.

  16. QUESTION:
    How can I heal my keratosis pilaris?
    I have keratosis pilaris on the backs of my upper arms and all around my upper legs. What can I do to improve my skin and help cure this? I have used a steroid base lotion prescribed by my doctor and I have also tried an over the counter lotion but they only help to a certain degree and then the improvement seems to plateau. Is there anything else I can try?

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately, there is no cure for keratosis pilaris. I have it too, and after meeting with a few dermatologists, I have discovered that all you can really do is wait for it to go away. Most people outgrow keratosis pilaris in their twenties or so. However it does help to keep the area moisturized, especially if you are using some sort of treatment on it.

  17. QUESTION:
    What can I do to help my skin condition, keratosis pilaris?
    I have a skin condition called keratosis pilaris. I was born with it and I get little white bumps on my arms and legs. It looks like pimples/acne but it's not. I have tried every lotion and scrub, but nothing has worked. Does anyone have this skin condition who has had success in reducing the bumpy appearance?

    Also, because I have been picking at the bumps for years, I've gotten scars. Is there a good cream or lotion to make the scars fade away?

    • ANSWER:
      If you keep on scrubbing and loading on products with tons of chemicals it is only going to make your skin get more irritated. If I were you I would such to all organic products. Coconut and emu oil are wonderful for skin. Raw organic shea butter is wonderful also.

      Try going to a health store or look online..I get everything from rose mountain.

      There are many organic oils out there that help reduce inflammation, reddness, scars, etc.

  18. QUESTION:
    What would work better for keratosis pilaris scars: bio oil or maderma?
    I have scars all over my arms from picking and scratching at my bumps on my arms, also know as keratosis pilaris. I have heard good things about both, but before i go and spend on cream, i want to know whats better! And if anyone had keratosis pilaris and used a different cream to get rid of the scars, please let me know!!!
    thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I would recommend using Bio Oil. Its natural and from what ive seen cheaper. But i would recommend exfoliating your arms with any thing that will remove any dead skin and then rub on the Bio Oil. only thing is its really sticky so don't put it on right before you go to bed it will get on everything.

  19. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of keratosis pilaris?
    I have keratosis pilaris on my upper arms and its very noticeable (especially in the winter) are there any cures for it? Like to make it completely go away? I would really love to get rid of this! Thanks for your help!

    • ANSWER:

  20. QUESTION:
    how do you get rid of keratosis pilaris?
    i have eczema, and this keratosis pilaris came during my flareup and i have never ever had it and now my whole body is covered in these skin coloured bumps, is there a way to get rid of this?
    any cleansing baths? or scrubs or remedies? i really just want my skin to go back to normal!
    is it normal for keratosis pilaris to just come out of nowhere? is it curable? are there any prescriptions like betamethasone or any other steroids that can fix it?

    • ANSWER:
      Treatments, elixirs, etc. are just going to be a waste.

      The quickest and easy fix is a chemical exfoliant (for example a Glycol based one that you would use on your face) or even a physical exfoliant will clear it up in as little as three weeks. Enjoy your clear skin!

  21. QUESTION:
    How to diminish the look of keratosis pilaris?
    Well I think I have keratosis pilaris, people told me they might be ingrown hairs but it's not going away. I exfoliate with sugar and my dial body wash on my legs because that's where I have it. Does anyone know how to make the spots less noticeable and blend with my skin better.? Any products that help would be REALLY helpful. Thank you ☺

    • ANSWER:
      I have KP too... it IS the hair follicles, but not ingrown hairs, it's just that the skin cells from the follicles for some reason doesn;t shed in the normal way. The only think you can do is use a loofah or exfoliating sponge on the areas.... using products is expensive and a waste... all you need to do is get rid of the dead skin that is accumulating around the hair follicles, and then use just an ordinary light body lotion.

  22. QUESTION:
    Does Amlactin really work for Keratosis Pilaris?
    Hello everyone, I just bought a bottle of Amlactin lotion 3 days ago, and I was wondering if it really truely works for keratosis pilaris? Has it worked for you, and if so how long does it generally take to see improvements/results? Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      YES IT DOES!!!! I have really bad keratosis pilaris. Amlactin worked within the first two weeks. It didn't completely eliminate the condition, but it makes it less noticeable. I swear by Amlactin!! However, if you stop using it, the keratosis pilaris comes back.

  23. QUESTION:
    How do you recover from Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have severe Karatosis Pilaris on my legs. It's been such a long time since I've wore skirts. I've had it for almost 2 years and it won't go away. It's starting to bother me so much and the doctors don't know what to do...

    Does anyone know of any cures of Keratosis Pilaris? Does Laser Treatment work?

    • ANSWER:
      Try looking at these sites:
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/keratosis-pilaris/DS00769
      http://www.helpforkp.com/

      This site is by someone who also has KP:
      http://www.epinions.com/content_970694788

      Good luck!

  24. QUESTION:
    Hi i have a mild case of Keratosis Pilaris Is there any treatment for it?
    What is keratosis pilaris and how do you get it?

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis it is a genetic folicular condition which can be treated with the help of Forever Living Products. I know some one who has used these products successfully

      http://www.freewebs.com/aloe2you/

  25. QUESTION:
    How to reduce sight of Keratosis Pilaris?
    I've had red bumps on my arms for years now, and after much online research, I've come to the conclusion that these bumps are Keratosis Pilaris.

    I'm wanting to know how to reduce the sight of them. I've heard using a scrub with a loofah helps, but what kind of scrub? Also, I heard lotion helps, but I'm not sure what kind...Cetaphil, Eucerin, AmLactin, etc.

    I'd appreciate any advice! Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      I have had KP for a very long time and I have tried everything to get rid of it. But I have recently discovered a lotion called KP Duty. After two days, the red bumps were gone completely and the redness was reduced. It has been a week and the redness has been greatly reduced. However, the lotion is a bit pricey () but it does spread easily so you don't need a lot of it. Hope this helps. :)

  26. QUESTION:
    Is it a good idea to use hair removal creams such as Veet or Revitol, on areas affected with keratosis pilaris?
    I found this idea on a keratosis pilaris message board:

    ttp://www.keratosispilaris.org/general-discussion/6182-maybe-answer-hair-removal-products.html

    So, anyone here think it would it work?

    • ANSWER:
      I would check with my doctor. You dont' want to make the problem worse.

      GL

  27. QUESTION:
    What's the best way to cover Keratosis Pilaris for a few hours?
    I have severe Keratosis Pilaris on my legs and it sucks that I cannot wear skirts, shorts, swim suits or anything short. Its been here for almost 2 years now and I don't know what to do.

    I was wondering if anyone knows how I could cover it for a couple hours or something. I wanna wear a nice skirt and sit by the lake :(...

    • ANSWER:
      You might try tanning once or twice a week, this has proved to be very effective. The use of tea tree oil and Lubriderm at night has also proved of benefit. When washing in the evening, try sulphur soap with a body scrubber. Clearasil vanishing cream and Lubriderm again in the morning. This should give you a continuing improvement.
      I add a link which discuses the condition.

      http://www.aocd.org/skin
      /dermatologic_diseases/
      keratosis_pilaris.html

      Hope this helps
      Matador 89

  28. QUESTION:
    where can i find a Keratosis Pilaris Kit?
    i realized i have keratosis pilaris...but i was wondering if they have kits or lotions or something at stores nearby stores like cvs, walmart, target...those kind of stores? do you know? i tried looking online but its hard to findout if those stores have them.

    • ANSWER:
      I also have Keratosis pilaris for as long as i could remember (im 15 now ) , theres actually no cure for it whatsoever but there are creams that could lessen the redness and the bumps. I havent used any creams yet for mine so i cant recommend anything.
      I think theyre might be a cream called KPduty or something liek that you could look it up

      good luck

  29. QUESTION:
    What lotion should i use for my Keratosis Pilaris?
    I heard that Amlactin or Eucerin works, but if you have used one which one was it and did it work?
    Or which lotion have you heard works best for keratosis pilaris.

    • ANSWER:

  30. QUESTION:
    How do you get rid of Keratosis Pilaris?
    Hey everyone. I have keratosis pilaris on the backs of my arms and right above my knees. I was just wondering if anyone had ever had them and actually had something done to cure them or to help them. I'm really self conscious of them so that's the worst part. I'm embarassed to wear shorts that show them and they just make me feel uncomfortable. Any help would be appreciated.

    Thanks! :)

    *I am a teenager*

    • ANSWER:
      I'm also a teenager who has keratosis pilaris. I haven't actually tried it, but I've heard a lot about a line of products by Derma Doctor called KP Duty. They make a lotion and an exfoliating scrub, which have both received consistent 5-star reviews on many websites. Many people say using a loofah everyday will help, but that hasn't worked for me. Hope I helped!

      (here is a link to KP Duty)
      http://www.dermadoctor.com/

  31. QUESTION:
    I was wondering about girls and keratosis pilaris?
    I know that 50% or so girls are affected by keratosis pilaris but at my school there is not one girl who I can see with it. At prom everyones arms were KP free. I am an 18 yr old male with KP and I know some fat guys who have it and I use to be fat. Do you have to be fat to get keratosis pilaris?

    • ANSWER:
      No, you don't have to be fat. And the KP is smaller on women than men, because we're smaller overall. And we spend a lot more time caring for our skin than guys do. We exfoliate, scrub, and moisturize. If you did that, your KP would be less visible too.

  32. QUESTION:
    If I have Keratosis Pilaris can I use shampoo with keratin in it?
    I have keratosis pilaris which is when my body creates too much keratin and leaves bumps all over my arms... I am wanting to use a shampoo and conditioner with keratin in it because it would make my coarse hair soft. Can I use it? Or would it make my skin condition worse? I would rinse it completely out and wash my body afterwards of course.

    • ANSWER:

  33. QUESTION:
    Can Keratosis Pilaris disqualify you from the Air Force?
    I go to MEPS in about a week and was wondering if having Keratosis Pilaris on my arms is a problem. It doesn't bother me, it's not contagious, and I don't have any prescription for it.

    (Wikipedia: Bearing only cosmetic consequence, the condition most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy.)

    It shouldn't be a problem right? Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      It's actually a fairly common condition, my husband has it and it's never prevented him from anything. If it's bothering you, try exfoliating the area and applying a lotion with urea or lactic acid in it.

  34. QUESTION:
    I got Keratosis Pilaris how can i get rid of them?
    I got Keratosis Pilaris how can i get rid of them?
    I got Keratosis Pilaris how can i get rid of them?
    i bought salt scrub bar it sais on it gently buff and smooth you skin with exfoliating sea salt ,loofah and softening sweet almond oil..will this help a little bit? can i use it everyday?

    • ANSWER:
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keratosis_pilaris <<<read this website and there are some treatments for it.

  35. QUESTION:
    I got Keratosis Pilaris how can i get rid of them?
    I got Keratosis Pilaris how can i get rid of them?
    i bought salt scrub bar it sais on it gently buff and smooth you skin with exfoliating sea salt ,loofah and softening sweet almond oil..will this help a little bit?

    • ANSWER:
      There is currently no known cure for Keratosis Pilaris (KP); however, there are effective treatments available in our forums.
      http://www.keratosispilaris.org/

      Moisturizing lotions are often soothing and may help the appearance of the skin. Skin creams with medications containing urea, lactic acid, glycolic acid, salicylic acid, tretinoin, or vitamin D may be recommended by your physician. However, improvement often takes months and the bumps are likely to come back.
      http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001462.htm

  36. QUESTION:
    How do you get rid of keratosis pilaris?
    I have keratosis pilaris and am desperate to get rid of it. Anybody that knows a way to get rid of it, has an idea or has experienced it themselves could u please help. this is making me very self conscious :(

    thx so much!!

    • ANSWER:
      I had this condition as well. The "permanent goosebumps" may not seem like a big deal to other people, but I understand how you feel! I have found KP will resolve once nutritional deficiencies are resolved.

      The two main things needed are:

      1. High quality omega-3 supplement like Neptune Antarctic Krill oil. You will also need to back off consumption of omega-6 rich foods because omega-6 competes with omega-3 for absorption.

      2. Adequate minerals. You will want to consider how mineral rich your diet is (probably a little low is my guess!) as well as how well you are absorbing the minerals you take in. Some things that helped me are Vital Earth fulvic minerals (results in just days), cultured foods and drinks (like kombucha, kefir and kimchee) and a Betaine HCl pill that helps me to break down and absorb the foods I eat. I tend to have low stomach acid (many if not most people do!) which makes it difficult to absorb nutrients, especially minerals and fats. No wonder I had KP!

      Try the recommended things above and see how your skin improves.

      CC

  37. QUESTION:
    What's the best way to get rid of keratosis pilaris?
    OK, so I worked out and got a really awesome body and the only thing stopping me from wearing a bathing suit is the keratosis pilaris on my legs. Does anybody know a GREAT way to cure them?

    • ANSWER:
      You should try "oil pulling" with coconut oil, take a look at this link
      http://www.keratosispilaris.org/showthread.php?t=4335
      It looks like it could be an answer, hopefully this helps!

  38. QUESTION:
    how can I be cured from Keratosis pilaris?
    Keratosis pilaris is a skin condition in which keratin protein forms within hair follicles thus making the skin appear scaly or like chicken skin.Keratosis pilaris symptoms vary – it can be found on your face, arms or thighs. It can be very bumpy or very red or both.

    • ANSWER:
      Nothing helps except for carrot juice. Carrot juice has been shown to either cure and or significantly reduce the Keratosis Pilaris symptoms for some people. To get results however you will want to drink a pint of carrot juice daily until the Keratosis Pilaris symptoms begin to disappear. It is thought that the reason carrot juice is effective in treating Keratosis Pilaris is because of the high levels of vitamin A within the fresh juice. Vitamin A is one of the most important for the health of your skin, nails, and hair. You could buy it at Wal-Mart. You could also search on google for keratosis pilaris/carrot juice.

      Good luck!

  39. QUESTION:
    What is the keratosis pilaris treatment "oil pulling"?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris on my arms and I have been reading up on all kinds of treatments as there's no cure. "Oil pulling" is what most people have found to be effective treatment, I keep seeing it again and again but, one problem, nobody actually explains exactly what it is! Any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      Oil pulling means to swish a vegetable oil around in your mouth, kind of like mouthwash. I like using coconut oil because it tastes best. It kills germs in your mouth and is pretty effective (if you ever get a toothache, it really does help!). But it doesn't do much for skin conditions, unless those conditions are caused by too much bacteria in your mouth...
      If you want to try it, it wouldn't hurt, but honestly I don't see it doing much for you lol

      Try scrubbing the area gently with some wet brown sugar while in the shower, then rub a bit of diluted apple cider vinegar on the area. This is what I do and it helps

  40. QUESTION:
    how can i get rid of keratosis pilaris?
    i have keratosis pilaris on my face, upper arms and upper thighs. ive been to a dermatologist and received creams, but they didnt work. how can i get rid of keratosis pilaris?

    • ANSWER:

  41. QUESTION:
    What do you think causes Keratosis Pilaris?
    Genetics is a stupid answer that doctors give us so they can gain profit from us buying creams that only cover the symptoms. I believe people who have family history of Keratosis Pilaris are more susceptible to it, though.

    What do you think causes this annoying problem that covers my face?

    • ANSWER:
      for acne,fair complexion,tanning,sunburn,marks,
      spots,make up tips,hair issues n other skin n hair problems
      u can refer to dis website
      http://skincaretipps2733.notlong.com
      it has got so many tips n free beauty samples
      for curing acne and all your skin problems

  42. QUESTION:
    How do I know if I have Keratosis Pilaris, and will it fade over years?
    I have these little bumps on my arms and legs (they almost cover them entirely) and sometimes have dead skin attached to the end of the hair. Is this keratosis pilaris?

    I use exfoliating gloves all the time but it doesn't seem to be working.

    I'm only a teenager, so it might fade but is there a chance that it won't?

    Thank-you (in advance)

    :) 8D

    • ANSWER:
      It seems like you have Keratosis Pilaris because i used to have the same exact thing. It may fade away, but if it hasn't faded when your 16 or so, you might have it your lifetime.

      If you would like to get rid of them, i have solutions because i tried these and it definetly worked for me.

      From now on, Put lotion on the area where bumps are present.
      And try to keep this area mosterized.

      There is a lotion out there to treat Keratosis Pilaris. It's called Amlactin. Usually found in Costco. It should be gone if you used it everyday when the bottle is half empty.

      If that does not work, see a local dermatologists for they can give you prescribed medicine for it.

      Hope i helped =]]

  43. QUESTION:
    Will there ever be a cure for Keratosis Pilaris?
    Keratosis Pilaris is a skin disorder which you are born with it. I am aware there are treatments, but I'm wondering will somebody make a cure for it to vanish off my skin forever?

    • ANSWER:
      Probably not. It is not life threatening. So most pharmaceutical companies wouldn't bother with the research to find a cure or develop more specific treatments. You could go to college and go into research yourself and make this a priority though. It often takes someone with a personal interest in something to find a breakthrough.

  44. QUESTION:
    Is bare essentials makeup good coverage for keratosis pilaris?
    I have keratosis pilaris (very dry, red marks) on the face and arms and was just wondering is bare minerals good coverage of this? currently using estee lauder which i find i have to cake on for coverage, hate it! thanks for any help

    • ANSWER:

  45. QUESTION:
    does anyone know how to reduce the redness in keratosis pilaris?
    i have had keratosis pilaris since about 8 months of age. does anyone know anything that really helps with the redness.that is what is most embaressing for me cause everyone can see it from a mile away.

    • ANSWER:
      Try a cream such as Acid mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 after bathing, and re-apply the cream again several times daily.

      If this does not help, change to a medicated cream containing urea (Curel, Carmol-20) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily - it may be too irritating to use more often. More aggressive home treatment can be done if ones skin can tolerate it. The plugged pores can be removed by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth, stiff brush, or 'Buf-Puf'.

      Prescription medicines that may help include antibiotics (Erythromycin, Bactrim) if the spots are very red and Tazorac Cream. Tazorac, a relative of vitamin A, may cause irritation in some people.

  46. QUESTION:
    How to make Keratosis Pilaris less noticable?
    So i have keratosis pilaris? and i know you cant get rid of so dont answer saying "you cant", i dont wanna hear that bs. i just wanna know how to make it less noticable? its realy embarrasing.

    • ANSWER:
      Buy a moisturizing lotion that has alpha hydroxy acid in it. That's what my dermatologist recommended for me and it seemed to work.

      I haven't had problems in a while, ever since I found a bath soap that really moisturizes my skin. I use Dove's extra rich moisturizing soap. It comes in a maroon bottle. I scrub with one of those nylon net poufy things. My skin looks great now.

  47. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of my Keratosis pilaris?!?
    I'm 16 & i have Keratosis pilaris, I really hate it because im embarrassed to show my arms. Is there any creams or anything that will help me get rid of it or at least make it less noticeable?

    • ANSWER:
      I too, have KP, and you are totally right--it is embarrassing. Take heart, however, because something like 50% of us have it. Here are some treatment hints:

      --lotion may help improve the symptoms, because dry weather worsens them
      --DO NOT use OTC acne meds. KP is not acne, and the ingredients in these creams, etc. will only irritate and dry out your skin, making it even worse.
      --DO NOT pick at them! You'll be left with terrible scars.
      --if you go to the dermatologist, you'll probably be given a peel. This will help improve the condition temporarily, but since it's a chronic condition it won't be a cure. You can also buy products to help "stimulate turnover." The problem is that most of them are pretty expensive.

      I ended up doing a bunch of research and developed a product that has worked really well for me. You have to use it twice a day, but I've found an 85-90% improvement (and it started to work almost immediately). You can buy it here:
      http://www.etsy.com/listing/66157122/miracle-serum-20-oz
      I bottle should last you a few months, if you are using the right amounts.

      You can also try some of the products listed here:
      http://www.helpforkp.com/keratosis_pilaris_treatment_index.html
      but since I've not tried any of them, I can't vouch for them. Good luck!

  48. QUESTION:
    Will the keratosis pilaris on my upper right arm disqualify me from joining army at MEPS?
    I have small dry bumps all over my upper right arm. Ive had them ever since i was little. I have some scarring from picking and i have tan skin so the scarring is a little dark. I think it is some thing called "keratosis pilaris" but ive always been told it was dry skin. I was wanting to know if its something i should worry about. I really dont want to be disqualified.

    • ANSWER:
      Yeah, it's considered to be an STD.

  49. QUESTION:
    Can you join the marines with Keratosis pilaris?
    I've recently found out that i have keratosis pilaris but it's not all severe i've never had to have medicine for it. It's on my top arms near the biceps and a little on my shoulders. Although I've always noticed the bumps and never thought anything of it.
    I talked to a friend and he said it'd probably be passable cause I've never had to use medicine.
    I need some help with this.

    I'm 17.

    • ANSWER:
      its not contagious or infectious. I think your good !


how do you get keratosis pilaris

Keratosis Pilaris Lotions

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How to cover keratosis pilaris on arms with makeup for a day?
    My girlfriend wants to wear a sundress for a photo shoot but she has keratosis pilaris on her arms...google it if you don't know what it is and would like to know.

    She is mostly concerned with the redness.
    She already uses lotions etc. Doesn't help.

    Is there like a body makeup she can cover it with that will last ?

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Try the Dermablend Leg Cover... You can use it on arms as well.

      I have found 'Sheer Color'. It is the best for covering redness and leaving skin looking natural. I think it is only available through mail order. It was developed by dermatologists to hide redness, scars, and birth marks. It comes with a concealer. The makeup itself is mineral and gives good coverage, but it is light and natural.

      If her arms flare up, I have found a product that contains Extra Virgin Coconut Oil helps calm the redness down.

      You can also trry Pulse Dye Laser treatment. It is a little radical but it is long-lasting and helpful.

      Palladio is NOTHING compared to bareminerals from bare escentuals. The only thing I have to say is that they have poor costumer service and organization. The makeup will cover redness in a very natural way. It will look like you have no makeup on.

      One month ago I started using the Herbal wet & dry foundation and it is great. They are not very expensive, either. Well, on Amazon.com it is dollars but I found it in Puerto Rico at . :D

      I use eucerin 10% Urea lotion on my skin twice a day.

      I also use Everyday Minerals makeup. They have a mint concealer that is great for covering redness. Also another concealer is Bisque; it is quite pink in color but it somehow manages to cover redness very well. These are used under mineral foundation. You can get free samples, although you have to pay a bit for the postage.

      I am ignorant about UO, but this makeup is great for my skin! I bought it from the Sally Beauty Shop in the U.S. I think the mildness by being talc and rice may have something to do with it and I have found that titanium dioxide makes all my KP worse, whether on my face or arms (sunscreen) or what. It even has chamomile which I suspect is an allergen for me but maybe it's so little or it's tempered by other ingredients. I have even used it on my arms and legs when needed. O:)

      Try Roc Skin Foundation.

  2. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of Keratosis Pilaris fast?
    i really dont like this, i cant wear short sleeves shirts, i need help !!! Give me a lot of informations as you guys can , and also what type of lotions work for Keratosis Pilaris?? Aloe vera lotion? thanks ;)

    • ANSWER:
      I found that champori cream for psoriasis clears my kp better than anything else: takes just a few days and then my skin stays smooth for months on end. Try it: champori is available without prescription and comes with money back guarantee, so if it doesnt work for you - it's free.
      Best,
      Mol.

  3. QUESTION:
    Are there any inexpensive and affective treatments for Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris (chicken skin) and I haven't been able to find anything that really works. I've gotten lotions from my doctor but that doesn't completely help.
    Is there any inexpensive and affective treatment that really helps or helped you?
    Thanks in advance!

    • ANSWER:
      Try a loofah to exfolitate:

      To treat keratosis pilaris patients can try several strategies to lessen the bumps. First, the patient can supplement the natural removal of dry skin and papules by using a loofah or another type of scrub showering or bathing. A variety of different over-the-counter (OTC) lotions, ointments, and creams can also be applied after showering while the skin is still moist and then several times a day to keep the area moist. Medicated lotions with urea, 15% alphahydroxy acids, or Retin A can also be prescribed by the dermatologist and applied one to two times daily. Systemic (oral) medications are not prescribed for keratosis pilaris. However if papules are opened and become infected, antibiotics may be necessary to treat the infection.

      I hope using a loofah, or something similar, helps you. As you no doubt already knew (and can read in the article), keratosis pilaris is difficult to treat. Good luck.

  4. QUESTION:
    How can I get rid of the appearance of Keratosis Pilaris?
    Ok so I've had keratosis pilaris for practically all of my life. Its been bugging me ever since. So today I went to the doctor and they said I indeed have keratosis pilaris, and gave me a prescription to buy this special lotion. I don't know how else can I resolve this quicker and make the bumps go away and feel smooth.

    • ANSWER:
      keratosis pilaris isn't curable, but this will diminish it's visibility..

      There is this new popular cream that people have been talking about.

      It was even televised on TV.

      It prevents future and existing acne, diminishes scars, and lightens skin and blemishes. Fast results too! (It's been claimed that major results can be seen within a week and no later than two weeks)

      Before and After photos are available at the given ebay site.

      This person is providing 1-3 week trial samples (Only for ONE DOLLAR.. definitely a deal) on ebay at:

      Search up "Cee En's Acne Solution" or "best acne solution ever" on ebay.

      First 100 customers can get the item for for one week trial and up to 3 weeks. Or you can purchase 1 month supply for or 6 month supply for 0

      It's expensive, but the product DOES work.

      My sister and cousin who both have major acne have tried the product and they both give it thumbs up. I have also heard many great feedbacks about this cream.

      I don't have a problem with acne, but it seems to have great results on my sister who has moderate to severe acne. Her acne swelling went away overnight.

      check the seller's feedbacks on the cream

      I hope this helps. =)

  5. QUESTION:
    What can I do to help my skin condition, keratosis pilaris?
    I have a skin condition called keratosis pilaris. I was born with it and I get little white bumps on my arms and legs. It looks like pimples/acne but it's not. I have tried every lotion and scrub, but nothing has worked. Does anyone have this skin condition who has had success in reducing the bumpy appearance?

    Also, because I have been picking at the bumps for years, I've gotten scars. Is there a good cream or lotion to make the scars fade away?

    • ANSWER:
      If you keep on scrubbing and loading on products with tons of chemicals it is only going to make your skin get more irritated. If I were you I would such to all organic products. Coconut and emu oil are wonderful for skin. Raw organic shea butter is wonderful also.

      Try going to a health store or look online..I get everything from rose mountain.

      There are many organic oils out there that help reduce inflammation, reddness, scars, etc.

  6. QUESTION:
    Can keratosis pilaris alba be removed by a laser?
    I have keratosis pilaris alba on my upper thighs and buttocks, and I want it gone. I've tried many creams and such, but nothing works, and it's pain having to put lotion on all the time. Is laser keratosis removal possible? If it is, do you have any idea how much it is?

    • ANSWER:
      ive had it on my upper arm for 5 yrs now and just like you ive tried so many creams and lotions and went to so many doctors .. and nothing works

      i think laser (for hair removal) does help because 6 months ago i went to this dermatologist and she did a little test on my arm and now six months later the area where i did the test is clear without any spots and also NO HAIR.. .
      i waited this long because i have sensitive skin and i wanted to see if it really does work .. and it did

      and she also said that it does go away 70% after 4 or 5 sessions
      im gonna go do my full arms soon cuz im really sick of it

      why dont you go make a test ,,,most laser centers do make a small test .. im sure it will work ..

      good luck :)

  7. QUESTION:
    What lotion should i use for my Keratosis Pilaris?
    I heard that Amlactin or Eucerin works, but if you have used one which one was it and did it work?
    Or which lotion have you heard works best for keratosis pilaris.

    • ANSWER:

  8. QUESTION:
    What lotion should i use for my Keratosis Pilaris?
    I heard that Amlactin or Eucerin works, but if you have used one which one was it and did it work?
    Or which lotion have you heard works best for keratosis pilaris.

    • ANSWER:
      Derma Doctor KP Derm. My girlfriend says it works wonders. Sephora.com

  9. QUESTION:
    What are the most affective treatments for Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have a mild case of Keratosis Pilaris on my forearms & biceps. I know there's no permanent cure for this skin condition, but I would like to clear it up for the most part.

    • ANSWER:
      I have keratosis pilaris on my upper arms, and I use Aveeno Daily Moisturizing Lotion. It works better than anything else that I've tried, and it's much cheaper than prescription creams! Keeping KP moist is key to reducing the bumps and redness. It works for me!

  10. QUESTION:
    What are some Over the Counter treatments for Keratosis Pilaris?
    From doing some research, and looking at pictures, I believe I have keratosis pilaris (on my thighs). What are some over the counter treatments that work well to cure keratosis pilaris?

    • ANSWER:
      Because it is hereditary, there is no way to cure or prevent keratosis pilaris. However, it may lessen over time with age.

      In some patients, the condition clears up on its own. When it does not, patients may choose to seek treatment for cosmetic reasons. There are several treatments aimed at softening the keratin deposits in the skin to improve its appearance. They include:

      Moisturizing lotions. Dry skin makes the condition worse, so applying moisturizer twice daily is important. Lotions that contain urea help the skin retain moisture and products that contain lactic acid or salicylic acid help to dissolve and exfoliate the keratin. Moisturizer should be applied immediately after bathing.

      Loofah sponges or brushes. Rubbing the affected areas after a long soak in a hot bath may help to unclog the plugged hair follicles.

      Topical retinoids. Class of chemical compounds that are chemically related to vitamin A. These drugs regulate skin growth but can be very irritating.

      These are just a couple of the available treatment for keratosis pilaris. Take a look at this site for some additional information that I think you'll find helpful : ) It's great that you're educating yourself!

      http://skin.health.ivillage.com/acneblemish/keratosispilaris.cfm

  11. QUESTION:
    How to reduce sight of Keratosis Pilaris?
    I've had red bumps on my arms for years now, and after much online research, I've come to the conclusion that these bumps are Keratosis Pilaris.

    I'm wanting to know how to reduce the sight of them. I've heard using a scrub with a loofah helps, but what kind of scrub? Also, I heard lotion helps, but I'm not sure what kind...Cetaphil, Eucerin, AmLactin, etc.

    I'd appreciate any advice! Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      I have had KP for a very long time and I have tried everything to get rid of it. But I have recently discovered a lotion called KP Duty. After two days, the red bumps were gone completely and the redness was reduced. It has been a week and the redness has been greatly reduced. However, the lotion is a bit pricey () but it does spread easily so you don't need a lot of it. Hope this helps. :)

  12. QUESTION:
    How can i make my keratosis pilaris go away?
    I'm 14 and have keratosis pilaris on my arms, chest, back, stomach, legs and really bad on my thighs and butt. What are the best non prescription things that you found to work for you. And i already know that there is not permanent cure and it's hereditary and only cosmetic but what are ways that you know work for you and are relatively easy?

    • ANSWER:
      Aveeno lotions help me out a lot. I have like the whole line of products and they have helped me keep it under control for the most part.

  13. QUESTION:
    How can I heal my keratosis pilaris?
    I have keratosis pilaris on the backs of my upper arms and all around my upper legs. What can I do to improve my skin and help cure this? I have used a steroid base lotion prescribed by my doctor and I have also tried an over the counter lotion but they only help to a certain degree and then the improvement seems to plateau. Is there anything else I can try?

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately, there is no cure for keratosis pilaris. I have it too, and after meeting with a few dermatologists, I have discovered that all you can really do is wait for it to go away. Most people outgrow keratosis pilaris in their twenties or so. However it does help to keep the area moisturized, especially if you are using some sort of treatment on it.

  14. QUESTION:
    Does Amlactin really work for Keratosis Pilaris?
    Hello everyone, I just bought a bottle of Amlactin lotion 3 days ago, and I was wondering if it really truely works for keratosis pilaris? Has it worked for you, and if so how long does it generally take to see improvements/results? Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      YES IT DOES!!!! I have really bad keratosis pilaris. Amlactin worked within the first two weeks. It didn't completely eliminate the condition, but it makes it less noticeable. I swear by Amlactin!! However, if you stop using it, the keratosis pilaris comes back.

  15. QUESTION:
    What is the best product for Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris on my buttocks and I have been researching different products. There are quite a few and I don't know which to go with. There's Glytone, KP duty, Biotreatment. Has anyone had success with any of these or a better product? I have dark olive skin and I scar very easily...even without picking, so I'm hoping for a product that helps with that as well.

    • ANSWER:
      I know how you feel. I had Keratosis Pilaris too and always wore long sleeves even when it was really hot. I started using Paula's Choice 2% BHA and it cleared up completely within a few weeks. I don't know if it works for everyone, but it seems to work for a lot of people. I've told several people about it and it has worked for everyone I've told. It is a fairly common thing.

      I started with their liquid formula but I also have used their 2% BHA body lotion. I recommend the liquid to start. You can find out a lot more about KP and the various treatments and products here: http://cosmeticscop.paulaschoice.com/keratosis-pilaris-solutions.aspx

      Good Luck!

  16. QUESTION:
    How to diminish the look of keratosis pilaris?
    Well I think I have keratosis pilaris, people told me they might be ingrown hairs but it's not going away. I exfoliate with sugar and my dial body wash on my legs because that's where I have it. Does anyone know how to make the spots less noticeable and blend with my skin better.? Any products that help would be REALLY helpful. Thank you ☺

    • ANSWER:
      I have KP too... it IS the hair follicles, but not ingrown hairs, it's just that the skin cells from the follicles for some reason doesn;t shed in the normal way. The only think you can do is use a loofah or exfoliating sponge on the areas.... using products is expensive and a waste... all you need to do is get rid of the dead skin that is accumulating around the hair follicles, and then use just an ordinary light body lotion.

  17. QUESTION:
    where can i find a Keratosis Pilaris Kit?
    i realized i have keratosis pilaris...but i was wondering if they have kits or lotions or something at stores nearby stores like cvs, walmart, target...those kind of stores? do you know? i tried looking online but its hard to findout if those stores have them.

    • ANSWER:
      I also have Keratosis pilaris for as long as i could remember (im 15 now ) , theres actually no cure for it whatsoever but there are creams that could lessen the redness and the bumps. I havent used any creams yet for mine so i cant recommend anything.
      I think theyre might be a cream called KPduty or something liek that you could look it up

      good luck

  18. QUESTION:
    Can Keratosis Pilaris disqualify you from the Air Force?
    I go to MEPS in about a week and was wondering if having Keratosis Pilaris on my arms is a problem. It doesn't bother me, it's not contagious, and I don't have any prescription for it.

    (Wikipedia: Bearing only cosmetic consequence, the condition most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy.)

    It shouldn't be a problem right? Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      It's actually a fairly common condition, my husband has it and it's never prevented him from anything. If it's bothering you, try exfoliating the area and applying a lotion with urea or lactic acid in it.

  19. QUESTION:
    When and how often should I apply Apple Cider Vinegar on my Keratosis Pilaris?
    I've been suffering from Keratosis Pilaris (those acne-like red bumps) on both of my upper arms for years now. After a lot of research, I came across a forum suggesting that Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV) can cure KP and many of the users praised ACV as a cure. For those whom it worked for: how often should I apply ACV on my arms and during which time of the day (morning, afternoon or night) ? Help is much appreciated!

    • ANSWER:
      once a day homie, there is a mixture on my source site that is suppose to work, i'm heading towards to store tonight to make my own lotion

  20. QUESTION:
    how can i cure my keratosis pilaris?
    i have keratosis pilaris, which is like red bumps all over my thighs and upper arms. i've tried alot of different lotions and exfoliators. what can i do?

    • ANSWER:
      There is no cure unfortunately. Just scrubbing with a luffa sponge, and then applying a lotion that is rich with vitamin E helps quite a bit. Applying lotions when you wake up and like an hour before you go to bed helps too.

  21. QUESTION:
    How do you get rid of Keratosis Pilaris?
    Hey everyone. I have keratosis pilaris on the backs of my arms and right above my knees. I was just wondering if anyone had ever had them and actually had something done to cure them or to help them. I'm really self conscious of them so that's the worst part. I'm embarassed to wear shorts that show them and they just make me feel uncomfortable. Any help would be appreciated.

    Thanks! :)

    *I am a teenager*

    • ANSWER:
      I'm also a teenager who has keratosis pilaris. I haven't actually tried it, but I've heard a lot about a line of products by Derma Doctor called KP Duty. They make a lotion and an exfoliating scrub, which have both received consistent 5-star reviews on many websites. Many people say using a loofah everyday will help, but that hasn't worked for me. Hope I helped!

      (here is a link to KP Duty)
      http://www.dermadoctor.com/

  22. QUESTION:
    How do I get the smell of my lotion to fade?
    I use this papaya lotion because it makes my skin look great, but I'm not a fan of the smell. I like using fresh, clean scents, and I always wear Gap's Washed Cotton perfume. Those two scents definitely clash and don't mix well together, how can I make the smell of my lotion go away faster. I don't want to stop using it because its the only think that gets rid of the keratosis pilaris (red bumps) on my arms!

    • ANSWER:
      Wait half an hour.

  23. QUESTION:
    Any treatment recommendations for Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have a skin condition called Keratosis Pilaris, which is rough bumps on upper arms and on thighs and legs. It is not eczema or acne, but it is like small red bumps on the skin. It is unsightly and I want to get rid of it. Any suggestions for lessening the appearance or getting rid of it? I've already tryed a loofa, multiple types of sponges, and moisturizing lotion such as Aveeno & Eucerin. Any advice will be appreciated, thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Small doses of the sun help - I won't say go and lay out but healthy sun helps -
      A lufa with a thick oil like Vaseline Intensive Care Cocoa butter
      helps soften the skin.

  24. QUESTION:
    How to make Keratosis Pilaris less noticable?
    So i have keratosis pilaris? and i know you cant get rid of so dont answer saying "you cant", i dont wanna hear that bs. i just wanna know how to make it less noticable? its realy embarrasing.

    • ANSWER:
      Buy a moisturizing lotion that has alpha hydroxy acid in it. That's what my dermatologist recommended for me and it seemed to work.

      I haven't had problems in a while, ever since I found a bath soap that really moisturizes my skin. I use Dove's extra rich moisturizing soap. It comes in a maroon bottle. I scrub with one of those nylon net poufy things. My skin looks great now.

  25. QUESTION:
    I got Keratosis Pilaris how can i get rid of them?
    I got Keratosis Pilaris how can i get rid of them?
    i bought salt scrub bar it sais on it gently buff and smooth you skin with exfoliating sea salt ,loofah and softening sweet almond oil..will this help a little bit?

    • ANSWER:
      There is currently no known cure for Keratosis Pilaris (KP); however, there are effective treatments available in our forums.
      http://www.keratosispilaris.org/

      Moisturizing lotions are often soothing and may help the appearance of the skin. Skin creams with medications containing urea, lactic acid, glycolic acid, salicylic acid, tretinoin, or vitamin D may be recommended by your physician. However, improvement often takes months and the bumps are likely to come back.
      http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001462.htm

  26. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris and I have it very severely. And I'm SO self conscious about it.
    I wanted to know how to get rid of it or just even make it less noticeable.
    I've tried scrubbing and lotion and all that stuff.
    Should I go to the doctor?
    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately there is not much that can be done for this condition. I have had a mild case of it all my life, my daughter's is worse, and my 10 year old grandson has it really badly on his arms and legs. If you want to go to a dermatologist, they might give you something for it, but from what I have read, not much can be done. A cortosteroid cream for eczema may help or Retin A (for acne), but most doctors recommend OTC treatments like Eucerin Cream.
      Something I found out though is that about 40% of the population has this disorder, so you are not alone. I know that is not of much consolation, sorry I couldn't give you better news.

  27. QUESTION:
    How Can I get rid of Keratosis Pilaris?
    I'm 14 and I have Keratosis Pilaris (Kp) everywhere. Kp is a common genetic skin condition where you get little bumps on your skin. But mine is on my arms, forearms, thighs, face, neck, chest, stomach, and on my shoulder blades. It wont go away. I used Amlactin (lotion) tried everything! Not to be all into myself or anything, but I am an attractive person, but I cant let girls touch me becuz of my rough skin. Its ruining EVERYTHING! How can I treat this thing, plz help!

    • ANSWER:
      I have KP on my arms and legs and I just recently bought KP Elements exfoliating lotion... My arms are so smooth and it even reduces the redness too. Even after the first application, I noticed a big difference. It's about for a small jar of it but it's definitely worth the money. I am very grateful they made this product!

  28. QUESTION:
    How do I know if I have Keratosis Pilaris, and will it fade over years?
    I have these little bumps on my arms and legs (they almost cover them entirely) and sometimes have dead skin attached to the end of the hair. Is this keratosis pilaris?

    I use exfoliating gloves all the time but it doesn't seem to be working.

    I'm only a teenager, so it might fade but is there a chance that it won't?

    Thank-you (in advance)

    :) 8D

    • ANSWER:
      It seems like you have Keratosis Pilaris because i used to have the same exact thing. It may fade away, but if it hasn't faded when your 16 or so, you might have it your lifetime.

      If you would like to get rid of them, i have solutions because i tried these and it definetly worked for me.

      From now on, Put lotion on the area where bumps are present.
      And try to keep this area mosterized.

      There is a lotion out there to treat Keratosis Pilaris. It's called Amlactin. Usually found in Costco. It should be gone if you used it everyday when the bottle is half empty.

      If that does not work, see a local dermatologists for they can give you prescribed medicine for it.

      Hope i helped =]]

  29. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of my Keratosis pilaris?!?
    I'm 16 & i have Keratosis pilaris, I really hate it because im embarrassed to show my arms. Is there any creams or anything that will help me get rid of it or at least make it less noticeable?

    • ANSWER:
      I too, have KP, and you are totally right--it is embarrassing. Take heart, however, because something like 50% of us have it. Here are some treatment hints:

      --lotion may help improve the symptoms, because dry weather worsens them
      --DO NOT use OTC acne meds. KP is not acne, and the ingredients in these creams, etc. will only irritate and dry out your skin, making it even worse.
      --DO NOT pick at them! You'll be left with terrible scars.
      --if you go to the dermatologist, you'll probably be given a peel. This will help improve the condition temporarily, but since it's a chronic condition it won't be a cure. You can also buy products to help "stimulate turnover." The problem is that most of them are pretty expensive.

      I ended up doing a bunch of research and developed a product that has worked really well for me. You have to use it twice a day, but I've found an 85-90% improvement (and it started to work almost immediately). You can buy it here:
      http://www.etsy.com/listing/66157122/miracle-serum-20-oz
      I bottle should last you a few months, if you are using the right amounts.

      You can also try some of the products listed here:
      http://www.helpforkp.com/keratosis_pilaris_treatment_index.html
      but since I've not tried any of them, I can't vouch for them. Good luck!

  30. QUESTION:
    CHICKEN SKIN aka KERATOSIS PILARIS, how do I get rid of these suckers?
    Does anyone know how to reduce the appearence of chicken skin or also known as keratosis pilaris. I hate having chicken skin, it's so embarassing. I hate showing my arms and legs or any part that has it. ARRRGH! Anyone else have this problem? Please help, I need some magic lotion or something to get rid of them somehow.

    • ANSWER:
      I have it too & it sucks!! I have previously used Am Lactin or Lac Hydrin, Retin-A based creams, and KP duty. The KP duty used to work for me, but doesn't any longer. It might work you you & is available at Sephora.

      Check out http://www.keratosispilaris.org/

      I found this online and am going to give it a try.

      - First I use a thick loofah sponge or buff-puff on the affected areas. I do this daily and I only use Dove Nutrium Body Wash with my sponge. I have tried several moisturizing body washes, and this one has proven to be the best for me. It is a dual formula that contains a gentle cleanser and a moisturizing lotion at the same time. It works great. When using the sponge, scrub as hard as you can on the affected area, and in a circular motion. Exfoliation is very important, especially since the affected areas are so dry. (Note: Dove has also recently come out with a Dove Nutrium Bar! So now I use both, and they are great. They make my skin so soft and silky, and the moisturizers are very good for the keratosis pilaris.)

      - After I exfoliate with this body wash, I then apply an over the counter lotion that has worked wonders for my keratosis pilaris. Neutrogena makes this lotion and it’s called “Multi-Vitamin Acne Treatment”. I know what you are thinking; keratosis pilaris is not acne. No it’s not, but for some reason this stuff works. In my reading and research on the subject, I ran across a treatment that recommended using a moisturizer that contained a small amount of salicylic acid. This product contains both. It is full of vitamins and moisturizers that are great for your skin, and it also contains this salicylic acid. If you apply this lotion right after you have scrubbed with the Dove Nutrium, it will give you results within 2 or 3 days. It did for me!

      - I also apply the Neutrogena Multi Vitamin Acne Treatment at night before going to bed. So I am applying it twice a day, once after showering and exfoliating, and once at bedtime.

      - Adding a humidifier in your bedroom will also help to clear your skin. The moisture will hydrate your dry skin while you sleep at night and help in clearing up the keratosis pilaris.

      - This next “treatment” is one I have found on my own and doctors do not recommend it. I am not telling anyone to do this, I am simply telling you what has worked in clearing up my skin condition. Tanning in the sun or in a tanning bed/salon. I like to tan anyway, so by trial and error I found that it cleared my skin. I started going to a tanning bed 2 or 3 times a week at first, and then dropped down to once a week. Each time I would tan for 12 to 15 minutes. That is not a lot of exposure, and it cleared my skin better than ANYTHING else I have ever done. I still have occasional problems with my arms, but my legs cleared right up and those bumps have never returned to this day, and I have not tanned in over 6 months. So I am very pleased with these results.

      Again, I am not recommending or condoning tanning or sunbathing, but I am telling you that it has helped to clear up my terrible case of Keratosis Pilaris.

      Doing these things consistently has helped me tremendously, but if you miss a day, you pay! Consistency is the key.

  31. QUESTION:
    Good liquid foundations and concealers to cover extreme redness?
    I have keratosis pilaris on my skin and that makes my cheeks really bumpy and red. I have lotion for the bumpiness but i dosent help with the redness and i need to find a good full coverage concealer and foundation that doesnt look cakey, lasts a long time, and looks natural. By natural i mean that if you look at someone they cant tell that you have concealer and foundation on. Do you know any brands or concealers that live up to these expecations? Please and thank you :)

    • ANSWER:
      use a green tinted primer. I think Elf just came out with a green primer, but if your willing to spend on something, get the smash box primer with a good tint. I have pretty bad redness like you but i am just naturally red skinned. I use revlon colorstay foundation. It has really good coverage, but not too much. enough to cover the blemishes. I put a dime sized amount on the back of my hand and i buff it into my skin using the sigma round top kabuki brush. then i use my fingers to really ensure that its blended in. I find that when i use my fingers i get alot more of a natural appearance. then i use my make up for ever concealer palette in light (it comes with a green concealer that is very pigmented and useful for spot redness) and i use that to conceal any blemishes. i use the maybelline fit me concealer in light for under my eyes! hope i helped :)

  32. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of Keratosis Pilaris?
    Help! I have Keratosis Pilaris (the small "goosebumps") on my lower butt. What is a preferably quick, at home remedy to get rid of this? Also, how often should I wash my jeans to keep this from happening?

    • ANSWER:
      I know how you feel. I had Keratosis Pilaris too and always wore long sleeves to hide it even when it was really hot. I started using Paula's Choice 2% BHA and it cleared up completely within a few weeks. I don't know if it works for everyone, but it seems to work for a lot of people. I've told several people about it and it has worked for everyone I've told. KP is a fairly common thing.

      I started with their liquid formula but I also have used their 2% BHA body lotion. I recommend the liquid to start. You can find out a lot more about KP and the various treatments and products here: http://cosmeticscop.paulaschoice.com/keratosis-pilaris-solutions.aspx

      Good Luck!

  33. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know how to treat or get rid of keratosis pilaris?
    Keratosis pilaris is a genetic skin disease that is actually pretty common.

    • ANSWER:
      http://www.helpforkp.com/

      My daughter and I also use Mustela Baby Lotion. It doesn't make it go away completely but it helps a lot. You can find it at BabiesRUs or on www.babycenter.com.

  34. QUESTION:
    What can I get at a normal store to get rid of the red bumps on the backs of my forearms and thighs?
    I know it is probably something called keratosis pilaris that doesn't have a "cure". Can somebody give me products that would help that I can buy at a store?

    • ANSWER:
      honestly, don't spend a lot of money on fancy things for it. Buy an exfoliating soap with the little beads in it, and a hand exfoliating scrubber, and EXFOLIATE. Do this everyday in the shower and put little but of lotion after. You should see results within 3-4 weeks! good luck xox <3

  35. QUESTION:
    I Have Keratosis Pilaris and need a quick fix?
    Since being pregnant my keratosis pilaris has gotten worse on my arms. I have been working on it for the past month and a half getting ready for a wedding this coming weekend, I still don't have any results. Help? My dress is strapless so bare arms!

    • ANSWER:
      There's a lotion called "AmLactin" that is supposed to work. You can get it over the counter at any drugstore.

  36. QUESTION:
    I have keratosis pilaris what can i use to help tame it?
    I have keratosis pilaris also known as chicken skin on my arms and other parts of my body but its one my thighs where its the worst I live in london and I was just wondering if there are any products that can help to make the condition less visible as I have been told there in no treatment that can get rid of the skin condition. Thanks x

    • ANSWER:
      Exfoliation is the key to getting rid of keratosis pilaris.

      Alpha Hydrox AHA Enhanced Lotion with 10% glycolic acid
      Glytone Body Lotion with 17.5% glycolic acid
      Any of Paula's Choice exfoliant will work

      Avoid heavy moisturizer, because they can exacerbate the condition.

      Cheers!

  37. QUESTION:
    why did my keratosis pilaris turn purple?
    i have keratosis pilaris all over my arms and tummy area and it got really really bad and red because of the cold winter. that convinced my mum to take me to see a pharmacist and the pharmacist gave me some calamine lotion. i've been applying it and applying moisturizer (it really really hurts when i apply them), it really helps calm the itch and i scratch less but now my whole arm is purplish and so is the skin at my tummy area. is this good or bad?

    • ANSWER:
      had bad case of KP on my arms for years...went to doc, dermo. and tried many things..nothing worked and then I found something that cleared it up and made my arms feel like silk. Olay Total Effects 7 in 1 moisturizer (NOT the one w/ spf) It's in the wrinkle cream section and -22... try it for 3 days and maybe you'll have same success w/ it..GREAT product to clear up KP

  38. QUESTION:
    Is there a way to slow down keratin production?
    I have keratosis pilaris and it's caused by an over production in the skin. Is there anything that i can use or take that will slow down the production of keratin.

    • ANSWER:
      you can't slow it down but you can treat it with a prescription cream called "carmol" which softens the skin. Also, you may not like this treatment, but you could pee on the affected area because your urine also contains urea which is the active ingredient in the carmol lotion.

  39. QUESTION:
    Is there any good treatment for Keratosis pilaris rubra faceii?
    Which is keratosis pilaris with red cheeks.. i've had it forever and its just plain ugly. i've heard somehere of a laser treatment for the skin of the cheeks but to me anything with a laser and skin sounds like it can go terribly wrong.

    • ANSWER:
      Chris. I'm sorry but there is no cure for Keratosis pilaris.

      Though it may improve with age and even disappear completely in adulthood; however, some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life.

      Treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden (if they do not already appear red), and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring.

      Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the ketanized skin "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. Instead, the hair grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated, and can be removed if the bump is picked or squeezed (which can lead to scarring).

  40. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of facial and arm redness?
    I have redness on my cheeks and redness on the upper part of my arms. It's not any type of skin condition on my face. I've been checked by a dermatologist. It just looks like somebody slapped me across the face but the redness never goes away. On my arms, some people have said it may be Keratosis Pilaris. I'm very pale and this redness really stands out. Any way to get rid of it or at least make it less noticeable? Thanks!
    I'm a girl if that helps.

    • ANSWER:
      Maybe try a skin bleaching agent. Not something real strong though. I know theirs products on the market that help even out skin tone or reduce facial reddening. You'll just have to look around. They come in the forms of lotions, creams, ect. Aveeno has such products. I use their face moisturizer with spf and their body one also. I haven't tried the ones for skin reddening or the ones that even out skin tone, but I am sure they are worth a try. Heres a link to the products. http://www.aveeno.com/segmentAction.do?segid=1002&catid=1000

      If this dont help then maybe with the help of a laser or Microdermabrasion. I have heard it can help lighten skin, like freckles, and obviously a laser is stronger and can remove things like moles, but if its just redness, then microdermabrasion if all else fails.

      In the mean time you can always do what they show on tv (think bare minerals) and cover with powders on your face. As for your arms wear longer sleeves? I'm not sure if a skin bronzer lotion would help any,,,but try to keep these areas safe from the sun with spf as you may have sensative skin in these areas.

      I too am quit pale. Blonde hair, blue eyes, freckles. I am less red with sunblock. Also, just wearing makeup helps,,,,i never darkened my skin since i like light skin. Also, i want to protect it from wrinkles and think it would look silly and fake on my complexion. I like you probably suffer the same kind of issue. I look red in these areas more than others. I just bare with it since i'm sure its common in pale skin types.

  41. QUESTION:
    What story can i buy this lotion at or can i only buy it online? ?
    What store can I buy chicken skin lotion (keratosis pilaris treatment) or can I only buy it online?

    • ANSWER:
      Don't waste your money. There's no cure, and no matter what u'll always have it. Trust me, i've checked they don't work.

      Instead try:

      Sally Hansen Airbrush Legs Leg Makeup (in LIght, Medium, Tan and then Deep glow [for african americans] ). It's waterproof and also stays on as long as you don't put on lotion before hand. Some people have even worn it to a pool and it works. It's like 11 dollars. It's hard to find, try the Sally Hansen or the nail polish aisle at walmart. It washes off in the shower with soap and water and a washcloth.

      If you can't find that then go for any other type of body makeup. Try to get waterproof.

  42. QUESTION:
    lotion i can buy at a drug store with beta hydroxy acid?
    I am trying to clear up my keratosis pilaris for Summer and heard that BHA can help.
    Is there a lotion or wash I can buy at someplace like Target that contains BHA?

    • ANSWER:
      I use Lubriderm Advance Therapy with AHA on my upper arms and it does the job for me. AmLactin (costs a little more) can be bought at your local drug store and I've seen it at Target and WalMart.

  43. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of these bumps on my legs that arnt razor bumps?
    On the tops of my thighs and leg I have these bumps. They are not red they are just little bumps on my legs that are the same color as my skin tone. I want to know how to go rid of them Because when I shave my legs they are never as smooth as they could be. I do not think it is keratosis pilaris. How do u get rid of it?

    • ANSWER:
      i have this problem too!!! it's very irritating.. not physically but just the fact that they're there..that's how i came upon you question. i was looking for an answer and i found this. It sounds accurate and reasonable. i hope it helps =] i'm going to try it.

      To eliminate leg bumps, aftershave, or razor bumps, you must understand what hair bumps are and where they come from. This will enable you to form a successful plan of attack. The bumps that appear on your skin are a direct result of ingrown hairs. Ingrown hairs develop at the end of the hair shaft. They have a sharpened edge and attempt to grow straight, however something prevents them from doing so. As a result, they curl back into the same hair follicle.

      People who want to know how to get rid of razor bumps often don't realize that rough, tough stubble that feels like it could cut glass is absorbent. The importance of this is simple: Hair that has absorbed water is much softer and easier to cut. Being able to easily cut the hair results in less skin irritation and a decreased chance of getting razor bumps due to the fact that the tip of the hair will be cleanly cut and smooth - not sharp and at risk of poking back into a neighboring follicle

      Allow it to continue growing and eventually free itself. This method works best when combined with daily moisturizing and gentile exfoliation to remove any dead skin that could be blocking the hair’s escape. If a pustule forms, gently squeezing it can cause the hair to pop up to the surface.
      Using a freshly sterilized pair of tweezers or a needle, you can fish the tip out from underneath this surface of the skin.

      The area of skin you have mentioned, the upper arms, legs and butt are often described as looking like chicken skin. The problem is that these areas are normally covered by our clothing and do not get as much exposure as the rest of our bodies. We also may not pay as close attention to these somewhat hidden areas when showering or moisturizing. These areas can tend to be dry. This dry skin can cause the bumps that you are seeing. In order to help get rid of these bumps you can try a stronger (alphahydroxy) moisturizing lotion.

      The best treatment is to let your leg hairs grow out to give your follicles a chance to recover.

  44. QUESTION:
    Does anybody know a Good treatment for Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have keratosis Pilaris on my legs and I'm looking for a way to treat it. I know there is no cure, I just want to improve the appearance of it.

    • ANSWER:
      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris; however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, Retin A and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to the lactic acid — a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may also be helpful but increases risk of skin cancer. Small amounts of vitamin A can be used orally but only with exteme caution due to potential for liver damage. Check with a dermatologist or family doctor before taking extra vitamin A due to the its potential toxic effects.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden (if they do not already appear red), and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

      Food allergies may also exacerbate the condition, causing hyper-keratosis pilaris, gluten being a common culprit (source: physician's (MD) oral presentation) .............. ll

  45. QUESTION:
    I want to wear this really cute shirt, but I have Keratosis Pilaris?
    It's a really pretty tank top (and no, i can't wear something under or over it!), but I have Keratosis Pilaris on my arms. I haven't showed my arms in over a year, and makeup makes it look worse (it exaggerates it and looks really dry). Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      just go for it. if you're worried about what people will think, don't be. if they care about you, they wont care about your arms, and if you dont make a big deal about it, they probably wont even notice it. also, lotion sometimes helps, and so does using a loofah while showering.

  46. QUESTION:
    Does KP Duty for Keratosis Pilaris really work?
    I have had Keratosis Pilaris ever since I can remember. And I really can not stand it. It makes me feel so ugly, very self conscious and I absolutely hate my arms. I know that there is no proven way to cure it 100%. But I have heard and read great things about KP Duty. Does anyone know if it works pretty well, or if anything else works for this? Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, it works because of glycolic acid.

      I have to say it is expensive for 4 ounces.

      You can get similar product for cheaper: Alpha Hydrox AHA Enhanced Lotion with 10% glycolic acid.

  47. QUESTION:
    For people with Keratosis Pilaris: Whats the best drugstore lotion to use?
    The bumps on my arms are getting slightly worse. I recently started using Palmer's Cocoa Butter lotion but I think it might have given me a few inflamed bumps. Any recommendations?

    • ANSWER:
      My kids have Keratosis Pilaris. Use lotions that contain Lactic Acid. We are using Am-lactin. If you can't find it, ask your pharmacist.

  48. QUESTION:
    what is the best lotion for keratosis pilaris?
    i use a 5% glycolic lotion now that's working moderately well, but i'd love to hear other suggestions.

    • ANSWER:
      Lubriderm Advanced Therapy Triple Smoothing Body Lotion is working well for me. It has active AHA.

      Also, Smooth Away--although it's not a lotion. Smooth Away is the product that removes hair. It exfoliates away the dead skin cells and makes makes the skin very smooth. You can get it at Walmart or Walgreens.

      Another thing I've done is mix equally regular white table sugar with olive oil and exfoliate in the shower. Sugar has glycolic acid. This worked pretty good.

      Good luck!

  49. QUESTION:
    How can I get rid of these "permanent goosebumps"?
    I have these "permanent goosebumps" along my outer, upper arms and thighs. It's this skin condition called Keratosis Pilaris. I'll probably contact my dermatologist because I've had this forever and it's totally unattractive, but I was wondering if there was a way to treat it right at home?

    • ANSWER:
      I have the same exact thing, and yeah it's incredibly hard to get rid of and all my dermatologist subscribed random oily lotions, but at Sephora they have this lotion called DermaDocter: KP Duty and it's actually for keratosis pilaris. http://www.sephora.com/browse/product.jhtml?id=P73509
      they do go away a little as u get older but yeah they are annoying.


keratosis pilaris lotions

Keratosis Pilaris Face Treatment

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What are good treatments for treating Keratosis Pilaris on your face and arms?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris on my face and arms. I already drink lots of water, use some baby oil on my arms, and use a face cream/scrub. What would be a better alternative instead of using baby oil and face scrub. What is your favorite treatment. Btw, water helps a lot.

    • ANSWER:
      Scrubs containing AHA (glycolic acid)

  2. QUESTION:
    How to cover keratosis pilaris on arms with makeup for a day?
    My girlfriend wants to wear a sundress for a photo shoot but she has keratosis pilaris on her arms...google it if you don't know what it is and would like to know.

    She is mostly concerned with the redness.
    She already uses lotions etc. Doesn't help.

    Is there like a body makeup she can cover it with that will last ?

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Try the Dermablend Leg Cover... You can use it on arms as well.

      I have found 'Sheer Color'. It is the best for covering redness and leaving skin looking natural. I think it is only available through mail order. It was developed by dermatologists to hide redness, scars, and birth marks. It comes with a concealer. The makeup itself is mineral and gives good coverage, but it is light and natural.

      If her arms flare up, I have found a product that contains Extra Virgin Coconut Oil helps calm the redness down.

      You can also trry Pulse Dye Laser treatment. It is a little radical but it is long-lasting and helpful.

      Palladio is NOTHING compared to bareminerals from bare escentuals. The only thing I have to say is that they have poor costumer service and organization. The makeup will cover redness in a very natural way. It will look like you have no makeup on.

      One month ago I started using the Herbal wet & dry foundation and it is great. They are not very expensive, either. Well, on Amazon.com it is dollars but I found it in Puerto Rico at . :D

      I use eucerin 10% Urea lotion on my skin twice a day.

      I also use Everyday Minerals makeup. They have a mint concealer that is great for covering redness. Also another concealer is Bisque; it is quite pink in color but it somehow manages to cover redness very well. These are used under mineral foundation. You can get free samples, although you have to pay a bit for the postage.

      I am ignorant about UO, but this makeup is great for my skin! I bought it from the Sally Beauty Shop in the U.S. I think the mildness by being talc and rice may have something to do with it and I have found that titanium dioxide makes all my KP worse, whether on my face or arms (sunscreen) or what. It even has chamomile which I suspect is an allergen for me but maybe it's so little or it's tempered by other ingredients. I have even used it on my arms and legs when needed. O:)

      Try Roc Skin Foundation.

  3. QUESTION:
    how do you get rid of keratosis pilaris?
    i have eczema, and this keratosis pilaris came during my flareup and i have never ever had it and now my whole body is covered in these skin coloured bumps, is there a way to get rid of this?
    any cleansing baths? or scrubs or remedies? i really just want my skin to go back to normal!
    is it normal for keratosis pilaris to just come out of nowhere? is it curable? are there any prescriptions like betamethasone or any other steroids that can fix it?

    • ANSWER:
      Treatments, elixirs, etc. are just going to be a waste.

      The quickest and easy fix is a chemical exfoliant (for example a Glycol based one that you would use on your face) or even a physical exfoliant will clear it up in as little as three weeks. Enjoy your clear skin!

  4. QUESTION:
    Would accutane help get rid of folliculitus and keratosis pilaris?
    Not only do I have mild to moderate acne on my back, face, and upper arms, but I also have folliculitus on my legs and keratosis pilaris on my uper arms. Would accutane help all my skin conditions?

    • ANSWER:
      I believe that you may have a condition called Hidradenitis Supprativa.of re-occurring boils/ cysts/abscesses , that are often misdiagnosed as ingrown hairs, herpes, being unclean or over wieght and folliculitis. This is a newly diagnosed skin condition , but there is a lot of info out there.
      Here is a link :
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hidradeniti...

      or the HS_USA page is ..
      http://www.hs-usa.org/hidradenitis_suppu...

      If this sounds like it might be you, READ it, PRINT it out, and TAKE it to your DOC.
      Its better to try to start treatment soon, it can spread over the body if left untreated. These boils can become quite large and painful. Sometimes even lasting for weeks or months , do not attempt to POP them they can then tunnel under your skin and spread all over the body. Most common areas are armpits, groin, binkni line, inner legs, and intimate places and basically anywhere that sweats and rub against clothing. Stress is a big inducer.

      There is a support group at MSN

      http://groups.msn.com/HidradenitisSuppor...

      This is also a link to a PDF of a study in Germany about HS and if it is genetic... I thought it was intresting :

      http://www.hs-foundation.org/pdf/2000_Cl...

      and a yahoo one, and I am open for questions!
      I have had this for 8 years, I was misdiagnosed for a LONG time, It was very embarrassing, painful and scary. I am just trying to help out so you don’t have to wait as long as I did.

      Currently I have 5 , 2 next to each other on my right inner groin. 2 in my upper HAIR area, and 1 med sized on my butt on the panty line, and they do come every week or so. I find that certian foods, not having a regular showering regimen, wearing clothing that irratiates the area.. and STRESS usually are a precusor to getting one.

      I also prefer to use NEXCARE bandages.. there are 2 kinds I like for comfort and stay put reasons..
      the first is like a clear bandaid.... soft on the edges with a small area of bandage... helps with those buggers when they are on bikni line.. usually stay for me.. or occasionally on my inner thigh for those I like the foamy sponge like ones that are beige in color.. I think they are 3M.

  5. QUESTION:
    How to go from grenade to beautiful?
    It's my last year of junior high, and I've been the ugly girl literally since preschool/kindergarten. I just want my high school years to be better than previous years.. I just have no idea where to start.
    1. I'm really overweight, like at least 100 pounds. I'm 217 pounds when my normal weight is in the range of 107-120. I've tried everything but I just can't lose the weight or keep it off if I do manage to lose it.
    2. I have short legs and big feet. I wear 10 wide size shoes.
    3. My hair and skin are so unhealthy. My hair is dyed black and reddish blonde, kind of short and dull. It's also fine and brittle. My skin is combination, my nose, chin and forehead are really oily and my cheeks are dry. I also have major blackheads all over, but mostly on my nose, chin and cheeks, with a few on my forehead. I have mostly tiny whitehead type things on my forehead. I also have horrible keratosis pilaris on my legs, face and arms.
    4. I'm a really pastey white where my keratosis doesn't cover, and my body hair is coarse and dark. I like being pale, love it actually. Just not dead looking.

    How can I go from grenade to beautiful from now until around the last day of July when school starts? I'm already saving money for a shopping spree for a whole new wardrobe. Any answers are appreciated...

    • ANSWER:
      Ok, well im going to start off by saying YOU think your the ugly girl. Im sure many others dont but there is nothing wrong with wanting to change your looks so here it goes:

      Weight- If your serious about it, go to your doctor and see how they reccomend you losing weight. DONT STARVE YOURSELF!! It is so important, you wont even lose weight for a couple months after you do that, you will get bigger. So exercise and eat a diet your doctor thinks is right then you will be a healthy weight in a matter on months.

      Legs and Feet- I am 5'3 and have abnormally long legs, so I know how you feel. Theres nothing you can do about it. You cant do anything about your feet either. Look up Alessandra Ambrosio shes a Victoria's Secret model with short legs and big feet but shes gorgeous!

      Hair- Stop dying it until it gets healthier. What you should start out by doing is getting a moisterizing shampoo such as Herbel Essences Hello Hydration, it works great and its cheap! Then get a shine spray and heat protectant (if you use heat on your hair.) Last you could try Aussies split end protecter. I dont have split ends but you put it in your hair after a shower and let it dry. It leaves it so soft. After your hair is soft and how you want it go to a professional hair stylist and get it dyed. Also get your hair trimmed every month and a half!

      Skin- Go to a dermetologist they will know how to treat that. In the mean time, look for a cleanser for your face thats for combonation skin also get a spot treatment for your black heads, put it on every night before bed. Make sure you wash your face everyday and take off ALL makeup before bed.

      Pale- Im super pale too but I get super brown in the summer. Dark hair actually compliments pale skin (I have dark brown hair and blue/gray eyes) but I try to use self tanner because I dont like my porcelain skin. Im glad you do though! To work pale skin all you really have to do is wear the right colors of clothes (Green, Cream, Red, Peach, Look up more colors) and make sure your eye makeup isnt too dark. Look up makeup tutorials for pale skin on Youtube.

      Good luck! I reccomend shopping at places like Forever 21, Charlotte Russe, American Eagle, PINK and Victoria's Secret for cute teen clothes. (:

  6. QUESTION:
    My 9 year old daughter has keratosis pilaris. What would be the best treatment?
    My daughter is 9 years old and has keratosis pilaris on her upper arms and small amount on her face. She already complained that kids in the school noticed her condition. I went online and checked few websites but I couldn't find how exactly to treat it and what products are efective. Could anybody give us good advice? Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Take her to a dermatologist. Over the counter products are unreliable and you risk irritating her skin. A doctor can recommend further treatment and probably a prescription skin cream for her face and arms.

  7. QUESTION:
    Anyone know how to get rid of the little white bumps on my arms?
    I have what i believe is "keratosis pilaris". I have researched and found medicines they say may work, but i was wondering if anyone has had this problem and if anything worked for you.

    • ANSWER:
      I believe you are right. My son has this, and his father did. I think it is or can be hereditary. They are probably located on your outer upper arms. I have read before that a salicylic acid body wash could help. If it were me, I would go to a skin clinic, not necessarily a dermatology clinic and ask them if having laser treatment would help get rid of them. They use it for facial acne and it would be more tolerable to have it done on your arms that the sensitive area that is your face. My son has developed MRSA from using to many antibiotics over the years and often prescribed for these bumps which did not help. A chemical peel could be another option

  8. QUESTION:
    what can i do to get rid of my Keratosis Pilaris?
    I started getting it in about the 7th grade. I first thought it was a bad case of acne because around the time i started breaking out too. Now that i notice that my face stopped breaking out, but the arms still persists, i figured something was wrong.

    any way to get rid of it?

    i also have alot of old scars from it too, so is there anything else to get rid of those?

    an answer would really make my day. I mean it.

    • ANSWER:
      Why Curaderm BEC5 is an effective treatment for Keratosis & Sunspots?
      Curaderm-BEC5 will identify every single Keratosis and Sunspots on the surface of the skin via specific cell receptors allowing only the precancerous cells to be recognized, destroyed and removed for good. Unlike other treatments, the healthy skin cells are not even disturbed by the treatment. Best wishes Get well soon.

  9. QUESTION:
    Can you use calmurid cream on your face?
    I have keratosis pilaris. Doctor diagnosed me last year. I have been using calmurid cream on my arms and legs since then. However now I have developed it on my cheeks. She said continue using the cream you have but when I got home the leaflet didn't say anything about using it on your face.

    • ANSWER:
      How does it work?

      This cream contains the active ingredients urea and lactic acid. It is used to moisturise and rehydrate dry, scaly skin.

      Dry skin results from lack of water in the outer layer of skin cells known as the stratum corneum. When this layer becomes dehydrated it loses its flexibility and becomes cracked, scaly and sometimes itchy. The stratum corneum contains natural water-holding substances, including urea, which retain water seeping up from the deeper layers of the skin. Water is also normally retained in the stratum corneum by a surface film of natural oil (sebum) and broken-down skin cells, which slow down evaporation of water from the skin surface.

      The skin dries out when too much water evaporates from its surface. This increases as we get older, and is made worse by washing, because hot water and soap remove the layer of natural oil on the skin surface.

      When urea is applied to the skin it penetrates the stratum corneum, where it readily absorbs and retains water. This increases the capacity of the skin to hold moisture, and the skin therefore becomes rehydrated.

      Lactic acid is known as a keratolytic. When applied to the skin it breaks down keratin, which is a protein that forms part of the skin structure. In conditions such as chronic eczema and ichthyosis, excessive amounts of keratin causes the skin cells to harden, and makes the skin become thickened and scaly. Lactic acid breaks down the keratin in the hardened and thickened skin, helping to shed skin cells from the area to which it is applied, and soften and improve the appearance of dry, scaly skin. This action also improves the ability of the urea to penetrate the skin and rehydrate it.

      The moisturising base of this cream also provides a layer of oil on the surface of the skin, which helps prevent water from evaporating from the skin surface.

      What is it used for?

      * Inherited, non-inflammatory dryness and scaling of the skin (ichthyosis, xeroderma)

      * Other dry, scaly skin disorders

      Warning!

      * This preparation is for external use only.

      * If you experience stinging when applying this medicine and this prevents you using it, the medicine can be diluted with an equal quantity of aqueous cream for a week of treatment. After this time you should be able to use it undiluted. Seek further advice from your pharmacist.

      * Avoid contact of this medicine with the eyes and the moist membranes lining the inside of certain parts of the body, eg mouth, nasal passages (mucous membranes).

      Not to be used in

      * Known sensitivity or allergy to any ingredient

      This medicine should not be used if you are allergic to one or any of its ingredients. Please inform your doctor or pharmacist if you have previously experienced such an allergy.

      If you feel you have experienced an allergic reaction, stop using this medicine and inform your doctor or pharmacist immediately.

      Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

      Certain medicines should not be used during pregnancy or breastfeeding. However, other medicines may be safely used in pregnancy or breastfeeding providing the benefits to the mother outweigh the risks to the unborn baby. Always inform your doctor if you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy, before using any medicine.

      * There are no known harmful effects when this medicine is used during pregnancy.

      * This preparation may be used safely by breastfeeding mothers, providing it is not applied to the breasts prior to breastfeeding. This will avoid ingestion by the infant.

      Side effects

      Medicines and their possible side effects can affect individual people in different ways. The following are some of the side effects that are known to be associated with this medicine. Because a side effect is stated here, it does not mean that all people using this medicine will experience that or any side effect.

      * Stinging on application

      The side effects listed above may not include all of the side effects reported by the drug's manufacturer.

      For more information about any other possible risks associated with this medicine, please read the information provided with the medicine or consult your doctor or pharmacist.

      How can this medicine affect other medicines?

      By smoothing and softening the skin this medicine can increase the absorption of other medicines that are applied to the skin. This can be useful in conditions such as eczema because it improves the ability of other medicines, such as corticosteroid creams, to penetrate the skin and reduce inflammation.

  10. QUESTION:
    What are good treatments for keratosis pilaris?
    Hey, I have KP on my arms and a little on my face, (but not so much to really notice)..but I can't say the same for my arms,(they're pretty noticeable) soo..I was wondering if there are any GOOD TREATMENTS because unfortunately there is NO CURE!!!

    Oh and Im 13 soooo I would really like to wear a swim suit without being self-consious about my arms...

    Thanks a lot:)

    • ANSWER:
      Hi! ohmygosh, I had the exact same question about a week ago. Im 16, and Ive never really thought too much about KP, until I found out im taking a trip to california in a couple weeks, and I want to try really hard to look good in a bikini as well!

      The appearance of KP can be decreased by these main ingredients: urea, lactic acid, glycolic acid, salicylic acid, tretinoin, or vitamin D These are all keratosis fighting substances that rid your skin of those pesky little keratosis-clogged pores.

      the first four can be found in moisturizers. My tip to you would be to find a moisturizer high in one or several of these ingredients (that means anywhere from 5% of an ingredient to 15%). Vitamin D is found in sunlight, so being in the sun will help a lot (Just don't get sunburned, lol) When I went to taiwan a year ago, I noticed that along with my tan, my kp was completely gone! my skin was baby smooth, and it had never been that way before. I didn't know why, but after some research, I realized Vitamin D helps a lot with KP.

      I have been struggling with KP for almost my entire life, so i can understand the frustration and embarrassment you might experience from having this condition.

      Along with moisturizing day and night with lotions high in those ingredients, I also follow the advice given in this youtube video:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_5S3gmUrXk

      I've only been using her treatment for about 2 days, but my appearance of KP has already decreased tons! Im thinking that by another week, it'll be completely gone :). Oh, and in the video, the girl mentions clearasil's ultra exfoliating scrub. Unfortunately, that product was only available in Canada, so i was pretty disappointed. But then I realized that clearasil's ultra acne scrub is the same thing as the exfoliating scrub. It just has a different name I guess because of different locations.

      Anyways, good luck! I hope this helps with your KP, and that we both look good in time for bikni season :)

  11. QUESTION:
    How do you treat Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have the condition KP (chicken skin) on my legs, upper arms and on the sides of my face. It's a condition where you get bumpy skin but is not itchy or irritated. Also wondering if I got it from the sun because it stops at my ankles and upper thigh. How do I get rid of it? Is there a type of cream or something? Please suggest products! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:

      1. How to prevent Sunburn* & scope for consequential skin cancer, Melanoma, etc: Expose Ur body and or the affected parts within 90 minutes from sunrise & within 60 minutes before sunset. Timely exposure of body ensures safe and sufficient production of Vitamin D by Ur body. During strong winds, no exposure to sunlight, please. Any extra exposure shall be @ Ur own risk for skin cancer/melanoma

      2. The symptoms cited---------an offshoot of blocked energy + accumulated toxins liver, lungs, Thyroid & Parathyroid, lymphatic system, Spleen, hormonal imbalance with a displaced solar plexus.

      ‘Target Therapy’ [Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies] proved to be effective for all types of cancer [including brain tumors, leukemia, melanoma, Crohn’s Disease, bone marrow cancer, breast cancer, etc., ] & all the most dreaded and incurable diseases.

      TARGET THERAPY* It is the God-given therapy communicated to the mankind through THE RIGVEDA, one of the Hindu scriptures.
      Target Therapy---Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies, [comprising Ayurveda, Homeopathy, Bio-chemic salts, Herbal Remedies, Yoga/Meditation, Magneto-therapy, Sidha, etc.,] U can have sizable & perceivable relief in 45-90 days. @ no/affordable costs, No side effects, and No Hospitalization.

      Dr.Vora designed it in such a way that the costs are the least for the survival/rescue of common man and the poor in villages, towns and metropolis on the globe; with NO insurance cover & NO money to bear the costs of chemo. It is most suitable to all the youngsters on this entire globe.
      U may study it, discuss with Ur family members/friends/acquaintances and slowly and steadily implement it for the best results.

      •No side effects and no risk. If it clicks, mostly possible, U shall have a cure. Lest, the therapy keeps mum. No extra risk. It is the most suitable line of treatment even for the terminally ill patients. Cancer cure/prevention is quite possible. U may try it for any incurable disease including cancer of any organ[s], post-surgical recurrence of tumors, Leukemia, HIV/AIDS, Crohn’s Syndrome, Gilbert’s Syndrome, colon cancer, Thalassemia, Alzheimer’s Syndrome, Muscular Dystrophy, Autism, bone TB., Tinnitus, all brain & spinal cord disorders, CLL, Crohn’s Syndrome, endometriosis, etc., ---it should aim @ [3] steps.
      1. Removal of toxins from all internal organs & purging through Normal Drainage systems, feces, urine, skin, lungs, menses [females].
      2. Activating all the internal organs to make each & every organ to function up to optimum levels, by purging out toxins.
      3. Supplying vitamins, nutrients, micro-nutrients, minerals, trace elements for invigorating the entire Immune system to produce antibodies.
      All items for a cure—available in Ur vicinity all over the globe.

      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse 'Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.

  12. QUESTION:
    What is an easy homemade-ish way to get rid of pimple and blemishes?
    I get these like pimple breakouts on my face sometimes, and i don't want to buy all those expensive creams and lotions and things. Anyone know something i can try a home, with household things, or something low cost? thanks so much.

    p.s oh and if someone also wants to explain to me how to hide all of that with make-up, it would be appreciated as well :D

    • ANSWER:
      Well my advice:
      For nice clear skin:Get some yarrow capsules,put one in some warm water,splash your face with it,pat dry with a wash-clothe.Or as a cleanser if you have dry skin try milk it has lactic acid (found in alot of really expensive creams!).Then for toner use lemon it balances the ph in your skin,Apply with cotton ball.Then use 100% pure aloe vera gel (get this stuff at local heath food store or drugstore).Hope I helped!,God bless!. :) Garlic is good for pimples to (not good for sensitive skin) just leave it on for like 5 mins (mash it up first).Also have a good diet,eat lots of fruits and veggies(I'm a vegetarian).Drink water too,half your body weight (if you weigh 100 lbs drink 50 oz a day).Taking MSM (100-1,000 mg) daily can help acne.

      Also try an egg mask,simply leave egg white (from one egg) on your face for 10 minutes.

      I advise you to try a tomato ,take a tomato and cut a few slices from it and then leave the slices on your face for about 10 minutes(flesh side down).

      For your body simply:

      Mix suger (or sea salt) and Olive oil together and you have a great scrub!.
      :)

      Info:
      Benefits of aloe vera

      Many ancient works, including the Bible, refer to the use of aloe. One of the first documented users of aloe vera was Cleopatra, who lived from 68 to 30 B.C. She is said to have used the gel on her skin as protection from the sun, and to have thought the gel helped to keep her skin young-looking. In fact, the Egyptians may have used aloe vera in their embalming of bodies, among other uses.

      About the year Six B.C., Dioscorides, a Greek physician, discovered aloe vera was effective in treating a wide range of ailments, from kidney problems and constipation, to severe burns of the skin.

      Today aloe vera continues to be widely used around the world. Studies have shown that aloe vera speeds the healing process, particularly in burns, including those from radiation. It is also used by dermatologists to speed healing after facial dermabrasion, which removes scars from the skins top layers.

      *****

      The possible benefits from the use of aloe vera gel and juice include:

      1. May help sooth skin injured by burns, irritations, cuts and insect bites.

      2. May help moisturize and soften the skin.

      3. May help speed the healing of skin wounds,acne, burns and other injuries.

      4. May help (when taken internally)with constipation, diarrhea and other intestinal problems.

      5. May speed and improve general healing when taken internally.

      6. May relieve itching and swelling of irritated skin.

      7. May help kill fungus and bacteria.

      8. May improve the effectiveness of sun screen products.
      ......................................…
      Benefits of Lactic acid

      Lactic acid is a naturally occurring alpha-hydroxy acid that is fermented from milk for use in cosmetics, lotions and cleansers to assist in smoothing and moisturizing the skin. Lactic acid is of great use in any healthy skin regimen, as it aids in the sloughing of dead skin cells, increasing cellular turnover while hydrating the skin for a fresh and rejuvenated complexion. Lactic acid can be used for many skin problems including the management of acne, wrinkles, psoriasis,sun damage, keratosis pilaris and hyperkeratosis, and can even be used on slightly sensitive or allergy-prone skin.

      Egg

      After applying egg whites, your skin takes on a tighter, more lifted appearance, causing some skin care aficionados to go so far as to call the egg white mask an "egg white face lift ". Other benefits of this natural skin care treatment, egg whites have been known to reduce the appearance minor breakouts, as well as enlarged pores.

      Tomatos and Lycopene

      Lycopene is high in antioxidants and fat soluble, with a small molecule structure that is easily absorbed by the skin. There is a drawback however. Lycopene is not dietary soluble (the molecule structure is tightly bound) unless cooked.Tomatos have high levels of both vitamins C and A,great for skin.

      Honey

      Honey also is be good for your skin. It has the ability to attract water. You can use honey instead of alpha hydroxy masks because of its high content of the acid. It is also safe for sensitive skin.

      You can also use it as a moisturizing mask for your skin as well as your hair.
      The reason why your skin clears up then blemishes again is because you skin becomes immune to the product your using. Thats why skin never stays clear. Face cleansers like Proactive, Clean and Clear and all that stuff has a lot of chemicals in that eat away bacteria on your face. Now there's nothing wrong with that but when it starts stripping your face of natural oils then you have a problem.

      Diet is also a bit part a clean skin. Make sure your eating right, fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meat and blah blah blah. Keep your hands from your face, and don't pick at your blemishes. It will just spread bacteria over your face.

      Buy some bare minara

  13. QUESTION:
    What is the best treatment for keratosis pilaris?
    For...
    Anywhere: legs, arms, elbows,knees
    face,Dark/colored skin
    People under 18 years of age

    • ANSWER:
      there is a keratosis pilaris kit from dermadoctor and my dermatologist told me to use AmLactin Moisturizing Cream.

  14. QUESTION:
    what is the best treatment for keratosis pilaris and reduction of deep keloidal scars?
    i have had KP for the past 15 years now and i have so many scars because of them which affects my overall self confidence. please help!

    • ANSWER:
      I'll tell you what, go natural. Natural remedies work. Start off by ditching all harsh and synthetic chemicals. They are terrible for your skin in the long run (not to mention, expensive). Switch to all natural or organic products and you will see a major difference. I can't even tell you how much my skin has cleared just from using natural home remedies. This is coming from someone who has had tons of scars on my face and body. Beyond belief. :-P Vitamin E is really good for scars. So is Rose Hip Seed Oil and Tea Tree.

      Oh and you should definitely try the BestBathStore soaps. All of their soaps are handmade with 100% natural ingredients. They can even out your skintone. I've been using their lemon cleansing bar as my body wash. It only took about 2 days for me to see major improvement on my scars.

      I'm not the only one. They have an entire review section here:
      http://bestbathstorecouponcodes.blogspot.com/p/reviews.html

      They offer free samples as well. Hope that helps. Take it easy.

      -Love Is Peace

  15. QUESTION:
    How do i get rid permanently of red dry bumpy skin?
    ever since i was little i have had this type of skin on the sides of my face, all over my arms, and some parts of my chest and i want it gone. ive tried everything, can someone plz recommend something to make it go away

    • ANSWER:
      You might have Keratosis Pilaris.

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris:
      1. Keratosis pilaris rubra: red, inflamed bumps
      2. Keratosis pilaris Alba: rough, white, bumpy skin
      3. Keratosis pilaris rubra faceii: reddish rash over the cheeks

      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris. However, there are effective treatments available that make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Most of the available treatments are purely symptomatic; the one thing they all have in common is need for repetition and ongoing commitment. Some seeking treatment with the disorder may be prescribed Tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream, often by request.

      Triamcinolone, most commonly sold under the trade name Aristocort, is a synthetic corticosteroid medically approved as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of eczema, which also reduces the amount of keratin in pores. It may be of most help to those with keratosis pilaris by reducing red, inflamed bumps. Triamcinolone is typically applied three times a day.

      Tretinoin, most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by causing the outer layer of the skin to grow more rapidly, which decreases the amount of the protein keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. As keratosis pilaris is manifested through excess keratin in the skin, Tretinoin forms a more effective and core approach to treatment than Triamcinolone, which forms a largely symptomatic approach. Tretinoin is typically applied once a day before bed.

      An alternative treatment is Adapalene, a retinoid medication that is a more stable compound, is less sunlight-sensitive, has fewer general side-effects, and may be just as effective as Retin-A. Treatment of KP with Adapalene would be considered an "off-label" use of the medication.

      As with Triamcinolone, Tretinoin or any other treatment, once therapy is discontinued, the condition reverts to its original state. However, skin treated with Tretinoin may take several weeks or more to revert to its pre-treatment condition, but may, at the same time, take several weeks or more to show optimal results, with the condition commonly worsening initially, as underlying keratin is brought to the surface of the skin. Tretinoin is considerably more expensive and dispensed in smaller quantities than Triamcinolone and other treatments. Although it may be the most effective treatment for keratosis pilaris, it is not considered the first line of treatment.

      Keratosis pilaris has not been clinically researched for treatment in an unbiased manner, with all claims of success or improvement being purely marketed or anecdotal. The condition is often dismissed outright by practitioners as being presently untreatable, giving mere moisturizing suggestions or reassurance that the condition will improve or cease with age, typically after 30. General practitioners are often unable to identify the condition. Ignorance, accompanied with the price, availability, quantity dispensed, time taken for optimal results to be achieved, more serious side-effects, adverse reactions, and worsening of the condition in the initial treatment phase - coupled with the cheaper, safer, and easier availability of other treatments - has hindered Tretinoin from showing its potential in the treatment of this condition.

      exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, creams, and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Beta hydroxy acids may help improve the appearance and texture of the afflicted skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to their containing lactic acid, a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may be helpful in moderation. Coconut oil may also be helpful if applied to afflicted areas while in the shower. Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, and, in many cases, will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing, such as tight-fitting jeans, is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

  16. QUESTION:
    What do I do about these strange bumps on my arm?
    Okay, so as you can imagine, I have acne on my face. No big deal, I treat it daily, but that's not the problem.

    I have all these weird, acne-like bumps on my arm, and I can't get rid of them. They've been there forever. They are NOT mosquito bumps. Help!

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis Pilaris is a common skin condition that is mostly found on the upper arms, buttocks and thighs. Dry skin cells that normally flake off the skin, get caught in the hair follicles and clogs them up. This forms little pimples that have a dry rough texture. They are not painful or itchy but aren't very attractive and are known chicken skin.

      Keratosis Pilaris Treatment

      Keratosis Pilaris occurs mostly in teenagers on the upper arms. However, babies and adults can experience this condition on their faces, upper arms, legs and buttocks. It's a genetic follicular disorder that looks almost like "goose bumps" and are rather rough to touch.

      Primarily, it appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms, but can also occur on thighs and buttocks or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet).

      Worldwide, keratosis pilaris affects an estimated 40 to 50% of the adult population and approximately 50 to 80% of all adolescents, varying in degree from minimal to severe. It can last for a number of years but usual begins to disappear at the age of about 30 years old.

      Keratosis pilaris is a result of a process called hyperkeratinization. This is when there is an excess production of keratin (a natural fibrous protein of the skin, hair and nails) that builds up around the hair follicles. The skin becomes flaky and dry and if not removed from the skin it clogs up the hair follicles causing the small pimple like bumps that are visible on the skins surface.

      google 'oil pulling' - I have read that that can have dramatic effect and help the condition - reason is not well understood

  17. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris does anyone know of treatment that actually works?
    I dont have KP that bad i have it on my legs but mildly and a bit on the top of my arm, i want to really conceal it as i dont want to feel self concious showing skin, so does anyone know of any creams or any other treatments theyve heard of or tried before that help lessen KP

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Photo therapy is a great start. A local tanning salon has a bed called the Time Capsule. Instead of tanning bulbs it is filled with LED lights. This therapy has worked great for my daughter; she had a rather severe case that her dermatologist prescribed just about everything for and nothing worked. The only real reason we treated it so aggressively was because the bumps were on her face and in her eyebrows and they were painful. After 5 visits those on her face disappeared, and those on her body were much fewer. She is very happy with the results.

  18. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of larger pores all over the body?
    urh. my legs my arms my face. I seem to have huge pores. Anyway to minimize them?

    • ANSWER:
      It may be Keratosis Pilaris (KP) - condition characterized by rough, bumpy skin on the back of the arms and thighs. Bassically anywhere. But the advice I can give you is use alot of lotion. For example Dermadoctor KP Duty Lotion, or Avon Moisture Therapy treatment (deep healing body lotion) for serisouly dry rough skin. Works well. I use it. Also hitting the tanning bed or even a spray tan can cover it. Or if it's really bad you can use make to conceal the condition.

  19. QUESTION:
    Why won't these pimples on my upper arms and shoulders go away? Is there treatment?
    I don't have acne, my face is completely clear, but I have pimples on my upper arms and shoulders that just won't go away no matter what i do.

    • ANSWER:
      It is probably a condition called keratosis pilaris. It is a result of your body's inability to slough off dead skin cells on certain areas of your skin (upper arms, thighs, butt, etc..) The excess skin cells get clogged around your pores and look like small pimples or goose bumps. There is no cure for this condition, but there are things you can do to lessen the problem or make the bumps less noticeable. Scrub the area in the shower with a loofa and use an anti-bacterial soap (nothing too moisturizing as this can make it worse). You should also get some lotions which contain glycolic acid or urea (this is best). This helps take off some of the extra dead skin cells. If this doesn't help enough, make an appointment with your dermatologist to discuss other options like acidic peels, which can help with the bumps and with some of the scarring associated with them.

  20. QUESTION:
    Whats the best treatment to get rid of Rosacea?
    I have rosalia on my checks and arms. Im going to the doctor soon. But is there any way i can try to clear it up?

    • ANSWER:
      You sound certain that it's rosacea.... I'm assuming by "rosalia" you may be meaning the bumpy skin, or pustules that can form with rosacea?
      Unfortunately there is no "cure" for rosacea. Living with rosacea is about educating yourself, learning & understanding your own personal triggers, and adjusting your lifestyle accordingly.

      Are you certain it might not be keratosis pilaris? http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pilaris/article.htm

      Regardless of what it actually is, there's certainly ways to keep some facial redness and rosacea acne under control and less noticeable. It's up to you how much effort you want to put into caring for your health and your skin.

      You can try increasing your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc… And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you’re not allergic) Omega 3’s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3’s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)

      Try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 – 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.

      Some people have had success using Turmeric orally or topically. (reduce redness and acne)

      Drink more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out.

      Earth Science has an herbal tonic facial mist that is an oil-free moisturizer which is sprayed (misted) directly onto your face. If you store it in the fridge, it is very refreshing and helps cool and lower the skin temperature of the face immediately. Because it's a mist, it can easily be applied anytime.

      Neutrogena makes an excellent moisturizer, simply called "Moisture". It's oil-free, fragrance-free, alcohol-free and they have a type that is specifically made for sensitive skin. You can safely use it on both your face and your arms.

      There are products you can buy that are specifically made to help reduce facial redness:
      - There is a face cream called ROSACURE which is an anti-redness cream formulated for rosacea-prone skin types.
      - Guinot has a face cream called RED LOGIC which claims to neutralize the appearance of red blood vessels.
      - LaTherapie Paris has a fortifying skin cream that is supposed to help soften high colour (reduce redness)

      I know there are other brands and products that may be similar. You need to find the one that works best with your skin and your body chemistry.

      If you're interested, here are a few other helpful, (and natural) hints for a better complexion for a lifetime:
      - avoid touching your face throughout the day (dirt, oils, & bacteria from your hands can clog the pores)
      - avoid any products with alcohol (internally or externally) Alcohol can irritate & damage sensitive skin tissue. Alcohol is also generally known as a trigger for most rosacea people.
      - only use gentle, fragrance-free, oil-free, alcohol-free cleansers on your face
      - avoid any scented soaps and creams
      - have a daily facial cleansing routine (2x daily, morning & night. Do not scrub as this will irritate the skin)
      - try a dairy milk face-soak during a flare-up (as long as you're not allergic) The dairy milk helps to balance the natural PH of the skin
      - try using face lotion containing certified green algae or aloe vera gel (use lotions, not creams, as lotion is more gentle on the skin and absorbs more easily)
      - try using pure tea tree oil for pimples & blemishes. Apply with a q-tip to each individual pimple or blemish.
      - avoid extended periods in direct sun (use sunblock with 15 - 30 spf)
      - drink pure green tea, rose hip tea, and fennel tea (great antioxidants)
      - eat foods high in anti-oxidants; such as blueberries, cranberries, purple grapes, broccoli, etc..
      - avoid spicy foods, greasy foods, and foods with a high refined-sugar content.
      - find out what your own personal food "triggers" are and avoid them so you can avoid flare-ups of redness and acne. (many people find food with histamines aggravate the redness)
      - avoid hot things. Hot showers & hot tubs, hot drinks (the heat will dilate blood vessels causing more redness)
      - try to get at least 7 - 8 hours of sleep each night (aids in the healing processes of the body)
      - try to cut down on stress (stress can magnify a multitude of conditions including rosacea)

      Check out the sites below for the most current, up-to-date information regarding rosacea...

  21. QUESTION:
    Whats the best thing to wash your face with daily to get rid of acne?
    At the moment im using this Boots daily face wash. Is that good for treating acne? Or should I just use Soap and hot water? Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      I used to use a lot of acne treatments. Even aspirin masks. didnt really work out. I also had a bad case of keratosis pilaris on my arms( you mite wanna look tht up) i started using burt's bees lotions and body washes about 3 days ago & i use it on my face. it has cleared up tremendously.
      i wont ever go back to using all those chemical infested body washes and acne teatments.
      i suggest you use Burt's Bees ance treaments. they really work.
      burts bees is almost 100% natural. its really good for the body.
      hope i helped:)
      good luck!

  22. QUESTION:
    In addition to Keratosis Pilaris, I get pimples on my arms that I always pick at?
    They aren't necessarily red... They are usually skin colored and there are lots of them. (The pimples that I get on my face aren't red either. And I don't get them that much really.) I have picked them since I was little. It's mostly when I'm stressed. Also my arms get fairly red and appear to have a tannish red to them and it looks terrible.. How do I fix this?

    • ANSWER:
      Initial treatment of keratosis pilaris should be intensive moisturizing. Try a cream such as Acid mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 after bathing, and re-apply the cream again several times daily.

      If this does not help, change to a medicated cream containing urea (Carmol, Vanomide, U-Kera, Ultra Mide, Nutraplus) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily - it may be too irritating to use more often. More aggressive home treatment can be done if ones skin can tolerate it. The plugged pores can be removed by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth, stiff brush, or 'Buf-Puf'.

      Prescription medicines that may help include antibiotics (Erythromycin, Bactrim) if the spots are very red and Tazorac Cream. Tazorac, a relative of vitamin A, may cause irritation in some people.

      http://www.aocd.org/skin/dermatologic_diseases/keratosis_pilaris.html
      http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pilaris/article.htm

  23. QUESTION:
    What are the red bumps on the back of my arms?
    I get them every once in a while, and white (looks like skin) comes out of them. They're very small, they don't itch and I do exfoliate.. Any suggestions as to how I can get rid of them? Anyone experience this before? Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Acne is not only present on your face but also arms. Just like any area of your body, your arms have hair follicles. They are connected to sebaceous glands. Usually, when the dead cells and sebum clog the glands, acne will develop.

      If you sweat a lot especially while wearing tight fitting clothes, you are likely to encounter acne on your arms. Tight clothing tend to prevent the sebum and dead skin cells from shedding off from the skin. Consequently, the pores will get clogged and acne will develop.

      For acne prevention, it is better to wear loose clothing. Always change your clothes every day. You don't want the dirt and dust to block your pores.

      Sometimes, you find it tempting to scratch the acne on your arms. By all means, don't do it. You don't want to have arms full with scars.

      If you go to gym for workout, you should shower after workout. This will keep your skin free from sebum and sweat. Shower will also wash away dead skin cells. Make sure that you arm is clean and dry after shower.

      You can apply anti-acne creams or lotions that contain benzyl peroxide or salicylic acid on the skin where acne develops. Massage them into the skin, and then leave it on for 30 seconds. Then rinse it off. Bear in mind that benzyl peroxide can bleach your clothes. Therefore, wear loose clothing to avoid discoloration on your clothes.

      Your arms don't have many oil glands as your face. Therefore, use mild acne treatments to prevent your skin from the inflammation and drying. Always keep your arms clean by washing them with a mild soap. Make sure that you don't scrub your arms as this will make the acne worse.

      Sometimes, your arms develop known as keratosis pilaris. They appears as a bump of keratin protein in the hair openings. You can find them on your upper arms. They are not pimples. You can get rid of them by scrubbing your arms with a loofah.

      Acne on arms may affect your self-esteem. With these simple tips, you can prevent and get rid of acne on your arms. If it still persists, then you should see a dermatologist for an appropriate treatment.
      http://acnecureinfo.blogspot.com

  24. QUESTION:
    How do you make the skin on your arms smoother?
    My upper arms seem normal, but they feel as though little itte-bitte pimples are covering the surface. How do you clear the skin and make it smoother?

    • ANSWER:
      i think i know what you're talking about. i have the same thing. it's little bumps, and they don't hurt, but they're sometimes dry and almost always annoying.

      Keratosis pilaris (KP, also follicular keratosis) is a very common genetic follicular condition that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin, hence referred to as chicken skin. It most often appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms (though the lower arms can also be affected), and can also occur on the thighs and tops of legs, flanks, buttocks, or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet). Less commonly, lesions appear on the face, which may be mistaken for acne.

      Classification
      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40% of the adult population and approximately 50%-80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men.

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faciei (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.

      Symptoms and signs
      Keratosis pilaris occurs when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore. This causes the formation of hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). The painless bumps are skin-colored, although they can become red and inflamed at times. Usually many plugs form in an area, causing patches of rough, bumpy skin. This gives the skin a sandpaper or goose flesh appearance. This may be more severe in the winter or times of low humidity, which causes the skin to become dry. It will eventually resolve on its own.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin's "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. The hair, then, grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated. The hair can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though removal can lead to scarring.

      Keratosis pilaris may be hereditary. It is present in babies and continues into adulthood, but is uncommon in elderly people. It is most obvious during the teenage years. KP is prevalent in those who are overweight, or have atopic dermatitis, ichthyosis, or descend from Celtic backgrounds. Keratosis pilaris occurs in otherwise healthy people.

      Treatment
      There is no cure for Keratosis pilaris, but treatment is available. One option is to use a loofa to remove the dead, dry skin. Another option is to use a dermotologist-prescribed cream or lotion that should be applied daily. The best lotions for this condition would have urea, 15% alphahydroxy acids, or Retin A in them. Over-the-counter lotions work as well and should be applied after showering, as well as several times a day. The lotions are often soothing and can help improve the appearance of the skin. Dermotologists also recommend mild peeling agents, or alpha hydroxy acids, that may open up the plugged follicles. Antibiotics may also help in some cases where the bumps are red and badly inflamed. To temporarily reduce redness but not roughness, pulse dye laser treatment or intense pulsed light (IPL) can be done.

      Although it may clear up with treatment, reccurance of KP is very likely. Therefore, treatment should be continued regularly. It may take several months to years for the condition to completely clear up.

      A dermotologist or physician can usually diagnose a patient for Keratosis pilaris by visually inspecting the patient's skin.

  25. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of acne 'bumps' on my face? What are they?
    On my cheeks, there's small bumps on the surface of my skin... they're not whiteheads or blackheads but they are red coloured. When I put foundation on, you can see the bumps and it doesn't look very attractive! I wash my face regularly twice a day, moisturize etc... What are these bumps and how do I get rid of them?

    • ANSWER:
      Acne vulgaris (commonly called acne) is a common skin condition, caused by changes in the pilosebaceous units, skin structures consisting of a hair follicle and its associated sebaceous gland via androgen stimulation. It is characterized by noninflammatory follicular papules or comedones and by inflammatory papules, pustules, and nodules in its more severe forms. Acne vulgaris affects the areas of skin with the densest population of sebaceous follicles; these areas include the face, the upper part of the chest, and the back. Severe acne is inflammatory, but acne can also manifest in noninflammatory forms. Acne lesions are commonly referred to as pimples, blemishes, spots, zits, or acne.

      Acne is most common during adolescence, affecting more than 85% of teenagers, and frequently continues into adulthood. The cause in adolescence is generally an increase in male sex hormones, which people of both genders accrue during puberty. For most people, acne diminishes over time and tends to disappear—or at the very least decrease—after one reaches one's early twenties. There is, however, no way to predict how long it will take to disappear entirely, and some individuals will continue to suffer well into their thirties, forties and beyond.

      The face and upper neck are the most commonly affected, but the chest, back and shoulders may have acne as well. The upper arms can also have acne, but lesions found there are often keratosis pilaris, not acne. Typical acne lesions are comedones, inflammatory papules, pustules and nodules. Some of the large nodules were previously called "cysts" and the term nodulocystic has been used to describe severe cases of inflammatory acne.

      Aside from scarring, its main effects are psychological, such as reduced self-esteem and, according to at least one study, depression or suicide. Acne usually appears during adolescence, when people already tend to be most socially insecure. Early and aggressive treatment is therefore advocated by some to lessen the overall impact to individuals.

      For more iformation about how to treat them, go to: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acne

      Good luck.

  26. QUESTION:
    How do you get rid of arm acne?
    I've had arm acne ever since I was ten years old well it started when I was ten. Whenever I where t-shirts and tank tops I always feel embarrassed to show my arms. I've tried lotions but they don't seem to work. If you have any suggestions please feel free to answer. Thanks a ton.

    • ANSWER:
      Acne is not only present on your face but also arms. Just like any area of your body, your arms have hair follicles. They are connected to sebaceous glands. Usually, when the dead cells and sebum clog the glands, acne will develop.

      If you sweat a lot especially while wearing tight fitting clothes, you are likely to encounter acne on your arms. Tight clothing tend to prevent the sebum and dead skin cells from shedding off from the skin. Consequently, the pores will get clogged and acne will develop.

      For acne prevention, it is better to wear loose clothing. Always change your clothes every day. You don't want the dirt and dust to block your pores.

      Sometimes, you find it tempting to scratch the acne on your arms. By all means, don't do it. You don't want to have arms full with scars.

      If you go to gym for workout, you should shower after workout. This will keep your skin free from sebum and sweat. Shower will also wash away dead skin cells. Make sure that you arm is clean and dry after shower.

      You can apply anti-acne creams or lotions that contain benzyl peroxide or salicylic acid on the skin where acne develops. Massage them into the skin, and then leave it on for 30 seconds. Then rinse it off. Bear in mind that benzyl peroxide can bleach your clothes. Therefore, wear loose clothing to avoid discoloration on your clothes.

      Your arms don't have many oil glands as your face. Therefore, use mild acne treatments to prevent your skin from the inflammation and drying. Always keep your arms clean by washing them with a mild soap. Make sure that you don't scrub your arms as this will make the acne worse.

      Sometimes, your arms develop known as keratosis pilaris. They appears as a bump of keratin protein in the hair openings. You can find them on your upper arms. They are not pimples. You can get rid of them by scrubbing your arms with a loofah.

      Acne on arms may affect your self-esteem. With these simple tips, you can prevent and get rid of acne on your arms. If it still persists, then you should see a dermatologist for an appropriate treatment.

  27. QUESTION:
    Why do I have little bumps on my arm, between my elbow and my shoulder and how do I get rid of them?
    They are small un-noticeable (except to touch) bumps on my arm where the biceps are. They usually feel softer when I put moisturiser on them, except this does not get rid of them. How do I get rid of them completely?

    • ANSWER:
      I believe that you are talking about Keratosis pilaris and as far as I know its genetic. Here's what I found on the internet. Hope it answers your question:

      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a very common genetic follicular condition that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin and hence colloquially referred to as "chicken skin". It most often appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms (though the lower arms can also be affected), and can also occur on the thighs and tops of legs, flanks, buttocks or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet). Less commonly, lesions appear on the face and may be mistaken for acne.

      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40 to 50% of the adult population and approximately 50 to 80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. Varying in degree, cases of KP can range from minimal to severe.[citation needed]

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks) and related disorders.

      Many people with keratosis pilaris do not know they have it (if the condition is mild). While KP resembles goose bumps, it is characterized by the appearance of small rough bumps on the skin. As a result, it is often confused with acne.

      Keratosis pilaris occurs as excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin, accumulates within the hair follicles forming hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). Bearing only cosmetic consequence, the condition most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy. Though people with keratosis pilaris experience this condition year round, it’s during the colder months when moisture levels in the air are lower that the problem can become exacerbated and the “goose bumps” are apt to look and feel more pronounced in color and texture.

      [edit] Treatment

      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris, however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, Retin A and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to the lactic acid — a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may also be helpful but increases risk of skin cancer. Small amounts of vitamin A can be used orally but only with exteme caution due to potential for liver damage. Check with a Dermatologist or Family Doctor before taking extra vitamin A due to the vitamins' potential toxic effects.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden (if they do not already appear red), and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. Instead, the hair grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated, and can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though can lead to scarring.

      Food allergies may also exacerbate the condition, causing hyper-keratosis pilaris, gluten being a common culprit (source: physician's (MD) oral presentation).

  28. QUESTION:
    Can I use this lotion for my new tattoos?
    I got a tattoo two days ago, I have been using Aquaphor since the first night. Could I use First Aid Beauty Ultra Repair Cream for my new tattoo? Here is a product description:

    This Ultra Repair Cream is a thick, rich, emollient product that hydrates deep down with exceptional penetration. This cream is for anyone with severely dry, scaly skin due to harsh winter weather, aggressive cosmetic treatments, or any of the following conditions: atopic dermatitis, irritant eczema, allergic eczema, and keratosis pilaris. With the help of colloidal oatmeal, shea butter, soothing eucalyptus oil, and ceramides, Ultra Repair Cream provides immediate relief and visible improvement for distressed skin. The FAB Antioxidant Booster defends skin from free radical damage and the cream deeply hydrates with exceptional penetration, providing immediate relief and visible improvement. The cream is immediately absorbed into the skin and can be used all over the body and on the face.

    What it is formulated WITHOUT:
    - Parabens
    - Sulfates
    - Synthetic Fragrances
    - Synthetic Dyes
    - Phthalates
    - GMOs
    - Triclosan

    I use it as a face moisturizer, so I already have it in the house.

    • ANSWER:
      That would be perfect! Another good one is Eucerin original formula.

  29. QUESTION:
    How to cover up Keratosis Pilaris with makeup?
    so I've already asked in another question how to treat it .. but it just gave me the same info I already know :( so I'm just giving up on that. How do you cover it up with makeup? and not face makeup. I have it on my upper arms and thighs only. right now I'm using tinted moisturizer and powder foundation, but it's not really working that well. any advice? certain products?

    thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      I have keratosis pilaris on my legs too, and it's a huge pain in the *ss. It's not a serious medical condition, but it's embarassing and unfortunately there's no cure (no "treatments" are working for me either). But anyway, I use the Sally Hansen Airbrush Legs to cover it up. It's basically like foundation for legs; it's not a self-tanner so don't go a shade darker, you need to choose the shade that's your skin tone or else it'll look weird.
      You can get it at drugstores. All you do is spray it onto your hands and apply it where you need it (don't spray directly on). And yes you can use it on your arms. Wash your hands after or else you'll have orange hands.
      If you don't believe that it works, read the reviews for yourself!!! (:

  30. QUESTION:
    what is the best stuff to use for blackheads and oily/dry skin?
    washing my face with soap really doesnt do much for my face.. so im wondering if theres other options?

    • ANSWER:
      You've got to try Carley's Clear & Smooth!! If you have severe acne, try their Industrial Strength Formula (specially made for teens) but if you have mild acne, try their Original Formula (for people who has bumpy skin, ALL types of acne, keratosis pilaris or just looking for a skin improvement). It also controls oily skin!! You can only get these online! Not sold in stores! They have a life time guarantee!! You can get a refund at any time after purchasing it if you don't like it! You'll love it cuz it's CHEAP!

      Industrial Strength Formula
      http://cgi.ebay.com/Teen-Acne-Kick-ss-Industrial-Strength-Treatment_W0QQitemZ290062716486QQihZ019QQcategoryZ29618QQcmdZViewItem?hash=item290062716486

      Original Formula
      http://cgi.ebay.com/Adult-Acne-The-best-skin-treatment-in-the-world_W0QQitemZ290064245774QQihZ019QQcategoryZ29618QQcmdZViewItem?hash=item290064245774

      It's REALLY a great product!! It works BETTER & CHEAPER than Proactiv!! I LOVE all their product!!

      You'll get 1 soap bar for FREE which helps hydrate dry skin EFFECTIVELY!!

      You can read their testimonials/feedbacks/reviews at their eBay MyWorld page (eBay feedback never lies) or their website here..
      https://samus.securehbs.com/~clearand/store/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=27&Itemid=27&virtuemart=841688d07c03c5b1bca4bb972baed030

      GOOD LUCK!!

  31. QUESTION:
    What are these bumps on my upper arms?
    I know it isn't keratosis because the bumps are not red. they are the same color as my skin tone. Some are on the sides of my face too. They are just annoying bumps. What are they and can I get rid of them? and if so, how?

    • ANSWER:
      It is KP most likely sweetie. Keratosis pilaris. Check out keratosispilaris.org... They have all kinds of treatment ideas. You can get it to go away or help it if you try hard enough. I believe diet helps the most. 50 percent of the world has some form of it.

  32. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of karatosis in cheeks?
    I only get the redness and bumpiness slightly in my face during the winter it is there year long on my arms, I am more concerned on how to reduce or get rid of it in my face without drying out my skin

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis Pilaris in cheeks or any other place are same and has the same effect.

      KERATOSIS PILARIS- is a common skin condition that causes rough patches and small, acne-like bumps, usually on the arms and thighs. Though you may not like the sandpaper-like appearance of your skin, keratosis pilaris isn't serious and doesn't have long-term health implications.

      Keratosis pilaris can be frustrating because it's difficult to treat. Prescription medications and self-care measures can improve the appearance of your skin.

      No single treatment universally improves keratosis pilaris. But most options, including self-care measures and medicated creams, focus on softening the keratin deposits in the skin.

      Treatment of keratosis pilaris can include the following prescription medications:

      -Ammonium lactate (Lac-Hydrin).
      -Urea (Carmol, Keralac).
      -Topical corticosteroids.
      -Topical retinoids.-

      Please consult your doctor for proper treatment -

  33. QUESTION:
    how to remove the bumps i have on my arms?
    its kiratosis pilaris , nad my doctor did give me a medical cream for it . but now i cannot use it cause im having lazer treatements, and the doctor said that i shouldnt use any medical creams.
    so any at home remedies?

    • ANSWER:
      For Keratosis Pilaris, wash with a mild soap (Clearly Natural Glycerine Soapglycerine soap, Dove Beauty Bar for Sensitive Skingentle cleanser, Dove Deep Moisture Body Washbody wash for keratosis pilaris, etc.) to not dry out the skin.

      One step in treatment is intensive moisturizing. Try Vaseline Intensive Care Total Moisture, Dry Skin Lotionvaseline lotion or Complex 15 Therapeutic Moisturizing LotionComplex 15 after bathing, and re-apply the cream again several times daily. Put this on when the skin is still damp. If one of these creams does not help, change to a cream containing urea (Nutraplus Lotion with Urea or Aqua Care Lotion for Dry SkinAqua Care) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Kiss My Face Peaches & Creme Moisturizer with 8% Alpha Hydroxy Acidsalpha hydroxy lotion) applied twice daily - it may be too irritating to use more often.

      The second step is to remove the plugged pores can be by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth, stiff brush, or a Buf-PufBuf-Puf. Using Dove Exfoliating Body Washbody wash for keratosis pilaris with the scrubber will moisturize as it exfoliates. Rub in a circular motion.

      Take a good Multivitaminmulti-vitamin. If you already are, take extra Vitamin AVitamin A.

      Increase the humidity in the bedroom with a Humidifierhumidifier.

      Get 15 to 30 minutes of sunshine every day possible.

  34. QUESTION:
    How do i get rid of these spots on my legs?
    So i have these wwierd blackhead/small spot things all over my legs and they wont go away, they went away when it was really hot, what is it? How can i get rid of these blackhead things??:/

    • ANSWER:
      They could be blackheads. They could be keratosis pilaris. They could be anything. No one is a dermatologist here.

      I will take a "guess" and they it is keratosis pilaris or blackheads, the treatments are the same.

      To REMOVE and CONTROL:
      1)Use a gentle water-soluble cleanser
      2)Use a beta hydroxy acid (i.e., salicylic acid) or beta-lipohydroxy acid (capryloyl salicylic acid) in 0.5-2% to unclog the pores.
      3)Use an oil-absorbent topical to provide a barrier that constantly soaks excessive oil for a period of time depending on how oily you are - just do not expect any miracles. Or, you can use specially made blotting paper or a plain tissue paper and blot your face throughout the day to reduce the shine.

      To PROTECT your skin
      1)Use and reapply broad-spectrum sunscreen with SPF 15 or greater daily. UV-ray can inflame the skin and irritate the sebaceous glands to produce more oil.

      If these conservative therapies do not work, then you should consult with a board-certified dermatologist about retinoid prescription such as Retin-A (Micro), Tazorac, or Differin. Or, you can get a series of chemical peels such as salicylic acid, mandelic acid, or glycolic acid.

  35. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of heat bumps?
    I have em bad on my face. It looks like im always nervous. So will like getting a tan help??

    • ANSWER:
      No, getting a tan will not help. what you have might not be heat bumps. It might be something called keratosis pilaris. It is harmless, but a nuisance for some people. If it is keratosis pilaris, initial treatment should be intensive moisturizing. Try a cream such as Acid mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 after bathing, and re-apply the cream again several times daily.

      If this does not help, change to a medicated cream containing urea (Carmol, Vanomide, U-Kera, Ultra Mide, Nutraplus) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily - it may be too irritating to use more often. More aggressive home treatment can be done if ones skin can tolerate it. The plugged pores can be removed by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth, stiff brush, or 'Buf-Puf'.

      Prescription medicines that may help include antibiotics (Erythromycin, Bactrim) if the spots are very red and Tazorac Cream. Tazorac, a relative of vitamin A, may cause irritation in some people.

      http://www.aocd.org/skin/dermatologic_diseases/keratosis_pilaris.html
      http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pilaris/article.htm

  36. QUESTION:
    Do i have keratosis pilaris or arm acne?
    ok well on both of my arms. there are these little tiny white bumps on the upper forearm. i dont know what they are. ive tried to pop them but nothing comes out of them.
    if u have any ideas of treatment or what you think it is let me know!

    • ANSWER:
      HELP HAS ARRIVED!!!!!!!!!!!

      I had this for years, my mom told me it was eczema. Most people say eczema is a name used for tons of different dry skin conditions that doctors can’t diagnose. I used eczema creams all through Jr. High and High School, all that did was make me feel greasy and uncomfortable with zero results.

      You probably have what is called Keratosis pilaris, Keratosis pilaris is a common, genetic follicular condition that causes the appearance of rough bumps on the skin. It most often appears on arms, thighs, hands, legs, sides, buttocks, or face (which on the face are often mistaken for acne). Worldwide, Keratosis pilaris affects an estimated 40% of the adult population and approximately 50%-80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. There are several different types of Keratosis Pilaris, including Keratosis Pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), Keratosis Pilaris Alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), Keratosis Pilaris Rubra Faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.

      Keratosis Pilaris is caused by Hyperkeratosis: when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin, which is cream colored, surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore, resulting in rough clogged pores. The openings are often closed with a white plug of encrusted sebum, the oily, waxy substance produced by glands in the skin to keep it from drying out. Hyperkeratosis is most likely caused by your body having a vitamin A & E deficiency.

      I started taking vitamin A & E pills at dinner every night and 90% of my white bumps on my cheeks, arms, and legs cleared up. My boss also had white bumps on her arms and tried taking the vitamins too, it worked nicely for her. You could try taking the vitamins, but if you stop taking them, your body will go back to being deficient in them unless you start eating more foods naturally containing vitamins A & E:

      Vitamin A: Liver, Red Pepper, Cayenne, Sweet Potatoes, Carrots, Dried Apricots, Cantaloupe, Spinach, Squash, Dried Herbs, Papaya, Mangoes, Green Peas, Tomatoes.

      Vitamin E: Sunflower Seeds, Almonds, Pine Nuts, Peanuts, Dried Apricots, Pickled Green Olives, Cooked Taro Root, Wheat Germ/Flax Seed/Corn/Canola/Soybean Oils, Hazelnuts, Broccoli.

      Both A & E: Paprika, Red Chili Peppers or Powder, Spinach

      If the bumps (clogged dry rough crusty pores) have a red or pink ring around them, it could just be that they are inflamed, or it could be some sort of skin infection, such as yeast, which lives on the skin naturally but could become an infection, or bacterial. If they are a little pink or red I would try an antibacterial soap.

      Antibacterial soaps are full of chemicals and poisons, some are so harmful they cause muscle weakness, such as in the heart and tongue, and should not be in stores. A natural alternative is a soap or lotion containing Tea Tree oil. Tea Tree oil has natural antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and antiseptic qualities. It also has beneficial cosmetic properties. Tea Tree oil has a faint medicinal scent to it like eucalyptus, which is why I would suggest a soap instead of a lotion. Products containing Tea Tree oil can be found in abundance at health and natural and heath stores, but is also available in main stream store such as Wal-Mart for as low as around .

      So in short, vitamin A, vitamin E, soap, and you should be good (: I wish you luck

  37. QUESTION:
    How do you get silky smooth legs fast?
    I have always hated my legs, and now i want to do something about them. I have very dry skin and these red bumps on my uperlegs between my knees and my hips...that section....what can i do to get silky smooth legs, and get rid of those bumps?
    I wash with a loufa and dove soap every day in the shower, and then mosturize with coca butter lotion.

    • ANSWER:
      You can try Carley's Clear & Smooth Original Skin Treatment to smooth out the bumps. It works FABULOUSLY in smoothing any kind of skin bumps (including keratosis pilaris) on the face & body. I use it myself & I'm VERY VERY pleased with it! And don't forget to buy their body lotion. That is a must for softening the skin! They're very cheap too!
      http://stores.ebay.com/ACNE-Results

      Other than that, I don't know because I have naturally smooth & silky legs. I don't even need shaving! They shine!

      Good luck. I wish you every success!

  38. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of acne on arm?
    I don't know if it's acne or dry skin or what. It's like these little bumps that looks kind of like acne and I hate having them on there, is there any type of treatment or lotion or something I can use? thank you for all your answers!

    • ANSWER:
      Acne is not only present on your face but also arms. Just like any area of your body, your arms have hair follicles. They are connected to sebaceous glands. Usually, when the dead cells and sebum clog the glands, acne will develop.

      If you sweat a lot especially while wearing tight fitting clothes, you are likely to encounter acne on your arms. Tight clothing tend to prevent the sebum and dead skin cells from shedding off from the skin. Consequently, the pores will get clogged and acne will develop.

      For acne prevention, it is better to wear loose clothing. Always change your clothes every day. You don't want the dirt and dust to block your pores.

      Sometimes, you find it tempting to scratch the acne on your arms. By all means, don't do it. You don't want to have arms full with scars.

      If you go to gym for workout, you should shower after workout. This will keep your skin free from sebum and sweat. Shower will also wash away dead skin cells. Make sure that you arm is clean and dry after shower.

      You can apply anti-acne creams or lotions that contain benzyl peroxide or salicylic acid on the skin where acne develops. Massage them into the skin, and then leave it on for 30 seconds. Then rinse it off. Bear in mind that benzyl peroxide can bleach your clothes. Therefore, wear loose clothing to avoid discoloration on your clothes.

      Your arms don't have many oil glands as your face. Therefore, use mild acne treatments to prevent your skin from the inflammation and drying. Always keep your arms clean by washing them with a mild soap. Make sure that you don't scrub your arms as this will make the acne worse.

      Sometimes, your arms develop known as keratosis pilaris. They appears as a bump of keratin protein in the hair openings. You can find them on your upper arms. They are not pimples. You can get rid of them by scrubbing your arms with a loofah.

      Acne on arms may affect your self-esteem. With these simple tips, you can prevent and get rid of acne on your arms. If it still persists, then you should see a dermatologist for an appropriate treatment.

  39. QUESTION:
    How can I get rid of acne?
    My face isn't that bad, but I feel like it is. I want clear skin, really. I'm allergic to most of the prescribed acne treatments, but I find Clean and Clear seems to help. I would like clear skin before school starts. Any tips?
    Also, I have these little bumps on my chest and like between my boobs. What causes them, and how do I get rid of them?!

    • ANSWER:
      You need to see a skin specialist. Acne isn't that big of a deal, you should wash your face twice a day with something like Neutrogena's Oil Free Acne Wash. And don't forget to wear sunscreen. As for the bumps on your chest, it isn't acne. It's Keratosis Pilaris, it's actually common, but you need to see a skin specialist in order to get rid of it. It won't go away unless you do, make sure you arrange an appointment soon or it will only get worse. Consult a doctor.

  40. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of Arm Acne?
    Help! I have arm acne. It's not as bad as some peoples. But it's still there. I tried exfolating it but it just made my arm sore and red. How do I get rid of it!

    • ANSWER:
      Acne is not only present on your face but also arms. Just like any area of your body, your arms have hair follicles. They are connected to sebaceous glands. Usually, when the dead cells and sebum clog the glands, acne will develop.

      If you sweat a lot especially while wearing tight fitting clothes, you are likely to encounter acne on your arms. Tight clothing tend to prevent the sebum and dead skin cells from shedding off from the skin. Consequently, the pores will get clogged and acne will develop.

      For acne prevention, it is better to wear loose clothing. Always change your clothes every day. You don't want the dirt and dust to block your pores.

      Sometimes, you find it tempting to scratch the acne on your arms. By all means, don't do it. You don't want to have arms full with scars.

      If you go to gym for workout, you should shower after workout. This will keep your skin free from sebum and sweat. Shower will also wash away dead skin cells. Make sure that you arm is clean and dry after shower.

      You can apply anti-acne creams or lotions that contain benzyl peroxide or salicylic acid on the skin where acne develops. Massage them into the skin, and then leave it on for 30 seconds. Then rinse it off. Bear in mind that benzyl peroxide can bleach your clothes. Therefore, wear loose clothing to avoid discoloration on your clothes.

      Your arms don't have many oil glands as your face. Therefore, use mild acne treatments to prevent your skin from the inflammation and drying. Always keep your arms clean by washing them with a mild soap. Make sure that you don't scrub your arms as this will make the acne worse.

      Sometimes, your arms develop known as keratosis pilaris. They appears as a bump of keratin protein in the hair openings. You can find them on your upper arms. They are not pimples. You can get rid of them by scrubbing your arms with a loofah.

      Acne on arms may affect your self-esteem. With these simple tips, you can prevent and get rid of acne on your arms. If it still persists, then you should see a dermatologist for an appropriate treatment.

      Are you dying to discover the truth once and for all if you can remove acne for good? Read about Acnezine review. Find how it can treat your acne naturally from inside out even scarring.

  41. QUESTION:
    how to get rid of chicken skin under your eyes?
    its like bumps n stuff but not pimples. they have been there for as long as I can remmber and i want them gone. any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      It could be keratosis pilaris which is a hereditary condition and there is no known cure.

      This condition usually affects backs of upper arms and forearms but also is known to affect thighs, buttocks and even face. The only place it cannot affect is palms of hands and soles of feet as there are no hair follicles for the build up of keratin (the same substance that is in your hair, skin and nails).

      You can try microdermabrasion but the under eye area is very delicate. All of the treatments used to make this condition better contain AHA's or lactic acid or Vitamin A.

      The eye area is such a delicate thing and I would recommend that you go to a dermatologist who is capable of assessing and diagnosing your problem and who may be able to suggest something to rectify it.

      Good luck.

  42. QUESTION:
    I need to see a dermatologist. How much does it cost? (Preferably the west coast)?
    I have the worst genetics ever and decided to see a dermatologist instead of spending money on products that don't even work! I've read all the answers and recommended products on yahoo but they really do not work for me.

    1. I have rosacea on my face
    2. Keratosis Pilaris Alba on my arms and legs
    3. Freckles/Sun Spots
    4. Severe stretch marks

    I'm a student without insurance.

    I'm looking for a number, not some answer like "it's different in every state", "doctors use this program, you should call them", etc etc.. I've read enough of that

    I WOULD LIKE A NUMBER PLEASE
    I really don't care which area it is at this point, please just give me an estimate.

    It would be nice to have prices for these treatments also..

    Thanks! :)

    • ANSWER:
      I went to dr Anna Guanche after seeing her on the TLC show "10 years younger". She is very friendly and has all the latest skin care techniques. I don't have insurance either so my office visit was around 0 and she gave me some prescriptions for my acne and rosacea which were tetracycline at and metro gel for (got them from Costco because they don't mark up their prices). I never had any procedures because they were around 0-500 each for lasers for my rosacea. She is in Calabasas.

  43. QUESTION:
    Creams/moisturisers for redness of the face (keratosis pilaris rubra faceii)?
    I have rather sever KP Rubra Faceii which covers both of my cheeks fully. I am aware that there is Pulse Dye Laser treatment that can help it but that's quite an expensive option - so could anyone recommend anything that can help reduce surface redness of the face? Any tips of creams/moisturisers/other would be greatly appriciated.

    • ANSWER:
      I'm not sure if this works, but the reviews seem pretty legitimate.
      http://www.amazon.com/KP-Elements-Keratosis-Pilaris-Cream/dp/B004IS1GGC
      I have KP too, it sucks. :(

  44. QUESTION:
    How can treat some bumps that i have on my elbows?
    they look red and white flakes and they are spreading. I have been using so many creams and they dont even go away. I even got them burned. they said there called chicken bumps

    • ANSWER:
      "Chicken bumps" or "chicken skin" is actually a condition called Keratosis Pilaris.

      The name keratosis pilaris comes from the process of “keratinization,” our body’s process for building up the epidermis, or outer-most layer of skin. When the body performs this process too much, too often, or in the wrong areas, excess skin collects around the hair follicles. This creates a miniature cone or clogged pore, much like a small pimple.

      While there is no cure for KP, there are some treatments that minimize the appearance of the areas affected such as:

      -The process of using exfoliating (scrubs and loofahs), moisturizing (lotions), softening (creams), and applying anti-inflammatory agents (sarnol hc lotion).

      -Alpha Hydroxy Acids (AHAs). Glycolic acid and Lactic acid are two AHAs used to minimize the bumps through chemical exfoliation. Lactic Acid, which comes in over-the-counter and prescription formulas, is also an effective ingredient for alleviating the appearance of KP bumps.

      -Urea. As with conditions that result in extremely dry and scaly skin, such as psoriasis, eczema, and ichtyosis, you may find your KP affected areas unresponsive to milder treatments. In this case you’ll want to try a product containing urea. You may have to see a dermatologist for some stronger versions of this.

      -Glytone’s KP Kit. As KP often responds well to a multi-faceted approach, consider a therapy regimen that incorporates more than one product, such as Glytone’s KP Kit. Since the goal of KP treatment is to exfoliate, moisturize, and prevent discoloring at the inflamed areas, you’ll find it handy to have both treatments and a gentle puff in one convenient package.

      -Vitamin A Treatments. Sufferers of acne and KP have used vitamin A creams such as Retin A, Tazorac and Differin for years. And while the potency of these products is undeniably effective at treating blemishes, the skin can become dry and pinkishly raw with overuse. Use a small amount of cream applied to the affected areas only once every other day or night. Stronger versions of this can also be obtained from a dermatologist.

      -Soothing Topical Anti-inflammatories. If youre having itching, this is the main thing that will help you. For an anti-inflammatory with the added benefit of itch relief, Sarnol-HC provides the effectiveness of 1% hydrocortisone. Sarnol HC Lotion’s base compounds help soften, smooth and moisturize the skin. Any other 1% hydrocortisone cream/lotion will work as well.

      If none of those treatments work for you, the strongest treatment yet is:

      -Microdermabrasion. Microdermabrasion therapies offered through visits to your dermatologist may be the last resort for sufferers of KP, but they can also be costly and inconvenient. However, there are a couple of at-home microdermabrasion products that, when used regularly, can have a similar glowing effect. Neova Microdermabrasion Scrub and Peter Thomas Roth AHA/BHA Face and Body Polish are excellent OTC alternatives.

      As with any long-term goal, persistence is the key to treating keratosis pilaris. It is, after all, a chronic condition that requires long term treatment. But chronic doesn’t mean panic. Regular treatment through the specialized products above will go a long way toward preventing new “chicken skin bumps.”

      Hope this wasnt too long, and very helpful for you.

      I have several relatives with KP, and simply exfoliating in the shower, moisturizing, and using hydrocortisone cream has worked wonders!

      Feel free to message me or email me with further questions, and see my source below for more information.

      RN

  45. QUESTION:
    What are These Bumps on my Arms?
    I have these bumps on my arms (a little on my face too) that i have yearround but get worse in the winter.They arent white or red and i got them around the age of 7.Does anyone know the name of them and how to treat it?

    • ANSWER:
      You probably have keratosis pilaris.
      There is no treatment but you can reduce the appearance of them. I have this too.
      Everyday, I take a shower with dove nutrium body wash and use a loofah.
      Then I use Eucerin plus intensive repair cream right after i shower.
      I also use aveeno creamy moisturizing oil, so now I switch off between the two.
      The key is to exfoliate and moisturize EVERYDAY.
      good luck!

  46. QUESTION:
    How do you get rid of pimples?
    i am 13 years old i get them on my face back and chest! i know it bcause of hormones but my friends dont have them! so pleasee helpp me!!

    • ANSWER:
      Well my advice:
      For nice clear skin:Get some yarrow capsules,put one in some warm water,splash your face with it,pat dry with a wash-clothe.Or as a cleanser if you have dry skin try milk it has lactic acid (found in alot of really expensive creams!).Then for toner use lemon it balances the ph in your skin,Apply with cotton ball.Then use 100% pure aloe vera gel (get this stuff at local heath food store or drugstore).Hope I helped!,God bless!. :) Garlic is good for pimples to (not good for sensitive skin) just leave it on for like 5 mins (mash it up first).Also have a good diet,eat lots of fruits and veggies(I'm a vegetarian).Drink water too,half your body weight (if you weigh 100 lbs drink 50 oz a day).Taking MSM (100-1,000 mg) daily can help acne.

      Also try an egg mask,simply leave egg white (from one egg) on your face for 10 minutes.

      I advise you to try a tomato ,take a tamato and cut a few slices from it and then leave the slices on your face for about 10 minutes(flesh side down).

      For your body simply:

      Mix suger (or sea salt) and Olive oil together and you have a great scrub!.
      :)

      Info:
      Benefits of aloe vera

      Many ancient works, including the Bible, refer to the use of aloe. One of the first documented users of aloe vera was Cleopatra, who lived from 68 to 30 B.C. She is said to have used the gel on her skin as protection from the sun, and to have thought the gel helped to keep her skin young-looking. In fact, the Egyptians may have used aloe vera in their embalming of bodies, among other uses.

      About the year Six B.C., Dioscorides, a Greek physician, discovered aloe vera was effective in treating a wide range of ailments, from kidney problems and constipation, to severe burns of the skin.

      Today aloe vera continues to be widely used around the world. Studies have shown that aloe vera speeds the healing process, particularly in burns, including those from radiation. It is also used by dermatologists to speed healing after facial dermabrasion, which removes scars from the skins top layers.

      *****

      The possible benefits from the use of aloe vera gel and juice include:

      1. May help sooth skin injured by burns, irritations, cuts and insect bites.

      2. May help moisturize and soften the skin.

      3. May help speed the healing of skin wounds,acne, burns and other injuries.

      4. May help (when taken internally)with constipation, diarrhea and other intestinal problems.

      5. May speed and improve general healing when taken internally.

      6. May relieve itching and swelling of irritated skin.

      7. May help kill fungus and bacteria.

      8. May improve the effectiveness of sun screen products.
      ......................................…
      Benefits of Lactic acid

      Lactic acid is a naturally occurring alpha-hydroxy acid that is fermented from milk for use in cosmetics, lotions and cleansers to assist in smoothing and moisturizing the skin. Lactic acid is of great use in any healthy skin regimen, as it aids in the sloughing of dead skin cells, increasing cellular turnover while hydrating the skin for a fresh and rejuvenated complexion. Lactic acid can be used for many skin problems including the management of acne, wrinkles, psoriasis,sun damage, keratosis pilaris and hyperkeratosis, and can even be used on slightly sensitive or allergy-prone skin.

      Egg

      After applying egg whites, your skin takes on a tighter, more lifted appearance, causing some skin care aficionados to go so far as to call the egg white mask an "egg white face lift ". Other benefits of this natural skin care treatment, egg whites have been known to reduce the appearance minor breakouts, as well as enlarged pores.

      Tomatos and Lycopene

      Lycopene is high in antioxidants and fat soluble, with a small molecule structure that is easily absorbed by the skin. There is a drawback however. Lycopene is not dietary soluble (the molecule structure is tightly bound) unless cooked.Tomatos have high levels of both vitamins C and A,great for skin.

      Honey

      Honey also is be good for your skin. It has the ability to attract water. You can use honey instead of alpha hydroxy masks because of its high content of the acid. It is also safe for sensitive skin.

      You can also use it as a moisturizing mask for your skin as well as your hair.

      Hope I helped!. :)

      http://www.riteaidonlinestore.com/products/prod.asp?pid=45914&catid=9717&trx=PLST-0-SEARCH&trxp1=9717&trxp2=45914&trxp3=1&trxp4=0&btrx=BUY-PLST-0-SEARCH

      Source(s):
      My brain.

  47. QUESTION:
    Is there a way to get rid of keratosis pilaris?
    I have this on my arms... I am 13. Is there anyway to get rid of it, or does it just stay there. Will it go away when I get older? Or could this just be something that has to do with me growing..puberty...
    and why the heck have I not got any answers yet??!! Do ya'll no know what keratosis pilaris is??!

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris is a common skin condition in which a protein in the skin called keratin forms hard plugs within hair follicles.
      Symptoms

      * Fine, bumpy texture to skin over the outer upper arm and thigh or elsewhere
      * Skin-colored bumps the size of a grain of sand
      * Slight pinkness may be seen around some bumps

      Treatment

      Moisturizing lotions are often soothing and may help the appearance of the skin. Skin creams with medications containing urea, lactic acid, glycolic acid, salicylic acid, tretinoin, or vitamin D may be recommended by your physician. However, improvement often takes months and the bumps are likely to come back.
      Causes

      Keratosis pilaris is benign, self-limiting, and often disappears with age. It is more common in patients who tend to have very dry skin, or who have atopic dermatitis (eczema). It seems to run in families.

      In mild cases, small bumps, similar in appearance to "goose bumps," are found on the backs of the upper arms. The texture is that of very coarse sandpaper.

      Bumps may also appear on the buttocks and thighs. Less commonly, lesions appear on the face and may be mistaken for acne.

      Individual lesions consist of small, skin-colored papules that form within hair openings. The condition is generally worse in winter and often clears in the summer.

  48. QUESTION:
    How do i get rid of my acne on my arms?
    It really annoys me and im embarrassed to wear tank top and even short sleeves! I only have a little on my forearm but a lot on my upper arm. please help and no rude comments please

    • ANSWER:
      Acne is not only present on your face but also arms. Just like any area of your body, your arms have hair follicles. They are connected to sebaceous glands. Usually, when the dead cells and sebum clog the glands, acne will develop.

      If you sweat a lot especially while wearing tight fitting clothes, you are likely to encounter acne on your arms. Tight clothing tend to prevent the sebum and dead skin cells from shedding off from the skin. Consequently, the pores will get clogged and acne will develop.

      For acne prevention, it is better to wear loose clothing. Always change your clothes every day. You don't want the dirt and dust to block your pores.

      Sometimes, you find it tempting to scratch the acne on your arms. By all means, don't do it. You don't want to have arms full with scars.

      If you go to gym for workout, you should shower after workout. This will keep your skin free from sebum and sweat. Shower will also wash away dead skin cells. Make sure that you arm is clean and dry after shower.

      You can apply anti-acne creams or lotions that contain benzyl peroxide or salicylic acid on the skin where acne develops. Massage them into the skin, and then leave it on for 30 seconds. Then rinse it off. Bear in mind that benzyl peroxide can bleach your clothes. Therefore, wear loose clothing to avoid discoloration on your clothes.

      Your arms don't have many oil glands as your face. Therefore, use mild acne treatments to prevent your skin from the inflammation and drying. Always keep your arms clean by washing them with a mild soap. Make sure that you don't scrub your arms as this will make the acne worse.

      Sometimes, your arms develop known as keratosis pilaris. They appears as a bump of keratin protein in the hair openings. You can find them on your upper arms. They are not pimples. You can get rid of them by scrubbing your arms with a loofah.

      Acne on arms may affect your self-esteem. With these simple tips, you can prevent and get rid of acne on your arms. If it still persists, then you should see a dermatologist for an appropriate treatment.

  49. QUESTION:
    I have rough, bumpy skin, and need help!?
    I have a skin condition called Keratosis Pilaris, where my skin is slightly red, rough, and bumpy, resembling goosebumps. I have it on my upper outer arms and the sides of my face. Please tell me how to cure or at least help reduce! I'd especially appreciate your own experiences and how you solved it, but any suggestions will be appreciated more than you know!

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      I think I have the same and I was looking for cures and treatments and this came up and I think I'm going to try it because it sounds pretty reliable, hope this helps! :)

      http://www.keratosispilaris.org/general-discussion/3469-2-ways-treat-keratosis-pilaris.html


keratosis pilaris face treatment

Symptoms Of Keratosis Pilaris

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    how can I be cured from Keratosis pilaris?
    Keratosis pilaris is a skin condition in which keratin protein forms within hair follicles thus making the skin appear scaly or like chicken skin.Keratosis pilaris symptoms vary – it can be found on your face, arms or thighs. It can be very bumpy or very red or both.

    • ANSWER:
      Nothing helps except for carrot juice. Carrot juice has been shown to either cure and or significantly reduce the Keratosis Pilaris symptoms for some people. To get results however you will want to drink a pint of carrot juice daily until the Keratosis Pilaris symptoms begin to disappear. It is thought that the reason carrot juice is effective in treating Keratosis Pilaris is because of the high levels of vitamin A within the fresh juice. Vitamin A is one of the most important for the health of your skin, nails, and hair. You could buy it at Wal-Mart. You could also search on google for keratosis pilaris/carrot juice.

      Good luck!

  2. QUESTION:
    What do you think causes Keratosis Pilaris?
    Genetics is a stupid answer that doctors give us so they can gain profit from us buying creams that only cover the symptoms. I believe people who have family history of Keratosis Pilaris are more susceptible to it, though.

    What do you think causes this annoying problem that covers my face?

    • ANSWER:
      for acne,fair complexion,tanning,sunburn,marks,
      spots,make up tips,hair issues n other skin n hair problems
      u can refer to dis website
      http://skincaretipps2733.notlong.com
      it has got so many tips n free beauty samples
      for curing acne and all your skin problems

  3. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of my Keratosis pilaris?!?
    I'm 16 & i have Keratosis pilaris, I really hate it because im embarrassed to show my arms. Is there any creams or anything that will help me get rid of it or at least make it less noticeable?

    • ANSWER:
      I too, have KP, and you are totally right--it is embarrassing. Take heart, however, because something like 50% of us have it. Here are some treatment hints:

      --lotion may help improve the symptoms, because dry weather worsens them
      --DO NOT use OTC acne meds. KP is not acne, and the ingredients in these creams, etc. will only irritate and dry out your skin, making it even worse.
      --DO NOT pick at them! You'll be left with terrible scars.
      --if you go to the dermatologist, you'll probably be given a peel. This will help improve the condition temporarily, but since it's a chronic condition it won't be a cure. You can also buy products to help "stimulate turnover." The problem is that most of them are pretty expensive.

      I ended up doing a bunch of research and developed a product that has worked really well for me. You have to use it twice a day, but I've found an 85-90% improvement (and it started to work almost immediately). You can buy it here:
      http://www.etsy.com/listing/66157122/miracle-serum-20-oz
      I bottle should last you a few months, if you are using the right amounts.

      You can also try some of the products listed here:
      http://www.helpforkp.com/keratosis_pilaris_treatment_index.html
      but since I've not tried any of them, I can't vouch for them. Good luck!

  4. QUESTION:
    How can I get rid of these little red bumps on my arms at home?
    AKA Keratosis Pilaris.
    This is exactly what thy look like, but this is not my arm.
    http://www.cellulitistreatment.us/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/Keratosis-Pilaris-Causes-Symptoms-and-Treatment-2650.jpg

    • ANSWER:
      I've had this. But I just started washing it with soap and a rag while a took a shower. It's just dirt down in your poures causin you to break out.

  5. QUESTION:
    Does weight have anything to do with topical skin conditions?
    I have a multitude of skin conditions, from keratosis pilaris and excema to a nickel allergy, and many more! I am also overweight and currently losing weight. Will this weight loss help clear up my existing rashes or help prevent more outbreaks? Thank you!

    -Also is there any homemade remedy to make an allergic reaction to nickel stop itching so much. If anyone else has this problem, then you know how irritating it can be! Thanks again.

    • ANSWER:
      You must avoid nickel, there is no remedy against it, and only some anti itch cream to get this a bit down. Loosing weight is always helpful, you feel better, you can take better a breath and even the possibility that some of the outbreaks are getting less.
      You have to be checked for these symptoms by an dermatologist, he can help you to handle all these much better..

  6. QUESTION:
    Does anybody know a Good treatment for Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have keratosis Pilaris on my legs and I'm looking for a way to treat it. I know there is no cure, I just want to improve the appearance of it.

    • ANSWER:
      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris; however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, Retin A and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to the lactic acid — a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may also be helpful but increases risk of skin cancer. Small amounts of vitamin A can be used orally but only with exteme caution due to potential for liver damage. Check with a dermatologist or family doctor before taking extra vitamin A due to the its potential toxic effects.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden (if they do not already appear red), and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

      Food allergies may also exacerbate the condition, causing hyper-keratosis pilaris, gluten being a common culprit (source: physician's (MD) oral presentation) .............. ll

  7. QUESTION:
    I need help eliminating milk and flour from my diet?
    20/F
    I have a skin condition called keratosis pilaris, also known as chicken skin. I want to see if I have any food sensitivities, so I am going to eliminate some common food allergens (milk and flour) to see if my skin clears up. I will do this for 1 week. Is this an effective way to try and clear up my skin?

    Also, what are some meal/snack ideas that don't involve milk or flour?

    Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      No, nothing helps except for carrot juice. Carrot juice has been shown to either cure and or significantly reduce the Keratosis Pilaris symptoms for some people. To get results however you will want to drink a pint of carrot juice daily until the Keratosis Pilaris symptoms begin to disappear. It might take a few days or a few weeks. It is thought that the reason carrot juice is effective in treating Keratosis Pilaris is because of the high levels of vitamin A within the fresh juice. Vitamin A is one of the most important for the health of your skin, nails, and hair. You could buy it at Wal-Mart. You could also search on google for keratosis pilaris/carrot juice.

      Good luck!

  8. QUESTION:
    What to use for Kerarosis Pilaris?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris and would like to know what everyone out there uses for theirs. I cant realistically spend the money it takes to buy things like "KP Duty" so I wanna know what different things people have used with results.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello,
      Keratosis pilaris occurs when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris, however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. Treatment includes tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream or Adapalene, a retinoid medication. Exfoliation, intensive moisturizing creams, creams and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. I hope it helps. Take care and regards.

  9. QUESTION:
    How can i get rid of Rosacea and Keratosis Pilaris?
    i have rosy cheeks with little rough bumps....i also have little bumps on my upper legs upper arms and butt....some look like pimples and scar....im pretty sure these are the symptoms....what now??

    • ANSWER:
      oh, man, that's what it's called. I think I have that too. I use hydrocortizone, you can get it at any drug store. It helps. Maybe it's the same thing. Hope I helped.

  10. QUESTION:
    How can I get rid of Keratosis Pilaris on my arms?
    I know you can't get rid of it in a snap.
    But what are good ways to reduce it so your arms don't look so..... Bumpy, Red and gross?

    • ANSWER:
      Jonbeha,
      There is no available cure, miracle pill, or universally effective treatment for KP. It sometimes clears completely by itself without treatment. The exact cause of KP is unknown. There seems to be a problem with overproduction of the keratin part of the skin called hyperkeratinization. KP is thought to be partly inherited (genetic) in origin. Many treatment options and skin-care recipies are available for controlling the symptoms of KP. Many patients have very good temporary improvement following a regular skin-care program of lubrication. As a general rule of thumb, treatment needs to be continuous. Since there is no available cure or universally effective treatment for KP, the list of potential lotions and creams is long. It is important to keep in mind that as with any condition, no therapy is uniformly effective in all people.

      ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED.

      It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms.

      The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions.

      Hope this helps
      matador 89

  11. QUESTION:
    How can I remove these bumps on my arm?
    I have had these small bumps on my upper arm for almost all of my life and I just recently found out that what I have is called Keratosis Pilaris. Is there any way I can remove these bumps on my arms? thanks

    • ANSWER:
      I also have them, and suffer from the same thing.

      the cure i have found is very simple.
      a little sunlight on the arms.
      less dairy & mainly less milk.
      more fresh produce
      more water.

      mine have faded dramatically, and are almost gone!
      when i have a tran, they are hardly there at all!
      good luck!

      Classification

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faciei (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.[3]

      [edit] Symptoms and signs

      Keratosis pilaris occurs when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore. This causes the formation of hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). The painless bumps are skin-colored, although they can become red and inflamed at times. Usually many plugs form in an area, causing patches of rough, bumpy skin. This gives the skin a sandpaper or goose flesh appearance.[4] This may be more severe in the winter or times of low humidity, which causes the skin to become dry. It will eventually resolve on its own.[5]

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin's "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. The hair, then, grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated. The hair can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though removal can lead to scarring.[6]

      Keratosis pilaris may be hereditary. It is present in babies and continues into adulthood, but is uncommon in elderly people. It is most obvious during the teenage years. KP is prevalent in those who have atopic dermatitis, ichthyosis, or descend from Celtic backgrounds. Keratosis pilaris occurs in otherwise healthy people.[7]

      [edit] Treatment

      There is no cure for Keratosis pilaris, but treatment is available. One option is to use a loofa to remove the dead, dry skin. Another option is to use a dermotologist-prescribed cream or lotion that should be applied daily. The best lotions for this condition would have urea, 15% alphahydroxy acids, or Retin A in them. Over-the-counter lotions work as well and should be applied after showering, as well as several times a day.[8] The lotions are often soothing and can help improve the appearance of the skin. [9] Dermotologists also recommend mild peeling agents, or alpha hydroxy acids, that may open up the plugged follicles. Antibiotics may also help in some cases where the bumps are red and badly inflamed.[10] To temporarily reduce redness but not roughness, pulse dye laser treatment or intense pulsed light (IPL) can be done.[11]

      Although it may clear up with treatment, reccurance of KP is very likely. Therefore, treatment should be continued regularly. It may take several months to years for the condition to completely clear up.

      A dermatologist or physician can usually diagnose a patient for Keratosis pilaris by visually inspecting the patient's skin.[12]

  12. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of keratosis Pilaris and scaring?
    I have had kp since I was 6 months old, I am now 14! It didn't used to bother me to much when I was younger, it wasn't that noticeable. I have it on my upper arms my tighs and my face, it's liveable not so red more bumpy than anything, but with certain scrubs and the occasional pick they have scabbed and I always pick them so they have scarred that was about a year ago, so that's only on my upper arms, I then went on holiday couple months after and they tanned, I have used bio oil since then and it's defiantly less visible but I was wondering firstly how to get rid of kp tried everything and then how to get rid or make scarrs less visible ? Thanks x

    • ANSWER:
      Sorry to hear about your condition. Apparently, it goes away when you get older, but of course, you'd wanna be relieved off it as much as you could before then.

      I'm guessing you've already done some online research, but lemme just share some info I found, in case you haven't come across them yet.

      According to Dr. Myers in this article from Mind, Body, Green, KP is a symptom/sign of gluten intolerance http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-7482/10-signs-youre-gluten-intolerant.html

      Have you heard about this, and tried improving your diet? High-gluten food (if you go through the whole article) isn't really healthy for anyone anyway, so try cutting out or reducing your intake of food with any wheat or flour. That might make you sad, but lots of people are doing that and their skin problems dramatically improve, not to mention experience a big improvement in having more energy & weight-loss. The typical American food has so much processed & refined starches. It's best to avoid or cut back on eating them (less bread, pasta, baked goodies, fast food, junk food, etc) and eat more fresh, whole foods that's not so processed.

      One of the best sites to explore on health is http://www.naturalnews.com/ There's a search field there you can use. A few articles that came up under KP talked about lots of skin problems, and there are reports of people having good results using Coconut Oil (virgin, organic -- I get mine from Trader Joe's cuz they sell things cheaper there than any other natural-products store) on their skin. It generally helps heal skin, so it could be good for KP & new scars. Tea Tree Oil also came up as an effective remedy to treat or reduce KP symptoms.

      For scars, I recommend aloe vera, coconut oil, cocoa butter, & vitamin e oil. There are also skin care products for scars. I use a homeopathic scar control medicine oil for my scars/keloids, while others use store-bought creams with dimethicone (a silicone oil that reduces scars). Wish I could help you find & get these, but good luck.

      Hope this helps...

  13. QUESTION:
    how to get rid of keratosis pilaris or chicken skin?
    i have a lot of these bumps on the back of my arm and a little on my inner thighs. i kno there is no cure but how to make it look smoother would b nice. thanx!

    • ANSWER:
      To reduce the symptoms of keratosis pilaris, you could take Omega 3, 6 and 9 essential fatty acids (fish oil or flax seed oil if you're vegetarian). If you take the fish oils, make sure it contains 3, 6 and 9 EFAs and take 1-2 capsules a day. It may take 6 weeks or more to see an effect. Vitamin E and B vitamins may increase the beneficial effects of the Omega oils.

      On your skin, use a good daily moisturizer. A moisturizer with alpha- or beta- hydroxy acids can be used a few times a week to help your skin with shedding old skin cells, which may make the skin smoother.

  14. QUESTION:
    I need help with keratosis pilaris?
    I have bad keratosis pilaris on my butt and thighs. And mildly on my chest, arms and legs but only because i'm tan. I need to know good things to do like what products to use or what vitamins to take. I already know that it's a genetic condition with no cure and i've already been to the dermatologist but it wasn't much help. Any info. would help. Thanks.
    everything has a cure but they aren't all discovered yet. Cancer doesn't have a cure yet.

    • ANSWER:
      I am a student of Sports Medicine and a future practitioner, so I might be able to give you some useful information. Research has not shown vitamins to be useful in treating keratosis pilaris. However, Vitamin A deficiency has been shown to lead to symptoms similar to those of keratosis pilaris. But it's unlikely that supplementing with Vitamin A will help, and it is possible to supplement with so much Vitamin A that it becomes toxic, so be careful if you decide to try that route. Otherwise, I would suggest gentle exfoliation to loosen the dead skin cells that may be entrapping the keratin at the opening of the hair follicles--you could do this with a loofa or a pumice stone. Use gentle, soap-free cleansers or body wash products. It may help to use some sort of moisturizer as well, i.e. Vasaline. You can treat it but can't cure it with these things---however, over time, it should disappear, especially if you are in adolescence or early adulthood.

  15. QUESTION:
    How do you treat Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have the condition KP (chicken skin) on my legs, upper arms and on the sides of my face. It's a condition where you get bumpy skin but is not itchy or irritated. Also wondering if I got it from the sun because it stops at my ankles and upper thigh. How do I get rid of it? Is there a type of cream or something? Please suggest products! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:

      1. How to prevent Sunburn* & scope for consequential skin cancer, Melanoma, etc: Expose Ur body and or the affected parts within 90 minutes from sunrise & within 60 minutes before sunset. Timely exposure of body ensures safe and sufficient production of Vitamin D by Ur body. During strong winds, no exposure to sunlight, please. Any extra exposure shall be @ Ur own risk for skin cancer/melanoma

      2. The symptoms cited---------an offshoot of blocked energy + accumulated toxins liver, lungs, Thyroid & Parathyroid, lymphatic system, Spleen, hormonal imbalance with a displaced solar plexus.

      ‘Target Therapy’ [Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies] proved to be effective for all types of cancer [including brain tumors, leukemia, melanoma, Crohn’s Disease, bone marrow cancer, breast cancer, etc., ] & all the most dreaded and incurable diseases.

      TARGET THERAPY* It is the God-given therapy communicated to the mankind through THE RIGVEDA, one of the Hindu scriptures.
      Target Therapy---Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies, [comprising Ayurveda, Homeopathy, Bio-chemic salts, Herbal Remedies, Yoga/Meditation, Magneto-therapy, Sidha, etc.,] U can have sizable & perceivable relief in 45-90 days. @ no/affordable costs, No side effects, and No Hospitalization.

      Dr.Vora designed it in such a way that the costs are the least for the survival/rescue of common man and the poor in villages, towns and metropolis on the globe; with NO insurance cover & NO money to bear the costs of chemo. It is most suitable to all the youngsters on this entire globe.
      U may study it, discuss with Ur family members/friends/acquaintances and slowly and steadily implement it for the best results.

      •No side effects and no risk. If it clicks, mostly possible, U shall have a cure. Lest, the therapy keeps mum. No extra risk. It is the most suitable line of treatment even for the terminally ill patients. Cancer cure/prevention is quite possible. U may try it for any incurable disease including cancer of any organ[s], post-surgical recurrence of tumors, Leukemia, HIV/AIDS, Crohn’s Syndrome, Gilbert’s Syndrome, colon cancer, Thalassemia, Alzheimer’s Syndrome, Muscular Dystrophy, Autism, bone TB., Tinnitus, all brain & spinal cord disorders, CLL, Crohn’s Syndrome, endometriosis, etc., ---it should aim @ [3] steps.
      1. Removal of toxins from all internal organs & purging through Normal Drainage systems, feces, urine, skin, lungs, menses [females].
      2. Activating all the internal organs to make each & every organ to function up to optimum levels, by purging out toxins.
      3. Supplying vitamins, nutrients, micro-nutrients, minerals, trace elements for invigorating the entire Immune system to produce antibodies.
      All items for a cure—available in Ur vicinity all over the globe.

      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse 'Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.

  16. QUESTION:
    What is a good product to get rid of "chicken skin"?
    The chicken bumps on the back of my arms and upper thighs is a condition called Keratosis pilaris (http://www.everydayhealth.com/skin-and-beauty/keratosis-pilaris.aspx). I know what ingrediants to look for in skin care products,but I was wondering if anyone knew specific products that worked well and are relatively inexpensive.

    • ANSWER:
      Your body is overproducing keratine and carrot juice helps A LOT. Carrot juice has been shown to either cure and or significantly reduce the Keratosis Pilaris symptoms for some people. To get results however you will want to drink a pint of carrot juice daily until the Keratosis Pilaris symptoms begin to disappear. It is thought that the reason carrot juice is effective in treating Keratosis Pilaris is because of the high levels of vitamin A within the fresh juice. Vitamin A is one of the most important for the health of your skin, nails, and hair. You could buy it at Wal-Mart. You could also search on google for keratosis pilaris/carrot juice.

      Good luck!

  17. QUESTION:
    what can you do to treat keratosis pilaris?
    i know i've read and went to a dr. about this.. and they said.. keratois pilaris is not harmful.. but i have a severe case in which my arms and back have the bumps all over. and its really ugly on my apperance.. and its gotta worse the past few years.. what da hell is going on? .. is there really a way to treat this? i feel like is so unfair to have that

    • ANSWER:
      While there is no cure for keratosis pilaris, there are palliative treatments available. The efficacy of these treatment methods is directly related to the individual's commitment and consistency of use.

      Creams containing the acid form of vitamin A, Tretinoin, have been shown to help. Most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, it is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by causing the outer layer of the skin to grow more rapidly, decreasing the amount of the keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. While keratosis pilaris is not acne, some believe this action may be of benefit to those with KP as well.

      Another retinoid that has the potential to help with keratosis pilaris is Adapalene. Benefits include increased stability when applied in conjunction with other topical medications, such as benzoyl peroxide. Adapalene is a moderator of cellular differentiation, keratinization, and inflammatory processes, having both exfoliating and anti-inflammatory effects

  18. QUESTION:
    Will having my arms waxed assist in reducing keratosis pilaris?
    This skin condition seems to start in the hair follicle.

    • ANSWER:
      Nothing helps except for carrot juice. Carrot juice has been shown to either cure and or significantly reduce the Keratosis Pilaris symptoms for some people. To get results however you will want to drink a pint of carrot juice daily until the Keratosis Pilaris symptoms begin to disappear. It is thought that the reason carrot juice is effective in treating Keratosis Pilaris is because of the high levels of vitamin A within the fresh juice. Vitamin A is one of the most important for the health of your skin, nails, and hair. You could buy it at Wal-Mart. You could also search on google for keratosis pilaris/carrot juice.

      Good luck!

  19. QUESTION:
    what are these little patches of permanent goose bumps ?
    I have had it for about a week now. They look like goose bumps. On both arms I have 6 of them on both arms. not itchy or sore. just patchs of permanent goose bumps. I don’t know if its related to diabetes cos I have been having signs and symptoms of diabetes the last couple of months. Also my hair is falling out. Don’t know if its related somehow. Or if it has anything to do with nutrition.

    • ANSWER:
      That is a difficult question to answer without looking at it, but it kinda sounds like keratosis pilaris. I don't think it's related to diabetes or any other condition. Here's a picture: http://girlalooshey.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/keratosis-pilaris.jpg

      You should see a doctor about the hair loss though--this may be caused from thyroid problems, birth control, or other hormonal problems.

  20. QUESTION:
    Since keratosis pilaris is caused by a vitamin A deficiency, would eating food with vitamin A clear it?
    Like carrots, eggs, milk, etc? Would it help at all?

    • ANSWER:
      Aeris,
      I feel sure that if you would kindly publish your source for the statement that – “Keratosis pilaris is caused by a vitamin A deficiency,” all of us in the medical profession would be most grateful and interested to amend our present knowledge. I was under the impression, up until now, that the exact cause of Keratosis pilaris – KP, is unknown. It presents as a problem with overproduction of the keratin part of the skin called hyperkeratinization. An excess of the protein known as Keratin, accumulates within the hair follicles forming numerous tiny rough bumps on the skin. Sometimes, these bumps can become irritated causing the follicles to redden excessively. KP, up until now, has been thought to be partly inherited (genetic) in origin. About 50%-70% of patients with KP have a known genetic predisposition and a high rate of affected family members. Many individuals have a strong family history of KP or "chicken skin." The underlying cause may partly be related to hypersensitivity reactions and overall dryness of the skin. KP is also closely related to ichthyosis vulgaris, dry skin, allergies, seasonal allergies, rhinitis, asthma, eczema, and atopic dermatitis. So to learn that it is a vitamin A deficiency is both enlightening and pleasing. I look forward to your imminent post with the details and link and/or address and name of trhe medical establishment where this discovery was made, and the medical personnel responsible for this breakthrough.

      ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED.

      It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms.

      The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions.

      Hope this helps
      matador 89

  21. QUESTION:
    How do you make the skin on your arms smoother?
    My upper arms seem normal, but they feel as though little itte-bitte pimples are covering the surface. How do you clear the skin and make it smoother?

    • ANSWER:
      i think i know what you're talking about. i have the same thing. it's little bumps, and they don't hurt, but they're sometimes dry and almost always annoying.

      Keratosis pilaris (KP, also follicular keratosis) is a very common genetic follicular condition that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin, hence referred to as chicken skin. It most often appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms (though the lower arms can also be affected), and can also occur on the thighs and tops of legs, flanks, buttocks, or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet). Less commonly, lesions appear on the face, which may be mistaken for acne.

      Classification
      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40% of the adult population and approximately 50%-80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men.

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faciei (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.

      Symptoms and signs
      Keratosis pilaris occurs when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore. This causes the formation of hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). The painless bumps are skin-colored, although they can become red and inflamed at times. Usually many plugs form in an area, causing patches of rough, bumpy skin. This gives the skin a sandpaper or goose flesh appearance. This may be more severe in the winter or times of low humidity, which causes the skin to become dry. It will eventually resolve on its own.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin's "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. The hair, then, grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated. The hair can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though removal can lead to scarring.

      Keratosis pilaris may be hereditary. It is present in babies and continues into adulthood, but is uncommon in elderly people. It is most obvious during the teenage years. KP is prevalent in those who are overweight, or have atopic dermatitis, ichthyosis, or descend from Celtic backgrounds. Keratosis pilaris occurs in otherwise healthy people.

      Treatment
      There is no cure for Keratosis pilaris, but treatment is available. One option is to use a loofa to remove the dead, dry skin. Another option is to use a dermotologist-prescribed cream or lotion that should be applied daily. The best lotions for this condition would have urea, 15% alphahydroxy acids, or Retin A in them. Over-the-counter lotions work as well and should be applied after showering, as well as several times a day. The lotions are often soothing and can help improve the appearance of the skin. Dermotologists also recommend mild peeling agents, or alpha hydroxy acids, that may open up the plugged follicles. Antibiotics may also help in some cases where the bumps are red and badly inflamed. To temporarily reduce redness but not roughness, pulse dye laser treatment or intense pulsed light (IPL) can be done.

      Although it may clear up with treatment, reccurance of KP is very likely. Therefore, treatment should be continued regularly. It may take several months to years for the condition to completely clear up.

      A dermotologist or physician can usually diagnose a patient for Keratosis pilaris by visually inspecting the patient's skin.

  22. QUESTION:
    What causes thoughs little red bumps on some peoples arms?
    I don't know if anyone will have any idea what Im talking about but yeah their not zits or anything just little red bumps. I know quite a few people that have them.
    HAHA Man I can belive I spelled THOSE wrong!!! wow, I swear im really not that stupid. Just a bad typer i guess ha.

    • ANSWER:
      It's a skin condition called keratosis pilaris. It's most common amongst caucasions. It's a harmless conditon in which the hair follicle becomes plugged by the dead skin cells that usually flake off. It's very common, in fact 40% of the population has it. It's genetic and while there is no cure for it, most people recommend exfoliating and moisturizer to alleviate the symptoms.

  23. QUESTION:
    How do I fix these appearance downfalls?
    I have all these little random bumps on my thighs are the top of my arms and I need to make them go away but I have no idea what they are! I've had them for years. You can't really see them but you can feel them. Does anyone know what they could be? Theyre really little. And they NEED to go away soon! Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      Here you go...

      Keratosis Pilaris
      Keratosis pilaris (commonly called KP) appears as "chicken skin bumps" on the skin. These bumps usually appear on the upper arms and thighs. They also can appear on the cheeks, back and buttocks. Keratosis pilaris, while unattractive, is harmless.

      What Are the Symptoms of Keratosis Pilaris?
      This disorder appears as small, rough bumps. The bumps are usually white or red, but do not itch or hurt. Keratosis pilaris is usually worse during the winter months or other times of low humidity when skin becomes dry. It also may worsen during pregnancy or after childbirth.

      How Is Keratosis Pilaris Treated?
      Although the condition may remain for years, it gradually disappears before age 30 in most cases. Treatment of keratosis pilaris is not medically necessary; but, individuals with this condition may want to seek treatment for cosmetic reasons.

      The initial treatment of keratosis pilaris should be intensive moisturizing. A cream such as Acid Mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 can be applied after bathing, and then re-applied several times a day. Other treatments may include:

      Medicated creams containing urea (Carmol-20) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily
      Efforts to unplug pores by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth or stiff brush.

  24. QUESTION:
    Is there anyway to get rid of chicken skin from the back of my upper arms?
    I've got chicken skin on the back of my upper arms. Is there anyway to get rid of it?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello,
      This is due to keratosis pilaris. Keratosis pilaris occurs when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris, however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. Treatment includes tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream or Adapalene, a retinoid medication. Exfoliation, intensive moisturizing creams, creams and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      I sincerely hope that helps. Take care and regards.

  25. QUESTION:
    Does waxing help prevent ingrown hairs and the irritation caused by shaving?
    I am considering waxing my bikini area. I have heard it last longer than shaving but, does it help with the irritation too?

    • ANSWER:
      Anything which causes the hair to be broken off short with a sharp tip can cause ingrown hair. Shaving is the leading cause, followed by waxing and tight clothing. The embedded hair causes a localized inflammation (sometimes painful) response in the skin with prostanoid involvement. Sometimes an ingrown hair occurs without external intervention, when the pore is blocked from various reasons, as is the case in keratosis pilaris, and the hair is forced to grow sideways.

      Symptoms include rash, itching skin, hair which remains in spite of shaving, and infection and pus collecting under skin. Treatments for ingrown hairs include putting a warm washcloth over the ingrown hair, shaving in a different direction, tweezing, exfoliating with facial scrubs, sponges, towels, or creams containing acids, and ibuprofen or other NSAIDs. Prophylactic treatments include twice daily topical application of diluted glycolic acid. If this is caused by waxing or shaving, try a topical applications such as salicylic prepared solutions (Barc Bump Down, Tend Skin, amongst others) also aid dramatically in the treatment of the ingrown hair

  26. QUESTION:
    Why do I have little bumps on my arm, between my elbow and my shoulder and how do I get rid of them?
    They are small un-noticeable (except to touch) bumps on my arm where the biceps are. They usually feel softer when I put moisturiser on them, except this does not get rid of them. How do I get rid of them completely?

    • ANSWER:
      I believe that you are talking about Keratosis pilaris and as far as I know its genetic. Here's what I found on the internet. Hope it answers your question:

      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a very common genetic follicular condition that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin and hence colloquially referred to as "chicken skin". It most often appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms (though the lower arms can also be affected), and can also occur on the thighs and tops of legs, flanks, buttocks or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet). Less commonly, lesions appear on the face and may be mistaken for acne.

      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40 to 50% of the adult population and approximately 50 to 80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. Varying in degree, cases of KP can range from minimal to severe.[citation needed]

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks) and related disorders.

      Many people with keratosis pilaris do not know they have it (if the condition is mild). While KP resembles goose bumps, it is characterized by the appearance of small rough bumps on the skin. As a result, it is often confused with acne.

      Keratosis pilaris occurs as excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin, accumulates within the hair follicles forming hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). Bearing only cosmetic consequence, the condition most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy. Though people with keratosis pilaris experience this condition year round, it’s during the colder months when moisture levels in the air are lower that the problem can become exacerbated and the “goose bumps” are apt to look and feel more pronounced in color and texture.

      [edit] Treatment

      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris, however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, Retin A and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to the lactic acid — a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may also be helpful but increases risk of skin cancer. Small amounts of vitamin A can be used orally but only with exteme caution due to potential for liver damage. Check with a Dermatologist or Family Doctor before taking extra vitamin A due to the vitamins' potential toxic effects.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden (if they do not already appear red), and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. Instead, the hair grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated, and can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though can lead to scarring.

      Food allergies may also exacerbate the condition, causing hyper-keratosis pilaris, gluten being a common culprit (source: physician's (MD) oral presentation).

  27. QUESTION:
    What are these bumps on my arms and how do I get rid of them?
    I have these weird bumps all over my upper arms and they're starting to spread to my forearms. I've always had them. They're red and sometimes white. I can scratch them off, but it doesn't do any good--there are too many and scratching doesn't really get rid of them. What are they? Can I get rid of them? My mom said they might be from not getting enough vitamins, but I don't think that's it. One of my sisters has them too I think, but no one else in my family does.

    • ANSWER:
      There is a large variety of skin conditions; so large that no one here can answer you so easily, at least without pictures. The best thing you can do is use Google to extensively research the symptoms. Such as, "red/white bumps, skin condition, itches" or whatever is the exact case. When you find a list of possible things it could be, look at them and look for pictures. Compare. If it looks like it's possibly it, use google image search on the terms you find.

      Or just go to a doctor who may refer you to a specialist.

      It sounds like this may be it:
      http://beauty.about.com/od/skinflaws/f/whitebumps.htm

      Keratosis Pilaris. This is google's image search results.

      http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&source=hp&q=keratosis+pilaris&gbv=2&aq=f&oq=&aqi=g9

      Unfortunately, it says it is incurable as it is hereditary. But it is treatable.

      Good luck.

  28. QUESTION:
    How do i get rid permanently of red dry bumpy skin?
    ever since i was little i have had this type of skin on the sides of my face, all over my arms, and some parts of my chest and i want it gone. ive tried everything, can someone plz recommend something to make it go away

    • ANSWER:
      You might have Keratosis Pilaris.

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris:
      1. Keratosis pilaris rubra: red, inflamed bumps
      2. Keratosis pilaris Alba: rough, white, bumpy skin
      3. Keratosis pilaris rubra faceii: reddish rash over the cheeks

      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris. However, there are effective treatments available that make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Most of the available treatments are purely symptomatic; the one thing they all have in common is need for repetition and ongoing commitment. Some seeking treatment with the disorder may be prescribed Tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream, often by request.

      Triamcinolone, most commonly sold under the trade name Aristocort, is a synthetic corticosteroid medically approved as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of eczema, which also reduces the amount of keratin in pores. It may be of most help to those with keratosis pilaris by reducing red, inflamed bumps. Triamcinolone is typically applied three times a day.

      Tretinoin, most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by causing the outer layer of the skin to grow more rapidly, which decreases the amount of the protein keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. As keratosis pilaris is manifested through excess keratin in the skin, Tretinoin forms a more effective and core approach to treatment than Triamcinolone, which forms a largely symptomatic approach. Tretinoin is typically applied once a day before bed.

      An alternative treatment is Adapalene, a retinoid medication that is a more stable compound, is less sunlight-sensitive, has fewer general side-effects, and may be just as effective as Retin-A. Treatment of KP with Adapalene would be considered an "off-label" use of the medication.

      As with Triamcinolone, Tretinoin or any other treatment, once therapy is discontinued, the condition reverts to its original state. However, skin treated with Tretinoin may take several weeks or more to revert to its pre-treatment condition, but may, at the same time, take several weeks or more to show optimal results, with the condition commonly worsening initially, as underlying keratin is brought to the surface of the skin. Tretinoin is considerably more expensive and dispensed in smaller quantities than Triamcinolone and other treatments. Although it may be the most effective treatment for keratosis pilaris, it is not considered the first line of treatment.

      Keratosis pilaris has not been clinically researched for treatment in an unbiased manner, with all claims of success or improvement being purely marketed or anecdotal. The condition is often dismissed outright by practitioners as being presently untreatable, giving mere moisturizing suggestions or reassurance that the condition will improve or cease with age, typically after 30. General practitioners are often unable to identify the condition. Ignorance, accompanied with the price, availability, quantity dispensed, time taken for optimal results to be achieved, more serious side-effects, adverse reactions, and worsening of the condition in the initial treatment phase - coupled with the cheaper, safer, and easier availability of other treatments - has hindered Tretinoin from showing its potential in the treatment of this condition.

      exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, creams, and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Beta hydroxy acids may help improve the appearance and texture of the afflicted skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to their containing lactic acid, a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may be helpful in moderation. Coconut oil may also be helpful if applied to afflicted areas while in the shower. Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, and, in many cases, will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing, such as tight-fitting jeans, is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

  29. QUESTION:
    Is it normal to have redness and bumps on the back of your arms?
    On the back of my arms there's always what looks like a red rash, and there's bumps too & I can't get rid of it. :[ Help?

    • ANSWER:
      Look up Keratosis Pilaris.. see if it looks familiar. It's VERY common. I've had it since I was nine.. I'm 27 now. Or it could possibly be folliculitis. Without more of a description of symptoms, it's hard to say. But the two ideas I listed above are probably the most likely.

  30. QUESTION:
    what do doctors look for when they think you have gluten allergy or celiac disease? Are both the same?
    Doctor thinks I have a gluten allergy. Is Gluten allergy the same as celiac disease? What will they look for in the blood test that I got done?

    • ANSWER:
      they are both the same, Celiac Diease is Gluten Allergy
      symptoms include

      * Upper repository tract problems (sustains, glue ear)
      * Fatigue
      * Chronic fatigue syndrome
      * Mouth ulcers
      * Anaemia
      * Iron-deficiency anaemia
      * Osteoporosis
      * Weight loss
      * Short stature in children
      * Diarrhoea
      * Constipation
      * Abdominal bloating
      * Crohn’s disease
      * Diverticulitis
      * Depression
      * Attention and behavioral problems (in children and adults)
      * Autism
      * Skin problems
      * Keratosis pilaris
      * Asthma
      * Irritability

  31. QUESTION:
    What are goosebumps and why do we get them?
    What are goosebumps and why do nervs or weather make them appear?

    • ANSWER:
      Goose bumps, also called goose flesh, chill bumps, chicken skin, people bumps, or the medical term cutis anserina, are the bumps on a person's skin at the base of body hairs which involuntarily develop when a person is cold or experiences strong emotions such as fear or awe. The reflex of producing goose bumps is known as horripilation, piloerection, or the pilomotor reflex. It occurs not only in humans but also in many other mammals; a prominent example are porcupines which raise their quills when threatened.
      ============
      Goose bumps are created when tiny muscles at the base of each hair, known as arrectores pilorum, contract and pull the hair erect. The reflex is started by the sympathetic nervous system, which is in general responsible for many fight-or-flight responses.

      As a response to cold: in animals covered with fur or hair, the erect hairs trap air to create a layer of insulation. Goose bumps can also be a response to anger or fear: the erect hairs make the animal appear larger, in order to intimidate enemies. This can be observed in the intimidation displays of chimpanzees,[1] in stressed mice[2] and rats, and in frightened cats. In humans, it can even extend to piloerection as a reaction to hearing nails scratch on a chalkboard, listening to awe-inspiring music[3]; feeling or remembering strong, positive emotions (e.g., after winning a sports event)[4]; or to an intellectual or spiritual epiphany.

      Piloerection as a response to cold or emotion is vestigial in humans; as humans retain only very little body hair, the reflex (in humans) now provides no known benefit.

      In humans, goose bumps are strongest on the forearms, but also occur on the legs, neck, and other areas of the skin that have hair. In some people, they even occur in the face or on the head. In humans, the areolas of the breasts of females typically show piloerection because of hormonal distribution, for example, when aroused or inside the maternity cycle.

      Piloerection is also a (rare) symptom of some diseases, such as temporal lobe epilepsy, some brain tumors, and autonomic hyperreflexia. Goose bumps can also be caused by withdrawal from opiates such as heroin. A skin condition that mimics goose bumps in appearance is keratosis pilaris.
      ==================

  32. QUESTION:
    what are these red dots on my upper arms?
    They are not spots and are not raised above the skin. On close inspection they look like little bleeds under the skin, like I've been pricked with little needles. They are not uniform in shape and are mostly tiny. I have no other symptoms and generally have good health. They have not appeared anywhere else on my body and do not cause me any discomfort, I just wondered what they are :)

    • ANSWER:
      This is most likely a harmless skin condition called keratosis pilaris. It's cause when dead skin cells plug up your hair follicles instead of flaking off your skin. The can be red dots, or raised bumps that are usually red or skin colored. Do a google image search of keratosis pilaris and if your dots or bumps match the pictures, bingo. If not, then I'm not sure what else to tell you. The upper arms is usually the only place some people have it.

  33. QUESTION:
    what is the symptoms, causes, diagnostic tests, and treatments related to keratosis pilaris?
    explain the disease as though you are talking to a colleague at your place of work then, describe the disease as though you are explaining it to the patient.

    • ANSWER:

  34. QUESTION:
    I am a teenager with upperarms that are either full of clogged pores or just are bumpy?
    I was wondering whether or not this was just dry skin. I do not see a dermatologist and I am not going to. When I saw my normal dr. he sad that it was just dry. I was wondering i there was anyhting I could do to fix this. I am kind of shy about them because they are slightly red as well.

    • ANSWER:
      Odds are the condition is actually what is called Keratosis pilaris, it resembles sort of goosebumps on the skin. KP affects an estimated 40 to 50% of the adult population and approximately 50 to 80% of all adolescents. Keratosis pilaris occurs as excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin, accumulates within the hair follicles forming hard plugs. Bearing only cosmetic consequence, the condition most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy. There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris; however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. I've has this condition since my teenage years, and I've tried a few treatments with little success. Ask you doctor if it may be KP.

  35. QUESTION:
    What does it mean when you have blood clots?
    A couple days ago I was noticing my skin under my foot was peeling . I put lotion on it cause I thought it was dry cause it looked like it. And then I started noticing red dots l. Though I didn't touch it . Now I have been growing more and I have like 6. What can they be. Please answer. Thank you

    • ANSWER:
      Anything like this?

      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/keratosis-pilaris/DS00769/DSECTION=symptoms

  36. QUESTION:
    Is it a bad thing if there are goosebumps on your forearm and they never go away?
    They appeared on my forearm and they don't go away! What if it's life threatening? Should I go see a doctor?

    • ANSWER:
      The reflex of producing goose bumps is known as horripilation, piloerection, or the pilomotor reflex. Goose bumps are created when tiny muscles at the base of each hair, known as arrectores pilorum, contract and pull the hair erect. The reflex is started by the sympathetic nervous system, which is in general responsible for many fight-or-flight responses. This is a response to cold or emotion and is also a (rare) symptom of some diseases, such as temporal lobe epilepsy, some brain tumors, and autonomic hyperreflexia. Goose bumps can also be caused by withdrawal from opiates such as heroin. A skin condition that mimics goose bumps in appearance is keratosis pilaris.

      How's your health, doing any drugs...if you are healthy it's probably nothing but if you are really worried go see a doctor to calm your nerves

  37. QUESTION:
    Help with treating keratosis pilaris?
    Hi so I am a 16 yr old girl and I think I might have keratosis pilaris. You know when you get those white bumps on your arms and thighs that look like goosebumps. well I recently noticed them becoming more visible. My mom says not to worry about it but I was just wondering if anyone else has this problem. If so, how can I treat it? vaseline? exfoliate? please I need some advice thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris

      Definition
      Keratosis pilaris is a common skin condition in which a protein in the skin called keratin forms hard plugs within hair follicles.

      Causes, incidence, and risk factors
      Keratosis pilaris is harmless (benign), does not get worse over time, and often disappears with age. It is more common in patients who have very dry skin, or who have atopic dermatitis (eczema). It seems to run in families.

      In mild cases, small bumps, similar in appearance to "goose bumps," are found on the backs of the upper arms. The texture is that of very coarse sandpaper.

      Bumps may also appear on the buttocks and thighs. Less commonly, bumps appear on the face and may be mistaken for acne.

      Individual bumps are small, skin-colored papules that form within hair openings (follicles). The condition is generally worse in winter and often clears in the summer.

      Symptoms
      • Fine, bumpy texture to skin over the outer upper arm and thigh or elsewhere
      • Skin-colored bumps the size of a grain of sand
      • Slight pinkness may be seen around some bumps

      Signs and tests
      Physical examination is usually all that is needed for your health care provider to make this diagnosis. Testing is usually not necessary.

      Treatment
      Moisturizing lotions are often soothing and may help the appearance of the skin. Skin creams with medications containing urea, lactic acid, glycolic acid, salicylic acid, tretinoin, or vitamin D may be recommended by your physician. However, improvement often takes months and the bumps are likely to come back.

      Expectations
      Keratosis pilaris may fade slowly with age.

      Calling your health care provider
      Call for an appointment with your health care provider (or discuss the condition during a routine visit) if you suspect that you have keratosis pilaris and the condition does not respond to use of over-the-counter moisturizing lotions.

  38. QUESTION:
    A man in his late 50s came to the doctor with a hard spot under is breastbone.?
    An x-ray revels nothing abnormal, although the man insists the spot wasn't there until the past few years.

    What is the explanation?

    • ANSWER:
      There are a number skin conditions that cause lumps and bumps to appear on the surface of the skin or just below the skin. This article covers some of the most common ones, and includes the following:

      * Skin cysts
      * Cherry angioma
      * Dermatofibromas
      * Epidermoid cysts
      * Folliculitis
      * Keratoacanthoma
      * Keratosis pilaris
      * Lipomas
      * Neurofibromas

      Skin Cysts

      Cysts are noncancerous, closed pockets of tissue that can be filled with fluid, pus, or other material.

      Cysts are common on the skin and can appear anywhere. They feel like small peas under the surface of the skin. Cysts can develop as a result of infection, clogging of sebaceous glands (oil glands), or around foreign bodies, such as earrings.
      What Are the Symptoms of Skin Cysts?

      Skin cysts usually are:

      * Slow-growing
      * Painless
      * Smooth to the touch when they are rolled under the skin

      Cherry Angioma

      A cherry angioma is a smooth, cherry-red bump on the skin.

      Although cherry angiomas usually appear on the trunk of the body, they can occur nearly anywhere. The cause of cherry angiomas is not known and the growths usually appear on people over the age of 40.

      Dermatofibromas

      Dermatofibromas are harmless round, red-brownish skin growths that are most commonly found on the arms and legs. Dermatofibromas contains scar tissue and feel like hard lumps in the skin.

      The cause of dermatofibromas is not known.
      What Are the Symptoms of Dermatofibromas?

      The symptoms of dermatofibromas include:

      * A red, brown or purple growth that can change colors over time
      * A growth that is as small as a BB pellet
      * Tenderness, pain and itching; however, growths also can be painless
      * A dimple that appears when the growth is pinched

      Epidermoid Cysts

      Epidermoid cysts, also called sebaceous cysts, are benign (non-cancerous) skin cysts formed from blocked oil glands in the skin. Most commonly, epidermoid cysts are found on the genitals, trunk and back; but, they also can occur in other areas of the skin.
      What Are the Symptoms of Epidermoid Cysts?

      In general, epidermoid cysts have a round appearance. A dark portion of the cyst is visible on the skin. If the cysts become infected, they will become red and tender. When the cysts are squeezed, they can produce a cheesy white discharge.

      Folliculitis

      Folliculitis is an inflammation of the hair follicles. It can be caused by an infection in the hair follicles, by chemical irritation or by physical irritation (for example, shaving or friction from clothing). Typical body sites that are involved in folliculitis include the face, thighs and scalp.

      Folliculitis is more common in people who have diabetes mellitus. It also is more common in people who are obese or have compromised immune systems.
      What Are the Symptoms of Folliculitis?

      The main lesion in folliculitis is a papule or pustule with a central hair. The hair shaft in the middle of the lesion may not be seen.

      Other symptoms include:

      * Multiple red pimples and/or pustules on hair-bearing areas of the body
      * A rash
      * Itching skin

      Keratoacanthoma

      A keratoancanthoma occurs when cells in a hair follicle do not grow normally. The growth apparently is triggered by a minor skin injury in an area that previously had suffered sun damage. Ultraviolet radiation from sun exposure is the biggest risk factor in keratoacanthomas.

      A keratoacanthoma usually will appear on sun-damaged skin as a thick growth that has a central crusted plug.

      Keratoacanthomas appear most often in people who are over the age of 60.
      What Are the Symptoms of a Keratoacanthoma?

      Keratoacanthomas are rapidly growing, red, dome-shaped bumps with central craters. Some keratoacanthomas can grow to extremely large sizes, occasionally 3 to 6 inches in diameter.

      Keratosis Pilaris

      Keratosis pilaris (commonly called KP) appears as "chicken skin bumps" on the skin. These bumps usually appear on the upper arms and thighs. They also can appear on the cheeks, back and buttocks. Keratosis pilaris, while unattractive, is harmless.
      What Are the Symptoms of Keratosis Pilaris?

      This disorder appears as small, rough bumps. The bumps are usually white or red, but do not itch or hurt. Keratosis pilaris is usually worse during the winter months or other times of low humidity when skin becomes dry. It also may worsen during pregnancy or after childbirth.

      Lipomas

      Lipomas are subcutaneous soft tissue tumors or nodules that usually are slow-growing and are considered benign (not harmful). They have a firm, rubbery consistency. Lipomas tend to form on the trunk, shoulders, neck, but can appear elsewhere on the body.
      What Are the Symptoms of Lipomas?

      Lipomas can appear as solitary nodules or in groups. Most lipomas are less than 5 cm in diameter and are asymptomatic, but they can cause pain when they compress nerves.

      Neurofibromas

      Neurofibromas are soft, fleshy

  39. QUESTION:
    I have red dots on my arms and legs. Do I have a skin disease?
    I have these little red dots on my arms and legs all over. It isn't chicken pox or anything, it doesn't itch. Sometimes it isn't that bad, but when i get uncomfortable or nervous it gets really bad. I've had it most of my life, but these past couple of years it has gotten worse. So do I have some kind of a skin disease, and if I do, can I treat it or get rid of it somehow?

    • ANSWER:
      It could be Keratosis Pilaris, it's a hereditary skin disorder that a lot of people have. I have it, and it sucks because there is no cure. Fortunately for some, though, it can improve with age. It is the most prominent during adolescence and during the teen years, but for some it starts to clear up a little later on.(some have said that when they entered their mid twenties they noticed that it was less noticeable) There is some really useful information about it on this site that can help you determine whether or not that is the problem:
      http://www.helpforkp.com/

      You can find some info and the symptoms here:
      http://www.helpforkp.com/keratosis_pilaris_about_kp.html

      And pictures in case you want to compare:
      http://www.helpforkp.com/keratosis_pilaris_pictures.html

      If you do have it one thing you can do is try to moisturize it with lotion (it helps) One really good moisturizer is Eucerin Plus Intensive Repair Cream. Don't try to physically exfoliate the skin with things like lofa sponges. Those can be too abrasive and can make it worse. The Eucerin lotion I mentioned has things in it that exfoliates the skin for you, which will give you good results.

      If it's not Keratosis Pilaris, thank your lucky stars and be sure to see a dermatologist to see what the problem is and what you can do about it. I had a doctor tell me I was ZINC deficient, but even after taking Zinc for 6 months there was very little improvement. It's actually better in the summer time. In the winter there is less moisture in the air and dryness can make Keratosis Pilaris look worse (which is why moisturizing the skin is a good idea, it’s better to put lotions and creams on right after a shower)

      Good luck!

  40. QUESTION:
    What really is hyper carotene pilarese?
    I have a friend that has tha skin condition and i'm not really not sure what it is. Please help me and my friend!

    thank you!!

    • ANSWER:
      What are her symptoms? Does she get bumps like on her upper arms and other areas? That sounds like keratosis pilaris to me. If that's it, it's usually not a problem. Just means skin in that area does not turn over fast enough, so hair follicles often get plugged with skin cells, etc. I use an over the counter lotion with lactic acid in it, like LacHydrin or AmLactin. Avon also has a lotion called Bump Minimizer.

  41. QUESTION:
    I have a friend who has Keratosis Pilaris. How can she treat it? Is there a method to hide the effects?

    • ANSWER:
      Summary
      There is no quick fix.

      Drink lots of fluids and apply unscented moisturing lotion 2-4 times per day, especially after bathing or swimming. Use mild soap, such as glycerine or Dove.

      Avoid drying situations: tanning, long showers or baths, low humidity, and scented/deodorent soap.

      Registering at http://www.KeratosisPilaris.org may provide some valuable information.

      It is possible that low vitamin-D levels are associated with KP. So, have her get VERY, very short exposures to sunlight each week: head and arms - 5-10 minutes 2-3 times a week without sunscreen. This is enough time to avoid tanning (which makes KP look worse and can damage follicles) but allows the vitamin to form. This is a case of a "a tiny little bit is good, but any more than that is very very bad." Do not go out and bake in the sun or tanning salon :-)

      A pharmacist or doctor can evaluate these treatments:
      --------------------
      From The American Osteopathic College of Dermatology
      http://www.aocd.org/skin/dermatologic_diseases/keratosis_pilaris.html
      QUOTE: With persistence, most people can get very satisfactory improvement. Initial treatment should be intensive moisturizing. Try a cream such as Acid mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 after bathing, and re-apply the cream again several times daily.

      -----------------------
      From Bielan B. "What's your assessment? Keratosis pilaris." _Dermatology Nursing._ 16(4):357-8, 2004 Aug.
      QUOTE: Keratosis pilaris can be very difficult to treat. Some patients respond to simple moisturization of the skin. Unfortunately, adults usually require more aggressive therapy. Ammonium lactate (Lac-Hydrin®) may be very beneficial in softening the keratin plugs as it is 12% lactic acid. In addition, an exfoliation device, such as a Buff Puff®, rubbed on the plaques may be beneficial but caution must be advised if the patient is darkly pigmented as rubbing may cause hyperpigmentation. Patient information can also be found at www.KeratosisPilaris.org

      In anticipation of predictable flairs of common dermatosis in Winter months, the patient should be told to expect a worsening of the skin condition in winter months and begin more frequent hydration of all lesions as the Fall turns to Winter. Frequent, long showers, which everyone enjoys more in cold winters, are also to be shortened. Finally, perfumed and deodorant soaps should be avoided.
      ------------------------------
      From eMedicine - Keratosis Pilaris
      http://www.emedicine.com/derm/topic211.htm

      QUOTE: No cure or universally effective treatment is available. Symptoms usually remit with increasing age.
      * General measures to prevent excessive skin dryness (eg, use of mild soaps) are recommended.
      * Some available therapeutic options include emollients, lactic acid, tretinoin cream, alpha-hydroxy acid lotions, urea cream, salicylic acid, and topical steroids. Mild cases may improve with emollients [creamy moisturizers]
      * More prominent inflammatory eruptions may benefit from a limited 7-day course of a medium-potency, emollient-based topical steroid applied once or twice a day followed by a routine of twice-daily applications of a compound preparation of 2-3% salicylic acid in 20% urea cream. Advise the patient to gently massage lotions into the affected area. After attaining initial control, patients can then be placed on a maintenance regimen.
      * Although calcipotriol ointment has been used effectively for various forms of ichthyosis, it has not demonstrated a therapeutic effect for KP in clinical trials.

  42. QUESTION:
    what works best for keratosis pilaris?
    I have just been recently diagnosed with keratosis pilaris. what can work best for this skin condition bc my doctor didnt tell me what to use on it or didnt even prescribe me anything for it. so maybe somebody can help me out with this problem

    • ANSWER:
      Many treatment options and skin-care recipes are available for controlling the symptoms of KP. Many patients have very good temporary improvement following a regular skin-care program of lubrication. As a general rule of thumb, treatment needs to be continuous. Since there is no available cure or universally effective treatment for KP, the list of potential lotions and creams is long. It is important to keep in mind that as with any condition, no therapy is uniformly effective in all people. Complete clearing may not be possible. In some cases, KP may also improve or clear spontaneously without any treatment.

      General measures to prevent excessive skin dryness, such as using mild soapless cleansers, are recommended. Frequent skin lubrication is the mainstay of treatment for nearly all cases. Best results may be achieved with combination therapy using topical products and physical treatments like gentle exfoliation, professional manual extraction of whiteheads, facials, microdermabrasion, and chemical peels.

      Sample treatment for a patient with mild to moderate keratosis pilaris:

      1. Wash area with Glysal cleanser once a day.
      2. Pat skin dry.
      3. Apply Salex or AmLactin lotion in morning.
      4. Apply tazarotene (Tazorac) or tretinoin (Retin-A) cream every other night.
      5. Get a monthly microdermabrasion and glycolic treatment with physician.

      Mild cases of KP may be improved with basic over-the-counter moisturizers such as Cetaphil or Lubriderm lotions. Additional available therapeutic options for more difficult cases of KP include lactic-acid lotions (AmLactin, Lac-Hydrin), alpha-hydroxy-acid lotions (Glytone, glycolic body lotions), urea cream (Carmol 10, Carmol 20, Carmol 40, Urix 40), salicylic acid (Salex lotion), and topical steroid creams (triamcinolone 0.1%, Locoid Lipocream), retinoic-acid products like Retin-A, Tazorac, and adapalene (Differin). There are also specially mixed "designer" combination, all-in-one prescription creams with multiple ingredients such as tretinoin 0.1%, hydroquinone 6%, and fluocinonide 0.05%. Another specially compounded combination prescription cream is a preparation of 2%-3% salicylic acid in 20% urea cream. These creams applied once or twice a day help to decrease the residual dry rough bumps.

      The affected area should be washed once or twice a day with a gentle wash like Cetaphil or Dove. Acne-prone skin may benefit from more therapeutic washes like Glysal, Proactiv, salicylic acid, or benzoyl peroxide. Lotions should be gently massaged into the affected area two to three times a day. Irritated or abraded skin should be treated only with bland moisturizers until the inflammation resolves.

      Occasionally, physicians may prescribe a short seven- to 10-day course of a medium-potency, emollient-based topical steroid cream once or twice a day for inflamed red areas. Intermittent weekly or biweekly dosing of topical retinoids seem quite effective and well tolerated, but the response is usually only partial. After initial clearing with stronger medications, milder maintenance regimens are used.

      Persistent skin discoloration called hyperpigmentation may be treated with fading creams like prescription-grade hydroquinone 4%, kojic acid, or azelaic acid 15%-20%. Special compounded creams for particularly resistant skin discoloration using higher concentrations of hydroquinone 6%, 8%, and 10% may also be formulated by a compounding pharmacist.

      Many treatments have been used in KP without consistent results. As there is no miraculous cure or universally effective treatment for KP, it is important to proceed with mild caution and lower expectations.

      A menu of available in-office physician or "medspa" performed treatments may be helpful as adjunctive treatment. Options include various chemical peels, dermabrasion, microdermabrasion, photodynamic therapy (PDT), ALA, Levulan, blue light, laser, photofacials, and Intense Pulsed Light (IPL). Overall, a combination of in-office treatments and a physician-directed home-maintenance skin-care routine is ideal.

      Severe cases of KP have been treated with isotretinoin (Accutane) pills for several months. Accutane is generally a very potent oral medication reserved for severe, resistant, or scarring cases of acne. Its use in KP would be considered off-label (not FDA approved) and not routine.

      Photodynamic therapy with aminolevulinic acid (Levulan) has been anecdotally reported as effective, but this successful use of off-label photodynamic therapy requires further trials.

      Microdermabrasion is a safe, minimally invasive, in-office procedure whereby the skin is gently exfoliated. Using vacuum-assisted suction, the skin is rubbed with an abrasive particle such as fine, powdery aluminum crystals or small diamond tips. Microdermabrasion assists in removing the excess keratin and outer layers of the epidermis (skin) in a controlled manner. As with other treatments for KP, there are small group observations an

  43. QUESTION:
    What am i supposed to do my legs are covered in acne?
    so i have kind of like acne on my knees,i went to the doc and he gave me a hydrocortisone type lotion,and pills,but none of that helps,and the doc said it could be a bacterial infection from shaving,so every time i shave more "zits" appear they look like zits and they're filled w/t stuff,could if be skin fungus or acne,and what can help,i have gym it sucks i have to cover up my legs

    • ANSWER:
      maybe it's a different skin condition that is often mistaken for acne such as: Keratosis Pilaris(which can appear in odd places on the body) or Pseudofolliculitis barbae('shaving bumps'- maybe it's just ingrown hair causing these pimple like bumps....if so then try to exfoliate your legs every time you shave with brown sugar or get a special exfoliator from a store). Try googling for images to help you identify your problem.....because I doubt that you have actual 'acne' on your knees but something else that resembles it. Also, I googled 'acne on knees' and a website popped up with different illnesses with this symptom......but it's probably just razor burn/ingrown hair in my opinion.

  44. QUESTION:
    Is there a skin disorder where your skin can't hold water?
    Like a chronic dehydration.

    I'm 22 years old and even though I wear a stable sunscreen everyday, my skin doesn't have alot of volume it is very photosensitive with fine lines and sagging, large pores and its been like this for a while. I've tried drinking lots of water and using moisturizers/serums.

    Any information would be appreciated.

    Thanks :)
    Thank you for the reply.
    I forgot to mention my skin is pretty oily also.

    • ANSWER:
      Well here is a list of causes of dry skin:
      http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/symptoms/dry_skin/causes.htm

      And here are some treatments:
      http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/d/dry_skin/treatments.htm

      I use a lotion with Lactic acid because I have a mild condition called keratosis pilaris. (I'm 26) I wish I could be of more help. Try to see a dermatologist if you can. They may be able to give you a more specfic cream/gel to help your skin hold water better. Good luck!

  45. QUESTION:
    I have a skin condition called caratitis ploaris?
    Do you know any good (but cheap- like the ones you can get at Target or something?) skin cremes that will get rid of it or make it less noticable? I am 14.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, yes it is keratosis pilaris. You can google this and get treatment options. I know there is something out there called a KP kit (Glytone) that our derm office routinely suggests.

      Product Description
      Glytone KP Kit. Rid your skin of unsightly bumps. Keratosis Pilaris is a common skin condition characterized by small, red bumps primarily on the back and upper arms. The Keratosis Pilaris kit will help reduce these symptoms. The Body Lotion, used in conjunction with the Exfoliating Body Wash, smooths away those rough bumps to reveal smooth, supple skin.

      The kit contains an Exfoliating Body Wash (6.7 fl. oz.), Body Lotion (8.4 fl. oz.) and 1 body pouf.

      ALSO:

      1. Do take measures to prevent excessive skin dryness, especially in colder winter months.
      2. Do use mild soaps like Dove soapless cleanser or Cetaphil cleanser.
      3. Do lubricate skin with special lotions containing lactic acid like AmLactin or Lac-Hydrin lotion.
      4. Do talk with your physician about using tretinoin (Retin-A), alpha-hydroxy-acid lotions (glycolic acid), urea cream (Urix 40), and salicylic acid (Salex).
      5. Do gently massage the lotions into the affected area twice a day.
      6. Do use a mild loofah or Buf-Puf to gently scrub the area weekly.

      1. Don't use harsh soaps or cleansers.
      2. Don't scrub harshly and try to scrape off the skin.
      3. Don't expect immediate results with topical creams.
      4. Don't give up hope.

  46. QUESTION:
    Should I see a dermatologist for Keratosis Palaris?
    The little red bumps on my arm. I haven't tried anything to get rid of them, I just want the quickest, best results. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment

      While there is no cure for keratosis pilaris, there are palliative treatments available. The efficacy of these treatment methods is directly related to the individual's commitment and consistency of use.[citation needed]

      Creams containing the acid form of vitamin A, Tretinoin, have been shown to help. Most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, it is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by increasing the cell turnover rate of the outer layer of the skin, decreasing the amount of the keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. While keratosis pilaris is not acne, some believe this action may be of benefit to those with KP as well.[7]

      Another retinoid that has the potential to help with keratosis pilaris is Adapalene.[7] Benefits include increased stability when applied in conjunction with other topical medications, such as benzoyl peroxide. Adapalene is a moderator of cellular differentiation, keratinization, and inflammatory processes, having both exfoliating and anti-inflammatory effects.

      An alternative is the prescription medication Triamcinolone.[7] Most commonly sold under the trade name Aristocort, Triamcinolone is a synthetic corticosteroid, compounded as a cream, which has been medically approved as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of eczema. As the action responsible for alleviating eczema symptoms is, as with retinoid creams, the reduction amount of keratin in pores, the effect of Triamcinolone on KP is expected to be similar.

      As with Triamcinolone, Tretinoin or any other treatment, once therapy is discontinued, the condition reverts to its original state. However, skin treated with Tretinoin may take several weeks or more to revert to its pre-treatment condition, but may, at the same time, take several weeks or more to show optimal results, with the condition commonly worsening initially, as underlying keratin is brought to the surface of the skin. Tretinoin is considerably more expensive and dispensed in smaller quantities than Triamcinolone and other treatments. Although it may be the most effective treatment for keratosis pilaris, it is not considered the first line of treatment.[citation needed]

      The condition is often dismissed outright by practitioners as being presently untreatable,[citation needed] giving mere moisturizing suggestions or reassurance that the condition will improve or cease with age, typically after 30. Ignorance, accompanied with the price, availability, quantity dispensed, time taken for optimal results to be achieved, more serious side-effects, adverse reactions, and worsening of the condition in the initial treatment phase - coupled with the cheaper, safer, and easier availability of other treatments - has hindered Tretinoin from showing its potential in the treatment of this condition.[citation needed]

      Sulfur has been used for skin treatment predating modern medicine. Sulfur soaps, lotions, and exfoliants have been used successfully for treating KP. Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) supplements used with some success often require dosage as high as 25g per day. Side effects can include thickening of hair and nails, and pale skin.[8]

      Exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, creams, and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Beta hydroxy acids may help improve the appearance and texture of the affected skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to their containing lactic acid, a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight is helpful as well. Coconut oil may also be helpful if applied to afflicted areas while in the shower. Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, and, in many cases, will cause bleeding.

  47. QUESTION:
    I have keratosis pilaris. I went to the doctor and he gave me lotion to help moisturize it.?
    After using the lotion my condition got even worse over a matter of a couple days. It has now spread all over my entire body. I was wondering what should I do.

    • ANSWER:
      Your body is overproducing keratine and carrot juice helps A LOT. Carrot juice has been shown to either cure and or significantly reduce the Keratosis Pilaris symptoms for some people. To get results however you will want to drink a pint of carrot juice daily until the Keratosis Pilaris symptoms begin to disappear. It is thought that the reason carrot juice is effective in treating Keratosis Pilaris is because of the high levels of vitamin A within the fresh juice. Vitamin A is one of the most important for the health of your skin, nails, and hair. You could buy it at Wal-Mart. You could also search on google for keratosis pilaris/carrot juice.

      Good luck

  48. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever heard of Keratosis Pilaris and do you think my fiance has it?
    He has all the symptoms of it... But this is the best picture I could find him. The picture doesn't do justice...It just shows some remnant of healed bumps on his face.

    http://i441.photobucket.com/albums/qq132/flowerjl/n21422755_33435337_9777.jpg

    • ANSWER:
      This appears to be acne, not Keratosis Pilaris. KP typically appears on the upper arms and sometimes neck -- usually not the face.

  49. QUESTION:
    does Keratosis Pilaris ever go away?
    ever since i was little, I had keratosis pilaris on both my arms and legs, and it looks very ugly o.O do they ever go away? or do i have to use a special treatment?

    • ANSWER:
      never goes away... i have it to, unfortunately. I have found that Oil of Olay body wash and in-shower body lotion conditioner ( oil of olay also) have lessened the symptoms tons!!! the red spots go away, and your follicles are able to push through the skin easily.
      key to the whole things is lotion lotion lotion... good luck!!!


symptoms of keratosis pilaris

Oral Keratosis

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Are there any inexpensive and affective treatments for Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris (chicken skin) and I haven't been able to find anything that really works. I've gotten lotions from my doctor but that doesn't completely help.
    Is there any inexpensive and affective treatment that really helps or helped you?
    Thanks in advance!

    • ANSWER:
      Try a loofah to exfolitate:

      To treat keratosis pilaris patients can try several strategies to lessen the bumps. First, the patient can supplement the natural removal of dry skin and papules by using a loofah or another type of scrub showering or bathing. A variety of different over-the-counter (OTC) lotions, ointments, and creams can also be applied after showering while the skin is still moist and then several times a day to keep the area moist. Medicated lotions with urea, 15% alphahydroxy acids, or Retin A can also be prescribed by the dermatologist and applied one to two times daily. Systemic (oral) medications are not prescribed for keratosis pilaris. However if papules are opened and become infected, antibiotics may be necessary to treat the infection.

      I hope using a loofah, or something similar, helps you. As you no doubt already knew (and can read in the article), keratosis pilaris is difficult to treat. Good luck.

  2. QUESTION:
    Does anybody know a Good treatment for Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have keratosis Pilaris on my legs and I'm looking for a way to treat it. I know there is no cure, I just want to improve the appearance of it.

    • ANSWER:
      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris; however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, Retin A and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to the lactic acid — a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may also be helpful but increases risk of skin cancer. Small amounts of vitamin A can be used orally but only with exteme caution due to potential for liver damage. Check with a dermatologist or family doctor before taking extra vitamin A due to the its potential toxic effects.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden (if they do not already appear red), and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

      Food allergies may also exacerbate the condition, causing hyper-keratosis pilaris, gluten being a common culprit (source: physician's (MD) oral presentation) .............. ll

  3. QUESTION:
    Best Product For Getting Rid Of Keratosis?
    I have a little keratosis on my forehead and I need to get rid of it! What are the best products?

    • ANSWER:
      There are different types of keratosis. Actinic keratosis is an early sign of skin cancer. For an accurate diagnosis to know specifically which type you have you should consult a cetified dermatologist.

      Generally speaking, keratosis is the build up of keratin on the skin and can be due to many causes. These areas usually become sore and inflamed.

      With that being said, I would recommend Bioskincare Cream.
      - http://www.healthyskincream.com/

      Depending on the severity of your keratosis, Bioskincare Cream is highly effective to use in conjunction with the oral and/or surgical treatments that dermatologists and medical professionals practice.

      Bioskincare Cream:
      - hypoallergenic
      - softens the tissues
      - supplies the necessary amino acids that are the building blocks of all proteins, especially copper peptides vital for the construction of collagen and elastin which are the support structures of the skin.
      - helps to hydrate dry, damaged skin
      - helps the skin to defend itself against the free radicals that can cause skin cancer thanks to the low molecular weight antioxidants it contains and the copper peptides which stimulate collagen synthesis and have an antioxidant effect

  4. QUESTION:
    Oral Surgeon said not to worry about Keratosis?
    I was reffered by my dentist to an oral surgeon, he said i have a small keratosis probably frictional and its noting to worry about and i dont need any treatment. I have since read that these can be pre-cancerous, should i worry? I should add that im a bit of a hypochondriac and tend to search too much on the net about health issues - should i just take his word and forget about it?
    Male, Non-smoker aged 35, moderate drinker.

    • ANSWER:
      No its not, you have one that is caused by something rubbing against it, remove the cause and then then you wont have a keratosis anymore.

  5. QUESTION:
    Why do I have little bumps on my arm, between my elbow and my shoulder and how do I get rid of them?
    They are small un-noticeable (except to touch) bumps on my arm where the biceps are. They usually feel softer when I put moisturiser on them, except this does not get rid of them. How do I get rid of them completely?

    • ANSWER:
      I believe that you are talking about Keratosis pilaris and as far as I know its genetic. Here's what I found on the internet. Hope it answers your question:

      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a very common genetic follicular condition that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin and hence colloquially referred to as "chicken skin". It most often appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms (though the lower arms can also be affected), and can also occur on the thighs and tops of legs, flanks, buttocks or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet). Less commonly, lesions appear on the face and may be mistaken for acne.

      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40 to 50% of the adult population and approximately 50 to 80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. Varying in degree, cases of KP can range from minimal to severe.[citation needed]

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks) and related disorders.

      Many people with keratosis pilaris do not know they have it (if the condition is mild). While KP resembles goose bumps, it is characterized by the appearance of small rough bumps on the skin. As a result, it is often confused with acne.

      Keratosis pilaris occurs as excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin, accumulates within the hair follicles forming hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). Bearing only cosmetic consequence, the condition most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy. Though people with keratosis pilaris experience this condition year round, it’s during the colder months when moisture levels in the air are lower that the problem can become exacerbated and the “goose bumps” are apt to look and feel more pronounced in color and texture.

      [edit] Treatment

      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris, however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, Retin A and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to the lactic acid — a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may also be helpful but increases risk of skin cancer. Small amounts of vitamin A can be used orally but only with exteme caution due to potential for liver damage. Check with a Dermatologist or Family Doctor before taking extra vitamin A due to the vitamins' potential toxic effects.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden (if they do not already appear red), and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. Instead, the hair grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated, and can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though can lead to scarring.

      Food allergies may also exacerbate the condition, causing hyper-keratosis pilaris, gluten being a common culprit (source: physician's (MD) oral presentation).

  6. QUESTION:
    I started using rite aid eyelid wipes regularly this week bc my optometrist said I have an bacterial eye infec?
    I am to clean eye area with wipe once a day. But now, there are 5 skin-colored little bumps on the area above my eyelid, under my eyebrow. They are without head/cannot be popped. Had those bumps somewhere else on my skin, I would have thought they were keratosis pilaris (KP). Any advice? Anyone had this?

    • ANSWER:
      clearly the wipes are irritating your eyelids.

      i'm confused as to why you are even using them.

      an eyelid wipe will not do anything to help a bacterial eye infection.

      you should be on an antibiotic eye drop and perhaps an oral antibiotic and maybe even steroid eye drops to help with the inflammation.

      what are you doing???

  7. QUESTION:
    How long does puberty pimples last?
    I'm 13. I have tried lots of skin products and nothing works. So I decided I would wait it out. I had it for 3 years now. When I was 10, it started out as a few pimples on my forehead. Now, I have a big groups of small pimples on each cheek. I have a group of small ones on my chin. And 3 larger (not huge) pimples on my nose. How many years will this last?

    • ANSWER:
      By the time you are fourteen/fifteen this will be over.

      Acne Facts

      Medications:
      Some medications are known to cause acne. Some cortisones, few anti-tuberculosis drugs and some anti-epileptic drugs can cause acne. Chlorinated solvents can also cause occupational acne.

      Food:
      Acne is not caused by any food. If you think that certain foods makes your acne worse, stop eating that food after you consult your dermatologist. Till now, no conclusive evidence has established a relation between acne and food.

      Frequent Washing:
      Frequent washing of the acne-affected skin will not help. Instead, it can adversely affect it. Washing twice a day is enough. Contrary to popular belief, dirt does not cause acne. It is the sebaceous gland that gets closed and forms the acne because of changes in the body.

      Oral Vitamin A:
      Retinoids (derivatives of vitamin A) are used topically and orally to treat acne under medical supervision. Vitamin A does not treat acne. If you take excessive vitamin A, hoping that it will treat acne, your health may become worse. Remember that Vitamin A in excess quantity can have adverse effects on the body.

      Hereditary:
      Acne can be hereditary. If your parents had acne, you may be more prone to it.

      Hormonal Changes:
      Hormonal changes bring on acne. The hormone androgen is responsible for excess production of sebum. Females can have acne outbreaks during menstruation and pregnancy.

      Acne-Like Conditions:
      Some other conditions such as folliculitis may appear like acne. There are many other diseases that may look like acne. Some of them are rosacea, keratosis pilaris, perioral dermatitis, etc. Always visit a dermatologist instead of trying self-treatment.

  8. QUESTION:
    Why is the color of my tongue white and not pink or red?
    Am I sick or have a disease?

    • ANSWER:
      Possible causes of symptom: White tongue: The following medical conditions are some of the possible causes of White tongue as a symptom. There are likely to be other possible causes, so ask your doctor about your symptoms.

      • Oral candidiasis
      • Candidiasis
      • Leukoplakia - white tongue or mouth lining.
      • Keratosis pharyngis - usually white lumps on the tonsils.
      • Jaundice - causes a yellow tongue

      Causes of coated tongue include:
      • Oral candidiasis
      • Debauch
      • Dehydration
      • Antibiotics side effect

  9. QUESTION:
    Bad cough and odd white spots on my tongue?
    I made out with my girlfriend over the weekend and now I have these odd spots on y tongue and a bad cough. Any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      Here's a list from a medical website:
      Oral candidiasis
      Candidiasis
      Leukoplakia - white tongue or mouth lining.
      Keratosis pharyngis - usually white lumps on the tonsils.
      Jaundice - causes a yellow tongue
      Causes of coated tongue include:
      Oral candidiasis
      Debauch
      Dehydration
      Antibiotics side effect
      See also causes of mouth white patches or throat white patches
      Leukoplakia
      Alcohol
      Smoking
      Oral thrush
      Steroid inhalers
      Fluticasone asthma puffers
      Immunosuppression
      Immunosuppressive medications
      Broad spectrum antibiotics
      Chronic illness
      AIDS
      Malignancies
      Epstein-Barr virus
      Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
      Mechanical trauma to tongue
      Oral manifestations of skin conditions
      Oral lichen planus

  10. QUESTION:
    If keratosis pilaris is a rash symtoms of hiv?
    i have a unprotected oral sex in a guy we got sex at nov 20 2010...  now im so scared because  i have a rashes my skin...  and fatigue but i have no swollen lymp node and fever and diaria. only night sweat do u think guys i am infected in hiv or just the stress only or anxiety.. plsss help my guyss because im really scared

    • ANSWER:

  11. QUESTION:
    Will my dentist know if i dip if i have only gone through one tin, which ive had for 3 months?
    I only keep it in for 10 min max.. and i obviously dont do it alot because ive only had one tin in 3 months.. i know off ppl who go through tins a week wud a dentist be able to tell i do?

    • ANSWER:
      By "dipping," I take it you mean chewing tobacco? This can cause staining or your teeth and gums, and also something called "smokeless tobacco keratosis," which is a white patch on the inside of your cheek. White patches are common in smokers and chewers, but are also often precancerous. (96% of oral cancer patients smoke or use tobacco).

      Don't be ashamed to tell your dentist. He or she will probably tell you all the risks of dipping, but they know realistically that you are probably going to do it anyways. :) It's important for them to have a complete and honest history, because this matters a lot when diagnosing and treatment planning. Recreational drugs could interact with drugs or influence healing, and some treatments may fail completely and you could waste a lot of money on something that otherwise wouldn't have been recommended with your history.

  12. QUESTION:
    Oral surgeon said not to worry about keratosis?
    I was reffered by my dentist to an oral surgeon, he said i have a small keratosis probably frictional and its noting to worry about and i dont need any treatment. I have since read that these can be pre-cancerous, should i worry? I should add that im a bit of a hypochondriac and tend to search too much on the net about health issues - should i just take his word and forget about it? Aged 35, non smoker, moderate drinker

    • ANSWER:
      if i were you i would go to the doctor sometimes to control the situation, only to be sure, only for precaution..... you dont'n have to be so worried, only control when you have time to go by the doctor XD :)

  13. QUESTION:
    i have to research tailors bunions for homework, any help?
    i have to know
    -the surgery procedure
    -what they are
    -is 14 too young to have them removed?
    any help needed?

    • ANSWER:
      Tailor's bunion, or Bunionette, is a condition caused as a result of inflammation of the fifth metatarsal bone at the base of the little toe.
      It is mostly similar to a bunion (the same type of ailment affecting the big toe). It is called Tailor's Bunion because in past centuries, tailors sat cross-legged, and this was thought to cause this protrusion on the outside aspect of the foot.
      It may also be known as Metatarsalgia or intractable plantar keratosis.
      It is usually characterized by inflammation, pain and redness of the little toe.
      Often a tailor's bunion is caused by a faulty mechanical structure of the foot. The fifth metatarsal bone starts to protrude outward, while the little toe moves inward. This change in alignment creates an enlargement on the outside of the foot.
      Tailor's bunion is easily diagnosed because the protrusion is visually apparent. X-rays may be ordered to help the surgeon find out the severity of the deformity.

      Treatment

      Shoe modifications - Wearing shoes that have a wide toe box, and avoiding those with pointed toes or high heels.

      Oral medications - Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may help in relieving the pain and inflammation.

      Injection therapy - Injections of corticosteroid are commonly used to treat the inflammation.

      Padding - Bunionette pads placed over the affected area may help reduce pain.

      Icing - An ice pack may be applied to reduce pain and inflammation.

      Surgery is often considered when pain continues for a long period with no improvement in these non-surgical therapies.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tailor%27s_bunion
      http://www.footphysicians.com/footankleinfo/tailors-bunion.htm
      http://www.eorthopod.com/public/patient_education/6481/bunionette_tailors_bunion.html

  14. QUESTION:
    Has anyone cured there Keratosis Pilaris out there?
    I want to know if anyone has actually got rid of it through home remedy, prescription, diet, or actions, and not by age, not by growing out of it. I'm actively trying to cure myself.

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment

      To treat keratosis pilaris patients can try several strategies to lessen the bumps. First, the patient can supplement the natural removal of dry skin and papules by using a loofah or another type of scrub showering or bathing. A variety of different over-the-counter (OTC) lotions, ointments, and creams can also be applied after showering while the skin is still moist and then several times a day to keep the area moist. Medicated lotions with urea, 15% alphahydroxy acids, or Retin A can also be prescribed by the dermatologist and applied one to two times daily. Systemic (oral) medications are not prescribed for keratosis pilaris. However if papules are opened and become infected, antibiotics may be necessary to treat the infection.

      Q:Are there any effective treatments for keratosis pilaris?
      A:
      Keratosis pilaris is a common skin disorder. Although it isn't serious, it can be frustrating because it's difficult to treat.

      Keratosis pilaris occurs most often in children. It results from the buildup of a protein called keratin in the openings of hair follicles in the skin. This produces small, rough patches — usually on the arms, thighs and face. The exact cause isn't known, but it may be associated with eczema.

      Keratosis pilaris typically causes no pain or itching. Treatment is directed at softening the keratin deposits in the skin and may include medicated creams containing urea or lactic acid. Even with treatment, this condition tends to remain for years. If associated with eczema, keratosis pilaris may improve with treatment of the underlying eczema.

      betamethasone dipropionate, Diprosone, Diprolene
      chloroxine-shampoo, Capitrol
      corticosteroids-topical
      desoximetasone-topical, Topicort, Topicort LP
      fluocinolone-topical oil, Derma-Smoothe/FS
      fusidic acid/hydrocortisone-topical
      halobetasol-topical, Ultravate
      hydrocortisone valerate, Westcort
      omega-3 fatty acids-oral, Coromega, Longs Fish Oil, Max Epa, Omega-3, Salmon Oil, Superepa
      pimecrolimus, Elidel
      pramoxine-hydrocortisone-cream, ointment, Enzone, Pramosone
      pramoxine-hydrocortisone-lotion, Pramosone, Zone-A
      tacrolimus ointment, Protopic
      tea tree oil-topical

  15. QUESTION:
    Was I prescribed the wrong medication?
    I sprained my ankle a week ago, and I got it checked out today. My doctor prescribed me an ointment to ease the pain. I just applied the ointment, only to read the tube and see "for the use of topical treatment of actinic keratosis"- which is thick, scaly, or crusty patches of skin when exposed to sun for too long. The ointment is Solaraze Gel 3%. I think I might have been prescribed the wrong ointment? Or am I wrong and does this gel actually help sprains?

    • ANSWER:
      You were not prescribed the wrong medication, maybe not the best medication but not wrong. The ingredient in the gel that helps you with your ankle pain is a NSAID called Diclofenac. It is also available in oral tablets. It mainly works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body

      It is used to reduce pain caused by different reasons

  16. QUESTION:
    How to treat keratosis pilaris?

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment
      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris, however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, Retin A and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. Milk Baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to the Lactic Acid a natural Alpha Hydroxy Acid in milk. Sunlight may also be helpful but increases risk of Skin Cancer. Small amounts of Vitamin A can be used orally but only with exteme caution due to potential for liver damage. Check with a Dermatologist or Family Doctor before taking extra Vitamin A due to the Vitamins' potential toxic effects.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden (if they do not already appear red), and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. Instead, the hair grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated, and can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though can lead to scarring.

      Food allergies may also exacerbate the condition, causing hyper-keratosis pilaris, gluten being a common culprit (source: physician's (MD) oral presentation).

  17. QUESTION:
    Does anyone have bumps on their arms?
    They are sort of like pimples, sometimes they are like dots...when I get colder they look purple-ish. What is going on with my arms?

    • ANSWER:
      The diagnosis sounds fairly right-on. Keratosis pilaris is very common, finding a home on the upper arms, thighs, and shoulders. Keratosis pilaris tends to be more severe during the winter months but no one is sure why that is the case and it definitely isn't consistent for everyone. Basically, the bumpy rough spots are clogged pores that sometimes get red and irritated but rarely itch. Regrettably there is no available cure or universally effective treatment, though it is generally well accepted that unclogging pores and reducing inflammation can improve matters greatly (Source: eMedicine Journal, July 2, 2001, Volume 2, Number 7).

      Lactic acid (a very effective form of alpha hydroxy acid) can help exfoliate skin cells, but lactic acid isn't effective for dissolving lipids, so it can't penetrate into the pore and exfoliate the lining of the pore that is a major cause of the problem. For that, you would need a beta hydroxy acid product with the active ingredient salicylic acid and a pH low enough for exfoliation to occur. It is also helpful to avoid bar soaps that can irritate skin or cause clogged pores. A gentle body shampoo is best. The recommendation to scrub away the plugs can mean you inflame the area and still leave the skin feeling rough and bumpy below the surface where the abrasive can't reach.

      Another common condition that can manifest itself as visible red bumps on the arms and thighs is bacterial folliculitis. This inflammatory condition involves an infection of the hair follicle by the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus. It begins with mild swelling and redness around the hair follicle and may eventually become small, inflamed pustules. This condition is most common in persons with a lot of body hair, but can occur on anyone. The most common form of prescribed treatment is a course of oral antibiotics (penicillins, cephalosporins) but topically applied antibiotics are also helpful (Source: The Skin Sourcebook, 1998, pages 162-164). You can also try treating the affected area with daily application of a product containing 5% or 10% benzoyl peroxide. This topical disinfectant is often helpful in keeping these inflamed, acne-like bumps under control.

      Paula Begoun

  18. QUESTION:
    I have a painful rash - can someone advise me?
    I have a rash on my right thigh, buttocks and lower back, it is spreading up my back too. I saw a GP and she said it was normal - Keratosis Pilaris (sp?) (tiny reddish goosebumps/tiny blisters) however, it feels dry and prickly, and the muscle underneath burns and I get a pressure sensation there before the rash appears. It is red, the intensity of redness varies throughout the day. my skin is tender to touch (like as if it were injured). Can anyone help?

    Has anyone else experienced similar?
    Firstly I'm a woman and a recent mother (4 months), the rash can sometimes itch a little. The redness varies depending upon time of day. If I've been in bed it will go red from the covers rubbing it, it can go red if I have tight trousers on, sometimes it calms down but the pain under the skin is still there.

    It;s dry too.

    • ANSWER:
      To put it sensitively you may have what sounds like cellulitis. Basically, cellulitis is a skin rash caused by a bacteria that infects the top layer of your skin called the dermis. Your skin is crying out to you that something is invading it. The best course of action is to take an oral antibiotic if this is in fact the diagnosis.

      I suggest you seek a second opinion and if you find it continuing to spread, you can always visit the emergency room for a quick remedy.

  19. QUESTION:
    What is the side effect of cinnamon?
    Im having cinnamon on daily basis powder and also thick boild sticks

    • ANSWER:
      Side Effects, Interactions and Warnings

      About 1000 patients were investigated at our clinic during 1991-1995 for occupational skin disease, and 5 had occupational allergic contact dermatitis from spices. The patients were chefs, or kitchen, coffee room, and restaurant workers. All patients had hand (or finger) dermatitis.
      - Contact Dermatitis 1996 Sep;35(3):157-62 -- Occupational allergic contact dermatitis from spices. -- Kanerva L, Estlander T, Jolanki R. -- Section of Dermatology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Finland.

      Erythema multiforme, or EM, is a hypersensitivity reaction to agents such as herpes virus, drugs or foods. Oral EM-like reactions may be induced by cinnamon. It is important for dentists to recognize this condition. The authors report an unusual case of cinnamon-induced oral EM-like reaction in an older female patient. The disease manifested itself as chronic extensive surface ulcerations and lip swelling. The patient was treated repeatedly with topical and systemic steroids but responded to them only temporarily. The patient was cured when the offending agent--cinnamon--was eliminated from her diet.
      - J Am Dent Assoc 2000 Jul;131(7):929-34 -- Cinnamon-induced oral erythema multiformelike sensitivity reaction. -- Cohen DM, Bhattacharyya I.

      Cinnamon linked to oral sores, irritation.
      - J Am Dent Assoc 1995 Sep;126(9):1214 -- Cinnamon linked to oral sores, irritation.

      Toxic manifestations of cinnamon oil ingestion in a child.
      - Toxic manifestations of cinnamon oil ingestion in a child. -- Pilapil VR. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 1989 Jun;28(6):276.

      Oral lesions induced by contact with cinnamon flavoring agents are relatively uncommon, and are probably unrecognized as such by many clinicians. Ten patients with these lesions seen during the past 6 years are described in this report. Most patients had a "burning sensation" as their primary symptom. Clinically, lesions appeared as erythematous patches with varying degrees of superimposed keratosis or ulceration, or both. The lesions were usually confined to the buccal mucosa and lateral border of the tongue. The offending agent was almost always cinnamon-flavored chewing gum, and symptoms typically resolved within 1 to 2 days of discontinuing the product containing cinnamon.
      - J Am Dent Assoc 1988 May;116(6):664-7 -- Oral mucosal reactions to cinnamon-flavored chewing gum. -- Allen CM, Blozis GG. -- Diagnostic Services, Ohio State University, College of Dentistry, Columbus 43210.

      A patient had acute stomatitis and dermatitis due to a popular toothpaste containing cinnamon oil flavor. Cinnamon cassia oil is known as a topical sensitizer and was demonstrated to be the offending allergen. Cinnamic aldehyde and related chemicals are used widely, so that patients having cinnamon allergy may be exposed to many sources.
      - Arch Dermatol 1976 Feb;112(2):202-3 -- Allergic contact dermatitis and stomatitis caused by a cinnamic aldehyde-flavored toothpaste. -- Drake TE, Maibach HI.

      Not recommended for use by pregnant women.
      - Blumenthal M, Busse WR, Goldberg A, et al. -- The Complete Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. -- Integrative Medicine Communications, 1998.

  20. QUESTION:
    when i wake up i have this white stuff on my tongue?
    i just got my tongue peirced on friday its sunday and its still swolling is everything okay

    • ANSWER:
      The white tongue could be caused simply from bacteria building up over time. I would try using a tongue scraper as well as mouthwash such as fluorigard or listerine.

      White tongue: White spots and patches or coating of the tongue are a symptom of several medical conditions:

      Antibiotics side effect
      Oral candidiasis
      Dehydration
      Leukoplakia
      Keratosis pharyngis

      Swelling will occur for the first week or so afterwards and can be extremely uncomfortable. Cold, Slurpee-style drinks and sucking on ice will help to mitigate the swelling and soreness, as will ibuprofen.

      A tongue piercing usually takes 4-6 weeks to fully heal. Aftercare for tongue piercings is more complicated than most other piercings, as the healing piercing will come into contact with anything that enters the mouth, including food and smoke.

  21. QUESTION:
    Some questions for all those who have "oil pulled" and/or have Keratosis Pilaris (chicken skin)?
    Ok, so I think I have Keratosis Pilaris (aka chicken skin). I have the little red bumps on the back of my upper arms and on my upper back. I read that "oil pulling" would help. I also read that oil pulling would help gums, teeth, and other things. I also read that it might make metabolism better. So, I have a few questions.
    If you have KP, have you oil pulled? If so, did it work, or what are some other good remedies for this condition?
    Will oil pulling help with weight loss?
    Does the coconut oil taste bad?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, while I do not have KP, I have read many user accounts saying that Oil Pulling has helped the condition. In regards to oral care, I can say with first hand experience that Oil Pulling DOES whiten, and strengthen teeth. In addition, it has been known to REVERSE the effects of gingivitis and aid with bleeding gums. In my opinion, you have absolutely nothing to lose and I think you should give it a shot. I have been doing it for years now and I still do it till this day. Coconut oil does not taste bad at all, it takes like coconut :) . You can also use Sesame or Sunflower oil however if you are worried about taste than I would recommend using Coconut Oil. Check out my site for more information.

  22. QUESTION:
    good advice needed?
    my daughter who is 3 has been diagnosed with keratosis pillaris, i have looked into this alot on the internet and it seems that people with this get it on arms and legs, my daughter has it on her face, which seems very unusual, has anyone else got it on their face? i am thinkng about getting a 2nd opinion as i dont believe it is kp.
    i forgot to say that the reason i dont think it is kp is that her little face is sooo red like the veins under her skin are popping, on web kp is just described as rough skin and doesnt say about redness

    • ANSWER:
      You are right, take another opinion.
      KP can also occur on the face.
      It is more common in women than in men. Varying in degree, cases of KP can range from minimal to severe. While KP resembles goose bumps, it is characterized by the appearance of small rough bumps on the skin. As a result, it is often confused with acne.
      Keratosis pilaris tends to be more severe during the winter months or other times of low humidity when skin dries out.

      To treat keratosis pilaris patients can try several strategies to lessen the bumps. First, the patient can supplement the natural removal of dry skin and papules by using a loofah or another type of scrub showering or bathing. A variety of different over-the-counter (OTC) lotions, ointments, and creams can also be applied after showering while the skin is still moist and then several times a day to keep the area moist. Medicated lotions with urea, 15% alphahydroxy acids, or Retin A can also be prescribed by the dermatologist and applied one to two times daily. Systemic (oral) medications are not prescribed for keratosis pilaris. However if papules are opened and become infected, antibiotics may be necessary to treat the infection.

      Since keratosis pilaris is thought to be a genetic disorder and is observed in several members of the same family, there is nothing that can be done to prevent this disorder. Following the treatment advice above can alleviate the outward characteristics of keratosis pilaris.

  23. QUESTION:
    Crazy rash/hives/or Something 4 months on my arms and face...?
    Okay, I have had these lil red bumps appearing every now and then for about two months, i went to the doctor and he said he had no idea what it could be and prescribed me prednisone, an oral steroid, which took it away for about 2 weeks, but then preceeded to come back.. with a vengance. Its now clusters of tiny raised red bumps that are itchy and all over some in clusters and others just periodically appearing here and there. This is also affecting my face especially around the eyebrows where it feels and looks like hives/pimples but are itchy as well. I have no idea what this could be, its not eczema, at first when it started it looked like tiny bug bites because the bumps had little holes at the tip, but now it has worsened, I just dont know what it could be. This is also on the back of my neck. Not any lower than my breastbone.
    Please help if you have any idea what this could be related to. I've always had slightly sensitive skin, but i have Never ever broke out with a rash of any kind. This is confusing to me and it is very ugly. Please Help Me.

    • ANSWER:
      This sounds like KP. (Keratosis Pilaris) Try Eucerin. My son has this. It took 4 doctors to figure it out. I was told that exfoliate first and remove the dead skin then put the Eucerin on.

  24. QUESTION:
    Please give accredited opinions based on knowledge. Will Choose best answer?
    What could cause swollen lymph nodes and rashes in vagina? I have already been tested for all STDs including herpes 1 and 2 and HIV. I have only been intimate (oral sex) with one person in my life. We started dating in 2008 and in last August of this year I had all these tests done. All were Negative after 2 years of being with him. I also have burning sensations in legs and arms with a bit of tingling. I never had vaginal sex. I am 23 yrs old. what could be wrong with me? will choose best answer, thanks

    • ANSWER:
      I don't think someone online can answer this for you.

      1 - Swollen lymph nodes = infection. It doesn't matter where the lymph nodes are. Have you had any infection recently?

      2 - Rash signals allergy. Are you allergic to anything? Do you shave as it could be razor burn?

      The best thing to do is see your doctor. That being said, I put what you gave us into WebMD's Symptom checker (http://symptoms.webmd.com/symptomchecker). I got back the following conditions:

      Animal Bite
      Lice
      Cervical Stenosis
      Spinal Tumor
      Abscess
      Blepharitis
      Cauda Equina Syndrome
      Cervical Spondylosis
      Contact Dermatitis
      Chagas Disease
      Actinic Keratosis
      Burns
      Lead Poisoning
      Wernicke Syndrome
      Porphyria
      Lyme Disease
      Multiple Sclerosis

      As you see from the list above, there are a wide range of conditions associated with the limited list of symptoms you gave. If you feel you need to, use WebMD to put in all your symptoms and read more about each condition. The best thing to do would be if you are concerned, talk to your doctor. They can run tests for some of the above conditions. Good luck.

  25. QUESTION:
    Rash or pimples? What is it?
    About two weeks ago I noticed that both areas of skin where my lymph nodes are on each side of my neck is covered with these tiny, color-less, non-itcy bumps. They are kind of right below my jaw line but off to the sides but not on my neck. I have no clue what these are. They do not itch or are not red. But are raised and rough to the touch. The area of skin they cover is about a finger length across. I almost feel like I can scratch one off but they have not gone away. But they are not under my chin at all, just off to the sides. I don't think they are pimples/whiteheads etc. Seems more like some kind of rash. What could it be??
    I took an oral steroid for 10 days and then got off of it. But its been over 3 weeks since then. Wasnt sure if that had anything to do with it.

    • ANSWER:
      They could be keratosis pilaris. Check here.

      http://www.aocd.org/skin/dermatologic_diseases/keratosis_pilaris.html
      http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pilaris/article.htm

  26. QUESTION:
    Is this Herpes or something else?
    I had a little white bump on my lip for about 2 weeks, then it turned into a pimple. I popped it and the normal white puss came out, but once the white head healed, I still had a small white bump, only now it's on a raised red area. Overall it has been present for about 5 or 6 weeks. I also have a few small bumps in my groin area. Each of them is by itself, 2 on seperate areas of my penis, and the other few scattered around my pelvic area with one only about 2 inches from my belly button (about at my belt line.) these bumps sometimes get a little bigger, and I think there are more than when I originally noticed them, but they have never disappeared. The first of these appeared 5 months ago and is still present. There is no itching, burning, oozing, or really any noticable difference in any of them except that they sometimes seem to grow and shrink a small amount. Overall, the only symptom I've noticed is that they exist. At first I thought they must be herpes, but the symptoms aren't very consistent with that. They first appeared when I was in a committed relationship with my girlfriend, which made her question me but I had not slept with anyone else. At the time, I had only had sex with one other girl in my life. So the bumps on my groin appeared during a time when I only had any sexual relations with one girl and she didn't show any symptoms (it was about 7 months into our relationship, and she didn't show any symptoms for the remaining 3 or 4 months we were together). I also have bumps on my arm that I have had since I was a child resembling a mild case keratosis pilaris, but it is undiagnosed. Can anyone tell me of anything that causes these symptoms that isn't herpes? Or does anyone know of herpes showing symptoms like these? I can't afford to get tested at the moment and would just like to know if there is anything else I should be looking for in the mean time.

    • ANSWER:
      herpes comes in so many different symptoms for so many people i can tell you what you had on your lip was most definitely a cold sore which means you already have oral hsv 1 but you can spread it to your genitals or your girlfriend coulda have given you oral and she had hsv1 they say almost 50 percent of hte population has one type of herpes and doesnt even know and it can shed when there are no visible cold sores....umm it might not be herpes either but you wont know til you get the blood test done and make sure you tell them to test for herpes bc the basic std screening doesnt test for herpes which is why most ppl that have it dont even know....

  27. QUESTION:
    What is this? What's this bump?
    I have 3 bumps around my vaginal area. It's not on the labia. It's AROUND it. One is near my buttocks and the other one is at the left side around my vaginal aread, a little bit by the thigh area. The one that's near my buttocks is small (less than centimeter) and red, so is one of them that's at my left side. The other one is underneath my skin. It hurts, it's almost the size of a SMALL marble. I'm only 15, I've never had any oral sex nor normal sex. I've never done anything with a guy. What's wrong with me? What do I have?

    • ANSWER:
      First you had to consult a competent doctor for diagnosis though you might read medical articles on the topic. Below I am giving just the beginning of an article published online in the WebMD. It is a long article titled: Cysts, Lumps, Bumps, and Your Skin. You can go to the attached link and read the full article.

      Cysts, Lumps, Bumps, and Your Skin:

      There are a number skin conditions that cause lumps and bumps to appear on the surface of the skin or just below the skin. This article covers some of the most common ones, and includes the following:

      Skin cysts
      Cherry angioma
      Dermatofibromas
      Epidermoid cysts
      Folliculitis
      Keratoacanthoma
      Keratosis pilaris
      Lipomas
      Neurofibromas_

      Visit the site given as the reference. Never panic or worry. Never imagine in anxiety. Just consult a competent doctor. :-)

  28. QUESTION:
    Are there any remedies or cures for Darrier's Disease?

    • ANSWER:
      Darier's disease is a genetic disorder discovered by French dermatologist Ferdinand-Jean Darier. Darier's disease is known because of dark crusty patches on the skin, sometimes containing pus. The crusty patches are also known as keratotic papules and also called keratosis follicularisis.

      Treatment is required only if there are troublesome symptoms. For patients with mild disease simple moisturisers, sun protection and selection of the right clothing to avoid heat and sweating are usually sufficient.

      Dermabrasion (sanding off the surface of the skin) may be effective in localised disease. Localised Darier's disease may also be treated successfully with topical retinoids.

      Secondary bacterial infection (usually due to Staphylococcus aureus) should be treated with antibiotics, and herpes simplex with antiviral agents.

      If symptoms are particularly severe then a trial of an oral retinoid medication such as acitretin or isotretinoin may be effective. Ciclosporin has been reported to be effective in a few patients.

  29. QUESTION:
    Kind of gross skin question?
    I have these red bumps on my skin, they look like razor burn but are on places I dont even shave. Ive had them for almost my whole life, so i know its not some kind of scary disease or bug or anything (thank goodness) Does anyone know what they might be? Also i dont have a skin doctor as of right now, so I cant go. I have them on my arms and my thighs. There make me very insecure...

    • ANSWER:
      Definitely not psorias... I have that, and it does not cause little red bumps. It sounds like Keratosis pilaris.

      "Keratosis pilaris is very common, finding a home on the upper arms, thighs, and shoulders. Keratosis pilaris tends to be more severe during the winter months but no one is sure why that is the case and it definitely isn't consistent for everyone. Basically, the bumpy rough spots are clogged pores that sometimes get red and irritated but rarely itch. Regrettably there is no available cure or universally effective treatment, though it is generally well accepted that unclogging pores and reducing inflammation can improve matters greatly (Source: eMedicine Journal, July 2, 2001, Volume 2, Number 7).

      Lactic acid (a very effective form of alpha hydroxy acid) can help exfoliate skin cells, but lactic acid isn't effective for dissolving lipids, so it can't penetrate into the pore and exfoliate the lining of the pore that is a major cause of the problem. For that, you would need a beta hydroxy acid product with the active ingredient salicylic acid and a pH low enough for exfoliation to occur. It is also helpful to avoid bar soaps that can irritate skin or cause clogged pores. A gentle body shampoo is best. The recommendation to scrub away the plugs can mean you inflame the area and still leave the skin feeling rough and bumpy below the surface where the abrasive can't reach.

      Another common condition that can manifest itself as visible red bumps on the arms and thighs is bacterial folliculitis. This inflammatory condition involves an infection of the hair follicle by the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus. It begins with mild swelling and redness around the hair follicle and may eventually become small, inflamed pustules. This condition is most common in persons with a lot of body hair, but can occur on anyone. The most common form of prescribed treatment is a course of oral antibiotics (penicillins, cephalosporins) but topically applied antibiotics are also helpful (Source: The Skin Sourcebook, 1998, pages 162-164). You can also try treating the affected area with daily application of a product containing 5% or 10% benzoyl peroxide. This topical disinfectant is often helpful in keeping these inflamed, acne-like bumps under control. "

      Check out: http://www.keratosispilaris.org/

  30. QUESTION:
    deficiency of vitamin A,the various kinds incl. xerophthalmia,follicular keratosis,xerophthalmia,bitot spots..
    pictures,or videos nd othr relevant info...

    • ANSWER:
      Vitamin A deficiency exists when the chronic failure to eat sufficient amounts of vitamin A or beta-carotene results in levels of blood-serum vitamin A that are below a defined range. Beta-carotene is a form of pre-vitamin A, which is readily converted to vitamin A in the body. Night blindness is the first symptom of vitamin A deficiency. Prolonged and severe vitamin A deficiency can produce total and irreversible blindness.

      Vitamin A (called retinol in mammals) is a fat-soluble vitamin. The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for vitamin A is 1.0 mg/day for the adult man and 0.8 mg/day for the adult woman. Since beta-carotene is converted to vitamin A in the body, the body's requirement for vitamin A can be supplied entirely by beta-carotene. Six mg of beta-carotene are considered to be the equivalent of 1 mg of vitamin A. The best sources of vitamin A are eggs, milk, butter, liver, and fish, such as herring, sardines, and tuna. Beef is a poor source of vitamin A. Plants do not contain vitamin A, but they do contain beta-carotene and other carotenoids. The best sources of beta-carotene are dark-green, orange, and yellow vegetables; spinach, carrots, oranges, and sweet potatoes are excellent examples. Cereals are poor sources of beta-carotene.

      Vitamin A is used for two functions in the body. Used in the eye, it is a component of the eye's light-sensitive parts, containing rods and cones, that allow for night-vision or for seeing in dim-light circumstances. Vitamin A (retinol) occurs in the rods. Another form of Vitamin A, retinoic acid, is used in the body for regulating the development of various tissues, such as the cells of the skin, and the lining of the lungs and intestines. Vitamin A is important during embryological development, since, without vitamin A, the fertilized egg cannot develop into a fetus.

      Vitamin A deficiency occurs with the chronic consumption of diets that are deficient in both vitamin A and beta-carotene. When vitamin A deficiency exists in the developed world, it tends to happen in alcoholics or in people with diseases that affect the intestine's ability to absorb fat. Examples of such diseases are celiac disease (chronic nutritional disorder), cystic fibrosis, and cholestasis (bile-flow failure or interference). Vitamin A deficiency occurred in infants during the early 1900s in Denmark. The deficiency resulted when milk fat was made into butter for export, leaving the by-product (skimmed milk) for infant feeding. Vitamin A deficiency has taken place in infants in impoverished populations in India, where the only foods fed to the infants were low in beta-carotene. Vitamin A deficiency is also common in areas like Southeast Asia, where polished rice, which lacks the vitamin, is a major part of the diet.

      The earliest symptom of vitamin A deficiency is night blindness. Prolonged deficiency results in drying of the conjunctiva (the mucous membrane that lines the inner surface of the eyelids and extends over the forepart of the eyeball). With continued vitamin A deficiency, the drying extends to the cornea (xerophthalamia). The cornea eventually shrivels up and becomes ulcerated (keratinomalacia). Superficial, foamy gray triangular spots may appear in the white of the eye (Bitot's spots). Finally, inflammation and infection occur in the interior of the eye, resulting in total and irreversible blindness.

      Vitamin A status is measured by tests for retinol. Blood-serum retinol concentrations of 30-60 mg/dl are considered in the normal range. Levels that fall below this range indicate vitamin A deficiency. Night blindness is measured by a technique called electroretinography. Xerophthalamia, keratinomalacia, and Bitot's spots are diagnosed visually by trained medical personnel.

      Vitamin A deficiency can be prevented or treated by taking vitamin supplements or by getting injections of the vitamin. The specific doses given are oral retinyl palmitate (110 mg), retinyl acetate (66 mg), or injected retinyl palmitate (55 mg) administered on each of two successive days, and once a few weeks later if symptoms are not relieved.

      The prognosis for correcting night blindness is excellent. Xerophthalamia can be corrected with vitamin A therapy. Ulcerations, tissue death, and total blindness, caused by severe vitamin A deficiency, cannot be treated with vitamin A.

      Vitamin A deficiency can be prevented by including foods rich in vitamin A or beta-carotene as a regular component of the diet; liver, meat, eggs, milk, and dairy products are examples. Foods rich in beta-carotene include red peppers, carrots, pumpkins, as well as those just mentioned. Margarine is rich in beta-carotene, because this chemical is used as a coloring agent in margarine production. In Africa, Indonesia, and the Philippines, vitamin A deficiency is prevented by public health programs that supply children with injections of the vitamin.

      Key Terms

      Bitot's spots
      Bitot's spots are superficial, foamy gray, triangular spots on the white of the eyeball.

      Carotenoids
      Carotenoids are yellow to deep-red pigments.

      Conjunctiva
      The conjunctiva is a clear layer of cells that covers the eye and directly contacts the atmosphere. The conjunctiva is about five-cells thick.

      Cornea
      The cornea is a clear layer of cells that covers the eye, just under the conjunctiva. The cornea is about 50-cells thick.

      Fat-soluble vitamin
      Fat-soluble vitamins can be dissolved in oil or in melted fat.

      Water-soluble vitamins can be dissolved in water or juice.

      Keratinomalacia
      Keratinomalacia is ulceration of the cornea.

      Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA)
      The Recommended Dietary Allowances are quantities of nutrients in the diet that are required to maintain good health in people. RDAs are established by the Food and Nutrition Board of the National Academy of Sciences, and may be revised every few years. A separate RDA value exists for each nutrient. The RDA values refer to the amount of nutrient expected to maintain good health in people. The actual amounts of each nutrient required to maintain good health in specific individuals differ from person to person.

      Xerophthalmia
      Xerophthalmia is a dry, thickened, lusterless condition of the eyeball resulting from vitamin A deficiency.

      For Your Information

      Books

      Brody, T. Nutritional Biochemistry. San Diego: Academic Press, Inc., 1998.
      Combs, G. The Vitamins. San Diego: Academic Press, Inc., 1992.
      Food and Nutrition Board. Recommended Dietary Allowances. 10th ed. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1989.

      Periodicals
      Filteau, S. M., and A. M. Tomkins."Vitamin A Supplementation in Developing Countries." Archives of Disease in Childhood 72 (1995): 106-109.

      ______________________

  31. QUESTION:
    reappearance of whitish tissue after removed white patch completely and biopsy taken report alredy given?
    doctor already removed the whitsh tissue and taken biopsy report already sent toyou in my earlier question.. when he examined again slight whitish patch seen. he says skin tissue is converting to bone tissue. hence take opinin of oral pathologist and take another biopsy. MY DOUBT IS Whether is it due to upper denture permanenetly fixed without doing any rootcanal creating problems in the lips for 6 months and now affecting lower buccal mucosa slight white patches are seen even without using lower floating denture.
    earlier biopsy observation sections show segment of stratified squamous epithelium showing moderate dysplasia with marked ortho and parakeratosis with hypergranulosis. IMPRESSION---BIOPSY FROM BUCCAL MUCOSA SHOWING MARKED EPITHELIALACANTHOSIS AND KERATOSIS WITH FOCAL EPITHELIALATYPIA AND SUBEPITHELIALROUNDCELL INFILTRATES
    BIOPSY DOCTOR SAYS IT IS NOT INVASIVE OR MALIGNANT.
    can you give a solution.I am worried since time is getting lost and landup seriously

    • ANSWER:
      You know, a lot of people have callouses on their elbows. You happen to have one in your mouth. It is not malignant and not invasive, so I don't understand why the repeated questions about what to do. There is no need to do anything. The doctors who have seen you say this. I have never seen you and can not determine any relationship between your upper fixed bridge and your buccal mucosa.

      I'm not sure you should be trying to find answers to this on Yahoo! Answers.

  32. QUESTION:
    vitamin A deficiency,incl. night blindness,xerophthalmia,follicular keratosis,nd its othr effects?
    pictures,tables,ne videos..etc fr a power point presntation..plzzzz help meeee

    • ANSWER:
      Vitamin A Deficiency (VAD):

      Medical Care

      In the United States, VAD can easily be prevented by consuming foods recommended in the Diet section below.

      Treatment of subclinical VAD includes consumption of vitamin A–rich foods, including liver, beef, chicken, eggs, fortified milk, carrots, mango, sweet potatoes, and leafy green vegetables.

      For VAD syndromes, treatment includes daily oral supplements of 600 mcg (2000 IU) for children aged 3 years or younger, 900 mcg (3000 IU) for children aged 4-8 years, 1700 mcg (5665 IU) for children aged 9-13 years, 2800 mcg (9335 IU) for persons aged 14-18 years, and 3000 mcg (10,000 IU) for all adults.

      Therapeutic doses for severe disease include 60,000 mcg (200,000 IU), which has been shown to reduce child mortality rates by 35-70%.

      Consultations

      Consult endocrinologists, gastroenterologists, ophthalmologists, nutritionists, infectious disease specialists, and dermatologists as indicated.

      Diet

      The 2000 US Department of Agriculture and Department of Health and Human Services Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend consumption of a variety of foods for a comprehensive nutrient intake.

      Liver, beef, chicken, eggs, whole milk, fortified milk, carrots, mango, orange fruits, sweet potato, spinach, kale, and other green vegetables are among foods rich in vitamin A.

      Eating at least 5 servings of fruits and vegetable per day is recommended in order to provide a comprehensive distribution of carotenoids.

      A variety of foods, such as breakfast cereals, pastries, breads, crackers, and cereal grain bars, are often fortified with 10-15% of the RDA for vitamin A.

      The goals of pharmacotherapy are to reduce morbidity and to prevent complications.

      Drug Category: Vitamins

      Essential for normal DNA synthesis and metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. May also work as cofactors used in aerobic cellular respiration.

      Drug Name Vitamin A (Del-Vi-A, Del-Vi-A)
      Description Cofactor in many biochemical processes.
      Adult Dose 3000 mcg (10,000 IU) PO qd
      Severe disease: 60,000 mcg (200,000 IU) PO for at least 2 d
      Pediatric Dose 800 mcg/d)
      Interactions Cholestyramine, neomycin, and mineral oil may decrease absorption
      Pregnancy A - Safe in pregnancy

      Precautions Risk of teratogenicity increases in pregnant women at doses >800 mcg/d (not recommended); parenteral vitamin A in infants of low birth weight may be associated with thrombocytopenia, renal dysfunction, hepatomegaly, cholestasis, ascites, hypotension, and metabolic acidosis (E-Ferol syndrome)

  33. QUESTION:
    oral hygiene question?
    I was wondering about (hairy) leukoplakia...I had a recent hiv scare, which seems to have been resolved, but i still have my doubts as a partial hypochondriac :P I understand it's probably nothing but it still brings about some concern. When I was going through the scare, i examined my tongue alot for any of those signs of leukoplakia. just a white spot on my tongue where i'd bitten it subconsciously in my nervousness. Nothing major, nothing looking like what i'd seen in the pictures. But now, on the underside of my tongue, on that tight stretch of skin down the center, there's a collection of white...flakes...I say flakes cause I can scrape it off pretty easily. I know HL cant be scraped off so easily so what is this? Perhaps dead skin from stretching my tongue about like a madman?

    • ANSWER:
      probably you answered yourself the best with your last sentence. I would not look at your tongue for at least 3 weeks and then re-check it. If still there, go get a "limited exam" with a dentist and ask them to examine it. From your description, it is most likely what you said in the last sentence. Also could be candidiasis (not a major issue) -- but overall not something I am worried about.

      (it is not uncommon for people to get a white "frictional keratosis" on the frenum of the tongue from sticking their tongue out too much...it should go away...your description of what you were doing would perfectly explain the condition under the tongue. Take care.)

  34. QUESTION:
    Help!! White bumps on back of throat, and very red.?
    Well..i did give head on the 9th..i noticed on the 11th my throat was sore and then i noticed a little white bump in the back of my throat. I went to the school nurse on the 12th and she said it was really red. She said it could be an ulcer or i could be getting strep. I kno it could be an STD but what all could it be?

    • ANSWER:
      You possible could be getting strept throat. That is what I had when i had that.
      Here are some other things why you could have whites spots on your throat-
      Oral candidiasis
      Candidiasis
      Monilia
      Lichen planus
      Leukoplakia
      Tonsillitis
      Actinomysis
      Chewing aspirin tablets
      Chemical throat injury (see Throat symptoms)
      Leukoedema
      Syphilis
      Keratosis pharyngis - white lumps on tonsils

  35. QUESTION:
    What is wrong with my skin??? please help!?
    For the most part of my life, i've had problematic skin. Not acne though- i have keratosis pilaris on my arms, and about 4 years ago i developed polymorphous light eruption on my face. (i'm 17 now)

    my issue is with the PMLE. usually i get an itchy pink rash on my face (only) when i expose myself to the sun for an hour or sometimes less, particularly during the summer. the rash lasts for about 1 1/2 weeks. the only things that help it are cold compressions and oral steroids.
    the last time i got it, this summer, i decided not to take the steroids and use a cortoderm ointment. the rash lasted about a month. it finally went away, but it left behind these tiny bumps on my cheeks. (they are only visible if you look very close).

    Now, for some reason, my cheeks are flaring up, even though it's winter, and i've barely spent any time outside. i'm now starting to think that i don't have pmle, and that all the doctors and dermatologists i've seen are useless.
    please help! this is crippling my life:(

    • ANSWER:
      It is obviously a rash of some sort. There are so many different causes of rashes that it is very difficult to narrow down any specific cause of one, especially without being able to see it. Common categories of rash are:

      scaly patches of skin not caused by infection,
      scaly patches of skin produced by fungal or bacterial infection,
      red, itchy bumps or patches over the body, such as on the chest and back.

      Although rashes are seldom dangerous, self-diagnosis is not usually a good idea. Proper evaluation of a skin rash requires a visit to a doctor or other health-care professional. Check this site for good information and you may be able to figure out what is going on.

      http://www.medicinenet.com/rash/article.htm

  36. QUESTION:
    I have some scaly brown marks on hands!!?
    They have been appearing and spreading too I tried to scratch them off and it looks like a scar do I have thrush they are on the back of my hands and a few on my arms the first time I saw them was the day after I got in a pool do I have cancer or something

    • ANSWER:
      There are several possible causes.

      Age or Liver Spots
      Age and liver spots are a type of hyperpigmentation that cause brown to black spots on the face and other areas of the body. The brown spots are caused by an increase in melanin, the pigment that gives skin its color. Genetics plays a part in developing age or liver spots, but ultraviolet rays or sun exposure is the most common cause of age spots. Age increases the chances of developing brown spots as most individuals produce more melanin as they get older.

      Keratosis
      Actinic and seborrheic are types of keratosis that cause spots or discoloration on the skin. Actinic keratosis symptoms include rough or scaly patches or bumps with a red to brown appearance and may be painful or easily irritated. Actinic keratosis is caused by sun exposure and is often a precursor to skin cancer, but can be treated effectively when caught early. Seborrheic keratosis is common in adults and has a brown mole or wart-like appearance. Other than genetics, the exact cause of seborrheic keratosis is unknown, but the spots are considered harmless and may be removed for cosmetic reasons.

      Melasma
      Melasma causes brown or grey skin discoloration on the skin. The spots may show up individually or cover large areas. Melasma is more common in women than men. Hormonal changes, certain medications and genetics are factors in developing melasma and sun exposure may exacerbate the problem. Melasma caused by hormonal changes such as pregnancy, birth control or hormone therapy often resolves itself after pregnancy or when medication is stopped.

      Phototoxic Medication
      Phototoxic medications may cause skin to become sensitive to sunlight. Initially, the symptoms of phototoxic light sensitivity appear much like a sunburn or rash. The results of this "sunburn" may include hyperpigmentation or brown spots on the skin. Some drugs associated with phototoxic reaction include tetracycline, sulfonamides, acne medications, some antihistamines and certain arthritis medications such as quinine.

      Brown spots are often treatable via medication, dermatology treatments or excision. Age spots and melasma and other hyperpigmentation conditions may be treated with oral or topical medications, laser therapy, chemical peels or dermabrasion. Raised lesions such as moles or keratosis spots are usually removed by freezing, excising or laser treatments.

      Most brown spots are preventable. Sun exposure is the most common culprit in skin discoloration. Sun damage may not show up until later in life, but too much sun even as a child can significantly increase the chances of developing hyperpigmentation. The best defense against brown spots or more serious skin conditions is covering the skin as much as possible when outdoors. This includes longer sleeves, hats and sunglasses. Sunscreen should be applied as a part of a daily regime, especially on the face where sun exposure is most prevalent.

  37. QUESTION:
    I have Keratosis Pilaris on my legs for the past 2 years. How can I treat this?

    • ANSWER:
      Do you mean keratosis follicularis, also called Darier's Disease? Pilar means hair, so I assume this is similiar, if not the same thing altogether. Characterized by black or brown, crusted, wartlike patches that can spread rapidly? Treatment usually includes large doses of topical or oral retinoids and oral or topical corticosteroids. Other forms of keratosis include actinic keratosis, keratosis senilis, and seborrheic keratosis.

  38. QUESTION:
    Please answer. What is this on my arms. Real answers too. no robot answers.?
    So i have these little itchy bumps on my arm from the elbow and bellow. These bumps are tiny like a pencil dot size but a little bigger. They are in clusters and randomly itch. They are normal skin color. They do not rise that much, but you can kinda feel them if i rub my arms. You cant really see them but you can see it when you are close to the arm. I included some pictures of it. i do not think they are keratosis because some of my family members have them and mines looks different. They get more itchy when i scratch. is it hiv, std? is it scabies? I noticed it at the end of may. and 2 weeks before that i received oral sex after a party. i also was in a pool for 2 weeks. i had to touch people because it was a life guarding class. i dont thinks its from a plant. i have eczema but its not like this.s been on my arm since the end of may. it The pics make it a little hard to see.

    http://s945.photobucket.com/albums/ad296/jamesboy123/

    • ANSWER:

  39. QUESTION:
    Do I Have HIV? Or Is It Just Anxiety? Can Anxiety Cause HIV Symptoms?
    Please no rude or stupid comments.

    well about 2 months ago i made out with this guy and later i gave him oral and he ejaculated in my mouth, i didnt know if he had HIV or not. i had brushed my teeth like 1 hour before and i dont know if my gums bled or not. and about a month ago my testicles started hurting like if they were super cold. then i got scared and looked up symptoms of HIV, and i read them and everytime i read one i later got that symptom. i had a fever, loss of appetite and alot of bumps on my back. then i got a lot of bumps all over my penis but they might be Fordye Spots. now i have a head ache that wont go away and i get diahriaeah only when i think about the hiv. i started getting bumps all over my arms and pubic area and she said it was Keratosis Pilaris but i dont know. my tempurate was fine and everything. i also have really bad anxiety and ive been stressing alot about this. i m just asking, do you guys think this is caused by stress and anxiety? i also have a really itchy scalp. and the bumps on my back kinda go away but when they itch they spread all over my back but when i dont scratch they go away. please help me? anxiety? HIV? im really scared :(
    and i get nausea, loss of appetite, and feel sick only when i think about the HIV when i think about other things or am having fun i dont feel that way. and im 16 by the way.

    • ANSWER:
      It could be stress, but you still need to get tested. It's been two months, so you should get an accurate result from the test. be safe from now on. I have been where you are recently. :)

  40. QUESTION:
    what is this rash on my skin. please no fake robot answers?
    So i have these little itchy bumps on my arm from the elbow and bellow. These bumps are tiny like a pencil dot size but a little bigger. They are in clusters and randomly itch. They are normal skin color. They do not rise that much, but you can kinda feel them if i rub my arms. You cant really see them but you can see it when you are close to the arm. I included some pictures of it. i do not think they are keratosis because some of my family members have them and mines looks different. They get more itchy when i scratch. is it hiv, std? is it scabies? I noticed it at the end of may. and 2 weeks before that i received oral sex after a party. i also was in a pool for 2 weeks. i had to touch people because it was a life guarding class. i dont thinks its from a plant. i have eczema but its not like this. The pics make it a little hard to see.

    http://s945.photobucket.com/albums/ad296/jamesboy123/

    • ANSWER:
      I honestly am having the same problem I went to the doctor to find out and found out it is a alergic reaction to something. It's going away but slowly, I am in another contry so the detergents and everything over here is different then what I am use to. But the best advise for you is just go see a doctor before you scratch off your skin like I did. I actually scratched off part of my tattoo in my sleep

  41. QUESTION:
    Dermatologists what options do i have left? This is really affecting me?
    To put it all in a nutshell i had severe acne ever i could remember. Maybe since fourth grade. I'm fifteen now and i still have acne but its calmed down. But my back,shoulders, and chest are basically old reminders of my severe acne. I have keloids all over my shoulders. I have acne scars all over my back. And my chest,shoulder,and back are plagued with these tiny hard little bumps all over that won't go away no matter how much i exfoliate. It looks like keratosis pilaris but nothing makes them go away. I've been on accutane and every other single oral antibiotic out there. I'm not exaggerating. Every topical medication. Yes, tazorac too. Please don't suggest any oral antibiotics or topical treatments. I've tried them all. Laser maybe? I just want clear smooth skin. Can anybody help me out please?

    • ANSWER:

  42. QUESTION:
    does the tongue easily get infection?

    • ANSWER:
      White tongue: White spots and patches or coating of the tongue are a symptom of several medical conditions:
      * Antibiotics side effect
      * Oral candidiasis
      * Dehydration
      * Leukoplakia
      * Keratosis pharyngis
      * Jaundice - causes a yellow tongue
      * "Lie Bumps" - small dots usually on tip of tongue
      The tongue is also examined and observed diagnostically in traditional Chinese medicine. A painful tongue may be an indication of several underlying serious medical conditions.

      Oral squamous cell carcinoma affects about 30,000 Americans each year. Ninety percent are smokers. Alcohol is also a risk factor. Early, curable lesions are rarely symptomatic; thus, preventing fatal disease requires early detection by screening. Treatment is with surgery, radiation, or both. The overall 5-yr survival rate is 52%
      Please see the web page for more details on Tongue, Geographic tongue, Glossitis, Tongue problems, Oral-lichen planus, Oral thrush, Tongue biopsy and Oral and throat cancer.

  43. QUESTION:
    WHAT ARE SOME Skin Diseases?
    What are some skin diseases and illnesses
    ANSWER QUICK WITHIN 1HR

    • ANSWER:
      •Acne
      Acne is the most common skin disease treated by physicians. It is a chronic condition that affects over 85% of adolescents and young adults. There are different types of acne that respond to different types of treatment.
      •Seborrheic Keratosis
      Seborrheic keratoses are benign lesions that don't necessarily look benign. They can have various colors, grow quickly, itch, and sometimes bleed. Fortunately, they are fairly easy to distinguish from skin cancers
      •Dermatitis
      The term dermatitis describes many classifications of rashes. The most common dermatitis is atopic dermatitis or eczema.
      •Herpes
      Oral and genital herpes are caused by the herpes simplex virus. An infection with this virus is life-long, however the rash can be controlled with medication. Herpes infections in pregnant women can cause serious infections for the baby.
      •Hives
      Hives are caused by an allergic reaction in the skin releasing the chemical histamine. Acute hives can usually be treated with medications but chronic hives, lasting longer than 6 months, require an investigation into the cause.
      •Infections
      Infections are caused when an outside organism gets into the skin. They are classified by the type of organism causing the infection - bacterial, fungal, or viral.
      •Psoriasis
      Psoriasis is a lifelong skin condition caused by changes in the immune system. The rash of psoriasis is very distinctive. In the last couple of years there have been many strides in the use of biologic medications that make psoriasis less of a "heartbreak".
      •Rosacea
      Rosacea is a common skin condition characterized by redness of the face and acne. We don't know exactly what causes rosacea, but there are effective medications and treatments to keep it under control.
      •Warts
      Warts are a common skin condition caused by the human papillomavirus. There are many effective treatments, and yes, duct tape is one of them.
      •Seborrheic Dermatitis
      Seborrheic dermatitis causes a characteristic rash on the hair-bearing areas of the face. Sometimes it can be controlled with dandruff shampoo.
      •Skin Cancer
      There are several types of skin cancer from the slow-growing basal cell carcinoma to the potentially fatal melanoma.

      Hope this helps

  44. QUESTION:
    I have these tiny red bumps on my arms and it's been there for years.?
    Some of them arent even bumps they just look like scars or something and they don't itch or anything but they really bother me. Does anyone know what it is or what I can do to get rid of it??? PLEASE HELP!!

    • ANSWER:
      keratosis pilaris, a lot of people have it

      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a very common genetic follicular condition that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin and hence colloquially referred to as "chicken skin". It most often appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms (though the lower arms can also be affected), and can also occur on the thighs and tops of legs, flanks, buttocks or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet). Less commonly, lesions appear on the face and may be mistaken for acne.

      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40 to 50% of the adult population and approximately 50 to 80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. Varying in degree, cases of KP can range from minimal to severe.[citation needed]

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks) and related disorders.

      Many people with keratosis pilaris do not know they have it (if the condition is mild). While KP resembles goose bumps, it is characterized by the appearance of small rough bumps on the skin. As a result, it is often confused with acne.

      Keratosis pilaris occurs as excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin, accumulates within the hair follicles forming hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). Bearing only cosmetic consequence, the condition most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy. Though people with keratosis pilaris experience this condition year round, it’s during the colder months when moisture levels in the air are lower that the problem can become exacerbated and the “goose bumps” are apt to look and feel more pronounced in color and texture.

      [edit] Treatment
      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris, however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, Retin A and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. Milk Baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to the Lactic Acid a natural Alpha Hydroxy Acid in milk. Sunlight may also be helpful but increases risk of Skin Cancer. Small amounts of Vitamin A can be used orally but only with exteme caution due to potential for liver damage. Check with a Dermatologist or Family Doctor before taking extra Vitamin A due to the Vitamins' potential toxic effects.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden (if they do not already appear red), and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. Instead, the hair grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated, and can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though can lead to scarring.

      Food allergies may also exacerbate the condition, causing hyper-keratosis pilaris, gluten being a common culprit (source: physician's (MD) oral presentation).

  45. QUESTION:
    Tiny White Lumps On Skin. Focused On Arms.?
    I get tiny white lumps on mainly my arms, They sometimes get bright, And really stand out. And sometimes they're barely noticeable.They're a fraction bigger than goosebumps. Any Idea as to what these are? Thankyou.

    • ANSWER:
      Or it could be.....Keratosis pilaris is very common, finding a home on the upper arms, thighs, and shoulders. Keratosis pilaris tends to be more severe during the winter months but no one is sure why that is the case and it definitely isn't consistent for everyone. Basically, the bumpy rough spots are clogged pores that sometimes get red and irritated but rarely itch. Regrettably there is no available cure or universally effective treatment, though it is generally well accepted that unclogging pores and reducing inflammation can improve matters greatly (Source: eMedicine Journal, July 2, 2001, Volume 2, Number 7).

      Lactic acid (a very effective form of alpha hydroxy acid) can help exfoliate skin cells, but lactic acid isn't effective for dissolving lipids, so it can't penetrate into the pore and exfoliate the lining of the pore that is a major cause of the problem. For that, you would need a beta hydroxy acid product with the active ingredient salicylic acid and a pH low enough for exfoliation to occur. It is also helpful to avoid bar soaps that can irritate skin or cause clogged pores. A gentle body shampoo is best. The recommendation to scrub away the plugs can mean you inflame the area and still leave the skin feeling rough and bumpy below the surface where the abrasive can't reach.

      Another common condition that can manifest itself as visible red bumps on the arms and thighs is bacterial folliculitis. This inflammatory condition involves an infection of the hair follicle by the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus. It begins with mild swelling and redness around the hair follicle and may eventually become small, inflamed pustules. This condition is most common in persons with a lot of body hair, but can occur on anyone. The most common form of prescribed treatment is a course of oral antibiotics (penicillins, cephalosporins) but topically applied antibiotics are also helpful (Source: The Skin Sourcebook, 1998, pages 162-164). You can also try treating the affected area with daily application of a product containing 5% or 10% benzoyl peroxide. This topical disinfectant is often helpful in keeping these inflamed, acne-like bumps under control.

      Paula's choice sells a BHA product that can be very effective in getting rid of Keratosis pilaris

  46. QUESTION:
    What is Tonsolis?
    White lumps that look to me like small curds of cottage cheese are forming in my tonsols

    • ANSWER:
      White lumps on your tonsils does not always just mean Tonsilitis.

      The following medical conditions are some of the possible causes of Throat white patches as a symptom. There are likely to be other possible causes, so ask your doctor about your symptoms.

      Strep throat
      Oral candidiasis
      Candidiasis
      Monilia
      Lichen planus
      Leukoplakia
      Tonsillitis
      Actinomysis
      Chewing aspirin tablets
      Chemical throat injury
      Leukoedema
      Syphilis
      Keratosis pharyngis - white lumps on tonsils.

  47. QUESTION:
    dose any1 no the side affects for...............?
    dose any1 no the side affects that aldara cream causes or if you have used it did you have any problems thanks for your help

    • ANSWER:
      Aldara
      Side Effects & Drug Interactionsfont sizeAAAAldara™
      (imiquimod) Cream

      For topical use only

      DRUG DESCRIPTION
      Aldara™ (imiquimod 5%) Cream is an immune response modifier for topical administration. Each gram contains 50 mg of imiquimod in an off-white oil-in-water vanishing cream base consisting of isostearic acid, cetyl alcohol, stearyl alcohol, white petrolatum, polysorbate 60, sorbitan monostearate, glycerin, xanthan gum, purified water, benzyl alcohol, methylparaben, and propylparaben.

      Chemically, imiquimod is 1-(2-methylpropyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]quinolin-4-amine. Imiquimod has a molecular formula of C14H16N4 and a molecular weight of 240.3. Its structural formula is:

      INDICATIONS
      Actinic Keratosis
      Aldara Cream is indicated for the topical treatment of clinically typical, nonhyperkeratotic, nonhypertrophic actinic keratoses on the face or scalp in immunocompetent adults.

      Superficial Basal Cell Carcinoma
      Aldara Cream is indicated for the topical treatment of biopsy-confirmed, primary superficial basal cell carcinoma (sBCC) in immunocompetent adults, with a maximum tumor diameter of 2.0 cm, located on the trunk (excluding anogenital skin), neck, or extremities (excluding hands and feet), only when surgical methods are medically less appropriate and patient follow-up can be reasonably assured.

      The histological diagnosis of superficial basal cell carcinoma should be established prior to treatment, since safety and efficacy of Aldara Cream have not been established for other types of basal cell carcinomas, including nodular and morpheaform (fibrosing or sclerosing) types.

      External Genital Warts
      Aldara Cream is indicated for the treatment of external genital and perianal warts/condyloma acuminata in patients 12 years or older.

      Limitations of Use
      Aldara Cream has been evaluated in children ages 2 to 12 years with molluscum contagiosum and these studies failed to demonstrate efficacy. [see Use in Specific Populations].

      Unevaluated Populations
      The safety and efficacy of Aldara Cream in immunosuppressed patients have not been established.

      Aldara Cream should be used with caution in patients with pre-existing autoimmune conditions.

      The efficacy and safety of Aldara Cream have not been established for patients with Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome or Xeroderma Pigmentosum.

      DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION
      The application frequency for Aldara Cream is different for each indication.

      Aldara is not for oral, ophthalmic, or intravaginal use.

      Actinic Keratosis
      Aldara Cream should be applied 2 times per week for a full 16 weeks to a defined treatment area on the face or scalp (but not both concurrently). The treatment area is defined as one contiguous area of approximately 25 cm2 (e.g., 5 cm x 5 cm) on the face (e.g. forehead or one cheek) or on the scalp. Examples of 2 times per week application schedules are Monday and Thursday, or Tuesday and Friday. Aldara Cream should be applied to the entire treatment area and rubbed in until the cream is no longer visible. No more than one packet of Aldara Cream should be applied to the contiguous treatment area at each application. Aldara Cream should be applied prior to normal sleeping hours and left on the skin for approximately 8 hours, after which time the cream should be removed by washing the area with mild soap and water. The prescriber should demonstrate the proper application technique to maximize the benefit of Aldara Cream therapy.

      It is recommended that patients wash their hands before and after applying Aldara Cream. Before applying the cream, the patient should wash the treatment area with mild soap and water and allow the area to dry thoroughly (at least 10 minutes).

      Contact with the eyes, lips and nostrils should be avoided.

      Local skin reactions in the treatment area are common. [see ADVERSE REACTIONS] A rest period of several days may be taken if required by the patient's discomfort or severity of the local skin reaction. However, the treatment period should not be extended beyond 16 weeks due to missed doses or rest periods. Response to treatment cannot be adequately assessed until resolution of local skin reactions. Lesions that do not respond to treatment should be carefully re-evaluated and management reconsidered.

      Aldara Cream is packaged in single-use packets, with 12 packets supplied per box. Patients should be prescribed no more than 3 boxes (36 packets) for the 16-week treatment period.

      Unused packets should be discarded. Partially-used packets should be discarded and not reused.

      Superficial Basal Cell Carcinoma
      Aldara Cream should be applied 5 times per week for a full 6 weeks to a biopsy-confirmed superficial basal cell carcinoma. An example of a 5 times per week application schedule is to apply Aldara Cream, once per day, Monday through Friday. Aldara Cream should be applied prior to normal sleeping hours and left on the skin for approximately 8 hours, after which time the cream sh

  48. QUESTION:
    Little goosebumps on my thighs???!?
    I have little goosebumps looking things on my thighs and arm.They just appeared.They itch a little at night and look red.What can this be??? Im in my early 20's.....any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      Definition

      Keratosis pilaris is a common skin condition that looks like small goose bumps, which are actually dead skin cells that build up around the hair follicle.

      Description

      Keratosis pilaris is a disorder that occurs around the hair follicles of the upper arms, thighs, and sometimes the buttocks. It presents as small, benign bumps or papules that are actually waxy build-ups of keratin. Normally skin sloughs off. However, around the hair follicle where the papules form, the keratinized skin cells slough off at a slower rate, clogging the follicles.

      This is generally thought to be a genetic disorder, although the symptoms of keratosis pilaris are often seen with ichthyosis and allergic dermatitis. It can also be observed in people of all ages who have either inherited it, have a vitamin A deficiency or have dry skin. Keratosis pilaris is a self-limiting disorder that disappears as the person ages. It can become more severe when conditions are dry such as during the winter months or in dry climates.

      Treatment

      To treat keratosis pilaris patients can try several strategies to lessen the bumps. First, the patient can supplement the natural removal of dry skin and papules by using a loofah or another type of scrub when showering or bathing. A variety of different over-the-counter (OTC) lotions, ointments, and creams can also be applied after showering while the skin is still moist and then several times a day to keep the area moist. Medicated lotions with urea, 15% alphahydroxy acids, or Retin A can also be prescribed by the dermatologist and applied one to two times daily. Systemic (oral) medications are not prescribed for keratosis pilaris. However if papules are opened and become infected, antibiotics may be necessary to treat the infection.

      So i think this is what you have got i hope this helps the other girl that first answered you has some good advice too. I'ts probably itchy and annoying but clearly nothing to worry about.
      have a nice day from Alex.

  49. QUESTION:
    Fixing skin?
    When I was little, I got goosebumps often, and I'd scratch them. Now my arms (towards the shoulders) have what look like red goosebumps, and they won't go away. I know it isn't a normal scar, but does anyone have any idea on how to get my skin back to normal?

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a very common genetic follicular condition that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin and hence colloquially referred to as "chicken skin". It most often appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms (though the lower arms can also be affected), and can also occur on the thighs and tops of legs, flanks, buttocks or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet). Less commonly, lesions appear on the face and may be mistaken for acne.

      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40 to 50% of the adult population and approximately 50 to 80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. Varying in degree, cases of KP can range from minimal to severe.[citation needed]

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks) and related disorders.

      Many people with keratosis pilaris do not know they have it (if the condition is mild). While KP resembles goose bumps, it is characterized by the appearance of small rough bumps on the skin. As a result, it is often confused with acne.

      Keratosis pilaris occurs as excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin, accumulates within the hair follicles forming hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). Bearing only cosmetic consequence, the condition most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy. Though people with keratosis pilaris experience this condition year round, it’s during the colder months when moisture levels in the air are lower that the problem can become exacerbated and the “goose bumps” are apt to look and feel more pronounced in color and texture.

      [edit] Treatment

      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris, however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, Retin A and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to the lactic acid — a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may also be helpful but increases risk of skin cancer. Small amounts of vitamin A can be used orally but only with exteme caution due to potential for liver damage. Check with a Dermatologist or Family Doctor before taking extra vitamin A due to the vitamins' potential toxic effects.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden (if they do not already appear red), and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. Instead, the hair grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated, and can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though can lead to scarring.

      Food allergies may also exacerbate the condition, causing hyper-keratosis pilaris, gluten being a common culprit (source: physician's (MD) oral presentation).


oral keratosis

Cancerous Skin Tumors

The experience of sunburn can be a very efficient (i.e. painful) reminder to heed adequate protection on future occasions. However more importantly, it should be a reminder of the long-term effects of sun exposure on our bodies and health which can include aging of the skin and skin cancer.

In order to more fully understand these consequences, lets take a look at exactly what sunburn is, its symptoms and its effect on the body.

Sunburn results when the amount of exposure to the sun, or other ultraviolet light source (e.g. tanning lamps and welding arcs etc.), exceeds the ability of the body's protective pigment, melanin, to protect the skin. Melanin content varies greatly, but in general darker skinned people have more melanin than lighter skinned. (Although fairer skinned people are generally more prone to getting sunburn than darker skinned people, this certainly does not exclude the latter from risk.)

Sunburn destroys cells in the outer layer of the skin, damaging tiny blood vessels underneath. Burns deeper into the skins layers also damage elastic fibers in the skin, which over time and with repeated sun overexposure, can result in the appearance of yellowish, wrinkled skin.

The damage to skin cells from UV exposure (either sunlight or tanning lamps etc.) can also include damage to their DNA. Its this repeated DNA damage, which can lead to a cell becoming cancerous. With the incidence of skin cancer rising dangerously in many parts of the world, and with its ability to develop and establish itself in the body long before external signs are detected, -- paying attention to this aspect of sun exposure and sunburn should certainly not be ignored if we are serious about preserving our health.

Now while it may be easier to ignore the effects of sunburn occurring at a cellular level, ignoring the external symptoms of sunburn in the days immediately following such exposure is entirely another matter.

While sunburn is usually not immediately obvious, skin discoloration (ranging from slightly pink to severely red or even purplish) will initially appear from 1 24 hours after exposure. Although pain is usually worst 6 48 hours afterward, the burn can continue to develop for 24 72 hours after the incident. Where there is skin peeling, this generally occurs 3 8 days after the burn occurs.

While minor sunburns typically cause nothing more than warm/hot skin, slight redness, and tenderness to the affected area, -- in more serious cases, extreme redness, swelling and blistering can occur. These blisters filled with fluid may itch and eventually break. This can then cause peeling of the skin, exposing an even tenderer layer of skin underneath.

Severe sunburn can cause very red, blistered skin but can also be accompanied by fever, chills, nausea (in some cases vomiting), and dehydration. In instances of extreme sunburn where the pain is debilitating, medical treatment may be required.

While the immediate effects of sunburn can certainly be painful and cause discomfort, the real deterrent to UV overexposure should be the potential damage to your long-term health including the risk of premature aging of the skin along with skin cancer.

Dont let sunburn and sun overexposure kill your chances of enjoying youthful skin, and a healthy body. Remember, the easiest way to treat sunburn will always be to avoid it in the first place!

Angela Perin is editor of the 'Safe Tan Ezine', which features practical articles and tips on Beauty, Fitness, Nutrition and more. To discover the Ultimate Experience in Natural Sunless Tanning, visit http://www.safetan.com.au

Article Source:

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What examinations should a young person have done if he had?
    a cancerous tumor removed in july,He only had an echo scan,chest x ray,heart test.If you were the doctor and did your job properly what would you recommend
    Sorry,it was in the bladder,non smoker

    • ANSWER:
      Post-operative tests for a cancer patient are highly variable, depending on the type, location. and extent of the cancer, and in the case of the USA, how much the doctor was paid for what he/she did.
      Removal of a basal cell carcinoma (a type of skin cancer) does not normally require any follow-up testing.

  2. QUESTION:
    there is a large blister like thing on canine where tumor was removed?
    A month ago she had a cancerous tumor removed from her lower abdoment. There were two small grape sized bumps on top of the skin covering tumor before it was removed, now it has turned into one big blister type thing where the tumor has been removed. Feels hard. Look red and shiny. What can it be?

    • ANSWER:
      You didn't say if it was sore or not anyway it could be an infection and a trip to the doctor should clear up any crazy thoughts going through your mind. Stay Strong.

  3. QUESTION:
    What are the chances of getting a cancerous tumor after getting a non-cancerous one?
    I just found out that a seemingly ordinary pimple-like growth on my boyfriend's arm that stuck around for over a year was a non-cancerous tumor. He got it removed, but I'm really worried that there may be a chance of a cancerous tumor emerging now. There's a history of cancer in his family. It's very possible I'm just being the overly concerned girlfriend, but I need to know: what are the chances of him getting another tumor, cancerous or non-cancerous?

    • ANSWER:
      Ur beloved boy-friend and anybody for that matter can as well prevent another benign tumor from becoming malignant with the following instructions. Do's and Don't's.

      Why are more and more young people falling victims to the demon- “CANCER”? What are Prime Causes* & Preventive/Curative Measures?
      1. Chronic & severe constipation [+ heavy quantum of accumulated feces in the rectum & the large intestine] with a displaced solar plexus. Bad diet with McDonald’s pizzas, burgers, KFC-deep freeze and deep fried chicken, pork, hot dogs, high rich calorie diets-obesity, etc. As a result, most of the Americans/Europeans are cancer victims due to chronic constipation issues.
      3. Hormonal imbalance.
      4. Heavy exposure to asbestos, pollution from industrial wastes, tobacco consumption and or smoking..
      5. Chronic & Unhealed wounds/injuries caused by bacterial/viral/metabolic syndromes/diseases with blocked energy + toxins in any internal organ.
      6. Sexual promiscuity, Perverted anal/oral sex, hetero-sex, lesbians, homosex amongst transgenders, bad personal hygiene [not washing gonads after coitus] & indiscriminate consumption of birth control pills 'with no' medical supervision by endocrinologist/gynecologist/physician.
      7. Chronic Stress & Strain.
      8. Lack of exercise & ever increasing obese bodies.
      9. Smoking and tobacco/gutka chewing. 90% lung-cancer victims are smokers, an American study reveals; as per Web Med News.
      10. Regular consumption of ‘colas’ with heavy doses of insecticides, freely available in India. Regular & excessive alcohol consumption.
      11. Skin Cancer Exposure to Sun’s rays @ odd hours [90 minutes after sunrise, beyond 60 minutes before sunset and anytime during strong winds] and excessive exposure to radiation emanating from cell phones, transmission towers, etc.,
      . 12. 24/7-- wearing of bra by the modern woman and avoiding breast feeding the child—breast cancer.
      13. Heavy genetic dispositions with more ‘cancer-stricken ancestors’
      14. Facts on Lung Cancer vis-à-vis Smoking:
      Prudent to stop smoking forthwith permanently------Because, out of every 10 lung cancer patients-9 are smokers-An American Research Study published in WebMD.com.

      CANCER/HIV PREVENTION & Cure:--
      1. Beware of Cancer Symptoms: Sudden loss of weight/stamina, anemia, unbearable pains in any organ despite medication, neuralgia, getting extremely tired for a little or no work, loss of appetite, unhealed wound in any part of the body for years together, chronic constipation, chronic hemorrhages, hemoptysis, etc. Cancer may affect from any organ to any organ[s]/system[s].
      2.. Good liquid Diet, green leaf juices + honey, like aloe vera juice, Noni juice, wheat grass powder, fresh fruit [seasonal fruit only] juices sprouted seeds like green gram, horse gram, ground nuts, boiled- after soaking in water for 15 hours-soya beans, etc., raw coconut, raw dates, watermelon, cabbage, yogurt, spinach, helped many a no. of Health conscious people all over the globe.
      3. Acupressure techniques a MUST to ensure faster recovery.
      4. No salt, no baking soda, no cooked food, No chocolates, No Pizzas, No burgers ----to boost-up immunity power to produce antibodies. Say no to Deep freeze and deep fried products from KFC and McDonald, Diet sodas with aspartame and colas made in India, etc.
      5. How to prevent Sunburn*: Expose Ur body and or the affected parts within 90 minutes from sunrise & within 60 minutes before sunset. During strong winds, no exposure please. Any extra exposure shall be @ Ur own peril.
      CURE:
      TARGET THERAPY* It is the God-given therapy communicated to the mankind through THE RIGVEDA, one of the Hindu scriptures.
      Target Therapy---Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies, [comprising Ayurveda, Homeopathy, Bio-chemic salts, Herbal Remedies, Yoga/Meditation, Magneto-therapy, Sidha, etc.,] U can have sizable & perceivable relief in 45-90 days. @ no/affordable costs, No side effects, and No Hospitalization.

      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse 'Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue. Source:
      'Health in Ur Hands' Vol. I & II available in all Indian languages all over the globe- by Dr.Devendra Vora,DSc.,MD.,FRCP, an octogenarian & the pioneer in Acupressure in India. Dr.Vora, the world renowned Acupressurist, an octogenarian and the Bhishma Pithamaha of acupressure in India--- treated and caused to treat more than 150000 cases of Cancer, HIV/AIDS, Diabetes, irregular menses and also many other most dreaded diseases.

  4. QUESTION:
    How many months/years does it take for a sunburn to become skin cancer?
    I have heard that sunburns do not become skin cancer immediately. How many months or years does it take for a sunburn to become skin cancer?

    My friend recently had a sunburn. Her sunburn was not healing and it became worse, so she went to a dermatologist 3 months after the sunburn happened. The dermatologist found that she has skin cancer. Could it be that she had skin cancer all along, and the recent sunburn did not cause her cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      I got from wikipedia that
      Skin cancer is most closely associated with chronic inflammation of the skin. This includes:

      1. Overexposure to UV-radiation can cause skin cancer either via the direct DNA damage or via the indirect DNA damage mechanism. UVA & UVB have both been implicated in causing DNA damage resulting in cancer. Sun exposure between 10AM and 4PM is most intense and therefore most harmful. Natural (sun) & artificial UV exposure (tanning salons) are associated with skin cancer.[citation needed] Since sunbeds cause mostly indirect DNA damage (free radicals) their use is associated with the deadliest form of skin cancer, malignant melanoma.[citation needed]
      2. Chronic non-healing wounds, especially burns. These are called Marjolin's ulcers based on their appearance, and can develop into squamous cell carcinoma.
      3. Genetic predisposition, including "Congenital Melanocytic Nevi Syndrome". CMNS is characterized by the presence of "nevi" or moles of varying size that either appear at or within 6 months of birth. Nevi larger than 20 mm (3/4") in size are at higher risk for becoming cancerous.
      4. Skin cancer is one of the potential dangers of ultraviolet germicidal irradiation.

      Skin can be protected by avoiding sunlight entirely, or wearing protective clothing while outdoors. Skin cancer is usually caused by exposing skin to UV rays excessively.

      about the treatment
      Most skin cancers can be treated by removal of the lesion, making sure that the edges (margins) are free of the tumor cells. These excisions provide the best cure for both early and high-risk disease.

      For low-risk disease, radiation therapy and cryotherapy (freezing the cancer off) can provide adequate control of the disease; both, however, have lower overall cure rates than surgery.

      Mohs' micrographic surgery is a technique used to remove the cancer with the least amount of surrounding tissue and the edges are checked immediately to see if tumor is found. This provides the opportunity to remove the least amount of tissue and provide the best cosmetically favorable results. This is especially important for areas where excess skin is limited, such as the face. Cure rates are equivalent to wide excision. Special training is required to perform this technique.

      In the case of disease that has spread (metastasized) further surgical or chemotherapy may be required.[11]

      Scientists have recently been conducting experiments on what they have termed "immune- priming". This therapy is still in its infancy but has been shown to effectively attack foreign threats like viruses and also latch onto and attack skin cancers. More recently researchers have focused their efforts on strengthening the body's own naturally produced "helper T cells" that identify and lock onto cancer cells and help guide the killer cells to the cancer. Researchers infused patients with roughly 5 billion of the helper T cells without any harsh drugs or chemotherapy. This type of treatment if shown to be effective has no side effects and could change the way cancer patients are treated

      about how many month it's depend on how your skin can deffend from the ultraviolet radiation.
      sorry for my bad english. But sorry about your friend

  5. QUESTION:
    How do chemotherapy drugs interact chemically with cancer cells to get rid of the cancerous cells?
    I have to give a chemistry project tomorrow in class and I need to have a basic understanding of what goes on chemically between chemotherapy drugs and the cancerous cells. Like what element interacts with what and how the chemo drugs stop the cancer cells from replicating. If anyone even has a most basic chemical explanation as to what occurs I would really appreciate it.

    • ANSWER:
      Chemotherapy works by destroying cancer cells; unfortunately, it cannot tell the difference between a cancer cell and some healthy cells. So chemotherapy eliminates not only the fast-growing cancer cells but also other fast-growing cells in your body, including, hair and blood cells.

      Some cancer cells grow slowly while others grow rapidly. As a result, different types of chemotherapy drugs target the growth patterns of specific types of cancer cells. Each drug has a different way of working and is effective at a specific time in the life cycle of the cell it targets.

      So, the chemicals are designed to go after specific cells that have a particular metabolic rate.

      Chemotherapy has NOT been very effective and the 5 year survival rate is very poor. It is expensive; a cancer patient is worth about 0,000 to the medical community.

      In 1972, according to the American Cancer Societies own figures, 33% of cancers had a five year survival rate. We should also point out that at that same time 33% of cancers went away on their own. Today, according to the ACS, the five year survival rate for cancer has risen to 40%. However, what they do not tell you is that:

      1.The statistics are invalid because they combine data of both local and metastasized cancers; and that the comparisons are not randomized [Ulrich Abel, Advanced Epithelial Cancer", 1990 (no longer in print) ]
      2.Cancers not factored into the original statistics are now factored in, such as skin cancers, many of which are not fatal and that the statistics are purposely inflated by including people with benign cancers.
      3.Technology has helped us to find cancers earlier, thus the survival time from diagnosis to eventual death has lengthened.
      4.They are now including in their stats non deadly skin cancers.

      By shrinking tumors, chemotherapy encourages stronger cancer cells to grow and multiply and become chemo resistant. Then there are the new cancers caused by chemotherapy, or secondary cancers. This quaint side effect is often overlooked in the lists of side effects in a drug's accompanying literature, though you can find this information quite easily at the National Cancer Institute. We pride ourselves in America for being technologically advanced and that our technology is rooted in a foundation of good science.

      Wrong.

      When it comes to medicine, little at all is based upon science. Again we shall point to the Office of Technological Assessment’s paper: Assessing the Efficacy and Safety of Medical Technologies in which we are told that fewer than 20% of all medical procedures have been tested, and that of those tested, half were tested badly.

      Medicine in America is not about healing.

      Most telling, according to Ralph Moss in his book Questioning Chemotherapy, is that in a good number of surveys, chemotherapists have responded that they would neither recommend chemotherapy for their families nor would they use it themselves. In an unpublished cohort study in which it was revealed that only 9% of oncologists took chemotherapy for their cancers.

      "Most cancer patients in this country die of chemotherapy.

      Chemotherapy does not eliminate breast, colon, or lung cancers. This fact has been documented for over a decade, yet doctors still use chemotherapy for these tumors,” Allen Levin, MD UCSF The Healing of Cancer.

      Additionally, Irwin Bross, a biostatistician for the National Cancer Institute, discovered that many cancers that are benign (though thought to be malignant) and will not metastasize until they are hit with chemotherapy. In other words, he's found that many people who've been diagnosed with metastatic cancer did not have metastatic cancer until they got their chemotherapy.

      For many cancers, chemotherapy just does not improve your survival rate. Some of these are colorectal, gastric, pancreatic, bladder, breast, ovarian, cervical and corpus uteri, head and neck. Knowing this, oncologists still recommend a regimen of chemotherapy, why?

      The answer you will get from oncologists that are honest is this: “We give it to patients so they won't give up hope and fall into the hands of quacks.” Quacks? Implicit in the definition of quackery is the sale of worthless or dangerous nostrums for profit. Who exactly are the quacks? Just because someone is wearing a white smock, has a title, and works in a nice air conditioned office, does NOT take away what he is. Con men don't look like crooks or they would never get anyone to buy into what they are selling. Looking credible does NOT mean they are.

      Dr Ulrich Abel, who poured over thousands and thousands of cancer studies, published his shocking report in 1990 stating quite succinctly that chemotherapy has done nothing for 80% of all cancers; that 80% of chemotherapy administered was absolutely worthless.

      To give a fair and accurate assessment of chemotherapy in your report, you should also tell people how it is NOT very effective and only a smal

  6. QUESTION:
    What foods are good for you skin and immunity?
    I have bad skin and always getting colds ect.

    • ANSWER:
      Boost your body’s immune system with

      1) Broccoli is chock-full of the phytochemical sulforaphane, which makes headlines because of its potent anti-cancer properties. It’s also a rich source of beta-carotene (good for the eyes and immune system, among other things), fibre and vitamin C.
      2) Blueberries have one of the highest antioxidant capacities (the ability to combat cell-damaging free radicals that can lead to heart disease and cancer). And, like cranberries, blueberries appear to fight off urinary-tract infections by preventing E. coli bacteria from sticking to cells in the urinary tract.
      3) Flax is a great source of both soluble and insoluble fibre (which makes it a natural laxative) as well as plant lignans which may reduce the risk of developing hormone-sensitive cancers, such as prostate and breast cancer. Flaxseed is also high in Omega-3 fatty acids, which are known to protect against heart disease.
      4) Garlic contains allicin, a phytochemical that may lower cholesterol and make blood platelets less sticky, cutting the risk of clots.
      5) Green tea is loaded with powerful antioxidants, which may protect against cell damage that leads to aging and help prevent heart disease and cancer. Green tea contains a polyphenol known as epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg), which in animal tests has been shown to prevent the formation of tumors. Researchers at Purdue University found in laboratory tests that EGCg killed human breast cancer cells but did not kill non-cancerous human breast cells.
      6) Skim milk - studies have found that increasing your calcium intake can also help relieve the symptoms of PMS.
      7) Fresh or canned salmon is one of the best sources of the celebrated Omega-3 fatty acids, which can help prevent heart attacks. Studies have also shown that Omega-3 may have the ability to offset depression as well as protect against inflammatory diseases such as arthritis.
      8) Soy is perfect source of protein since it’s a plant-based protein that’s low in saturated fat.
      9) Spinach is loaded with energy-promoting iron and folate, a B vitamin that prevents neural-tube defects in the fetus. It is important in red blood cell formation, protein metabolism, growth and cell division. The leafy green is also one of the best sources of lutein, an antioxidant that benefits eye, skin and cardiovascular health.
      10) Research has found that tomatoes, especially cooked or processed ones, can lower the risk of some cancers and heart disease.

      Good food, Good Skin

      Perhaps the simplest way to maintain a healthy, balanced diet and ensure the skin is getting optimal nutrition from the foods we eat is to follow the recommendations of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Daily Food Guide, commonly referred to as the food pyramid.

      These include:

      * Choosing and eating at least three ounces of whole grain breads, cereals, rice, crackers or pasta.
      * Eating a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, including more dark green and orange vegetables.
      * Consuming calcium-rich foods, such as fat-free or low-fat milk and other dairy products.
      * Opting for a variety of low-fat or lean meats, poultry and fish.

  7. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of a skin tag on my eye lid?
    I have a skin tag on my eye lid. Why is it there and how do I get rid of it?

    • ANSWER:
      ABOUT:

      They typically occur in characteristic locations including the neck, underarms, eyelids, and under the breasts...occur in locations where skin rubs against other skin or clothing.

      They are much more common in middle age and they tend to increase in prevalence up to age 60.
      Hormone elevations may cause an increase in the formation of skin tags.

      Skin tags are a type of growth or tumor, albeit a completely benign and harmless one. Tags are not cancerous (malignant) and not found to have potential to become cancerous if left untreated.

      REMOVAL:

      There are several effective medical ways to remove a skin tag, including removing with scissors, freezing (using liquid nitrogen), and burning (using medical electric cautery at the physician's office).

      Usually small tags may be removed easily without anesthesia while larger growths may require some local anesthesia (injected lidocaine) prior to removal. Application of a topical anesthesia cream prior to the procedure may be desirable in areas where there are a large number of tags.

      Dermatologists (skin doctors), family physicians, and internal medicine physicians are the doctors who treat tags most often. Occasionally, an eye specialist (ophthalmologist) is needed to remove tags very close to the eyelid margin.

      I hope this helps! :)

  8. QUESTION:
    How does a mole on your skin form, is it overnight or gradually?
    Does a mole just "pop up" onto your skin overnight, or does it gradually turn into one?
    I'm talking about like, black spots on skin, but they aren't freckles.

    • ANSWER:
      moles appear when a cancerous tumor is present. they are usually close in vicinity of each other.

  9. QUESTION:
    What are the characteristics of cancerous lumps?
    I have a lump on my thigh a couple inches above the knee. It's about the size of a pea. I just had a doctors appointment like two weeks ago, and I don't want her to think I'm crazy. I only want to go if it's serious. What are the characteristics of cancerous lumps?

    • ANSWER:
      I can say with almost 100% certainty that your pimple or cyst or clogged hair follicle has nothing whatsoever to do with cancer in any way shape or form.

      Most skin or subcutaneous (fatty tissue under the skin) lumps are benign. Most common subcutaneous tumors are lipomas and epidermoid or sebaceous cyst.

      Lipomas are benign fatty tumors, probably the most common ones in the entire body, and are more frequent in women.

      A sebaseous cyst is a closed sac found just under the skin containing grayish-white, pasty or cheesy-looking skin secretions; most often arise from swollen hair follicles, but also skin trauma can induce a cyst to form.

      Benign tumors are usually slow growing, painless, and freely movable lumps beneath the skin.

      You have to see your doctor if the lump gets hard, is fixed, grows fast or hurts.

  10. QUESTION:
    What is the best dressing or ointment to put on a cancerous tumor that has broken through the skin?
    It's actually a malignant tumor the doctors aren't going to remove. I need to keep it from getting infected and clean as possible. Please help!
    Need answer ASAP

    • ANSWER:

  11. QUESTION:
    Can a lump in your back be a cancerous tumor?
    I found a small lump on my the right side of my back about midway. Could this be a cancerous tumor?

    • ANSWER:
      It could be a number of things really like another poster say don't jump to the worse case of what it could be. It could be muscles bulging under your skin a solid piece of fat. a cyst and so on.

      Get it checked out and do some research like does it hurt when you touch and so on.

  12. QUESTION:
    What is the difference between benign and malignant neoplasms?
    I know that benign is non cancerous and malignant is cancerous. Are there any other differences between the two?

    • ANSWER:
      There is no difference other than one being cancerous and other malignant. The tumors may present themselves structurally differently but you have used the terms correctly.

      By structurally you may consider skin cancerous growths that present as moles on the skin. A dermatologist will the difference in color, shape and texture of the mole. A malignant skin neoplasm looks quite different than a normal benign neoplasm.

      The word neoplasm is a medical term which is defined as a new growth or tumour. A neoplasm may either be benign or malignant. It is an abnormal and uncontrolled mass of tissue which results from the excessive division of cells. These tissues are not required for the repair of organs. The growth of these tissues is uncoordinated with and exceeds that of the normal tissues. Benign neoplasms are not cancerous, but malignant neoplasms are cancerous.

      It starts from a single cell which has been altered. Cancer is a malignant neoplasm. A neoplasm is a tumour or a new growth of tissue which serves no physiological function. The multiplication of cell is localised. It generally designates a collection of cells which have undergone genetic transformation. A combination of these modified cells form a tumour. Neoplasmic cells differ in their structure and function form the original type of cells.

      Compare a lipoma neoplasm and a lymphoma neoplasm. Lipomas are benign fatty soft tissue tumors. I had one one on my back several years ago and had it removed surgically. Lymphomas on the other hand are malignant and have to do with the lymph system. Only a biopsy distinguished the difference.

  13. QUESTION:
    Is the ingredient aluminum in under arm deodorant the same aluminum of in metal?
    Is it cancerous?
    My high school teacher told us that studies have proven the dangers of this ingredient , that it can cause cancer.
    That would be in the 48hr protection product , but not most of the other under arm deodorant. So just read the labels on both sides or all the way around before you buy it and use it on your body , please.
    Thank you for being kind to yourself.

    • ANSWER:
      Nowadays anything may be cancer causing. I threw away all deodorants, shampoos, bath soaps and cosmetics containing the following
      Parabens (methylparaben, propylparaben, etc.) are skin irritants, disturb your hormonal balance, are potential mutagens and have been found in breast cancer tumors. (page 118) They are commonly found in shampoos, conditioners, lotions and deodorants.
      Propylene glycol is a strong irritant, may cause delayed allergic reactions, kidney, liver, nervous system damage, and has not been fully investigated for its potential to cause cancer. (page 128) Check your makeup, deodorant, mouthwash, shaving lotions and baby lotion for this ingredient.
      Fragrance may irritate the skin and cause a variety of adverse reactions. It may contain hundreds of different chemicals, some are hazardous, some cause cancer. (page 88) This is found in just about all cosmetics and personal care products, unless it says fragrance free. See page 21 to discover what fragrance free really means.
      Sodium fluoride is a poison and its toxic effects can be delayed. It can cause death if swallowed. (page 135) Check your toothpaste. Unless it says fluoride free, it most likely has some form of fluoride in it.
      Octyl methoxycinnamate is a skin and eye irritant. It disrupts your hormone balance and has been shown to increase the growth of cancer cells. (page 115) Used in makeup, suntan lotions and sunscreens.
      Sodium lauryl sulfate is a skin and eye irritant, and may cause dry skin and eczema. It is a potential mutagen and may inhibit DNA synthesis. (page 136) It is found in shampoos, bubble bath, lotions, creams, and toothpaste.
      D&C colors are primarily derived from coal tar which is known to cause cancer. They are certified by the FDA not to contain more than 20 ppm of lead and arsenic, but the certification does not address any adverse effects these colors may have on your body and disregards the permeability of the skin which allows these substances to be absorbed into your body. (page 70) Commonly used to add color to most commercial cosmetics and personal care products.
      FD&C colors are primarily derived from coal tar which is known to cause cancer. They are certified by the FDA not to contain more than 10 ppm of lead and arsenic, but the certification does not address any adverse effects these colors may have on your body. (page 86) Added to most cosmetics and personal care products for color.
      I shop purely organic for all my cosmetic needs and meats, produce etc.....I've had papilary and follicular cancers, my mom suffered breast cancer, others in my family had leukemia, and various other cancers.....
      I hope this helps~ {{{hugs}}}

  14. QUESTION:
    How can you tell if you have Skin Cancer?
    Yeah, my family gets burned very easily and some people in my family have gotten skin cancerous things removed. Is it like a spot or something? I just don't know what they are and how can you tell if it's skin cancer. I don't want to get skin cancer...and I can't call a relative. So can someone please help me!!!

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      There are a variety of different skin cancer symptoms. These include sores or changes in the skin that do not heal, ulcers in the skin, discoloration, and changes in existing moles.

      Basal cell carcinoma usually looks like a raised, smooth, pearly bump on the sun-exposed skin of the head, neck or shoulders. Sometimes small blood vessels can be seen within the tumor. Crusting and bleeding in the center of the tumor frequently develops. It is often mistaken for a sore that does not heal.
      Squamous cell carcinoma is commonly a red, scaling, thickened patch on sun-exposed skin. Ulceration and bleeding may occur. When SCC is not treated, it may develop into a large mass.
      Most melanomas are brown to black looking lesions. Signs that might indicate a malignant melanoma include change in size, shape, color or elevation of a mole. The appearance of a new mole during adulthood, or new pain, itching, ulceration or bleeding of an existing mole should be checked.

  15. QUESTION:
    Does cancer cell transmit to others by direct or indirect physical contact?
    Does using bed sheets or clothing (that are physically touched by the person's cancer cell part) after a person who has skin cancer increase possibility for anyone get it too? I'm just curious, because I heard that cancer cells can transmit to other healthy cells.

    • ANSWER:
      No. Cancer is a result of a DNA mutation. The mutation has to happen in the body. Cancerous tumors are results of accelerated mitosis inside the organ. So no, it is not contagious.

  16. QUESTION:
    What are some symptoms of you having cancer?
    I am just interested in what some symptoms are of you possibly having either skin or breast cancer. Thank you for your answers.

    • ANSWER:
      Losing weight is one, my mum was rather skinny so was my nanna (both had breast cancer) Stage 4

      Breast cancer symptoms vary widely — from lumps to swelling to skin changes — and many breast cancers have no obvious symptoms at all. Symptoms that are similar to those of breast cancer may be the result of non-cancerous conditions like infection or a cyst.

      Some Symptoms of Advanced (Metastatic) Breast Cancer
      Stage 4, or metastatic breast cancer is the most advanced stage of this disease. Metastatic breast cancer is defined as having spread beyond the breast and underarm lymph nodes into other parts of the body.

      * bone pain (bone metastases)
      * shortness of breath (lung metastases)
      * drop in appetite (liver metastases)
      * unintentional weight loss (liver metastases)
      * headaches, neurological pain or weakness (could be brain metastases)
      (This is what my mother had, and it was very noticeable)

      Breast Lumps

      * These lumps can be benign or malignant. Benign lumps do not spread to other parts of the body. A malignant lump is made up of cancer cells. When it first develops, this malignant tumour is confined to the breast. Most lumps are not cancerous

      Changes to look for:

      * A lump, lumpiness or thickening in the breast or armpit – especially if it is in one breast only
      * A change in the size or shape of your breast
      * Skin changes such as dimpling or redness
      * Nipple inversion or discharge
      * A change to the nipple, like a rash, ulcer or itchiness
      * An unusual or persistent pain

      Inflammatory Breast Cancer (IBC) – Aggressive and Unusual Symptoms
      One type of breast cancer that does not appear in lumps is called inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). This aggressive cancer grows in sheets instead of lumps, and it invades nearby skin, resembling a rash. It will not respond to topical creams or antibiotics, and should be treated very promptly. Symptoms:

      * a sudden increase in mature breast size (as much as a cup size in a few days)
      * itching in the skin of the breast that is continuous and not relieved by pills or creams
      * a change in the breast skin color, resulting in pink, red, or dark-colored areas
      * breast is excessively warm to the touch, or harder or firmer than usual
      * unusual pain, which occurs out of the regular cycle
      * sometimes a change in skin texture, similar to the skin of an orange
      * breast skin ulcers (later stage IBC)

  17. QUESTION:
    How can I tell if this lump I have is a calcified lymph node, or a tumor?
    It's a half inch to the left of the C6 vertebrae( Spinal Cord ) , I was wondering if there are even lymph nodes around there, or if it's a tumor in my back.
    It's 2:40, doctor isn't available atm.

    • ANSWER:
      Any lump*/lymph node enlargement*, in any part of the body on the skin, is a sign of blocked energy + toxins in the lymphatic system. It may be a cyst, tumor [benign/malignant]. If possible identify it properly or U may use both medicines alternatively mentioned hereunder, for the best possible cure in 45 days.
      Prudent to be aware of
      Any Cancer, lupus, HIV/AIDS, Kaposi’s Sarcoma, etc., —Common Symptoms:
      Sudden loss of weight/stamina, anemia, unbearable pains in any organ despite medication, neuralgia, FATIGUE-getting extremely tired for a little or no work, loss of appetite, unhealed wound in any part of the body for years together, chronic constipation, chronic hemorrhages, etc. Cancer may affect from any organ to any organ[s]/system[s].

      1. Cyst*— Cyst. A cyst is a sac that may be filled with air, fluid or other material. A cyst can form in any part of the body, including bones, organs and soft tissues. Most cysts are non-cancerous (benign). Some common examples of cysts include sebaceous cysts, small bumps that form just beneath the skin, and ovarian cysts. It's important to note, however, that nearly all cancers are capable of producing cysts. (A sac containing liquid secretion or pus).
      •2. Tumor*— Tumor. A tumor is an abnormal mass of tissue. Like a cyst, a tumor can form in any part of the body. A tumor can be benign or cancerous (malignant).
      To determine whether a cyst or tumor is benign or malignant, a sample of the affected tissue — or, in some cases, the entire suspicious area — is removed and studied under a microscope. This is known as a biopsy. A swelling on any of the cutaneous, mucous or serous surface of any part of the body of independent growth.
      •1. Cure for Cyst-----------—Mixture of CF 3.x, CP 3x or 12x, CS 3x, NM 3x and S 12x.

      2.Cure for Tumor----—Mature of CF 12x, CP 3x or 12x, CS 3x, KM 3x, KP 3x, KS 3x, NM 3x, NP 3x and S 12x. For small children's bloody tumour-CF 3x is useful

      •Dosage*: 2 grains t.d.s.
      •All these biochemic salts/homeo medicines available @ local Homoeo shops, are safe and with side benefits. Don’t swallow medicine. The medicine to be dissolved on/under the tongue. Don’t take any thing 10 minutes before and 10 minutes after medication. You can take water.

      U may try both medicines alternatively. If not curable in 45 days, then
      anyways, prudent* to see a general surgeon/local homeopath/dermatologist for physical examination, relevant investigations, accurate diagnosis and permanent cure by medication and or surgical interference.
      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse 'Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.
      Source: ‘HEALTH IN UR HANDS’ [Vol.I & II] available in all Indian Languages all over the globe] by Dr.Devendra Vora, DSc.,MD.,FRCP.,---an octogenarian & the pioneer in Acupressure in India.

  18. QUESTION:
    Cancer often involves excessive and uncontrolled mitosis resulting in a tumor.?
    Some of the chemotherapeutic agents used in cancer inhibit DNA replication. While this is somtimes successful in stopping tumor growth, there are side effects. What are they?

    • ANSWER:
      the chemotherapeutic agents inhibit DNA in any dividing cell and not specifically in only cancerous cells. therefore, the side effects include the non-division of normally dividing cells like skin, hair cells, liver etc that are nearby. thus u see such patients undergoing chemotherapy with hair loss and pale skin sometimes with scabs, sometimes also with some organ failures.

      scientists are still working with studying the surface molecules especially receptors on cancer cells (which have many more receptors than normal cells). they will then identify some antigens specific only to cancer cells and can thus synthesize antibodies specific only to cancer cells and then fuse them with the chemotherupatic agents so that these agents can specifically localize only at cancerous cells and greatly reduce the side effects ie the action on non cancerous cells

  19. QUESTION:
    What is unspecified Sarcoma and how bad is it for a 39 year old woman?
    She is a friend and told me what she had and I just am trying to understand what it is and how bad things are. She had 8 tumors in her leg.

    • ANSWER:
      It means that they don't know exactly what type she has yet.
      Sarcoma is a cancer of the connective tissue. The connective tissue includes muscle, bone, fat, nerve, cartilage, blood vessel, and deep skin tissue. Connective tissue is present throughout the body, so sarcoma can occur in any location. Two thirds of sarcomas are located in the extremities (arms or legs). Because it is so rare and it takes multiple forms in multiple locations, sarcoma is difficult to detect, often misdiagnosed and complex to treat.
      My oldest brother had soft tissue Sarcoma (fibro) of the cervical spine...he was diagnosed when the cancer was in "stageIV" and there wasn't much they could do...Sarcomas are very complex to treat!... The prognosis with sarcomas is poor unfortunately:-(

      Some of the most common subtypes of sarcoma are listed below.

      Liposarcomas are malignant tumors which develop from fat tissue. They can develop anywhere in the body, but they most often grow in the retroperitoneum (tissue at the back of the abdominal cavity).

      Leiomyosarcomas are malignant tumors which develop from smooth muscle tissue. (Smooth muscle is the type of muscle over which your brain does not have conscious control like the muscle fibers in the uterus or in the walls of blood vessels.) They can arise anywhere in the body but the uterus or gastrointestinal tract are two relatively common locations for leiomyosarcoma.

      Rhabdomyosarcoma are malignant tumors which resemble developing skeletal muscle. These tumors most commonly grow in the arms or legs, but can also develop in the head or neck area, as well as the urinary and reproductive organs.

      Synovial Sarcoma is a malignant tumor made up of cells which resemble the cells in joints. ("Synovial cells" line the joints.) However, synovial sarcoma does not necessarily arise in any joint, and the name is probably a misnomer, since the cancer cells are probably quite different from normal joint cells. Synovial sarcomas can arise in any location in the body, and it often appears in young adults.

      Angiosarcoma are malignant tumors that resemble blood or lymphatic vessels.

      Fibrosarcoma is cancer of the fibroblast-type cells in the body which form scars and do other important connective functions.

      Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor (MPNST) is a cancer of the cells that surround nerves -- it is also called neurofibrosarcoma.

      Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) also known as GI Stromal Sarcoma is an increasingly recognized diagnosis of connective tissue cancerous cells which support the GI tract.

      Desmoid Tumor is not strictly a sarcoma since it is not technically a malignancy. However, since it has risk of coming back, it is a tumor which generally should be managed by a team skilled in sarcoma management.

      Ewing's Sarcoma is also known as Peripheral Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET). It is a class of diseases which arise from very primitive cells in the body. Although this is usually thought of as a bone tumor, Ewing Sarcoma is increasingly recognized to arise in soft tissues in the body as well.

      Osteosarcoma (also known as osteogenic sarcoma) is a tumor of cells which form bone.

      Chondrosarcoma is a tumor of cells which form cartilage.

  20. QUESTION:
    What is wrong with my dog Crunk?
    He has a bleeding bump on his arm - he has had it before and it was removed, vet said it was a skin tumor. He couldn't get one twice, right? What else has this symptoms? It does not seem to bother him at all - he doesn't even get mad when I pinched it (It looks like a big, huge pimple...) He is a pit bull, are there any diseases like this theat they are prone to?

    • ANSWER:
      If the vet had the tumor sent in for a biopsy and said it was a skin tumor that was benign then its probably not much to worry about. Maybe the vet didn't remove a wide enough area around the tumor and some of the cells causing the tumor remained behind to reform another tumor in the same area- it doesn't mean the doctor is a bad vet sometimes its hard to tell where the tumor ends and the normal tissue begins. I would have the lump reevaluated to make sure it hasn't changed into a cancerous tumor. Try not to let the dog lick it either or else it will get worse. You may have to have it removed again if it does not heal or if it grows bigger.
      If it is not in the same area and it looks just like the tumor that was removed before Crunk might just have a genetic predisposition for skin tumors, or they might be warts-dogs can get them pretty much anywhere. I'm not sure if pit bulls get skin tumors a lot, I personally haven't seen any with that problem. If its been there for a couple of weeks and hasn't gotten better then its probably not a bug bite especially if it looks like the lump he had before.
      Dogs can occasionally get pimples but usually on the chin when there is a bacterial infection going on.
      Either way you should always get any lumps and bumps checked out the sooner the better to give you peace of mind and so you can get it taken care of before it gets worse. Good luck.

  21. QUESTION:
    Imagine a new medication that slows the cell cycle. How would this medication likely effect cancer?
    A. It might slow the rate of mutations.
    B. It might slow the division of cancerous cells.
    C. It might slow the effectiveness of chemotherapy.
    ?

    • ANSWER:
      There are lots of common diseases which do not have any cure till date inspite of progress made by science. I am getting success with most of the common diseases with the following.

      Give up water and all other liquids for 24 hours. To avoid dehydration keep indoors. In case of cancer repeat this after every 48 hours.
      On other days drink 1 glass of water 1 hour before each meal. The total water intake on these days should not be more than 3 glasses.

      There are 3 main or rather only common symptoms of cancer -
      1) The cells are not able to produce 38 units of energy that is done in case of normal cells.
      2) The stomach acid is very low.
      3) Tumours or general swelling.

      The reason and logic for the above in short is as under -
      The cells of the human body are at the lowest level which produce energy. To produce energy cells burn glucose in presence of oxygen.
      When there is more water in the cell then the energy producing capacity of the cell is significantly reduced. Reduced energy by the cells cause build up of water outside the cells as well.
      Continued less burning of glucose also causes accumulation of other minerals in the cell. That causes the cells to swell up.
      This does not happen overnight.
      There are various checks in the body to avoid build up of water in the cells. Like whenever there is change in atmosphere temperature the body adjusts the amount of water that cells carry. When this adjustments fails due to some reason the body tries various modes to get rid of the excess water - sinus, cold and cough, adrelin levels, water reduction thru increased urine etc.
      There are certain other complications that happen due to build up of excess water in the cells. One is build up of bacteria and infections in the body.
      These bacteria or infections cause the increase in the body temperature. The increased temperature takes care of the situation.

      What is the reason for cancer. Same. There are tumours in all kind of cancers. The tumours are caused due to cells not dieing. The reason for cells not dieing is cells not producing enough energy and that prolongs their life cycle.
      What is the cure for cancer. The cure for cancer and all other common ailments is same. I found that sinus, cold, cough, IBS, skin blood clots, slip disk, dry skin, IBS, mouth ulcers, renal failure etc can be cured effectively by giving up water and all other liquids for 24 hours to 48 hours. This has been tested on more than 50 persons so far. Thru Yahoo Answers this same been tested on more than 100 people but I do not have conclusive proof of this. The cerainity with which relief is produced in 24 hours gives enough hope for cancer cure in 15 days.

      Now what happens when there is excess water in the cells. That causes build up of excess water outside the cells. That causes pain in the entire body due to constant excess weight on the cells. That also causes the infections to build up. The antibodies causes the increase in body temperature.

      After treatment of cancer patients with chemo etc they are asked to avoid getting in touch people with cold and cough. The chances of such people catching infection is more.

      By giving up water what happens in the body. The blood acids go up by 10% in 24 hours due to reduction in water content by 5% of body weight. That produces enough heat in the body. That causes the infections not to grow, water to come down, there will be more energy production. Increase in body temperature is enough indiction of antibodies becoming more effective. Google on fever and treatment.

  22. QUESTION:
    Any one familiar with the chip in dogs causing cancer?
    My 1 year old puppy has a chip in his skin between both his shoulder blades and I have just recently heard that it causes cancer in dogs who have this chip. Any one heard of any thing?

    • ANSWER:
      The Associated Press is reporting that a series of studies dating to the 1990s--and largely unpublicized --indicated a possible link between microchips in some lab mice and rats and cancer. Some 2,000 microchips have been implanted in humans worldwide, but millions of dogs and cats have been microchipped, raising worries about the implants' safety (as well as how the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved implanting the chips in humans in 2005).

      VeriChip Corp., the Florida company that makes the chips, says they are safe. Chairman and CEO Scott Silverman says management wasn't aware "of any studies that have resulted in malignant tumors” in lab animals. He also pointed out that millions of pets have had chips implanted without reports of significant problems.

      But the AP has found several studies that do show an increase of tumors that were attributed to the chips.

      Dr. Cheryl London, a veterinarian oncologist at Ohio State University, says that veterinary pathologists haven’t reported a jump in cancerous tumors from the chips. She suggested, though, the need for a 20-year study of chipped dogs. And Dr. Chand Khanna, a veterinary oncologist at the National Cancer Institute, concurred with that recommendation, saying current evidence “does suggest some reason to be concerned about tumor formations.”

      its all really still speculation. until a full study has been done there is no proof either way.

  23. QUESTION:
    Where can I find instructions to remove my own tumor?
    I have a small growth on my left index finger - a bump about .8 cm in diameter that my OB said is probably a blood vessel tumor. because of the way is sits on my finger and the way the skin pulls away from it around the edges, it looks like I could just pop it out or cut it off myself. I'd like to do it as safely as possible, though, so are there instructions online somewhere for this sort of thing?

    P.S. - I know it would be better to have a doctor take care of it, but I can't afford to see one. Blew all the money on rent and not having babies.

    • ANSWER:
      Even though it may look easily excisable...I wouldn't, especially if it's potentially attached to a blood vessel. It may look ok at the surface but you have no idea how deep the tumor goes (think roots of a tree). You risk breaking open the tumor and speading potentially cancerous cells as well as having an uncontrollable bleed by rupturing your blood vessel not to mention the risk of infection. Don't do it!

  24. QUESTION:
    What are the differences between multiple gallbladder polyps and solitary gallbladder polyps?
    My mother (52 years old) was diagnosed to have multiple gallbladder polyps (the largest was about 8mm) recently, however suggestions of treatments varies among doctors asked. And some argued that multiple gallbladder polyps are mostly benign and are less cancerous then solitary gallbladder polyps is it correct? Thanks a lot!

    • ANSWER:
      Notwithstanding whether if it multiple or solitary gall bladder polyps, it must be cured. Maybe, they symptoms are linked to diabetes, gall stones, hypothyroid,etc.

      Cure is available in 'target therapy'-------------------------

      The symptoms cited---------an offshoot of blocked energy + accumulated toxins gall bladder, pancreas, adrenal gland, liver, Thyroid & Parathyroid, lymphatic system, Spleen, hormonal imbalance with a displaced solar plexus.

      TARGET THERAPY* It is the God-given therapy communicated to the mankind through THE RIGVEDA, one of the Hindu scriptures.
      Target Therapy---Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies, [comprising Ayurveda, Homeopathy, Bio-chemic salts, Herbal Remedies, Yoga/Meditation, Magneto-therapy, Sidha, etc.,] U can have sizable & perceivable relief in 45-90 days. @ no/affordable costs, No side effects, and No Hospitalization.

      Dr.Vora designed it in such a way that the costs are the least for the survival/rescue of common man and the poor in villages, towns and metropolis on the globe; with NO insurance cover & NO money to bear the costs of chemo. It is most suitable to all the youngsters on this entire globe.
      U may study it, discuss with Ur family members/friends/acquaintances and slowly and steadily implement it for the best results.

      •No side effects and no risk. If it clicks, mostly possible, U shall have a cure. Lest, the therapy keeps mum. No extra risk. It is the most suitable line of treatment even for the terminally ill patients. Cancer cure/prevention is quite possible. U may try it for any incurable disease including cancer of any organ[s], post-surgical recurrence of tumors, Leukemia, HIV/AIDS, Crohn’s Syndrome, Gilbert’s Syndrome, colon cancer, Thalassemia, Alzheimer’s Syndrome, Muscular Dystrophy, Autism, bone TB., Tinnitus, all brain & spinal cord disorders, CLL, Crohn’s Syndrome, endometriosis, etc., ---it should aim @ [3] steps.
      1. Removal of toxins from all internal organs & purging through Normal Drainage systems, feces, urine, skin, lungs, menses [females].
      2. Activating all the internal organs to make each & every organ to function up to optimum levels, by purging out toxins.
      3. Supplying vitamins, nutrients, micro-nutrients, minerals, trace elements for invigorating the entire Immune system to produce antibodies.
      All items for a cure—available in Ur vicinity all over the globe.

      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse 'Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.

      Source: ‘HEALTH IN UR HANDS’ [Vol.I & II] available in all Indian Languages all over the globe] by Dr.Devendra Vora, DSc.,MD.,FRCP.,---an octogenarian & the pioneer in Acupressure in India.
      Dr.Vora, the world renowned Acupressurist, an octogenarian and the Bhishma Pithamaha of acupressure in India--- treated and caused to treat more than 150000 cases of Cancer, HIV/AIDS, Diabetes, irregular menses and also many other most dreaded diseases.

  25. QUESTION:
    How long does it take for a surgery cut to heal?
    I just got surgery on my left boob, they took out a small non cancerous tumor and the incision isn't a big one. The procedure took no more then 20 minutes and I am out of work for 4 days however my stitches haven't dissolved yet and I was curious on when this wound will close up on its own? Will it be a month from now? Another week?

    • ANSWER:
      I don't believe they would put dissolvable stitches into your chest, because they leave bigger scars. The stitch itself will show as raised. If they are non-dissolvable ones, they take them out after about a week to ten days.
      Wound healing already sets in just minutes after the wound is allowed to close. Blood clots form and it is no longer "open," however, it takes a few days for the skin to be stable again.

  26. QUESTION:
    What kind of sunscreen should I use on my cats ears?
    My kitten has one white ear and the vet said white ears are prone to cancerous tumors when exposed to the sun. He recommended using a sunscreen. He also said indoor cats are especially proned because they lay in the window siles in the cool of the house in summer. Outside cats usually keep in the shade.

    I'm wondering if there is a sunscreen for cats that work better than people sunscreen. Does anyone know?

    Also, has anyone had a white cat that has developed cancer tumors and if so, what can be done?

    • ANSWER:
      Ask your vet what is safe to use...and yes...white cats are especially prone to sunburn, because they are light colored especially around the nose, eyes, and ears. Someone else on here said it has nothing to do with color...and it does (in the case of skin cancer that it)

  27. QUESTION:
    How do malignant melanomas cause weight loss in cancer patients?
    I read that one of the first signs of cancer is unexplained weight loss. However, I don't understand how this would happen in something like skin cancer - what has a cancerous mole got to do with your weight and digestive system? Medical explanation, please!

    • ANSWER:
      This must be at the late stage of melanoma. Weight loss is not an early symptom/sign of this cancer.

      Weight loss can be caused by eating fewer calories, using more calories, or both.

      Melanoma at late stage can make chemicals that change the way the body uses certain nutrients, like protein, carbohydrates, and fat. A patient may seem to be eating enough, but the body may not be able to absorb all the nutrients from the food. Tumor selectively use more glucose, so the normal metabolism of the body is no longer there.

      For many patients, the effects of cancer and cancer treatments make it hard to eat well. Anorexia and cachexia are common causes of malnutrition in cancer patients.

  28. QUESTION:
    how do I know if my dog has a tumor & what do I do about it?
    I have a dog that is six years old. He has been the best dog ever. He is half bitbull so he is strong and can deal with any pain. He has had a bump on his arm for a while now. It is the same color as his skin and has fur on it. It has been on there for a couple of months but we havnt done anything about it because he has no pain or anything. But these last couple of days he has been very tired and just not himself. Can you please help me understand what's going on? Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      It could be calcification, it could be a wart, it could be a benign tumor, or it could be a tumor that is cancerous. You need to go to a vet so that he/she can feel it to be able to guess what it is, then he/she may do some sort of test, maybe use a needle to examine the fluid or do an ultrasound,scan, or xray.

  29. QUESTION:
    My dog has formed a lump on her back almost out of the blue. what could it be?
    I doesnt seem to bother her, but she has lost the hair on it. It seems to have gotten bigger. I initially thought it looked like a blister or something, but it actually bleeds a little if irritated. Not alot, but just like a regular cut would bleed. She is an 11 month old boxer, who I hope is too young to have a tumor Any thoughts as to what it could be? I havent been able to take her to the vet yet b/c I have a two week old baby at home and my husband is working 12 hr days for the next few weeks. Any remedies to help clear it up would be helpful.

    • ANSWER:
      I would definitely take her to the vet to get it checked out, when you can. There are different possibilities when a dog develops a lump. Is the lump hard or soft? Does it move? Does it feel warm or look red in color?

      If it's soft, it could be a sterile abscess or an infection of some kind. You may need antibiotics to treat it. A soft, rounded, movable, and non-painful lump under the skin could also be a Lipoma, or a fat deposit under the skin. These are extremely common and present no real danger. Most vets will want to biopsy the lump to be sure, but if this is what your puppy has, it may not even need to be removed. There are many kinds of non-cancerous lumps, including cysts, warts, infected hair follicles, and hematomas (blood blisters). None of these are as serious as cancerous lumps, obviously, though they may cause discomfort or health concerns.

      Chances are there isn't anything you can do to diagnose this or treat it at home. The vet will give you a better idea of what you're dealing with, but try not to worry too hard. Chances are it's not cancer. Lumps and bumps are very common, and often harmless.

  30. QUESTION:
    What is wrong with my hamster? Suddenly becoming fatter, has a swollen belly)?
    I have a 2 yr old male hamster, he has lived alone in the same environment all his life and has been fed the same amount ever since. Lately I have noticed that he feels fatter like his tummy is swollen. He doesn't seem any different other than the physical. He also has some black spots on/in his skin that I can see through his fur. Could he have a tumor? Are these skin spots cancerous? Anyone with hamster expertise please advise, Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Sound like he is just old, hamsters as they get old can develop problems when the liver or kidneys begin to fail, or are not functioning properly. This can cause an abnormal accumulation of fluid in the abdomen. It is unlikely your vet will be able to do anything because of his age, most geriatric diseases in hamsters are not curable, but certainly have a word with him if you are concerned. The black spots?? You do not say where they are; are they on his hips, if this is so, then what you are seeing is his hip spots. These will become more noticeable as he ages, and the fur starts thinning.

  31. QUESTION:
    Can multiple movable small lumps in dogs breast still be benign?
    My dog is a female 11y/o Japanese spitz. I palpated 3 <1cm lumps underneath her skin which was smooth and round. Vet says it's a tumor most likely malignant coz it's in 3 different areas. I want to know if it's possible that it is still benign? My dog is normal looking still playful, asks for food when we eat. She currently had an infection though, she has yellow discharge from her genitals
    Thank you for the answers. I'm going to try out and ask other Vet's about this. Yes, I think she is also being treated for Pyometra. I understand this is a life threatening and I am hoping it would be resolved by the meds she is taking. Still hoping it is benign.

    • ANSWER:
      No vet can palpatate a tumour and tell whether or not it's benign. Only a needle biopsy can tell anything about a tumour and even that can miss cancer cells occasionally. Putting off doing at least a needle biopsy is taking a major chance with your dogs life. Many cancerous tumours can be removed successfully if caught early enough, but every day you wait the percentage of cure goes down.
      The Pyometra could be a cause or a result of the tumours but without at least a biopsy noone and no vet can assure you there are no cancer cells present in the tumours nor can they be sure there are cancer cells present.

  32. QUESTION:
    How to keep a hedgehog healthy?
    Are there any ways to make sure my hedgehog never gets cancerous tumors or liver failure or seizures or any other health problems? Other than just taking care of it the right way?

    • ANSWER:
      it is very hard to totally prevent cancer in any species. Liver failure can be helped by feeding a high quality food with the right levels of fat and proteins. Find a light variety of a high quality cat food and make sure they get plenty of exercise and this will help ward off most liver problems, especially fatty liver disease.

      Cancer is curable sometimes if it is caught early enough. Keep an eye on him or her by inspecting their body daily looking for lumps, bumps, redness or swelling on the skin or in the mouth. Oral tumours are quite common and are often the hardest to cure, even if they are caught early.

      Seizures are not common in hedgehogs and quite often, a source is not easily determined. It could be a brain tumour, poisoning, hypoglycemia, etc... Poisoning is easy to avoid if you carefully monitor what goes in their cage and what they come in contact with when they are out. If a seizure occurs, get to the vet asap.

      Other common ailments are WHS. There is no cure and no preventative action that can be successfully taken. Often, you just need to make the animal comfortable and be ready to help them along when they are ready :(

      If you are worried about health problems, discuss with your vet what form of action she would recommend for the more common problems that you mentioned. Have regular stool and blood checks done and visits for whenever you suspect something is amiss.

      Best of luck!

  33. QUESTION:
    Hello this is Joy,I wanna ask one Question. what is skin cancer?How can coffe be an antidote for skin cancer?
    what ingredients do coffe have that act as an antidote?
    excess of coffe ,how it harms?
    beside, skin cancer which dieases could be cured by coffe?

    • ANSWER:
      Skin cancer is a malignant growth on the skin which can have many causes. Skin cancer generally develops in the epidermis (the outermost layer of skin), so a tumor is usually clearly visible. This makes most skin cancers detectable in the early stages. There are three common types of skin cancer, each of which is named after the type of skin cell from which it arises. Cancers caused by UV exposure may be prevented by avoiding exposure to sunlight or other UV sources, wearing sun-protective clothes, and using a broad-spectrum sun screen.

      Skin cancers are the fastest growing type of cancer in the United States. Skin cancer represents the most commonly diagnosed malignancy, surpassing lung, breast, colorectal and prostate cancer. More than 1 million Americans will be diagnosed with skin cancer in 2007.

      Skin cancer is most closely associated with chronic inflammation of the skin. This includes:

      1. Sunburn or excessive sun damage, especially early in life. UVA & UVB have both been implicated in causing DNA damage resulting in cancer. Sun exposure between 10AM and 4PM is thought to be most harmful. Natural (sun) & artificial UV exposure (tanning salons) are associated with skin cancer.
      2. Chronic non-healing wounds, especially burns. These are called Marjolin's ulcers based on their appearance and can develop into squamous cell carcinomaand.
      3. Genetic predisposition, including "Congenital Melanocytic Nevi Syndrome". CMNS is characterized by the presence of "nevi" or moles of varying size that either appear at or within 6 months of birth. Nevi larger than 20 mm (3/4") in size are at higher risk for becoming cancerous.

      Skin can be protected by avoiding sunlight entirely, or wearing protective clothing while outdoors. Skin cancer is usually caused by exposing skin to UV rays excessively.

      Honey coffee may not be a cure to skin cancer, however coffee is a cure to baldness and also a good source of atioxidants.

  34. QUESTION:
    Prior to treatments such as chemotherapy and radiation, how were cancer patients treated?
    This got me thinking. After hearing a rather gross story from the Middle Ages that dealt with a nun treating a cancerous tumor, how were cancer patients treated prior to the advent of chemotherapy and radiation?

    And here's an additional question: why does chemotherapy cause hair loss and nausea in patients?

    • ANSWER:
      Unless a tumor could be cut out, most cancers resulted in death; although there were probably plenty of off-the -wall treatments. In the early stages of Xray therapy (think 1900s)--it was considered to be effective if the skin burned! Surgery for growths goes as far back as the Egyptians & Greeks (they used various drugs & chemicals for anesthesia).

      Many Chemo drugs work by targeting the cell cycle in rapidly dividing cells (which is simply what a tumor is--very rapidly dividing & growing cells); the hair follicle is one such rapidly normal dividing cell line (your hair grows, right?) so that's why they get "killed" off & hair falls out. So too the cells lining the GI tract are affected & you have many of the GI side effects associated with chem. That and many many drugs cause nausea in general.

  35. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever heard of a skin disorder with two words, last one being Keratosis?
    I can't remember the first word but it looks and feels like small round rough patches on the surface of my skin, worse on my legs, ankles and top of my feet. I also have problems with skin tags on the underside of my upper arms, inside thighs and a few on my back. I am only a few lbs overweight so it's not due to that. My dermatologist told me what it was a couple of years ago and I cannot remember, he's not in practice now. If someone else has this or if you're a derm, I'd love to hear from you.
    I searched and now I'm pretty sure the name of this disorder is Seborrheic Keratosis. Anyone out there know anything about it?

    • ANSWER:
      I had a quick search and found this:
      SEBORRHEIC KERATOSIS
      A seborrheic keratosis is a benign skin growth that is very common among people over 40 years of age. The growths resemble flattened or raised warts, but have no viral origins and may exhibit a variety of colors, from pink or yellow through brown and black. Because only the top layers of the epidermis are involved, seborrheic keratoses are often described as having a "pasted-on" appearance.

      Because the tumors are rarely painful, treatment is not often necessary. There is a small risk of localized infection caused by picking at the lesion. If a growth becomes excessively itchy, or if it is irritated by clothing or jewelry, cryosurgery has been found to be highly effective in their removal. The main danger associated with seborrheic keratoses lies in their resemblance to malignant melanomas, which has sometimes led to a misdiagnosis of the cancerous lesions. If there is any doubt, a skin biopsy will allow a physician to make a correct diagnosis. A mutation of a gene coding for a growth factor receptor (FGFR3), has been found in 40% of seborrheic keratosis.

      I also found SOLAR KERATOSIS
      What is a solar keratosis?

      A solar keratosis is a small, rough, bump which develops on the skin. It is caused by a lot of exposure to the sun over many years. One or more may develop. It is sometimes called an actinic keratosis.

      What does a solar keratosis look like?

      Each one can range from the size of a pinhead to 2-3 cm across. Their colour can be light, dark, pink, red, the same colour as your skin, or a combination of these. The top of each one may have a yellow-white crust. They feel rough and dry, and are slightly raised from the surface of the skin. You can often feel them more easily than see them. Some redness may develop in the surrounding skin.

      Sometimes a finger-like growth of hard skin appears to come out of a solar keratosis (a 'cutaneous horn').

      Several solar keratoses may develop at about the same time, often in the same area of skin. Sometimes several join together and form a large flat-ish rough area of skin.

      Solar keratoses usually develop on areas of skin which have been exposed to the sun a lot. For example, on the face, neck, bald patches on the scalp, and the backs of the hands. They may appear in other areas in people who do a lot of sunbathing.

      There are usually no other symptoms. Rarely, you may get an itchy or pricking sensation from affected areas of skin.

      I hope that these help

  36. QUESTION:
    I had cancerous calcifactions on my right breasts I had lumpectomy and radation, then five rys later I have it?
    on my left breasts I don't know yet if it is cancerous, I have to go for another mammogram where they use magnifer. Anyone else have the same thing happen to them?

    • ANSWER:
      We are treating one such case.
      Details follow------------------

      Lymphatic System is ‘nothing’ but scavenging system collecting blocked energy with toxins, dead cells, pus, etc., from each and every organ and putting the debris into 5 excretory channels, feces, urine, skin, lungs and menses[ladies].In cancer and tumors, be it benign or malignant----the malignant cells travel throughout streams of blood and lymph. Hence, there may be metastases in any part of the body, be it nearby or far off producing secondaries just like a bunch of potatoes appearing slowly and steadily.

      To prove this fact, we have seen many no. of surgically extracted tumors [benign to start with] reappearing @ the previous or producing metastases/secondaries after 5-10 years. It is also a fact that surgery, chemo and radiation do extend life considerably for a decade; if the patient follows strict diet restrictions. Longevity shall increase further.
      Mastectomy & Metastases developed @ a latter date possible. Live example.
      Latest recorded documentation on cure for ‘breast cancer’.
      •1. A diabetic patient aged 62 years from Hyderabad. Mastectomy of left breast in 2005 and recurrence of tumors in the left chest in 2011. Metastases/Secondaries spread to sternum and complained of breathing problems, constipation, insomnia, severe pain edema in the left chest. Chemotherapy is fraught with severe reactions & doctors refused to treat her due to advancing age & extremely weak constitution. On 01102011 Doctors @ Image Hospitals, Hyderabad predicted, in the light of prognosis, metastases, etc., that she would live for a month. Patient shifted to Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies on 17102011. Feed back Dated 01012012-sleeping well, edema and pain subsided substantially and no problem of breathing on passing very stinking stools on 15122011. Again the patient approached us for further treatment and the domiciliary treatment is commenced on 25042012 and she is getting on well.

      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse ‘Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.

      Source: ‘HEALTH IN UR HANDS’ Vol. I & II--- by Dr.Devendra Vora, D.Sc.,M.D.,F.R.C.P.,---an octogenarian & the pioneer in Acupressure in India. Available all over the globe in all Indian languages. Dr.Vora, cured and caused to cure more than 150000 cases of Cancer, HIV/AIDS, Diabetes, irregular menses and also many other most dreaded diseases.

  37. QUESTION:
    How do you get Cancer and what exactly is it?
    i'm looking for a fairly simple explanation as to how cells become cancerous?

    • ANSWER:
      Cancer happens when normal cells change so that they grow in an uncontrolled way. This uncontrolled growth causes a tumour to form.

      Nobody knows what causes this to happen. Cancer specialists don't know, so nobody here will.

      Smoking has been linked to lung and some other cancers, and excessive sun exposure to skin cancers - but other than that we're still pretty much in the dark.

      Many people, invariably those who have not had or studied cancer, have a pet theory about what causes cancer. You will probably get answers telling you it's down to diet or lack of exercise or some other unproven thing.

      That's because it's easier for people who haven't had cancer to 'blame the victim' - to put an individual's cancer down to their lifestyle - rather than accept that it is a random, and still mysterious, disease that can strike any of us at any time

  38. QUESTION:
    What is an abscessed breast tumor in a cat?

    She has seen the vet. That is how i found out exactly what it was in particular.

    • ANSWER:
      A tumor is any growth that occurs in the body. (A cancerous growth is called a neoplasm.) An abscess is the collection of pus in a cavity beneath the skin, in an organ, or in a body space. it feels like fluid under pressure. Abscesses that do not drain spontaneously need to be lanced by your vet. he will flush the cavity with a dilute antiseptic solution to keep it open and draining until it heals from below. Antibiotics are used to treat abscesses. Most skin bacteria respond well to a variety of antibiotics, but cultures and antibiotic sensitivity tests may be needed to select the best drug.

      I hope it's not cancer. I hope it all works out. best of luck.

  39. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to get a tumor on your finger for typing alot?
    Lately, I have been having pain on one of my fingers. My mom thinks I'm getting a tumor for typing a lot. But, a couple of days ago I was cutting my nails and I think a piece of skin came off and I think its hurting cause of that. I really need help I'm kinda worried..

    • ANSWER:
      A non-cancerous cyst or a blister maybe.

  40. QUESTION:
    My wife is characterless,Is there any medical procedure or test to know approximately how many men she has?
    My wife is characterless,Is there any medical procedure or test to know approximately how many men she has slept with.

    her vagina is very loose and the skin inside her vagina's lips is very loose and little bit hangs down.and her vaginal lips are wide open.meaning one can place three fingers side by side between the breadth of the lips without pushing them.

    Is there anyway to tell about a woman like how many men she has slept with by the way she walks. cos my wife walks with her legs a bit apart unlike other women and her feet are placed diagonal when she walks.

    How does women's breasts sag or hang like a still pendulam. is it only with women who breastfed or also with other women.

    what are reasons for it.

    3. Can limping be due to any type of sexual acitivity in women.

    4. what are reasons of rasoli (tumor or lump in uterus, which may be cancerous or noncancerous) or on outerside of women's uterus.
    .

    • ANSWER:
      Reason of development of tumour in uterus is not known,
      if ur wife says she had no sex with any other man
      then being a good husband u should trust it.
      Limping not related with sexual activity,
      if pelvic muscles have lost tone then vagina becomes loose.
      after the birth of baby it becomes loose,

  41. QUESTION:
    Do I have a tumor or is this something else?
    I recently noticed a small bump under my chin. It is not attached to my skin but is under it, I think its attached to my throat! It is mildy tender to the touch and is no bigger than the tip of my finger. I started smoking like 6 months ago but only every so often would I smoke one( like 1 every few days on average), and I recenty quit. But I'm scared and I don't know what this thing is. Can anyone help me out?

    • ANSWER:
      Nobody on this site can tell you if you have a swollen lymph node or if you have an agrressive cancer. I seriously doubt if it is due to your spell of smoking but good for you that you quit. We learn in school that Typically lumps that are cancerous move about and don't hurt when you feel them. I have learned not to trust typical.
      When you have a concern like this, worry helps nothing. Be proactive and have it checked by your doctor.

  42. QUESTION:
    What is the difference between cancer and a tumour?
    Sounds daft but what exactly is the difference?
    I know you get lumps and growths with both.

    • ANSWER:
      A tumor is basically an abnormal growth or swelling of something. Tumors can be benign, that is, non-cancerous. An example of this would be a lipoma, which often manifest as fatty encapsulated lumps beneath the skin of the arms, neck or back. They are unsightly, but do no harm.

      A cancer is a malignant growth, and this can be distinguished by whether or not it grows in an 'aggressive' manner, invades surrounding tissues and metastasizes to other areas of the body. cancer is literally runaway cell growth, the cellular replication machinery is unable to shut down.
      Some benign tumors can compromise health, if they grow large enough to compress or obstruct other organs, like adrenal gland tumors, pituitary tumors and uterine fibromas.

  43. QUESTION:
    Why are there two hard immovable lumps deep under the skin near my hip joint?
    I am a 17 year old male and there are two hard, immovable lumps inbetween my inner theigh and pubic area (one on each side). They are sometimes painful and have a burning sensation. They are not noticable from the surface, only by feel. Any ideas what they are and how serious, if at all, it is?

    • ANSWER:
      Could be a lipoma, fatty tumor non cancerous. If you are getting a burning sensation they could be pushing on a nerve. They are usually nothing to worry about but can cause secondary pain from pushing on other tendons and nerves in your body. I would still have it checked. It could be a nueroma, a bundle of nerves. That is like when a bunch of nerves get all twisted up together and make a small tumor, they are usually nothing to worry about, just really annoying and sometimes painful.

  44. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to get breast cancer as young as 14?
    My cousin keeps telling me about this lump she found. She said it feels hard under the skin. Could it be cancerous?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, but it is not the same type of breast cancer that affects older women or men. Breast cancer in children and teens is rare, but it can and does happen.

      In the case of your cousin, however, it is far more likely that her breasts are still developing and she has 'breast buds', but she should be examined by a doctor just to be sure:
      http://life.familyeducation.com/puberty/growth-and-development/40471.html

      And, here is information about childhood breast cancer.

      The American Pediatric Surgical Association has information concerning this:
      http://www.eapsa.org/parents/resources/breast_disorders.cfm

      "Breast Cancer in Children:
      Breast Cancer is unusual in a young girl and most lumps or masses that are seen will be benign (non-cancerous). As mentioned earlier less than 0.1% of all breast cancer occurs in children.

      Juvenile Secretory Carcinoma is a rare form of breast cancer in children. These are usually small, poorly defined masses that merge with the surrounding breast tissue. They are usually slow growing and less aggressive than adult cancers. Local excision with close follow-up is usually sufficient to remove the tumor.

      Cystosarcoma Phylloides is a rare tumor of the breast that can occur in children. It is a rapidly growing tumor which stretches the breast and the overlying skin. About 25 percent of these tumors are cancerous so primary treatment is to resect the tumor mass.

      There are other types of cancer that may spread to the breast tissue. This includes lymphoma, a disease of the lymphatic system since there is a significant number of lymph nodes within the breast and the area of the axilla (armpit).

      Other tumors of childhood may occasionally spread to the breast area and are treated according to the primary mass. All girls should be taught breast self-examination once their breasts are developing and they are going through their menstrual cycles. This should be the beginning of a life long habit."

      And, report of a 12 year old girl with Inflammatory Breast Cancer
      http://www.ibcresearch.org/research/ibcwhatweknow_1814_1979.htm#1972_12yrold

  45. QUESTION:
    How to remove a cyst at home?
    I have had a "cyst" like this on my shoulder before. I went to a plastic surgeon to get it removed. It was not cancerous, and he called it a cyst or fatty tumor. Now I have one on my ass and would rather get rid of it at my house to save me the embarrassment. I would say it's a little bigger that a marble, right under the skin, is hard, and causes no pain. How can i get rid of this

    • ANSWER:
      scissors

  46. QUESTION:
    Should I be concerned about this bump type thing on my neck?
    on the right side of my neck is a bump. its the same colour as my skin and it doesn't feel as though its on my skin, but rather under it.
    It doesn't hurt and isn't irritating in any way. But I only noticed it a few days ago and I don't know if I should be concerned about it or not. What could it be?

    • ANSWER:
      Any lump*/lymph node enlargement*, in any part of the body on the skin, is a sign of blocked energy + toxins in the lymphatic system. It may be a cyst, tumor [benign/malignant]. If possible identify it properly or U may use both medicines alternatively mentioned hereunder, for the best possible cure in 45 days.
      Prudent to be aware of
      Any Cancer, lupus, HIV/AIDS, Kaposi’s Sarcoma, etc., —Common Symptoms:
      Sudden loss of weight/stamina, anemia, unbearable pains in any organ despite medication, neuralgia, FATIGUE-getting extremely tired for a little or no work, loss of appetite, unhealed wound in any part of the body for years together, chronic constipation, chronic hemorrhages, etc. Cancer may affect from any organ to any organ[s]/system[s].

      1. Cyst*— Cyst. A cyst is a sac that may be filled with air, fluid or other material. A cyst can form in any part of the body, including bones, organs and soft tissues. Most cysts are non-cancerous (benign). Some common examples of cysts include sebaceous cysts, small bumps that form just beneath the skin, and ovarian cysts. It's important to note, however, that nearly all cancers are capable of producing cysts. (A sac containing liquid secretion or pus).
      •2. Tumor*— Tumor. A tumor is an abnormal mass of tissue. Like a cyst, a tumor can form in any part of the body. A tumor can be benign or cancerous (malignant).
      To determine whether a cyst or tumor is benign or malignant, a sample of the affected tissue — or, in some cases, the entire suspicious area — is removed and studied under a microscope. This is known as a biopsy. A swelling on any of the cutaneous, mucous or serous surface of any part of the body of independent growth.
      •1. Cure for Cyst-----------—Mixture of CF 3.x, CP 3x or 12x, CS 3x, NM 3x and S 12x.

      2.Cure for Tumor----—Mature of CF 12x, CP 3x or 12x, CS 3x, KM 3x, KP 3x, KS 3x, NM 3x, NP 3x and S 12x. For small children's bloody tumour-CF 3x is useful

      •Dosage*: 2 grains t.d.s.
      •All these biochemic salts/homeo medicines available @ local Homoeo shops, are safe and with side benefits. Don’t swallow medicine. The medicine to be dissolved on/under the tongue. Don’t take any thing 10 minutes before and 10 minutes after medication. You can take water.

      U may try both medicines alternatively. If not curable in 45 days, then
      anyways, prudent* to see a general surgeon/local homeopath/dermatologist for physical examination, relevant investigations, accurate diagnosis and permanent cure by medication and or surgical interference.
      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse 'Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.
      Source: ‘HEALTH IN UR HANDS’ [Vol.I & II] available in all Indian Languages all over the globe] by Dr.Devendra Vora, DSc.,MD.,FRCP.,---an octogenarian & the pioneer in Acupressure in India.

  47. QUESTION:
    Why is there never any muscular cancer?
    I always hear about cancer of the organs but never anything muscular. And yes, I know that skin is an organ.
    Okay, judging from the first responses to my question... I KNOW that skin and muscles are different and I am curious, if muscles aren't made of cells then what are they made of?

    • ANSWER:
      Your question is an excellent one, and there is a scientific explanation. First, muscle cancers do occur, but they are rare. The reason muscle cells rarely become cancerous is that they are "post-mitotic cells.

      Post-mitotic means the cells no longer replicate themselves via mitosis. The process of carcinogenesis occurs in cells that are replicating. The process of carcinogenesis begins with a mutation in a cell that is passed on to the daughter cell when the initial cell replicates - this process is called "Initiation".

      As more and more of these mutated daughter cells replicate, the potential for more mutations occurs (again mutation occurs during the process of cell replication called mitosis). This process of ongoing development of additional mutations is called "Promotion". At this stage of carcinogenesis a "tumor" has formed, but it is not yet cancerous.

      The final stage of carcinogenesis is called "Progression". This last stage occurs when tumor cells acquire additional mutations (again, mutations require cell replication) that allow the tumor cells to spread (metastasize) - thus, becoming "cancer".

      I hope this wasn't too complicated to help you understand this important concept about cancer. In summary, cells must be replicating to develop mutations that can eventually lead to cancer. Muscle cells are post-mitotic cells - they have lost the ability to replicate themselves (mitosis). Thus, it is very difficult for them to become a cancer cell.

      Best wishes and good luck.

  48. QUESTION:
    How can I get my parents to take my oral medical worry seriously?
    Okay, to start off I've been quite a hypochondriac in the past, so my parents think that everything I think is wrong with me isn't true. They usually won't take me to the doctor now unless I have a fever or something of the sort. Now, I'll get to what I think is a problem:

    A few months ago, while trying to get a tonsil stone out, I realized there was a part of my left tonsil that was a different consistency than the rest of the tonsil. It's a lot harder, although still somewhat squishy. There was also a dark red spot next to it, it looked almost like a line made with a pen. I brought the lump up to my parents and they said it was nothing, don't worry about it, etc. Eight months later, it, and the red spot next to it are still there. There's also a lump underneath my tongue, on the floor of my mouth on the left side. It's a different consistency from the rest of the floor of my mouth and I can see/feel it when I pull my tongue back.

    I'm 17, male, and neither I, nor my family, smokes. I never have. I don't drink commonly either (been drunk one time, that's about it). I do have a family history of cancers, on both sides. My father has had skin cancer, paternal grandfather has had a cancerous tumor in a limb, and my maternal grandfather has had colon cancer.

    My parents just get angry when I tell them about this stuff though. What can I do to make them take me seriously? Even if it's not cancer, it is still better to know now, earlier on, than if it is to let it progress and possibly kill me or destroy my face later on...
    @Emily - Actually, to go to a doctor, where I live, you do need a parent with you if you're under 18, and even then after that you still need their insurance information in order to be able to GO to the doctor.

    • ANSWER:
      The problem with being a teenage hypochondriac is that you are constantly crying wolf over one perceived health issue after another. Your parents take off work, take you to the doctor, you miss school, you have tests done and there's nothing wrong. After awhile, your parents are going to realize that you're a hypochondriac and not believe you anymore. If you had oral cancer, it would have become worse in the last eight months, but apparently it has not. Just ask your dentist to check out your mouth the next time you have a dental appointment.

  49. QUESTION:
    My cat has odd shaped lumps on her belly?
    It seems like they are in her teats, or under the skin and one of her nipples is large and purple. She was spayed 3 years ago after having two litters, so I know she is not pregnant. The lumps are hard and odd shaped.
    The largest one is about 3 inches, and it feels sort of like cartilage or something.

    • ANSWER:
      could be tumors. your cat seems young to have those, but take to vet. they could be cancerous..good luck.


cancerous skin tumors