Actinic Keratosis Images

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What is this condition?
    My sister has this, and she is very concious about it
    The picture shows it but its not her, its of google images but it looks like that.
    its on her arms the top part.
    Does anyone know how to get rid of it or tone it down. its really bad.
    http://atlasdermatologico.com.br/ListaImagens/keratosis_pilaris4.JPG

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      It looks like prickly heat,or actinic keratoses,such lesions develop due to extreme or prolong exposure to ultraviolet rays. treatments available are topical fluorouracil(Effudex)liquid nitrogen cryosurgery and curettage.

  2. QUESTION:
    What is this skin condition?
    I have spent a lot of time in the sun this summer, HOWEVER, I have used sunscreen regularly, hardly burned at all. I have also spent a lot of time in pools. The skin is not raised or sunken, it does not itch or burn, it just looks weird and nothing else. In the pictures there is a bit of dried skin, that is why the skin has the appearance of being slightly scratched off. It is not though, the skin is completely normal in all regards except its look. Also, the exceptionally white patch on my neck near the adam's apple is a birth mark, not caused by said disease. Please look at these photos!

    http://postimage.org/image/l1nrhju49/
    http://postimage.org/image/o9s8ulge1/
    http://postimage.org/image/5iqbkfltl/
    http://postimage.org/image/a76bfmb09/
    Maybe I wasn't clear enough. This summer and spring I have not peeled. I have not experienced any pain whatsoever from sunburn. Only slight reddening after being outside. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      It looks to me like some of those times you "hardly burned at all" cost you a layer of already-tanned skin, leaving the new, untanned skin exposed. This is a pretty typical pattern for peeling after sunburn. If you're outdoors much, it'll even up--but as pale as you are, you need to take care not to get burned *at all.*

      Skin cancer's ugly stuff, of course, but even actinic keratosis is a major PIA common in pale people who burned a little, when they're older. Don't let that be you.

  3. QUESTION:
    Skin cancer question????
    Is all skin cancer a dark shade? I have a new spot on my leg. It's just alittle darker than my natural color (but not much.)It's not raised or anything. I have an appointment in June. But if anyone has any skin cancer experience and can help me relax a bit I would greatly appreciate it...

    • ANSWER:
      I'd guess you have developed a small solar keratosis. These are skin spots that develop due to sun exposure and as you age. If that is what it is, if you are under age 30 and not a tanner, then this is probably nothing to be worried about. If you are older then this type spot can develop into a precancerous skin lesion called an actinic keratosis. If the spot is cosmetically bothering you then laser treatment will remove the it or you can have it frozen off. Don't bother looking up images of solar keratosis because the examples on the web are not superficial examples but are examples to be found on older people with extensive UVA exposure and are not typical for the type skin spot that you have described.
      good luck at your appointment

  4. QUESTION:
    skin condition sounds like keritinosites?

    • ANSWER:
      I can think of 2 possibilities.
      1) Keratolysis. This is the separation or loosening of the horny layer of the epidermis or a disease characterized by a shedding of the epidermis recurring at more or less regular intervals. This link is to a picture of pitted keratolysis http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/imagepages/2460.htm
      2) Keratosis. This is a lesion on the epidermis marked by the presence of circumscribed overgrowths of the horny layer. Different forms include seborrheic, actinic and pilaris. This will take you to a like to view images of the various types.
      http://vsearch.nlm.nih.gov/vivisimo/cgi-bin/query-meta?v%3Aproject=medlineplus&query=Keratosis&x=61&y=5

  5. QUESTION:
    Rough skin on my hands, please help!?
    Well I've had this for about like 3 months now, its like dark spots on my hands and on those spots my skin is very rough and ashey, I don't know what this is, I've tried various kinds of lotions but it never works. And it hurts in a burning way when I put some lotion on, and its really annoying and gross, I want it gone, but I don't know what to do, I have like 2 big spots on each hand, and its very annoying, I don't know what this is, and I just want to get rid of it:( any help? Please!! And it sometimes hurts when I thouch it:(

    • ANSWER:
      You may want to have a dermatologist look at it. Many times we get sun damage to the skin and the lesions show up as patchy, scaly, and nonhealing. These are called actinic keratosis. It is important to have those treated as they can be precancerous. I can't see them obviously, but they could also be eczema patches or another skin condition, only a doctor can tell you for sure. You may want to Google actinic keratosis and look at images to see if they look similar...then you will know.


actinic keratosis images

Skin Cancer Pictures

In days past, tanned skin was a faux-paux; while those with porcelain white skin were admired. Nowadays, this couldn't be farther from the truth. People with sun-kissed skin are admired and complimented; while, porcelain white skin is seen as taboo.

People are drawn to Arizona for the 300 days of clear, blue skies and brightly, shining sun. What people do not realize is that skin cancer in Arizona is, and has been, a growing concern.

According to the Arizona Department of Health Services, Arizona is ranked #2 in the world, just behind the gold coast of Australia, for skin cancer.

Unfortunately, this year alone, one million people will be diagnosed with skin cancer in the United States, alone!

Living in Arizona it is important to be aware of the two types of sun rays that penetrate through the earth atmosphere: UVA and UVB.

The UVA rays are mainly aging rays that cause damage to DNA and collagen cells; while, harming the dermis. The UVB rays are mainly burning rays that stay in the epidermis, or superficial layers. UVB rays cause your melanocytes to produce melanin (tanning capabilities) and can cause a burn, which can lead to the beginning stages of skin cancer.

In our sunny desert climate, the most important hours of the day to use sunscreen is between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. Even on a rare, cloudy day the sun ultraviolet rays penetrate through the clouds, causing your skin to burn.

Those who burn easily are at a greater risk of developing skin cancer. Certain characteristics can make you more susceptible such as: blue eyes, red or blond hair, or if you are prone to freckles and/or have light skin.

There is one easy way to protect yourself and prevent damage to your skin: using an FDA approved sunscreen that blocks both UVA and UVB rays like the Anthelios line from La Roche-Posay.

The Anthelios sunscreen holds the patent technology of three sun filters: Octocrylene, Parsol 1789, and Mexoryl SX. The Anthelios sunscreen gives you complete broad-spectrum protection.

Don't become a statistic because you forgot to use your sunscreen. To learn more about skin cancer please visit us online at http://www.nvpsaz.com/skin/skin-cancer.

Kendal Tate
Steven Gitt, MD, FACS
North Valley Plastic Surgery; Phoenix, Arizona.
www.nvpsaz.com

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    I have a mole that looks like the skin cancer pictures on the web, plus it's got a red area around it and it's?
    I have a mole that looks like the skin cancer pictures on the web, plus it's got a red area around it and it's sore to the touch. Does it sound like skin cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      Asking such as question here will not help. Go see your doctor, a dermatologist is you can get an appointment soon. They will look at it, likely remove the mole. The sample will then be sent for a pathology report.

      Only then will you know what it is and if it is cancer (Melanoma) and how to treat it.

      See a doctor

  2. QUESTION:
    How does skin cancer look on the arm?
    About two weeks ago I woke up and I saw a little red dot like when a mosquito bites you. Since then it started growing only in diameter, it's not a bum it's rather flat and red, it's not hard it feels like normal skin just a bit bumpi. I worried that It might be skin cancer, could it. I'm going to the doctor in a week, but Im always thinking about it. I've looked at pictures of skin cancer and it doesn't look like any of the types of moles. Please help.

    • ANSWER:
      Skin cancer, to my knowlage is usually in the form of a mole, so i think you're okay but definitly get it checked, ASAP

  3. QUESTION:
    Without going to a dermatologist, any ways to tell an age spot from skin cancer?
    A little bit darker area on my cheek that is raised ever-so-slightly has just appeared. I do have an appointment with my dermatologist scheduled, but in the meantime, is there any way for me to tell if it's just an age spot or skin cancer? It's somewhat circular, but not quite.

    • ANSWER:
      Skin cancer is not like an age spot.
      From what Ive seen on people who have skin cancer,
      there is a dark brown spot with a raised bumpy appearance.
      Here are some photos to give you an idea ............ http://www.medicinenet.com/skin_cancer_pictures_slideshow/article.htm

  4. QUESTION:
    What are some other causes for skin growths, besides Skin cancer?
    what are some causes for skin growths( like funny moles) besides skin cancer.. I have some suspicious growths.. it doesnt look like any of the pictures or symptoms that i have researched for skin cancer. what else could they be.. I have a doctors opp. in a week,, i just want some opinions.

    • ANSWER:
      Where are the growths?
      It could be bacterial skin infection.
      Could be a boil.
      A ingrown hair?
      HErpes?
      WArts?
      Keloids?
      Dermiaitis?
      Scabies?
      Lymes Disease?
      morgellons disease?
      Hidradenitis Suppurativa???
      I mean u arent telling much!

  5. QUESTION:
    What are these weird bumps on my shoulder?
    Ive seen pictures of skin cancer, and this doesnt realy look like thats what it is. I thought it looked like acne, but now it doesnt look like acne any more. Does anyone know what it is?

    • ANSWER:

  6. QUESTION:
    What should I do about a patch of dry skin?
    I have a small (size of a pea), pink (I'm white), scaly patch of dry skin on my chest. I know it is not skin cancer or anything because I get these on my chest and legs every winter and they go away after a while. Problem is I'm getting my picture taken soon. How do I get rid of it quickly?

    • ANSWER:

  7. QUESTION:
    If a mole is skin cancer, will it get bigger?
    I've got like a small flesh colored mole on my shoulder, and there's a brown spot on top of the mole. The mole is perfectly round, but the little spot isn't and it's different shades of brown, which worries me. I just recently noticed it like yesterday. I think i've been thinking it was a scab since I have a bad habit of picking at things on my skin.

    If its skin cancer, will the brown part get bigger? Right now it's like the size of a dot made by a thick pen.

    • ANSWER:
      I certainly would go to a physician or nurse and have them assess that mole, for certain, Growth of the mole might not be outward- it might grown INTO your skin, where you cannot see it.

      Here is an excerpt from the National Cancer Institute's website. I will leave the url link below.

      Dysplastic Nevi

      About one out of every ten people has at least one unusual (or atypical) mole that looks different from an ordinary mole. The medical term for these unusual moles is dysplastic nevi. The "Pictures of Ordinary Moles and Dysplastic Nevi" section shows the differences between ordinary moles and dysplastic nevi.

      Doctors believe that dysplastic nevi are more likely than ordinary moles to develop into a type of skin cancer called melanoma. Because of this, moles should be checked regularly by a doctor or nurse specialist, especially if they look unusual; grow larger; or change in color, outline, or in any other way.

      Please make that visit to a health provider soon, and best of luck!

  8. QUESTION:
    How long does it take for a skin tumor to metastisize?
    I discovered three days ago what looks like a skin blemish about the size of a pinkie fingerprint on my upper middle of my back. When I last checked my back two weeks ago it was not there. It is slightly darker than the surrounding skin and not raised. If it is skin cancer, have I caught it in time, and if it is the melignant type, how long does it take to metastisize?

    • ANSWER:
      Try looking here for some info

      http://www.melanoma.org/learn-more/melanoma-101/melanoma-pictures?gclid=CL_t3o-amK4CFY9W7Aod6UGCMQ

  9. QUESTION:
    How to convince my grandpa to get the surgery?
    My grandfather has bad skin cancer and the doctor says that if he doesn't get his nose removed the cancer will spread throughout the body and he'll die. He is 71 and refuses to get the surgery done. I think I know the reason. He spend all day out with his friends and is rarely at home so not having a nose might make him think that he will be trapped at home or he might be embarrassed to go in public. I showed him a picture of a friend of mine who has a prosthetic nose and looks perfectly normal (can't tell the nose is fake at all) but he still refuses.

    What more can I do? I'm not ready to lose my grandpa anytime soon. He's practically a father to me but he won't listen to anyone.

    • ANSWER:
      This is not up to you.

      Your Grandfather is an adult an presumably still competent so he is entitled to make his own medical decisions.

      His Dr has explained the relevant risks and benefits of surgery/non-surgery and he has made his decision.

  10. QUESTION:
    Is it normal to look bad in pictureme studio Walmart photos?
    I got some pictures taken there and I look DREAFUL, I looked like I had skin cancer. It was terrible, are pictures taken there known to be bad?

    • ANSWER:
      Places like this aren't interested in the craft of photography. Their sole existence is predicated upon producing something cheap they can turn around for a profit. They don't consider managing lighting situations for different subjects, nor do they care enough to do any post processing. It's all about churning out as many shots in a day as they can, not about producing quality for it's customers.

      IMHO those hole it the wall photo 'studios' are a big waste of money and time.

  11. QUESTION:
    Do men actually swim in one piece swimsuits while doing competitive swimming?
    Can someone show some proof of this, pictures or text articles. I think it's a great idea because it protects men who have or are prone to skin cancer plus it improves exercise performance.
    What I really mean is a girl's/ladies' swimsuit. Do men even wear them ever for practice.
    Can someone show some proof of this, pictures or text articles. I think it's a great idea because it protects men who have or are prone to skin cancer plus it improves exercise performance.
    Plus have any of you men done it.
    Sorry, didn't mean to repeat the first part of addittional details.

    • ANSWER:
      yes some do, but they typically only wear them for big competitions, not everyday as a practice suit. the suit that the US men wore at the olympics were tested by NASA (see video below).

      i don't believe skin cancer prevention or exercise performance are big concerns with these kinds of suits, just speed speed speed.

  12. QUESTION:
    How to rid my self of my bad stress reliever?
    Well when I'm stressed I tend to eat glass which cuts up my mouth and throat. And last nite I ate an entire picture frame (small glass one) I was so stessed because my girl might have skin cancer! I can't help it but I'm so worried and scared so I eat glass

    • ANSWER:
      Skin cancer is treatable.
      This is very strange behaviour.

      The irony is some of us don't stress at all, we promise the moon and squander the earth.

  13. QUESTION:
    Do you know anything about skin cancer?
    I have my own tanning bed at my house. I use to tan way too much sometimes twice a day. But here latly, I have only been tanning about everyother day. My question is that two days ago, I got out of the tanning bed, I noticed a little red bump appearing, I blew it off like it was a pimple or something but it is more like a blister now. My aunt has skin cancer from tanning she said that the doctor told her your body can only hold so much color, then it does like an overflowing cup, and that is when you start to get skin cancer. Does anyone know anything about skin cancers? I tried to google it but there are so meny kinds and all the pictures looked different.

    • ANSWER:
      I didn't think you could get skin cancer from tanning beds, I thought it was only from direct sunlight.
      But I don't tan so I'm definetly not an expert.

      Here's a couple of informative artcles I was able to find on the net regarding skin cancer.
      I do know that out of all the cancers, skin cancer is the easiset one to treat and survive from.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skin_cancer

      http://www.skincancer.org/

      http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/types/skin

  14. QUESTION:
    What are some good attention getters for my speech?
    I am giving a process speech on "skin care"- how to a take care of your face. I can not think of any great attention getters besides the typical skin cancer/aging statistics. Does anyone have any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      Visuals are always highly helpful. Find a dramatic picture of someone with skin cancer, perhaps. Or if you don't want to go that route, ask a few questions to engage attention. "How many of you wash your face daily?" "How many of you sunbathe?" "Who here knows someone with skin cancer?" Etc, etc. People like to show off, and generally if they know an answer to something--even if they wash their face twice daily--they'll be happy to raise their hands. And you should have their attention from then on, so long as you keep your voice full of inflections and speak loudly and clearly. Also be sure to start speaking within thirty seconds of reaching the podium or front of the room. It's very difficult to gain interest after that point. Good luck!

  15. QUESTION:
    How can I get my boyfriend to wear sun cream?
    He is 22 and seriously burnt and blistered when he was about 15. He has a history of skin cancer in his family (dad and half sister - from his dad's side). Yet still refuses to wear sun cream. He says it is greasy on his skin so he doesn't like it. I have started to say if he won't wear factor 15 I will wipe factor 50 down one side of his face but this isn't working anymore. Any suggestions, or a non-greasy sun cream or anyother threats? Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Honestly, if my girlfriend burnt that easily and she wasn't wearing sunscreen, I would show her pictures of burnt skin due to too much sun, and traumatise her into wearing it. If that didn't work then there would be not much else I can do, except refuse to go anywhere with her that involves being in the sun. Sometimes you have to be drastic.

      There are plenty of sunscreen products that aren't that greasy, I know I use Neutrogena myself.

  16. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of eczema white spots?
    I have engagement pictures coming up soon and I have little white spots on my arms from where eczema was during winter. I have plenty of ointment to keep my eczema under control, but now I have all these spots that stand out. My fiance works in the medical field and doesn't want me to tan because of skin cancer fears, and I respect him for that.

    If anyone knows how to get rid of these spots, I would greatly appreciate some advice :)

    • ANSWER:

  17. QUESTION:
    There is a mysterious rash travelling to different places on my body?
    Its not itchy, its looks like a big group of freckles. Im not sexually active and havent been sick recently or had any symptomns that rashes require.
    Its was on my upper back last week then my stomach and now above my butt.
    Its really worrying me cause im not sure if it could be like skin cancer or somthing. I Dunno.
    Please help me out
    Im not even sure if its that serious though.

    • ANSWER:
      From your description of traveling freckles, I"m not sure you're going to get any valid answers without submitting a couple of clear pictures of the problem. Otherwise, go to your local dermatologist for the answer to your problem.

  18. QUESTION:
    How can you tell the difference between eczema and basal cell skin cancer?
    i looked at pictures and it looks identical to the eczema I have. But i've had that my whole life...

    • ANSWER:
      Most intimately and certainly.

      Eczema is known medically as "the itch that rashes" -- the reason is that it itches before the rash comes.

      Basal cell -- shiny, raised, not itchy , nothing like eczema. Had a pimple that wouldn't pop -- turned out to be basal cell.

      Where you fit, I cannot tell. But there is a big difference.

      GOOD LUCK!

  19. QUESTION:
    I have brown spots that have become dry and flakey?
    I have brown spots on my arms and legs and they have started to become dry and flakey.It was just one or two spots, now it is quite a few. I have looked up skin cancer I don't think that is what it is. I would love to know if anyone has a clue what this could be.

    • ANSWER:
      search dry brown and flaky skin then go to Flaky Skin: Itchy, Red, Dry Flaky Skin? i hope this helps good luck
      No wait go to the link below it
      it has a picture of it too the link is called Dry skin

      tell me if this helps

  20. QUESTION:
    How fast can skin cancer spread?
    Oh, and why are some cells affected by skin cancer, more than others?
    (Basal, squamous, etc...)
    Specifically squamous, and melanoma.
    Would anyone know how fast these cancers can spread?

    • ANSWER:
      If it is Basal cell it doesn't usually spread, if it does it does so slowly, it is the least serious of skin cancers. Then the squamous is the next most serious.
      You can find a lot of info by typing in the type you are concerned with such as basal cell carcinoma do it on the Yahoo search and you will even see pictures of the different types.

  21. QUESTION:
    What are these dark areas on my neck?
    My neck has these really dark, rough patches, on both sides. There is also some dark rough spots on the left side of my chest, and a faint patch in the middle. Lotion does not seem to help, and I have this cream that I can rub on it, for about an hour, and it becomes less rough and dark, but it just comes back again. Is this some sort of skin cancer? I can not go to a doctor, because I am short on money. If you want pictures, just leave ur email, and I will send some. Thanks for the help.

    • ANSWER:
      do you tan? over exposure to UV rays may cause dark patches on skin (other then the intended tan) i'd cut back on sun exposure. use the creams regularly if they help. and i'd remove any recent changes to lifestyle such as new pet, new vitamins, new laundry detergent, etc and consult a doctor if you can manage it.
      good luck

  22. QUESTION:
    Is it true that skin cancer is primarily caused by burning?
    I tan a lot during summer, (I'm light-olive skinned) and I never burn. I use tanning lotion in order to prevent peeling and sunburn. Anyway, I want to know if it's safe to tan if I never burn. Thanks in advance!

    • ANSWER:
      No. Skin Cancer is caused by sunlight and can occur even when it does not burn, because the ultraviolet rays can usually cause malignant moles.

      I would say it's safe to tan, but if you ever notice any suspicious moles in your body, I would suggest that you talked to a doctor.

      If you would like to know more about the warning signs of skin cancer, check here:
      http://www.emedicinehealth.com/slideshow_skin_cancer_pictures/article_em.htm

  23. QUESTION:
    If I picked a nose zit a long time ago and has not healed, can it be skin cancer?
    am gonna see a dermotologist soon, but curious and nervous!! i had it looked at a while back and the nurse did the abcd's of skin cancer and said it didnt look like that..it is a small, round red bump on my nose with some broken blood vessels underneath it. i picked the zit about 4-5 years ago and it HURT LIKE HECK!! my friend told me to use tooth paste on it and she saw a change, i also see a little less pink underneath. havent had sun burns there in a long time too...is it possible to be cancer or is the nose that dang sensitive?
    it never bled or pussed or changed since the day i popped it. smaller than a pencil eraser ...
    thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      If it is any type of cancer I would say it could be a rodent ulcer which is the least serious type. It very rarely spreads beyond the place it first appears and if left untreated gradually destroys the area it is on. Removal usually sorts it out 100%.
      I have given you a link to some pictures so you can have a look and see what you think.
      http://search.mywebsearch.com/mywebsearch/AJimage.jhtml?pg=AJmain&action=click&searchfor=rodent+ulcer&tpr=null&st=bar&ptnrS=ZUYYYYYYKHGB&ct=CI

  24. QUESTION:
    Is a patch of white blotches on the skin something to worry about?
    My husband has a portion on his shoulder blade where he has white blotches. I have noticed it before but I can't remember if it has always been there and since he can't really see his back he doesnt know either. He says it doesn't bother him at all no itching, hurting, anything. It looks kind of like scars from acne like little circles like that but they are like white....or like some peoples skin looks after they burn and start peeling but he doesnt have sun burn. I thought about skin cancer but all the pictures I looked at did not at all look like this. It isn't raised off of the skin it is smooth. And Melanoma and skin cancers they say start out looking like a wart or mole which this is definitely not. Maybe a birth mark? Would birth marks be white instead of brown. He has a dark complexion (he is German) so these marks I guess are more like flesh colored (the color of my complexion compared to him). Has anybody ever seen or had something like this?? What was it?

    • ANSWER:
      i had this weird random rash once didn't itch or hurt me only lasted a few days but left some white patches, one on my shoulder, but its gone now that was maybe just under a year ago? doesnt sound serious just some kind of pigment loss. dont worry

  25. QUESTION:
    Please help me find pictures to compare some blisters that appeared in the genital area.?
    I suddenely developed these odd blisters right outside the opening of the ganital area, and as soon as I discovered them, I went to the hospital. They said they suspect herpes, but need to wait for test results. I have not been with anyone but my husband since we were both tested (2 years ago), and I know it's not from him because he is in the army and was just tested last month due to activation and getting sent overseas. I searched for pictures of herpes, though, and none of them look like what I have. I could really use some advice, maybe you know of a good site with pictures for identifying things like this. I've looked everywhere and checked things other than herpes, but nothing has even come close other than a couple pictures of the skin cancer melanoma, but these blisters developed only yesterday. Some are all white, some are multicolored white and grayish-black. Please help, I am very freaked out.

    • ANSWER:
      http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/md/genitalwartpictures.html
      they should have something that looks like you have.

      and if that one doesn't have it, check out a few more I found...

      http://fm.mednet.ucla.edu/derm2/atlas/index.cfm
      this one has a "lesion characteristics" search engine

      http://www.meddean.luc.edu/lumen/meded/medicine/dermatology/melton/atlas.htm
      a little more advanced...

      http://www.dermatlas.com/derm
      8822 images!

      good luck!

  26. QUESTION:
    I have had a raised pink pimple on my leg for over a year now it is pink with a white scab sometimes itchy?
    It as like 4 heads on & only itches when in the heat or a hot bath. I am scared it could be skin cancer. I went to the doctor yesterday who is referring me to a skin specialist. So now I have to wait for the appointment! I am worried as the doctor didn't say what it was all he aid was it's definitley not excema! Any answers appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      Because you didn't include a picture of the lesion with your question, you'll have to realize that I'm only guessing at what you have. But, from your description, I'd say that you probably have a "dermatofibroma" which is nothing more than a permanent scar from an ingrown hair in the past. If i'm right, that lesion will stay forever, unless it is surgically removed, but it's nothing to worry about, either, other than the cosmetic worry. Please keep your dermatology appointment.

  27. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know anyting about skin cancer?
    Where I can see pics on skin cancer? I have a strange spot on my leg that has been there for awhile, and it doesn't hurt, but it is brown in color. It only hurts if I scratch it or press on it.
    I first thought it was a pimple, so I tried to pop it awhile back and it bled a little, so I thought it would go away, but didn't.

    • ANSWER:
      If it is just a little bit scaly or the skin is thin in this area it could very well be skin cancer.......but the good news is it may at this point only have penetrated the skin......I had it and it was treated....a small spot on my back.....as soon as I felt it and it didn't go away for a week or so I went to the doctor. (mine was a brown color too by the way)......
      On something like this you need to act quickly and go to the doctor immediately.......you don't want it to go into your system...the longer you wait the more chances you are taking.
      Better to be safe than sorry.............look up in google and as for pictures of skin conditions or skin cancer for pictures. should be there.

  28. QUESTION:
    How can I get my hair to stop flipping up at the sides?
    I have medium/short blonde hair (it goes to the bottom of my ears and the bangs are in my eyes just a little). I really like how my hair looks right when I get out of the shower and I towel dry it. It has different colors because the wet makes it darker underneath and it is nice and straight. But, if I actually thoroughly wash it with shampoo, it will poof up and my sides flip up really badly...here is a pic of what the flips sort of look like:

    http://www.google.com/imgres?q=guy+blonde+hair+natural&um=1&hl=en&safe=off&rlz=1C1TSND_enUS411US411&biw=1366&bih=667&tbm=isch&tbnid=AtZOYLd9aOKSKM:&imgrefurl=http://www.cancer-research-awareness.com/skin-cancer.html&docid=u4I_r2J-s61U_M&imgurl=http://www.cancer-research-awareness.com/images/j0443874.jpg&w=215&h=320&ei=ICyNT_WIDOSkiQKGt5ixCA&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=297&vpy=285&dur=3141&hovh=256&hovw=172&tx=117&ty=128&sig=117161806710847893419&page=1&tbnh=144&tbnw=101&start=0&ndsp=24&ved=1t:429,r:9,s:0,i:86

    His right side (viewers left) has that little flip, but my hair is much thicker and a bit longer and the flips are usually worse than that.
    If I only barely wash my hair, just enough to get most of the oil out, it actually looks more like this:

    http://www.google.com/imgres?q=guy+with+flippy+blonde+hair&um=1&hl=en&safe=off&rlz=1C1TSND_enUS411US411&biw=1366&bih=667&tbm=isch&tbnid=wcRyvUZcogtWLM:&imgrefurl=http://quizilla.teennick.com/user/xoxtwobitbabyxo143ily/journal/%3Flimitstart%3D40&docid=_0cchoVG5ZyCGM&imgurl=http://quizilla.teennick.com/user_images/X/XO/XOX/XOXTWOBITBABYXO143ILY/1218761855_5670_full.jpeg&w=359&h=400&ei=HSuNT5-CFqKPiAKslunBCA&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=180&vpy=133&dur=3106&hovh=237&hovw=213&tx=113&ty=179&sig=117161806710847893419&page=1&tbnh=144&tbnw=132&start=0&ndsp=21&ved=1t:429,r:0,s:0,i:67

    Of course, the guy in the picture has his hair straightened which I don't like to do and it doesn't really do anything about the flipping unless I really hold the iron on it. I don't even own an iron...I use my mom's (I'm a senior in high school).

    I get my hair cut at a great clips. I don't have an issue with what they do. They have tried all sorts of different things (nothing to try to fix the flips except cut them off) on my hair because I just wanted to see what it was like. Last time I went, they thinned it. I thought that is supposed to make the flipping worse but it didn't do anything at all.

    What can I do to make my hair look more like the guys in the second picture (whose hair color is very similar to mine but mine is a little lighter). I really don't like the flip...how can I get it to lay flat...and suggestions are welcome.

    I would prefer to not use any sort of special shampoos or irons or gels if I can help it but I am willing to at least try stuff to see if it works.

    Oh, and my hair is well above average thickness, very clean usually, very oily, and very all around healthy. The ladies at the great clips love my hair (according to them). I only started going to great clips about a year ago and never knew my hair was any different that average....but anyway...

    Thanks ahead of time for your help. Five stars to a good, best answer!!! :)

    • ANSWER:
      have you ever thought some guys may be wanting to get this kind of hair..& You get it without trying!
      It looks quite good though i don't know why you don't want the flips..
      You can go to the salon and get your hair permanently straightened? that'll cost some money but it'll probably last till you cut the straightened hair off.
      You could buy your own hair straightener? That seems so metro though,
      You could cut your hair shorter like this:
      http://media29.onsugar.com/files/2011/05/21/4/1714/17146343/0b/blonde-hairstyle-for-men.jpg

      Idk, whatever.. i say leave your hair as it is..

  29. QUESTION:
    I Have A Black Mole And has been there for a while, do i have skin cancer?
    I really believe that i have skin cancer. I have a mole on my neck, that is solid black, with a skin tag growing right in the center of it, and skin tags growing all around it. The Black Mole has been there for almost 2 years now. The Mole is Small(Ish) It is less than half the size of a pencil eraser. Should i still go to the doctor? Could it be treatable? I am afraid that it has spread, WOULDN'T it have killed me by now if it was cancer? If i do go to the doctor, could they remove it and would i be okay? PLEASE only serious answers. Please don't say anything like" Go to your doctor" I plan to, but i want to know something right now that could possibly help me. PLEASE help.

    • ANSWER:
      Aaron, Everything the good doctor has told you in the above answer needs to be considered. One thing about moles is that they can and do change but very slowly, it is when they start to change rapidly that it is more concerning. Since you are under age 18 you will need your parent(s) to call and make a doctor appointment for you to get this examined and authorize any treatments, so I suggest sitting down tomorrow morning and talking with one of them about taking care of this.

      Another good thing would be to start a health journal (I advise this to all teens who take an active role in their own health care). In your journal paste a picture or tracing, along with measurements of each of your moles and oddities about your body (more will come with every year--sad but true), so they are documented for future reference, should something like this happen with another one of your blemishes.
      I wish you al the best

  30. QUESTION:
    My cat has scin cancer & has had her ear tips removed. Does any one have pictures of an earless cat?
    My poor little 3 year old pure white cat had her ear tips removed yesterday due to SCC (Skin cancer) She looks quite shocking at the moment as her head is shaved, the vet said she will look fine when the fur grows back; but i have never seen an earless cat before so does anyone else have experience of this; and maybe a photo i could look at. It would help me get through this.

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      I volunteer at our local Animal Services and we had a white cat in there that got skin cancer and had it's ears completely removed, so her face looked like a round snowball! If I hadn't been at the limit of cats i could have, I would have adopted her, she was so beautiful and her hair did grow back. It turns out her owners (that initially turned her in), came back to get her, so that was a blessing.

      For anyone who doesn't know, white cats should never be kept outdoors because they do develop skin cancer. If they go out at all, or lay in the sunshine a lot, put sunscreen on their ears. This is an absolute fact.

  31. QUESTION:
    Should i be worried or am i just being paranoid?
    I noticed that a mole/freckle appeared on my back about 3-4 weeks ago after i was sunburnt, its slighty raised so i can feel a bump when i touch it, could it be skin cancer or am i just being paranoid?

    • ANSWER:
      You should speak and show it to someone older you know. Without picture, no one can assure you it's nothing to worry about.. Hope it's nothing seriously.

      p.s. it just simply might be freckle.. :-)

  32. QUESTION:
    How can i get my skin super smooth?
    I love my skin but i just can't always keep it smooth.
    I want to know how i can have it smooth and always moisturized . I would like it to be healthy and lood good>
    Please help me find the product that i can use.

    • ANSWER:
      Go for natural products that don't contain allergens and alcohols.

      Try the mask on my profile to help feed your skin cells to keep them healthy so you will look good.

      In addition to the mask, add a bit of baking soda to your soap when you wash your face. This is a mechanical dermabrasion that gets rid of dead skin cells rather than chemical exfoliation (benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid, glycolic acid) which kills skin cells to remove them from your skin. These chemicals also increase your risk of skin cancer. Salicylic acid is dermally absorbed and increases your risk of Reye's Syndrome, a lethal liver and brain disorder.

      Click my picture to get a great oatmeal mask. It's perfect for a chilly winter night...

      goofy's got the right idea. However, when you wash the oil off, use a bit of baking soda as a gentle abrasive to make sure the dead skin cells get removed so you don't break out. I oil and wash my face every night before I go to bed. I used to have oily skin, I don't any more ;o) Sounds backwards but it really works!

  33. QUESTION:
    How long will it take me to get tan?
    Hello well starting this week i am going to go to the tanning bed everyday and everyday next week. I really want to get tan but how long do will it take me to get tan? I'm pretty pale right now but i tan fairly easily? if any of you tan how long did it take you to get a nice tan. and please don't say anything about skin cancer because i am well aware of it. I already picked up a tanning lotion WITHOUT bronzer because i heard they turn your finger tips orange.

    • ANSWER:
      To get super tan you will have to be tanning for @ least 60 years, George Hamilton & Tom Jones are two examples, who ARE super tan! Google them.
      Tanning comes & go, unless you do them everyday 24/7 for the rest of your life. But in the end the only thing you'll benefit is either moles, freckles, skin tags or discolorations from sunscreens, lotions, etc. and the more you do, the more they get larger, darker & bumpier. My nephew had a membership in a tanning bed salon for a year. After it expired, he stopped, now he's as white as before he began.

      Tanning, is a result for 'damaged skin' and no products can reverse you from skin cancer or damaged skin, may prevent you from pre-mature aging, but that's part of the billion dollar beauty industry.

      To get the level of SPF you see on the label, you have to spread the lotion on like a layer of vanilla frosting; that's the thickness used in Food & Drug Administration tests. "So your SPF 30 is really a 10." says Steven Q Wang, M.D. director of dermatologic surgery and dermatology @ Memorial Sloan-Ketterng Cancer Center in Basking Ridge, NJ and author of Beating Melanoma. So don't skim: Frost that cupcake!"
      ~ Vogue May or June 2011. Glamour May 2012.

      Take the Skin Picture Quiz - Identify These Common Skin Conditions on MedicineNet.

  34. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know what is wrong with McCains jaw and why does it seem it is getting bigger?
    I heard he has a clean bill of health. But what happened to his jaw? Was it a result of the war or is it skin cancer? It concerns me and I really don't know what it is? Anyone know?

    • ANSWER:
      It was from the skin cancer. If you look closely at a picture of his left cheek (his left, not yours) you will see a large vertical scar from the sugery.

  35. QUESTION:
    How does a person with fair skin tan without burning?
    Lately I've noticed that in my pictures I look hideously pale, lol. I've tried tanning in the past, but I'm sensitive to the UV rays. Any tips on how I can tan without getting a painful burn?

    • ANSWER:
      One of the safest ways to get a glowing tan is by getting spray tans. Tanning salons offer spray tans in which you stand in a booth and the entire body is tanned. Sunless tanners contain DHA, which causes a safe chemical reaction that produces a tan. Spray tanning can give the same tan to the skin as the sun does, without causing skin cancer or aging the skin via harmful UVA and UVB rays.

      Qubie Girl Beauty "Nichole Your Personal Esthetician"
      www.qubiegirl.com

  36. QUESTION:
    What exactly do the symptoms of breast cancer look like?
    I have seen pictures and stuff, but nothing matches what im looking for. So please give a picture or something :) I;d really appreciate it!

    • ANSWER:
      you may feel a lump (most common...especially near nipple or in upper outer quadrant), may have nipple discharge, may have inversion of a nipple (when the other nipple isnt), may have tightening of skin of breast, discoloration of the breast, breast skin that looks like an orange peel (very, very bad sign)

  37. QUESTION:
    Where can I see pictures of skin cancer moles or patches?
    I found some stuff online with illustrations, but I'm looking for real photos. Anyone know of any sites?

    • ANSWER:
      Go to Google Images and you can find pictures of skin cancer.

      Melanoma Images
      http://images.google.com/images?svnum=10&um=1&hl=en&q=melanoma

      Skin cancer
      http://images.google.com/images?svnum=10&um=1&hl=en&q=skin+cancer

      Basal cell carcinoma
      http://images.google.com/images?svnum=10&um=1&hl=en&q=basal+cell+carcinoma

  38. QUESTION:
    What can i do to tan as dark as native indian skin color?
    I'm try to get a tan, but not by being in the sun, rather a bronzer. Any product y'all can recommend. It's that i love dark color skin, i think it is beautiful. I want to be as dark as native indian skin color i think it is sexy. And that way i don't get sunburned, a thong tanline on my butt or tan nude out in the sun exposing my self.

    • ANSWER:
      Are you White , Asian or Latin ? Either way don't do it ... be happy with your own skin colour

      This is my natural skin colour if you are wondering http://assets.mog.com/pictures/wikipedia/148435/TatyanaAli27.JPG
      http://www.mycelebrityfashion.co.uk/outfits/amerie-amerie-launching-her-new-album-557/amerie3.jpg

      I can get as dark as this if I just stay in the sun and use a couples of bronzers

      http://bix.yimg.com/images/4EBymrHAvj.jpg
      http://www.blackbusinessexpo.com/kENYAMOORE.jpg

      This is the darkest I have ever been http://www.kenyamoore.info/albums/pictures/Kenya-Moore-Photos-014.jpg

      These skin tones are nearly impossible unless you have it naturally ... Im telling you that skin cancers may appear or something damaging may occur

      Be happy with what you have

      My mother is a Russian Jew and she is very beautiful ... she has straight dark blond hair , grey eyes and pale to medium white skin ... my father on the other hand is the opposite ... extremely dark brown skin , dark brown eyes and black black hair ... they are both very attractive individuals in their own way

  39. QUESTION:
    I have this patch of really dry skin on my thumb, could it be skin cancer?
    I've had this dryness for quite some time, it seems to get worse when it is really cold out. I have tried various lotions and nothing seems to moturize the area.

    I'd feel retarded if I went all the way to the dermatologist and it turned out to be nothing...

    If its cancer can it spread throughout
    My body and eventually cause brain cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      I probably isn't cancer but dermatitis or eczema. Wear gloves when doing dishes and apply some cream after getting your hands wet for any reason. Cetaphil has a thick cream that works well as does Aquafor. Aquafor comes in smaller tubes so you can carry it your purse or pocket. Put the cream on at night and cover with a band aid.

      You can try some OTC cortisone ointment, also, during the day.

      If using these products for 2 weeks and no change then see your MD as they can give a more accurate diagnosis and prescribe different or stronger medication.

      Usually superficial skin cancer does not spread though out the body and cause brain cancer. But melanoma can cause serious problems, so if your patch of dry skin looks like the pictures in the info below, see you dermatologist right away.

  40. QUESTION:
    How do you get paler skin naturally?
    I'm quite tanned, but I hate it and I would like paler skin. I don't want any thing that's chemically altered like getting the whitening injection thing that Michael Jackson got, but maybe if someone could give the name of a cream or something.

    • ANSWER:
      Number one rule: stay out of the sun. Like Mario Lopez, he's a Mexican descent, but he won't even stand outside in the sun to do a photo shoot for a tanning lotion. Julianne Moore is one of those, who like to protect her skin from AGING. She walks in the shade. I grow up in Asia for 13 years, so I was dark, but it took more than 13 years to the color I have now.

      Your tan will fade after several months even years, depends how old you are now.

      I've been protecting myself from the sun since I was 9.

      1. Because I don't want to look like a farmer.
      2. Because I get too hot.
      3. I want to look like movie stars & models, they have blemish-free skins.
      4. I don't want to look like an old prune or get moles on my neck & face like my aunts.

      No matter, I still got Discoid Lupus (Google it), caused from the sun. It took 12 years for them to fade. Tried all kinds of lotions that were prescribed to me, and none of them worked. More & more now I protect myself and I take my wide brim hat everywhere I go, or use an umbrella. Floppy hats are back in style. In Asia, they use umbrella all the time. Here in the States, people started to catch on, and I see people walking w/umbrella, they are used on the beach, and they sell patio umbrellas. It was invented for a reason and also to protect us from getting skin cancer. Wear long jackets, or denim a lot. Even inside a car, the heat alone from the sun can tan anyone.

      While in HS, I frequently wear a floppy hat. Thank God, those are now back again! I've use a wide brim hat, even in the car to avoid glare. Long drives I put a blanket over the window, and my umbrella comes with me everywhere.

      Sunscreen will not protect you from getting burned.

      Sunscreen will only make your moles or freckles larger, bumpier & darker, if you have them already. Not just moles, but freckles, skin tags, seborrheic keratoses, Discoid Lupus, Bullous Pemphegoid, Lentigo (Google search them) and lentigines -- nearly always non-cancerous skin lesions

      Sunscreen will not protect you from skin cancer.

      Sunscreen will not protect you if you have allergies, I never thought I had allergies!

      Sunscreens also discolor your skin - for ever!

      Sunscreen blocks Vitamin D as well.
      RE SKIN LIGHTENING:
      The FDA have banned 23 more whitening products. Google it. About 17,600,000 results.
      The reason cited for the proposed ban is that studies in rodents show "some evidence" that hydroquinone may act as a carcinogen or cancer-causing chemical, although its cancer-causing properties have yet to be proved in humans. Hydroquinone also has been linked with the medical condition known as ochronosis in which the skin becomes dark and thick. Dome-shaped yellowish spots and grayish-brown spots also are observed in ochronosis among black women and men in South Africa, Britain, and the U.S. Ochronosis has been observed in conjunction with hydroquinone use even in persons who have used hydroquinone-containing cosmetics for a short time. Some studies also report abnormal function of the adrenal glands and high levels of mercury in people who have used hydroquinone-containing cosmetics. For these reasons, hydroquinone has already been banned in Japan, the European Union, and Australia.

      Any skin-lightening products containing hydroquinone would be considered new drugs, according to the proposed FDA regulations. The products would require FDA approval before being sold to the public and would only be available with a doctor's prescription.

      Take the Skin Picture Quiz - Identify These Common Skin Conditions on MedicineNet.

  41. QUESTION:
    How to decide the correct sunscreen lotion for my skin ?
    I have started swimming . And as its summers I'm worried tat the sun will affect my skin I have a clear n fair skin and don't want to tan myself or get my skin affected . Can someones suggest me the best sunscreen for my skin .. And any other tips for skin and hair care while swimming ! ..

    • ANSWER:
      2011 products to AVOID. This research and advocacy group recommends a mere 20 percent of the 600-plus beach and sport sunscreens it evaluated.
      You will get burned, no matter what anyway, since sunscreen does NOT protect you from the heat of the sun.
      Read the label. The SPF or sun protection factor, relates solely to the degree of protection a formula provides against UVB rays. UVBs known as the 'burning rays, vary seasonally (peaking around noon), damage the superficial layer of the dermis (which may contribute to skin cancer), and generally result in a sunburn. UVA rays - which account for 95% of the ultraviolet radiation that reaches the Earth's surface, and which cut through clouds and glass year-round - are somewhat stealthier. These are the ones that have a longer wavelength, allowing them to penetrate deeper into the skin, destroying collagen and elastin, which contributes to photo-aging (sagging skin, wrinkles), and triggering cell mutations, which may initiate skin cancer. ~ Vogue May or June 2011 issue.
      Best protection is wearing DENIM clothing, or a wide brim hat, but better yet, an umbrella.

      Too much soaking in the sun or water are the skin's worst enemies, causes wrinkles and no anti-aging products or lotions can prevent skin from aging.

      've been protecting myself from the sun since age 9, but no matter, I got Discoid Lupus. Google that one. It was like someone punched my chin and it gave a purplish mark. It took 12 years for that to fade, so now I'm using a wide brim hat or umbrella for protection. Gene Simmons & Shannon both have been seen hold an umbrella during an event. They were invented before beauty products, for a reason. Google also Bullous Pemphegoid another skin disorder. My husband's aunt recently got MELANOMA IN HER LUNGS, and in hospice now. When only last Christmas, she was behaving and very happy like she's 35 again! She's almost 84. She was a golfer and did stained glass.

      Take the Skin Picture Quiz - Identify These Common Skin Conditions on MedicineNet.

  42. QUESTION:
    How Long do you keep the Skin Whitening Forever E-book by Eden Diaz?
    Hi, I was just wondering how long you are able to keep the skin whitening e-book by Eden Diaz? Is it forever, and you just pay a one time fee, or do you keep it for two months then they take it back???
    Really confused.

    • ANSWER:
      The FDA have banned 23 more whitening products. Google it. About 17,600,000 results.
      The reason cited for the proposed ban is that studies in rodents show "some evidence" that hydroquinone may act as a carcinogen or cancer-causing chemical, although its cancer-causing properties have yet to be proved in humans. Hydroquinone also has been linked with the medical condition known as ochronosis in which the skin becomes dark and thick. Dome-shaped yellowish spots and grayish-brown spots also are observed in ochronosis among black women and men in South Africa, Britain, and the U.S. Ochronosis has been observed in conjunction with hydroquinone use even in persons who have used hydroquinone-containing cosmetics for a short time. Some studies also report abnormal function of the adrenal glands and high levels of mercury in people who have used hydroquinone-containing cosmetics. For these reasons, hydroquinone has already been banned in Japan, the European Union, and Australia.

      Any skin-lightening products containing hydroquinone would be considered new drugs, according to the proposed FDA regulations. The products would require FDA approval before being sold to the public and would only be available with a doctor's prescription.
      Skin Creams, Soaps and Lotions Marketed as Skin Lighteners and Anti-aging Treatments: May Contain the Toxic Metal, Mercury
      Take the Skin Picture Quiz - Identify These Common Skin Conditions on MedicineNet.

      Mercury can also be found in some lightening products, as can steroids, and I’m sure you understand the health risks of steroids and mercury.

      And it doesn’t stop there, there is in fact a range of chemical ingredients which can be found in various bleaching products, many of which are of particular concern for both your health and your skin. Cancer is only one of the concerns, others include the risk of thinning the dermal layer of your skin, causing symptoms much like serious acne, permanent skin discoloration and much more.

      If you’re considering whitening your skin for any reason it’s something you should be very aware of. Nothing is worth getting cancer for.

  43. QUESTION:
    On my arm little bubbles of blood ( not blisters) are starting to pop out in 1 spot?
    I've noticed alot of moles and or freckles growing on myself lately. I'm worried of course about skin cancer. I've looked up pictures but only worry myself into hypochondria. On my arm in a small concentrated spot are little bubbles of blood of various sizes. I haven't a clue what they are from, only that they should NOT be there. If anyone has any idea what this is let me know!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Have you been scratching there lately? I get a kind of rash that sounds similar, if I itch somewhere alot. It usually goes away after a day or two tho. :)
      Good luck,

  44. QUESTION:
    How do you make your skin soft and smooth?
    What kind of body wash and body lotion makes your skin super soft? I'm not sure of my skin type. It's not oily(like my face) but I'm not sure if it's considered dry or normal. My skin is also kinda sensitive and if I use lotion from Bath&Body Works it stings and burns. So if anyone can recommend a good moisturizing lotion and wash that would be fabulous! :)

    • ANSWER:
      1. Staying out of the sun. If you have gotten sunburned before you're 18, you'll have dark spots or brown spots, some get freckles and those will get darker and bumpier as you get older. It's best not to make them darker or bumpy, and staying out of the sun will prevent that. Just from the heat, can make anyone flaky. I use my wide brim hat everywhere I go, and while I'm inside a car as a rider, I use blanket over the window or sit where it's shady. Lotions does not protect you from sunburn, same with cancer and could permanently discolor your skin. Lotions does not protect you from skin diseases. Take the Skin Picture Quiz - Identify These Common Skin Conditions on MedicineNet.

      2. Don't go in a tanning bed. You'll aged 10-15 years faster.

      3. Bathing or showering in hot water and too much chlorine can make you looking like 'dishpan hands'. Use warm to cool water. Too much sun & water causes aging, skin's worst enemies.

      4. Use a washcloth when taking a shower. I use Bath & Body (Suave, Dove, Irish Spring, etc.) wash for body & face. No baths! The less you're in the water, the less you'll get wrinkles.

      5. For oily skin, the less you fuss with your skin, the better. Keep your face oil-free & dry from dirt & perspiration. Blot it with a tissue or blotter, and keep them dry. Using powder foundation, blush & eyeshadow is best. Less is best, less product poisoning. Google Elizabeth Taylor when she's 16, then Google her when she's 79.

      6. Servings of 3-5 fresh fruits & vegetables daily. Google: FIVE FOODS TO EAT FOR BEAUTIFUL SKIN
      All the vitamins & minerals you need for good skin care comes from all the healthy foods you eat from Mother Nature, not made by man, those can do more harm than good.

      7. For your hands, wear gloves winter, spring, fall, and wear gloves for every chores you do, so you don't have to wash them often. In the garden, office, kitchen. Thank God for those! Too bad they don't have ones for feet.

  45. QUESTION:
    What is the signs of skin cancer?
    What is the signs of skin cancer? i want to know.

    • ANSWER:
      It can look like a red or weird shaped mole or birthmark.

      It can take many shapes, sizes and colors. Google skin cancer, and you will be able to get a gist on what it might look like. If you are worried for yourself or someone else, you or them really need to see a MD to get it checked out.

      Skin cancer look like the picture of the following:

  46. QUESTION:
    What are some good ways to get a lighter skin ?
    I heard about Pure sodium chloride, salt baths...what are some good ways to get a lighter skin (to lose tan) ?

    • ANSWER:
      Number one rule: stay out of the sun. Like Mario Lopez, he's a Mexican descent, but he won't even stand outside in the sun to do a photo shoot for a tanning lotion. Julianne Moore is one of those, who like to protect her skin from AGING. She walks in the shade. I grow up in Asia for 13 years, so I was dark, but it took more than 13 years to the color I have now. My neighbor only do errands after the sun had gone down.

      Best sunscreen: wear denim clothing, floppy hat, or umbrella. They were invented to protect us from the elements.

      Your tan will fade after several months even years, depends how old you are now. I was a vendor outside, sitting only in the shade, until a car parked in front of me, the glass reflecting right @ me, during sunset, caused my chest to tan (not burn) and discolored, for about 3 weeks.

      I've been protecting myself from the sun since I was 9.

      1. Because I don't want to look like a farmer.
      2. Because I get too hot.
      3. I want to look like movie stars & models, they have blemish-free skins.
      4. I don't want to look like an old prune or get moles on my neck & face like my aunts.

      No matter, I still got Discoid Lupus (Google it), caused from the sun. It took 12 years for them to fade. Tried all kinds of lotions that were prescribed to me, and none of them worked. More & more now I protect myself and I take my wide brim hat everywhere I go, or use an umbrella. Floppy hats are back in style. In Asia, they use umbrella all the time. Here in the States, people started to catch on, and I see people walking w/umbrella, they are used on the beach, and they sell patio umbrellas. It was invented for a reason and also to protect us from getting skin cancer. Wear long jackets, or denim a lot. Even inside a car, the heat alone from the sun can tan anyone.

      While in HS, I frequently wear a floppy hat. Thank God, those are now back again! I've use a wide brim hat, even in the car to avoid glare. Long drives I put a blanket over the window, and my umbrella comes with me everywhere.

      RE SKIN LIGHTENING:
      The FDA have banned 23 more whitening products. Google it. About 17,600,000 results.
      The reason cited for the proposed ban is that studies in rodents show "some evidence" that hydroquinone may act as a carcinogen or cancer-causing chemical, although its cancer-causing properties have yet to be proved in humans. Hydroquinone also has been linked with the medical condition known as ochronosis in which the skin becomes dark and thick. Dome-shaped yellowish spots and grayish-brown spots also are observed in ochronosis among black women and men in South Africa, Britain, and the U.S. Ochronosis has been observed in conjunction with hydroquinone use even in persons who have used hydroquinone-containing cosmetics for a short time. Some studies also report abnormal function of the adrenal glands and high levels of mercury in people who have used hydroquinone-containing cosmetics. For these reasons, hydroquinone has already been banned in Japan, the European Union, and Australia.

      Any skin-lightening products containing hydroquinone would be considered new drugs, according to the proposed FDA regulations. The products would require FDA approval before being sold to the public and would only be available with a doctor's prescription.
      Skin Creams, Soaps and Lotions Marketed as Skin Lighteners and Anti-aging Treatments: May Contain the Toxic Metal, Mercury.

      Take the Skin Picture Quiz - Identify These Common Skin Conditions on MedicineNet.
      One YA poster used lemon on her skin: "i use 2 put lemon on my face mostly my chin area, and wat happend it dried it out and actually made it look darker and now looks discolored…"

      The sun is more powerful than most people think!

  47. QUESTION:
    How to get an even skin tone?
    I've tried lemon juice, beauty products, egg masks, honey, and every remedy you can think of but I can't get an even skin tone. like my forehead and around my eyes are much darker than my color. suggestions please!

    • ANSWER:
      You've had a self-tanner mishap...or you have a benign condition called melasma that's often associated with oral contraceptives, says Dina D. Strachan, M. D., a dermatologist in New York City. Doctors aren't sure why some birth-control pills cause these dark patches on the forehead, cheeks, or upper lip, but they do know UV exposure makes them worse.

      For one thing: Oral contraceptives can upset your skin, since hormones in BCP make pigment cells more sensitive to the sun, resulting in brown blotches.
      Doctor's advice: Talk to your doctor about switching to a low-dose estrogen formula, like Yaz or Ortho Tri-Cycles Lo, or the non-estrogen type of contraception known as the mini pill, says Sundaram. Wearing sunscreen will also help. "If you've had hyperpigmentation on the pill, you're likely to be sensitive during a pregnancy too." she says. In bulk cases, higher levels of hormones are to blame.
      ~ Allure 1-12

      Have you watched 1-9-13 People Choice Award? Kaley Cuoco (“The Big Bang Theory”) hosts, had dark UNDERARM, and she's not that concern about hers, the makeup expert couldn't even do anything to lighten hers.

      I've been protecting myself from the sun since age 9, by using umbrella or floppy hat. But no matter, I got Discoid Lupus, but it took 12 years for them to fade. Other than that, I've had flawless skin all my almost 60 years of my life. Use a floppy hat or umbrella.

      Have you seen Jennifer Hudson's flea bitten scars on her legs?
      Take the Skin Picture Quiz - Identify These Common Skin Conditions on MedicineNet.

      Wash cloth, exfoliate them, using bath & body wash when you take a shower, your skin heals, just give it time. But keep them protected by not exposing them to the sun, so they don't get darker.
      Sunscreen will not protect you from getting burned.

      Sunscreen does not protect you from getting moles or freckles, they will only get darker & bumpier or larger from each exposure from the sun.

      Sunscreen will not protect you from skin cancer.

      Sunscreen will not protect you if you have allergies, I never thought I had allergies!

      Sunscreens also discolor your skin - for ever!
      Sunscreen also is flammable after it is on your skin. A Massachusetts man said he suffered second-degree burns from a grill after applying sunscreen aerosol spray on parts of his body.

      Any skin-lightening products containing hydroquinone would be considered new drugs, according to the proposed FDA regulations. The products would require FDA approval before being sold to the public and would only be available with a doctor's prescription.
      Skin Creams, Soaps and Lotions Marketed as Skin Lighteners and Anti-aging Treatments: May Contain the Toxic Metal, Mercury. BB Creams, too.

  48. QUESTION:
    Has anyone you know survived breast cancer without a mastectomy?
    If so, what stage was the cancer and what was the treatment? Any help or information would be appreciated!

    • ANSWER:
      My wife was diagnosed with stage 2b breast cancer. The tumor size was 4.78cc with evidence of lymph node involvement.

      She had 15 weeks of Adriamycin, she did have a mastectomy and will undergo more chemotherapy 12 weeks of taxol followed by 6 weeks of radiation.

      The reason I am answering your question is because my wife feared losing her breast and was afraid of the surgery. I remember seeing her 2 hours after the surgery and she looked great. She had excellent skin color and she spent the night in the hospital.

      She ate a full dinner, and she was on pain medication but the pain was never too severe. I learned how to empty her drain and she only had it in for a week. After the first day home she was taking percocet one every 4 hours for two days. After that she was taking one advil every four hours for about two days. After the fifth day she was taking one advil every six or seven hours. Now she does not take anything for pain and it has been two weeks.

      To make it easier for me, I looked at pictures of women that had gone through the surgery so I was prepared for seeing her without a breast. I have read books that women will always remember the look on their spouses faces when they see it gone for the first time. My expression told her she looked great!

      She is getting though it, losing a breast is tough but it is better than losing one's life. Her cancer was pretty aggressive. The pathology report stated that cancer was found in her breast it was now the size of a grain of rice, and also there was cancer found in one of her lymph nodes measuring 8mm.

      Because of it we will be getting on Taxol for 12 more weeks then following it up with radiation.

      I hope you or somebody you care about will not have to go through a mastectomy, but I wanted to let you know that if they or you do, it is not the end of the world.

      Looking back at it, the first day home I asked her how she felt, she said she felt better than she had felt for the last two weeks. The fear of the unknown was scary, once it was done, it was nothing.

      She is missing one breast but she is so much more than that, and all I want is a total cure of the cancer. We will do whatever it takes to fight it, and I will be with her every step of the way.

      Good luck,

      DAVE

  49. QUESTION:
    How can I make my skin smoother?
    I dont have acne but my skin is so bad, i moisturize and everything, what should i do to make my skin smoother, drink more water or something?

    • ANSWER:
      Sometimes we feel entirely virtuous about our skin-care regimen because it's full of SPF-- all year round!-- and cleansers and such. But the truth is, we may not realize that we're overdoing (or underdoing) something that can lead to the very thing we're trying to avoid: dryness, breakouts, accelerated aging, New York dermatologist Dr. Jeannette Graf. (I've been giving this same advice for decades, but she's proof enough!).

      SNOPES ON WATER: Drinking 8 glasses of water. Just another reason to make you pee more and sell more bottled waters.
      http://www.snopes.com/medical/myths/8gla…

      The sun and soaking in the tub or pool are skin's worst enemies. Avoid them as much as possible, they're aging and causes the skin to get wrinkles.

      Use a loofah sponge or a wash cloth each time you take a shower, and use bath & body wash. Don't use hot water.

      I've been protecting myself from the sun since I was 9.

      1. Because I don't want to look like a farmer.
      2. Because I get too hot.
      3. I want to look like movie stars & models, they have blemish-free skins.
      4. I don't want to look like an old prune or get moles on my neck & face like my aunts.

      No matter, I still got Discoid Lupus (Google it), caused from the sun. It took 12 years for them to fade. Tried all kinds of lotions that were prescribed to me, and none of them worked. More & more now I protect myself and I take my wide brim hat everywhere I go, or use an umbrella. In Asia, they use umbrella all the time. Here in the States, people started to catch on, and I see people walking w/umbrella, they are used on the beach, and they sell patio umbrellas. It was invented for a reason and also to protect us from getting skin cancer.

      The sun is more powerful than most people think!

      Take the Skin Picture Quiz - Identify These Common Skin Conditions on MedicineNet.

      Google: FIVE FOODS TO EAT FOR BEAUTIFUL SKIN
      All the vitamins & minerals you need for good skin care comes from all the healthy foods you eat from Mother Nature.


skin cancer pictures

Subcutaneous Keratosis

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    If the doctor says you have sun damage on your face....does that mean it is skin cancer?
    I have been having a problem with a rash on my cheek and around my lips for about 3 months now. When I asked the doctor about it he looked at it and said it looked like sun damage. He has referred me to a dermatologist with a diagnosis of unspecified disorder of skin and subcutaneous tissue. My appointment is in 2 weeks.

    • ANSWER:
      The two most common skin cancers are basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma. They are typically red and may be bumpy or scaly or may be crusted and bleed. Usually not described as a rash, but some may be. Actinic keratosis are areas of sun damage that are red and rough or scaly and are precancerous. Melanoma is the most well known, but less common type of skin cancer. It is more dangerous and appears like a brown spot most commonly. Don't worry for now.

  2. QUESTION:
    I need a medical expert to tell me what is wrong but no one knows..can you make since of it?
    I had a lump in left armpit and had a biopsy done. the finding were ectopic breast tissue. Now I have a new lump. Only the lymph nodes on my left armpit have been swollen. No others! My history is as follows:*pectus excavatum*Endometriosis, PID or just cysts (ive gotten all those answers)*Weird spot on my left breats that came back inconclusive*Acid Reflux*Depression*Frequent UTIs*Frequent URI*Anemia*Tinea versicolor
    Mom*Anemia*Cervical cancer in her late 20s*non-hodgkins lymphoma in mid 40s
    Dad*Keratosis
    Grandpa on my moms side*small cell carcinoma
    And I am still waiting for my other grandparents to call back

    I gathereed all the papers I could find from visiting my dr.
    4/8/08- chest xray. FINDINGS:There is a ill-defined increased opacity in the right perihilar/infrahilar region suspicious for infiltrate within the right middle lobe. The lungs are otherwise clear though slightly hyperinflated. No evidence for plueral effusion. Heart size, peripheral vasculature and mediastinum are normal. IMPRESSION: Abnormal chest suspicious for right middle lobe infiltrate/pneumonia. LAB WORK: ldl cholesterol calc was high. t3 uptake was low
    4/11/08-ultrasound. FINDINGS: directed ultrasonography in the area of palpable abnormality in the lateral aspect of the left breast and axilla was performed. there are two well circumscribed nearly anechoic masses with central areas of increased echogenicity which exhibit blood flow consistent with small axillary lymph nodes, one measuring nearly 8mm and the other measuring 6mm. in the lateral aspect of the left breast in the subcutaneous tissue, theres is a third lesion measuring app. 9mm in length X 2mm AP X 6mm transverse with similar appearance of small lymph node. IMPRESSION: 1.Areas of palpable abnormality in the left breast correspond to masses consistent with lymph nodes. 2. bi-rads 2. benign finding.
    4/17/18-addended report-ct chest with contrast. FINDINGS: there is a thorax deformity consistent with a pectus excavatum and a significant angulation of the sternum manubrium. the cardiac silhoutte is rotated and midly compressed into the left thorax. in the right middle lobe region there is an area of consolidation within the medial segment with stranding of density extending to the pleural surface. there is a curvilinear area of density extending to the pleural surface in the posterior surlcus on the left consistent with scarring. there are small lymph nodes noted in the axillary regions bilaterally. they have fatty central hilar regions and are not pathologically enlarged. the breast tissue is very dencse with no discrete abnormalty seen. no mediastinal or hilar adenopathy seen.
    10/24/08-went to dr. he said axillary lymphodemopathy
    11/2/08-URI/Cough-zpac, tussinex
    11/3/08- cough, shortness of breath, axillary lymphodemopathy. TB skin test NEG
    11/7/08- chronic cough, axillary lymphodemaopathy-drink lots of fluid
    12/02/08-ottis media, lymphadenopathy left axilla..rocephin, amoxicillin, tylenol LAB: seg-high, lymph-low
    , absolute neut-high
    12/16/08-biopsy, ectopic breast tissue
    5/22/09-low back pain, sciatica, ultram, muscle relaxers Urinalysis: urobilinogen 1.0
    5/23/09-viral illness, tussinex. Urinalysi: bilirubin-moderate, ket-40mg/dL, Proteins-30mg/dL Strep: Neg
    5/26/09-lymphadenopathy, bronchospasm, URI Urinalysis: epithelial cells-mod, wbc-mod, rbc-tntc, bacteria-light, mucus-heavy, amorphous-light, casts-granular 0-2, bilirubin-moderate, ket-trace, blo-large (menus), pro - 100mg/d.MONO-Neg CHEST XRAY: cardiomegaly borderline ABDOMEN: normal BLOOD WORK: all normal

    If anyone has any ideas of whats going on please let me know! I am loosing weight, cough, eyesight issues, and abdominal pain. I go thursday to a dr to see if they will biopsy the new lump.

    • ANSWER:
      I don't have answers for you. I just wanted to say God bless you.

  3. QUESTION:
    need quick biology help!?
    I need help with these 10 questions:

    1. Baldness is:
    a. hyperhidrosis
    b. hypertrichosis
    c. albinism
    d. alopecia

    2. Inflammatory disease of the sebaceous glands characterized by papules, pustules, and inflamed nodules, and plugs of sebum that block pores is:
    a. seborrheic keratosis
    b. acne
    c. impetigo
    d. seborrheic keratosis

    3. A benign cavity lined with keratinizing epithelium and filled with sebum and epithelial debris is a:
    a. carbuncle
    b. keratinous cyst
    c. furuncle
    d. seborrheic dermatitis

    4. Radiographic imaging procedure of the spinal canal after injection of a contrast medium is:
    a. EMG
    b. myelography
    c. DEXA
    d. arthrography

    5. What is the lab test that looks for a substance present in the blood of those who have rheumatoid arthritis?
    a. Ca
    b. RA
    c. RF
    d. THR

    6. The bus driver and the administrative assistant were both diagnosed with a compression injury that manifests itself as fluctuating pain, numbness, and paresthesia of the hand caused by compression of the median nerve at the wrist. They both have:
    a. osteoarthritis
    b. rheumatoid arthritis
    c. carpal tunnel syndrome
    d. sciatica

    7. Drugs that are applied directly on the skin are:
    a. intradermal
    b. subcutaneous
    c. transdermal
    d. topical

    8. Route of administration in which drugs are injected within the skin is called:
    a. intradermal
    b. subcutaneous
    c. transdermal
    d. topical

    9. A fever blister is caused by:
    a. HPV
    b. HSV
    c. TB
    d. STSG

    10. A stretch mark is a(n):
    a. stratum
    b. stria
    c. excoriation
    d. erosion

    Thanks for the help. I did all of the other ones myself, except these.
    well it's from a biology book:)

    • ANSWER:
      No way this is bio, this looks more like Health to me.

      The only one I think I know is 6, A possibly?

  4. QUESTION:
    need quick biology help!?
    I need help with these 10 questions:

    1. Baldness is:
    a. hyperhidrosis
    b. hypertrichosis
    c. albinism
    d. alopecia

    2. Inflammatory disease of the sebaceous glands characterized by papules, pustules, and inflamed nodules, and plugs of sebum that block pores is:
    a. seborrheic keratosis
    b. acne
    c. impetigo
    d. seborrheic keratosis

    3. A benign cavity lined with keratinizing epithelium and filled with sebum and epithelial debris is a:
    a. carbuncle
    b. keratinous cyst
    c. furuncle
    d. seborrheic dermatitis

    4. Radiographic imaging procedure of the spinal canal after injection of a contrast medium is:
    a. EMG
    b. myelography
    c. DEXA
    d. arthrography

    5. What is the lab test that looks for a substance present in the blood of those who have rheumatoid arthritis?
    a. Ca
    b. RA
    c. RF
    d. THR

    6. The bus driver and the administrative assistant were both diagnosed with a compression injury that manifests itself as fluctuating pain, numbness, and paresthesia of the hand caused by compression of the median nerve at the wrist. They both have:
    a. osteoarthritis
    b. rheumatoid arthritis
    c. carpal tunnel syndrome
    d. sciatica

    7. Drugs that are applied directly on the skin are:
    a. intradermal
    b. subcutaneous
    c. transdermal
    d. topical

    8. Route of administration in which drugs are injected within the skin is called:
    a. intradermal
    b. subcutaneous
    c. transdermal
    d. topical

    9. A fever blister is caused by:
    a. HPV
    b. HSV
    c. TB
    d. STSG

    10. A stretch mark is a(n):
    a. stratum
    b. stria
    c. excoriation
    d. erosion

    Thanks for the help. I did all of the other ones myself, except these.

    • ANSWER:
      4b 9b Herpes simplex virus 6c 7d 5c rheumatoid factor 3b 1d 10b 8a 2b

      wow that was some hard stuff. I'm lucky i don't take that course


subcutaneous keratosis

Microdermabrasion Keratosis Pilaris

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Seriously. Is there really no cure for Keratosis Pilaris?
    If you don't know what Keratosis Pilaris is, they are little bumps on your skin that are on your upper arm, your face and some other parts of the body. Does anyone know any home remedies or anything that can actually cure this?

    • ANSWER:
      mmmm maybe try microdermabrasion.. either at a beauty therapist or l'oreal make one that is soooo good in a tube for exfoliating but its not just a scrub its done with crystals that really scratch the surface (without wrecking it) and they help to get any bumps, dead skin, lumps, pimples, scaba, acne scars to clear and u only need to use the smallest amount as it is so good!! if anything will get rid of them, that will xx goodluck please try it ...

  2. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of facial and arm redness?
    I have redness on my cheeks and redness on the upper part of my arms. It's not any type of skin condition on my face. I've been checked by a dermatologist. It just looks like somebody slapped me across the face but the redness never goes away. On my arms, some people have said it may be Keratosis Pilaris. I'm very pale and this redness really stands out. Any way to get rid of it or at least make it less noticeable? Thanks!
    I'm a girl if that helps.

    • ANSWER:
      Maybe try a skin bleaching agent. Not something real strong though. I know theirs products on the market that help even out skin tone or reduce facial reddening. You'll just have to look around. They come in the forms of lotions, creams, ect. Aveeno has such products. I use their face moisturizer with spf and their body one also. I haven't tried the ones for skin reddening or the ones that even out skin tone, but I am sure they are worth a try. Heres a link to the products. http://www.aveeno.com/segmentAction.do?segid=1002&catid=1000

      If this dont help then maybe with the help of a laser or Microdermabrasion. I have heard it can help lighten skin, like freckles, and obviously a laser is stronger and can remove things like moles, but if its just redness, then microdermabrasion if all else fails.

      In the mean time you can always do what they show on tv (think bare minerals) and cover with powders on your face. As for your arms wear longer sleeves? I'm not sure if a skin bronzer lotion would help any,,,but try to keep these areas safe from the sun with spf as you may have sensative skin in these areas.

      I too am quit pale. Blonde hair, blue eyes, freckles. I am less red with sunblock. Also, just wearing makeup helps,,,,i never darkened my skin since i like light skin. Also, i want to protect it from wrinkles and think it would look silly and fake on my complexion. I like you probably suffer the same kind of issue. I look red in these areas more than others. I just bare with it since i'm sure its common in pale skin types.

  3. QUESTION:
    I need a Microdermabrasion set, but i have sensitive skin. Would i be alright to use the one from L'Oreal?
    I will post a link right when i find it, but for those of you who know it, what do you think?

    I have sensitive skin, but only on my cheeks due to a mild case of Keratosis Pilaris.

    • ANSWER:
      i don't know about that one but i know Mary Kay has a really good one. good luck

  4. QUESTION:
    Can microdermabrasion help keratosis pilaris?
    I have had it for AGES and my boyfriend hates it. I would do almost anything to get rid of it.
    Im 14 and have it on my upper arms, cheeks and back. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      save your money. invest in a loofah for the shower -exfoliate gently before you finish. moisture well. for the worst sites, use AmLactin. see your dermatologist for more treatment help. keratosis pilaris is just clogged pores and the fix is easy.

  5. QUESTION:
    Would microdermabrasion be appropriate for Keratosis Pilaris treatment?
    I was just wondering if I would be able to try microdermabrasion to treat some mild Keratotis Pilaris that I have on my legs right above my knees and the back of my arms, or if microdermabrasion is used for something totally different.

    Thanks. :)

    • ANSWER:
      keratosis pilaris isn't curable.. but this will help diminish its visibility..

      There is this new popular cream that people have been talking about.

      It was even televised on TV.

      It prevents future and existing acne, diminishes scars, and lightens skin and blemishes. Fast results too! (It has been claimed that major results can be seen within a week and no later than two weeks)

      Before and After photos are available at the given ebay site.

      This person is providing 1-3 week trial samples (Only for ONE DOLLAR.. definitely a deal) on ebay at:

      Search up "best acne solution ever" on ebay.

      First 100 customers can get the item for for one week trial and up to 3 weeks. Or you can buy the whole container for 0

      It's expensive, but the product DOES work.

      My sister and cousin who both have major acne have tried the product and they both give it thumbs up. I have also heard many great feedbacks about this cream.

      I don't have a problem with acne, but it seems to have great results on my sister who has moderate to severe acne. Her acne swelling went away overnight.

      I hope this helps. =)

  6. QUESTION:
    Has anyone tried the Neutrogena Microdermabrasion System?
    I would like to invest in one, but would like to know how they work and if they really work? Is it really worth the money? It will be used for keratosis pilaris. I have a mild case, but I am self conscious about it and heard microdermabrasion works.

    • ANSWER:
      havent bought the neutrogena one, but bought the l'oreal one.... the one that comes in the silvery grey box

      my advice - GET IT

      coz ure only gonna use a little bit each time (and u only use it once a week) it will keep for ages. i bought mine in august 2005, its may 2007 and ive still got it .....

      yes, my skin has improved, because the conventional exfoliators taht u buy in the shops dont work half as well as my microdermabrasion kit. honest!

      get it - its worth every penny.

      my skin is much softer than it was before

      cant comment on the neutrogena one, havent even heard of it, but i give 5/5 for the l'oreal one

      go for it!!!

  7. QUESTION:
    Are peels good for keratosis pilaris that is on the back and arms? If so, which one would work best?
    And be specific about which brand would work, please. Also (I keep getting mixed reviews on this) but are gold peels good or bad for the skin?

    • ANSWER:
      peels are not bad for the skin but they wont cure the problem..
      Start off with some gentle physical exfoliation. Twice a week, soak in a warm bath and then lightly scrub affected areas with a loofah or Buf-Puf. Moisturize well after you get out of the water. Look for urea, a skin-softening ingredient that's a favorite with dermatologists. You can find it in Gold Bond Ultimate Softening Shea Butter Lotion or Carmol 20. If you don't see any improvement after a few weeks, step up the treatment with chemical exfoliants.

      Again, start off gently. Some people are able to deal with stronger exfoliants while others will find themselves sensitive to certain products. Alpha-hydroxy acids are a good option for fighting rough skin. Glycolic and lactic acids are the most popular AHAs available over the counter. You can find glycolic acid available in DDF's Glycolic Exfoliating Wash 5% or DermaDoctor's KP Duty, a formula specially created to deal with the condition. You can find lactic acid in products like AmLactin (usually located behind the pharmacy counter) and Fresh Milk Bath and Shower Cream.

      Another option is vitamin A, or retinol. You can try prescription formulas such as Retin-A or Differin, but you can also go with an over the counter retinol line such as RoC or SkinCeuticals. Be careful and sparing when you use vitamin A products, however. Many people are sensitive to retinol and may experience peeling and irritation with the first several uses.

      f you're still not seeing much improvement after trying these options, see your dermatologist for a chemical peel or microdermabrasion. These options will help exfoliate stubborn cases of keratosis pilaris so that you can start treating the problem from there. Since the condition is caused by the skin's failure to exfoliate itself properly, keratosis pilaris is a continual problem. One chemical peel will not keep the skin smooth forever. Instead, view the peel as a jump-start and continue to treat the condition with at-home exfoliation.

  8. QUESTION:
    I have keratosis pilaris. How do I get rid of it?
    I have keratosis pilaris (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0002433/). The rashes are on my shoulders and back. I already use Amlactin on my rashes, but I feel like some of the rashes might be scarring. Are there any other things I can use to get rid of my keratosis pilaris rashes and scars?

    • ANSWER:
      I have keratosis pilaris, also. I am only 16, but I've had it since I was a toddler. I wish I didn't have to deal with it, but it isn't that big of a deal. Remember that there is worse that could occur and at least KP doesn't hurt.

      You should try this:
      DERMAdoctor KP Duty Body Scrub

      It can be purchased at Sephora or other online sites.
      Sephora Website: http://www.sephora.com/kp-duty-body-scrub-P147925?skuId=934539

      I haven't tried it, but I am planning to purchase it myself. It has very good reviews and is also formulated for keratosis pilaris. It's not just a scrub, it's also a chemical peel and microdermabrasion.
      I know that sounds really intense, but it is a strong scrub to deal with skin like KP.

      Sorry if this looks like one of those spam answers.

      Try it, even if it is expensive. It might be worth it. Also, Sephora has an amazing return policy. If you do not like the product or it is not helping, you can return it (even if it was used). Full refund. I've returned things there and they have been kind and respectful of your reason for your returns.

      Good Luck.

  9. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of the red bumps on my legs?
    I have patches of dry, red bumps on my thieghs, my butt, and my chalves. How do I get rid of them? What is the best lotion to use to get rid of them? Anything helps!

    • ANSWER:
      What you have is called Keratosis Pilaris and is very common. From personal experience, the best advice I can give is exfoliate, exfoliate, exfoliate, followed by a deep moisturizer, such as a body butter or body oil. I've also heard that microdermabrasion might work well for this skin condition. The bumps and redness might not fully go away, but your skin will be much improved with appearance, smoothness, and softness. Hope this helps out!

  10. QUESTION:
    What are the little bumps on the back of your arms called?
    I think that they are associated with hair follicles but I'm not sure.

    • ANSWER:
      They are called Keratosis Pilaris 40-50% of the adult population have this (including me!). They look like goosebumps, and is also known as "chicken skin" condition (which is not very flattering).
      The cause is a genetic follicluar problem (so you were right about the follicles)
      It is worse when the skin dries out - so is worse in winter, basically. Also gets worse for some people around pregnancy.

      There are various treatments, but no actual cure - so you can get it looking better, but it will never go away. Treatments include microdermabrasion, dry treatment creams for the skin, and skin moisturisers/treatments that contain:
      lactic acid or vitamin A, or glycolic acids.

      Other treatments and more information can be found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keratosis_pilaris

  11. QUESTION:
    I have Eczema and Keratosis Pilaris, anyone know of medications to help improve either?
    Any remedies, medications, etc to help the conditions get better? Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      I have both as well, so I have had to educate myself about them.

      The first thing you should know is that neither can be cured. They can be treated, which will reduce the appearance and make skin look and feel smoother, but nothing will make it go away completely.

      There are various types of eczema. The kind I get most often, and which I have every spring and summer, is the kind which causes blisters on the palms and soles of the feet. I have only had a few blisters on my palms over the years (I have had it for about ten years), but I get terribly itchy blisters on my feet which turn into rough dry itchy patches. I also had it on my forearms two summers ago, and that was a real misery. My doctor has prescribed creams for both types, and while they don't make it go away completely, they do help with the itching. Eczema is generally related to immune problems, so it can be caused by allergens like pollen, or costmetics, or even nickel in jewelry. I know from experience that the blistering type I get on my feet happens if my feet stay damp for a long time (like if I put on sneakers and my feet get soaked, and I have to keep the sneakers on until my feet dry out) or if I overmoisturize the soles of my feet. Ironically, proper hydration is one of the only non-chemical things you can do to help the problem--be sure you are drinking a lot of water. Other than that, you can moisturize and try and keep the patches from getting too dried out, which makes them worse. A doctor can give you cortisone or prednisone for inflammation in very bad cases, but my doctor said that thought in the dermatology community is that those should be used sparingly, and that topical creams should be used if possible. He refuses to give me Elidel, which is a fairly new treatment, because he says there is anecdotal evidence and scientific data that suggests it can be a carcinogen. Instead, he gives me anti-inflammatory creams. When I had it on my forearms, it covered them completely from wrist to elbow, and the worst breakout lasted for about two weeks--I had to apply a thick layer of cream and then lightly wrap my arms to keep the cream from rubbing off on other things. It cleared up, but left bumps which look and feel like KP, but which are not--they are simply left over bumps. He looks at them every time I see him, and has told me that eventually they will go away as long as I continue to moisturize and use a body scrub on my arms. He did warn me to not use too much scrub on my arms because it can irritate them and make it come back, so I exfoliate about twice a week on that part of my arms. I only exfoliate my feet after the blisters burst and leave the dry patches, and I am very careful about being gentle about it--for the first time ever I recently had a dry patch which cracked (ouch!), and the only thing that helped with that crack was a bandage and Neosporin--it kept it from getting worse, and helped the crack heal, as well as moisturizing the area. I just moisturize all over every day, and if something makes me itch, be it a new lotion, or detergent, or even something I eat, I make a mental note to stay away from it in the future.

      The KP is both harder and easier to deal with. It's a genetic condition, and about 50% of people have it. It's just due to too much keratin building up on the skin. The reason why it's harder to deal with, in my mind, is because once you settle on something to help it, you have to keep doing it, or it just recurs. The reason why it's easier to deal with is because you can buy a lot of stuff OTC to deal with it. The main ways of helping reduce the look of it include using a lotion or cream with an acid in it (glycolic acid, lactic acid, or urea), using microdermabrasion, or using scar cream. Another thing which isn't widely known is that exposure to sunlight helps it a bit--that's largely useless for most people, as they need to use sunscreen, but I have darker skin and can get some sun with no problems, so it does help my arms and legs (those are the only places I have it). The things which have worked best for me are simply exfoliating and using a lotion called AmLactin, which has lactic acid in it. Additionally, shaving helps my legs tremendously, so I shave all the way up. My doctor did tell me that you have to be careful with manual exfoliation or microdermabrasion, as they can be too harsh and irritate the skin, causing an outbreak of eczema! (I know--it's a really great example of a lose-lose situation). I know my KP gets worse in the winter, and he told me that's because the air is dry, and friction from clothing can make it appear worse. Your best bet it to experiment and find a regimen which works for you, and then stick to it. Also, hydration is important, so be sure to drink plenty of water and use lotion to help keep the moisture in your skin. There are some prescription strength creams for it, but my doctor won't give me those because they could cause eczema, as well, and I would rather deal with the KP than the eczema. I do know from experimenting and browsing the internet that there are some very expensive kits which are supposed to help with it, but I bought one and they aren't any more effective than just using an exfoliant and a lotion with acid in it, and they are really expensive. The one consolation with KP is that while it bothers those of us who have it, it is so common that many people don't even notice it--I have found that what looks like screaming little dots on my skin to me isn't even noticed by those around me, or even the girls at the day spa where I go regularly.

      So, to recap:

      For eczema you can get an anti-inflammatory cream from your doctor, and he or she may prescribe cortisone or prednisone for it if it gets really bad. Drink plenty of fluids, and avoid any triggers as much as possible. You can use gentle exfoliation and lotion to reduce the look of the patches once they begin to clear up, but be careful to not irritate the skin so much you cause another outbreak.

      For KP, drink plenty of fluids, and find a regimen which works for you which involves acid creams, or microdermabrasion or exfoliation (be careful with those two), and moisturize regularly. Once you experiment and find what works best for you, stick to it. And remember it isn't as noticeable to others as it is to you.

      Best of luck.

  12. QUESTION:
    What exactly is microdermabrasion?
    I get bumps all over my legs and the back of my arms. I am led to believe that is is caused by clothing rubbing and not letting the hair come out because when I pop them the hair and little tear drop looking root comes out? Would mirco-dermabrasion help me? How and what is it?

    • ANSWER:
      heres a question for you???....is the bumps on your legs on your theighs? cus i have the smae promblem and microdermabrasion will not work on it..its a skin condition called keratosis pilaris.. here is a website that you can check it out

  13. QUESTION:
    how to get rid of chicken skin under your eyes?
    its like bumps n stuff but not pimples. they have been there for as long as I can remmber and i want them gone. any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      It could be keratosis pilaris which is a hereditary condition and there is no known cure.

      This condition usually affects backs of upper arms and forearms but also is known to affect thighs, buttocks and even face. The only place it cannot affect is palms of hands and soles of feet as there are no hair follicles for the build up of keratin (the same substance that is in your hair, skin and nails).

      You can try microdermabrasion but the under eye area is very delicate. All of the treatments used to make this condition better contain AHA's or lactic acid or Vitamin A.

      The eye area is such a delicate thing and I would recommend that you go to a dermatologist who is capable of assessing and diagnosing your problem and who may be able to suggest something to rectify it.

      Good luck.

  14. QUESTION:
    What can I do for this naturally?
    My skin is horrible, and really sensitive, and I have like...Keratosis Pilaris, and weird perminent rash things and stufff...
    So is there anything I can do naturally to even the skin tone, and make it more normal? Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      This is a harmless skin condition that tends to occur during the winter time or when your skin gets dry and dehydrated. For the arms I think the easiest way to keep it under control would be to use a glycolic cleanser and a daily exfoliant (a glycolic daily exfoliant or a microdermabrasion scrub.) The bumps are probably too stubborn for a regular scrub. Follow this with a moisturizer containing sunscreen to seal in your moisture barrier and you should have smooth arms in no time.

      The glycolic cleanser that Natural skin shop sells is gentle enough to use every day and leaves you feeling so clean, but not dry or tight.

      www.naturalskinshop.com

  15. QUESTION:
    How can treat some bumps that i have on my elbows?
    they look red and white flakes and they are spreading. I have been using so many creams and they dont even go away. I even got them burned. they said there called chicken bumps

    • ANSWER:
      "Chicken bumps" or "chicken skin" is actually a condition called Keratosis Pilaris.

      The name keratosis pilaris comes from the process of “keratinization,” our body’s process for building up the epidermis, or outer-most layer of skin. When the body performs this process too much, too often, or in the wrong areas, excess skin collects around the hair follicles. This creates a miniature cone or clogged pore, much like a small pimple.

      While there is no cure for KP, there are some treatments that minimize the appearance of the areas affected such as:

      -The process of using exfoliating (scrubs and loofahs), moisturizing (lotions), softening (creams), and applying anti-inflammatory agents (sarnol hc lotion).

      -Alpha Hydroxy Acids (AHAs). Glycolic acid and Lactic acid are two AHAs used to minimize the bumps through chemical exfoliation. Lactic Acid, which comes in over-the-counter and prescription formulas, is also an effective ingredient for alleviating the appearance of KP bumps.

      -Urea. As with conditions that result in extremely dry and scaly skin, such as psoriasis, eczema, and ichtyosis, you may find your KP affected areas unresponsive to milder treatments. In this case you’ll want to try a product containing urea. You may have to see a dermatologist for some stronger versions of this.

      -Glytone’s KP Kit. As KP often responds well to a multi-faceted approach, consider a therapy regimen that incorporates more than one product, such as Glytone’s KP Kit. Since the goal of KP treatment is to exfoliate, moisturize, and prevent discoloring at the inflamed areas, you’ll find it handy to have both treatments and a gentle puff in one convenient package.

      -Vitamin A Treatments. Sufferers of acne and KP have used vitamin A creams such as Retin A, Tazorac and Differin for years. And while the potency of these products is undeniably effective at treating blemishes, the skin can become dry and pinkishly raw with overuse. Use a small amount of cream applied to the affected areas only once every other day or night. Stronger versions of this can also be obtained from a dermatologist.

      -Soothing Topical Anti-inflammatories. If youre having itching, this is the main thing that will help you. For an anti-inflammatory with the added benefit of itch relief, Sarnol-HC provides the effectiveness of 1% hydrocortisone. Sarnol HC Lotion’s base compounds help soften, smooth and moisturize the skin. Any other 1% hydrocortisone cream/lotion will work as well.

      If none of those treatments work for you, the strongest treatment yet is:

      -Microdermabrasion. Microdermabrasion therapies offered through visits to your dermatologist may be the last resort for sufferers of KP, but they can also be costly and inconvenient. However, there are a couple of at-home microdermabrasion products that, when used regularly, can have a similar glowing effect. Neova Microdermabrasion Scrub and Peter Thomas Roth AHA/BHA Face and Body Polish are excellent OTC alternatives.

      As with any long-term goal, persistence is the key to treating keratosis pilaris. It is, after all, a chronic condition that requires long term treatment. But chronic doesn’t mean panic. Regular treatment through the specialized products above will go a long way toward preventing new “chicken skin bumps.”

      Hope this wasnt too long, and very helpful for you.

      I have several relatives with KP, and simply exfoliating in the shower, moisturizing, and using hydrocortisone cream has worked wonders!

      Feel free to message me or email me with further questions, and see my source below for more information.

      RN

  16. QUESTION:
    How can i get rid of them?
    i have these little tiny bumps on my forehead and cheeks. They're not pimples or spots or belemishes or whatever you call them, they're little bumps. It's really wierd.. If i tilt my head in the light they become visible, but from straight on you cant see them..

    They're rather noticeable though, unless everybody stands directly infront of me, they can see them.

    What are they and how can i get rid of them?

    I wash my face twice daily with a gentle clenser, and exfoliate every other day.

    • ANSWER:
      It could be keratosis piliris.. I have it too... THis is a minor case i guess you could say...
      http://www.google.com/imgres?q=keratosis+pilaris+face&hl=en&biw=1280&bih=594&gbv=2&tbm=isch&tbnid=Qk0o9QzpGI1_3M:&imgrefurl=http://www.laser-derm.com/Microdermabrasion.htm&docid=mh87bYvOTiNlnM&w=329&h=268&ei=kFVdTpjyN9TF0AHYy9iSAw&zoom=1

      There are some face washes like kP duty... Heres a link

      http://www.sephora.com/browse/product.jhtml;jsessionid=05OBRHVU1EXYUCV0KRTQ5UQ?id=P122302&shouldPaginate=true&categoryId=5762

  17. QUESTION:
    Does microdermabrasion help reduce the appearance of keratosis pilaris?

    If you have keratosis pilaris, what have u done to help reduce the apperance. I ask because I have it and want to wear short sleeves with the nice weather, but kp prevents me from doing so :(
    Thank you so much for your answers so far ♥

    • ANSWER:
      My best friend had the same problem as you (she is 30). This is what she did (after trying many at home remedies and a few medium chemical peels). She has a series of 8 microderma professional treatments and bought one of those at home kits and used it several times a week for a few weeks. Now the skin on her arms looks very good, it's like she never had the keratosis. she still uses the microderma kit once a week for maintenance. I believe its the body kit form Neutrogena, but there are a lot of other options out there that can help you.
      microderma exfoliates only the top layer of skin, not hurting it in any way, but thus cleans the inside of pores and follicules and reduces the cicken skin appearance.
      hope this helps.

  18. QUESTION:
    what works best for keratosis pilaris?
    I have just been recently diagnosed with keratosis pilaris. what can work best for this skin condition bc my doctor didnt tell me what to use on it or didnt even prescribe me anything for it. so maybe somebody can help me out with this problem

    • ANSWER:
      Many treatment options and skin-care recipes are available for controlling the symptoms of KP. Many patients have very good temporary improvement following a regular skin-care program of lubrication. As a general rule of thumb, treatment needs to be continuous. Since there is no available cure or universally effective treatment for KP, the list of potential lotions and creams is long. It is important to keep in mind that as with any condition, no therapy is uniformly effective in all people. Complete clearing may not be possible. In some cases, KP may also improve or clear spontaneously without any treatment.

      General measures to prevent excessive skin dryness, such as using mild soapless cleansers, are recommended. Frequent skin lubrication is the mainstay of treatment for nearly all cases. Best results may be achieved with combination therapy using topical products and physical treatments like gentle exfoliation, professional manual extraction of whiteheads, facials, microdermabrasion, and chemical peels.

      Sample treatment for a patient with mild to moderate keratosis pilaris:

      1. Wash area with Glysal cleanser once a day.
      2. Pat skin dry.
      3. Apply Salex or AmLactin lotion in morning.
      4. Apply tazarotene (Tazorac) or tretinoin (Retin-A) cream every other night.
      5. Get a monthly microdermabrasion and glycolic treatment with physician.

      Mild cases of KP may be improved with basic over-the-counter moisturizers such as Cetaphil or Lubriderm lotions. Additional available therapeutic options for more difficult cases of KP include lactic-acid lotions (AmLactin, Lac-Hydrin), alpha-hydroxy-acid lotions (Glytone, glycolic body lotions), urea cream (Carmol 10, Carmol 20, Carmol 40, Urix 40), salicylic acid (Salex lotion), and topical steroid creams (triamcinolone 0.1%, Locoid Lipocream), retinoic-acid products like Retin-A, Tazorac, and adapalene (Differin). There are also specially mixed "designer" combination, all-in-one prescription creams with multiple ingredients such as tretinoin 0.1%, hydroquinone 6%, and fluocinonide 0.05%. Another specially compounded combination prescription cream is a preparation of 2%-3% salicylic acid in 20% urea cream. These creams applied once or twice a day help to decrease the residual dry rough bumps.

      The affected area should be washed once or twice a day with a gentle wash like Cetaphil or Dove. Acne-prone skin may benefit from more therapeutic washes like Glysal, Proactiv, salicylic acid, or benzoyl peroxide. Lotions should be gently massaged into the affected area two to three times a day. Irritated or abraded skin should be treated only with bland moisturizers until the inflammation resolves.

      Occasionally, physicians may prescribe a short seven- to 10-day course of a medium-potency, emollient-based topical steroid cream once or twice a day for inflamed red areas. Intermittent weekly or biweekly dosing of topical retinoids seem quite effective and well tolerated, but the response is usually only partial. After initial clearing with stronger medications, milder maintenance regimens are used.

      Persistent skin discoloration called hyperpigmentation may be treated with fading creams like prescription-grade hydroquinone 4%, kojic acid, or azelaic acid 15%-20%. Special compounded creams for particularly resistant skin discoloration using higher concentrations of hydroquinone 6%, 8%, and 10% may also be formulated by a compounding pharmacist.

      Many treatments have been used in KP without consistent results. As there is no miraculous cure or universally effective treatment for KP, it is important to proceed with mild caution and lower expectations.

      A menu of available in-office physician or "medspa" performed treatments may be helpful as adjunctive treatment. Options include various chemical peels, dermabrasion, microdermabrasion, photodynamic therapy (PDT), ALA, Levulan, blue light, laser, photofacials, and Intense Pulsed Light (IPL). Overall, a combination of in-office treatments and a physician-directed home-maintenance skin-care routine is ideal.

      Severe cases of KP have been treated with isotretinoin (Accutane) pills for several months. Accutane is generally a very potent oral medication reserved for severe, resistant, or scarring cases of acne. Its use in KP would be considered off-label (not FDA approved) and not routine.

      Photodynamic therapy with aminolevulinic acid (Levulan) has been anecdotally reported as effective, but this successful use of off-label photodynamic therapy requires further trials.

      Microdermabrasion is a safe, minimally invasive, in-office procedure whereby the skin is gently exfoliated. Using vacuum-assisted suction, the skin is rubbed with an abrasive particle such as fine, powdery aluminum crystals or small diamond tips. Microdermabrasion assists in removing the excess keratin and outer layers of the epidermis (skin) in a controlled manner. As with other treatments for KP, there are small group observations an

  19. QUESTION:
    Does anybody have keratosis pilaris, if you do, how do you get rid of it?

    • ANSWER:
      To the brain child above---it's a SKIN CONDITION you don't die from it---GEEZ do some research before you answer a question....!!!!!! I have it, it is CHRONIC which means, no, you cannot get RID of it... Products used to treat keratosis pilaris include: Glycolic Acid (AHA), Lactic Acid, Urea, Vitamin A Treatments, Microdermabrasion. Other Recommended Treatments for Keratosis Pilaris Include:

      Glycolic Acid: MD Formulations Hand & Body Creme, Philosophy Soul Owner, MenScience Daily Body Wash, ZENMED™ AHA/BHA Complex,

      Kiss My Face Alpha and Aloe Oil Free Moisturizer, ZENMED™ Stretta

      Lactic Acid: AmLactin 12%, Epilyt Lotion, Aquaphor Baby Healing Ointment, LactiCare Lotion

      Urea: Carmol 10 Lotion, Carmol 20 Cream

      Vitamin A Treatments: Afirm 3X, SkinCeuticals Retinol 1.0 Microdermabrasion: Dermanew, L'Oreal ReFinish Chest, Arms & Hands, Neutrogena At Home MicroDermabrasion Body System

      Scar Treatments: Mederma, Cellex-C High Potency Serum, ZENMED™ Scar Treatment Kit

      Other: Tend Skin, Olay Complete Body Wash with Vitamins and Shea Butter for Extra Dry Skin, St. Ives Medicated Apricot Scrub, Peter Thomas Roth Silica Face & Body Polish, CLARISONIC Skin Care Brush, Juara Skincare Candlenut Body Polish

      Prescription Treatment

      » Salex 6% Cream & Lotion - keratolytic used to aid in removing excessive keratin in certain skin conditions.

      Cosmetics and Corrective Make-up

      » Dermablend » Sheer Cover

      I am rather lucky---I have a mild case---it is on my elbows and under my arms and on my thighs and inside my legs and various other places but on me it only looks like small red goosebumps

  20. QUESTION:
    will exfoliating gloves help red spots on my upper arm?
    i have small red spots on my arm i think its Keratosis Pilaris will exfoliating help

    • ANSWER:
      Physical exfoliation is a double-edge sword, but it is not preferred for keratosis pilaris. Too rough can make more redness.

      The CAUSE(S):
      The exact cause is unknown, but keratosis pilaris (KP) is developed because of hyperkeratinization (disorder of inner lining of hair follicle). Excessive keratin (tough protein) blocks the opening of hair follicles, thus, leads to hyperkeratosis (thickening of the stratum corneum of epidermis). KP is observed as benign bumps that are usually white, sometimes red, and generally do not hurt or itch. KP affects 50-80% adolescent and 40% adults.

      To CORRECT KP:
      1)Wash the affected area with a gentle cleanser
      2)Use an over-the-counter topical exfoliant/keratolytic product with one or a combination of the following ingredients: glycolic acid, lactic acid, malic acid, mandelic acid, resorcinol, salicylic acid, sulfur, and urea.
      3)Use an over-the-counter topical corticosteroid like 1% hydrocortisone cream. This should only be used short-term because it can thin the skin if you use it too frequently.
      4)Moisturizer with a well-formulated lotion or cream.

      To PREVENT KP:
      Since the exact cause is still unknown, there is no way to prevent that particular cause from occurring in the future. You can control the conditions of KP, however:
      1)Avoid harsh soaps like bar soaps
      2)Avoid scrubs
      3)Take a warm shower, pat dry, and then apply topical products.

      Improvement can take a few weeks to a one month with diligence, compliance, and patience depending on the severity of KP. If the over-the counter therapies are ineffective, then you should visit a board-certified dermatologist and request a prescription-strength retinoid, keratolytic agent(s), or immunomodulators. Or, you can pay for a series of chemical peels or microdermabrasion. Chemical peels are better than microdermabrasion unless your skin is too sensitive with the acids. Microdermabrasion is a waste of money in my opinion, but it is still an option.

  21. QUESTION:
    im 17years,i have keratosis pilari on my arms, neck black, streght marks i really hate my body what can i do?
    i really hate my body because i am so young and i would love to used all the cute things the teen girls like me use but i cant. people always tell me that i have a nice body they call me thick but for me thickness is fat i dont know what can i do?

    • ANSWER:
      The CAUSE(S):
      The exact cause is unknown, but keratosis pilaris (KP) is developed because of hyperkeratinization (disorder of inner lining of hair follicle). Excessive keratin (tough protein) blocks the opening of hair follicles, thus, leads to hyperkeratosis (thickening of the stratum corneum of epidermis). KP is observed as benign bumps that are usually white, sometimes red, and generally do not hurt or itch. KP affects 50-80% adolescent and 40% adults.

      To CORRECT KP:
      1)Wash the affected area with a gentle cleanser
      2)Use an over-the-counter topical exfoliant/keratolytic product with one or a combination of the following ingredients: glycolic acid, lactic acid, malic acid, mandelic acid, resorcinol, salicylic acid, sulfur, and urea.
      3)Use an over-the-counter topical corticosteroid like 1% hydrocortisone cream. This should only be used short-term because it can thin the skin if you use it too frequently.
      4)Moisturizer with a well-formulated lotion or cream.

      To PREVENT KP:
      Since the exact cause is still unknown, there is no way to prevent that particular cause from occurring in the future. You can control the conditions of KP, however:
      1)Avoid harsh soaps like bar soaps
      2)Avoid scrubs
      3)Take a warm shower, pat dry, and then apply topical products.

      Improvement can take a few weeks to a one month with diligence, compliance, and patience depending on the severity of KP. If the over-the counter therapies are ineffective, then you should visit a board-certified dermatologist and request a prescription-strength retinoid, keratolytic agent(s), or immunomodulators. Or, you can pay for a series of chemical peels or microdermabrasion. Chemical peels are better than microdermabrasion unless your skin is too sensitive with the acids. Microdermabrasion is a waste of money in my opinion, but it is still an option.

  22. QUESTION:
    Does OIL PULLING help cure Keratosis Pilaris?
    My KP has gotten worser and worser. It has been veyr red and bump. It also has a lot of scars from me scrubbing it in the showers. I'm wondering if OIL PULLING (oilpulling.com) will help cure it? I have braces so will the oil harm my braces? Will it loosen up the metal and make it rust?

    • ANSWER:
      Try this instead:
      KP Duty Body Scrub
      What it is:
      A dermatologist body scrub with chemical and physical medi-exfoliation.

      What it is formulated to do:
      Medical-quality exfoliation requires more than scrubbing. Dry skin, flaky patches, and "chicken skin" bumps are held together by bonds that physical exfoliation alone can't break. KP Duty body scrub delivers serious medi-exfoliation for deeper, more thorough results. This dual-action chemical and physical exfoliator blends the best of a chemical peel and microdermabrasion into a single, easy-to-use treatment. Smooth, non-abrasive, synthetic beads lift away dead skin cells.

      What else you need to know:
      This enhanced exfoliation helps prepare skin for self tanning and post-bathing treatments (including body acne, keratosis pilaris (chicken skin bumps), shaving bumps, ingrown hairs, and bleaching) and is infused with green tea and willow bark to reduce irritation and redness typically associated with routine in-office exfoliation.

  23. QUESTION:
    what geets rid of achne marks, I have it on my back and arms and it sucks i hate it i want to wear a bikini!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately if they are older acne scars, there is no home remedy that will be able to get rid of them completely. If you have the money to spend, the best way to get rid of them is to do a microdermabrasion in a professional dermatologist's office. It will typically take about 6 treatments every 2 weeks for about 0 a pop, but it really does work.

      If you don't have the money or the time to go that route, your best bet would be to start using an acne body wash immediately to stop any new acne flare-ups. Then you can always use an acne spot treatment on your new larger pimples. Also, a tan can help mask the uneven color of the zits and in moderation, can dry out some of the pimples you have. Be careful because if you overdry your skin, you will actually get more zits.

      Be careful that the bumps on your arms is actually acne and not keratosis pilaris, a hereditary condition characterized by bumps of keratin protein in the hair openings. It is common on the upper arms and cannot be treated like regular acne. The best thing to do in this case is to smooth down the bumps by exfoliating daily with a loofah or Buf Puf sponge (in the drugstore.) Only a dermatologist will know for sure and it is always best if you are uncomfortable with something skin related to get an office visit and be sure.

      I hope that this helps.

  24. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris?
    What are some really good products to treat Keratosis Pilaris but are still cheap?? Also should I exfoliate every day??

    Is there anything i can eat/stop eating to prevent KP from showing? I hear fatty acids are good......

    Any Suggestions?
    10 points for best answerr!

    • ANSWER:
      There is a prduct called "KP Duty" KP Duty is a concentrated treatment with potent antioxidant Green Tea, moisture replenishing Hyaluronic Acid and texturizing Dimethicone. It is a little expensive (.00) but it works very well.

      Another product is Microdermabrasion Body Polish... it exfoliates and smoothes tiny, hard skin bumps allowing Repairing Body Balm to penetrate pores. Use up to 2x per week.

      The most effective over-the-counter products to treat Keratosis Pilaris vary from person to person. If traditional scrubs and exfoliants aren’t as effective as you’d like, try Summers Laboratories' Keralyt Gel, which incorporates 6% salicylic acid, and has been shown to be one of the more effective therapies in many cases.

  25. QUESTION:
    [Repost] I need an at home microdermabrasion set... DETAILS INSIDE! please help!?
    Okay, so i do have sensitive skin, but only on my cheeks due to a mild case of Keratosis Pilaris. I am going to be using micro. to fade a few acne scars that i have. (mom's wedding this saturday, need them as faded as possible by then.) Would i still be okay to use it? Any other suggestions that are relatively cheap, but able to do at home, and work effectively?

    • ANSWER:
      you can still use any regular at home kit, just don't press down or spend too much time on your cheeks. If they are very sensitive then you could just work around them.
      I also have sensitive cheeks and I use a loreal at home kit, when i'm using the scrub sometimes it burns if i press down too hard but when i put on the lotion that comes with it it stops burning. Your skin will be a little more sensitive after you use the kits. Just make sure you use sunscreen when you go outside, if you dont you'll burn very easily (I learned this the hard way)
      I'm not sure if you'll be able to get what you want by saturday. The kits are only suposed to be used a few times a week at most and if you use it every day or more than once a day it's going to make your skin way too sensitive. The way they work is to peel layers of skin off and it would take a month or so to really see any difference with the acne scars.

  26. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris ("Chicken Skin")?
    Does it only show up on your upper arms, or can it be on the entire arm? I think I have keratosis pilaris, but I have it on my entire arm. It's really light on the lower part of may arm and is barely noticeable, but it is there. It's pretty bad on my upper arm tho...

    • ANSWER:
      Most people with keratosis pilaris don't know they have it. While KP resembles goosebumps, it is characterized by the appearance of small, rough bumps on the skin. Primarily, it appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms, but can also occur on thighs and buttocks or any body part except palms or soles. (Often confused with acne.)

      Keratosis pilaris is unsightly but completely harmless. KP tends to be worse during the winter months or other times of low humidity when the skin dries out. It may also occur and/or worsen among pregnant women or show up after childbirth.
      Keratosis Pilaris (KP) cannot be cured, however
      it can be treated.

      There is no cure for keratosis pilaris, since KP is a chronic, genetic follicular disease, however treatments are available. Results from treatments vary and can often be disappointing. With persistence, most people will see satisfactory improvement. It is recommended that treatment not be discontinued because the buildup of keratin (the hard protein in the skin, nails, and hair) will continue to reform around the hair follicles.

      For Keratosis Pilaris, Dermatologists recommend chemical exfoliants that are found in alpha hydroxy moisturizers, such as Eucerin’s Plus Intensive Repair Creme, rather than physical exfoliants, such as a loofah sponge, which can be too abrasive on the skin

      Other Recommended Treatments for Keratosis Pilaris Include:

      Glycolic Acid: MD Formulations Hand & Body Creme, Philosophy Soul Owner, MenScience Daily Body Wash, ZENMED™ AHA/BHA Complex,

      Kiss My Face Alpha and Aloe Oil Free Moisturizer, ZENMED™ Stretta

      Lactic Acid: AmLactin 12%, Epilyt Lotion, Aquaphor Baby Healing Ointment, LactiCare Lotion

      Urea: Carmol 10 Lotion, Carmol 20 Cream

      Vitamin A Treatments: Afirm 3X, SkinCeuticals Retinol 1.0 Microdermabrasion: Dermanew, L'Oreal ReFinish Chest, Arms & Hands, Neutrogena At Home MicroDermabrasion Body System

      Scar Treatments: Mederma, Cellex-C High Potency Serum, ZENMED™ Scar Treatment Kit

      Other: Tend Skin, Olay Complete Body Wash with Vitamins and Shea Butter for Extra Dry Skin, St. Ives Medicated Apricot Scrub, Peter Thomas Roth Silica Face & Body Polish, CLARISONIC Skin Care Brush, Juara Skincare Candlenut Body Polish

  27. QUESTION:
    PLEASE HELP: Home Microdermabrasion kits?
    I want to invest in one and noticed the Shoppers Drug Mart has its own brand and I am wondering if anyone has tried it. Can it be used on your arms and legs? I was originally going to get the Loreal one, but then decided on the Neutrogena one because it has a hand held thingy. Does the scrubber make the microdermabrasion better than without? I really don't want to spend on a kit if it is going ot be crap. The Life Brand is only 14.99 on sale this Sat and has same ingredients as Loreal and others. What should I do please help :)
    It would mainly be used on my arms. I have mild keratosis pilaris and want to wear short sleeves for summer and hoping this will help :(

    • ANSWER:
      I'm flawless so I dont know how to help you I have perfect skin good luck though

  28. QUESTION:
    I have severe Keratosis Pilaris seems like it won't clear up?
    I have very bad keratosis pilaris on my thighs and legs. it's extremely dry almost like alligator skin and it looks like i have goosebumps all the time. i've had it for about 4-5 years, it wasn't as bad as it was now back then. it looks like it's getting worse. it's so embarassing and ugly looking i do not like to show my thighs they look horrible. So i've tried using non fragrance soaps, cocoa butter, herbal oil, even triamcinolone which is used for eczema treatment. I've tried the natural stuff and none of it works. it's really aggravating to me those rough dry bumps and patchy looking skin just won't go away! does anyone know of any over the counter treatment particularly for this condition that will clear up the bumps and dry patches on my legs and thighs, or anyone have the same problem as me and have a suggestion for something they used that had good results?
    i just found out about this stuff called AmLactin XL. is this stuff good for clearing up keratosis pilaris?

    • ANSWER:
      The CAUSE(S):
      The exact cause is unknown, but keratosis pilaris (KP) is developed because of hyperkeratinization (disorder of inner lining of hair follicle). Excessive keratin (tough protein) blocks the opening of hair follicles, thus, leads to hyperkeratosis (thickening of the stratum corneum of epidermis). KP is observed as benign bumps that are usually white, sometimes red, and generally do not hurt or itch. KP affects 50-80% adolescent and 40% adults.

      To CORRECT KP:
      1)Wash the affected area with a gentle cleanser
      2)Use an over-the-counter topical exfoliant/keratolytic product with one or a combination of the following ingredients: glycolic acid, lactic acid, malic acid, mandelic acid, resorcinol, salicylic acid, sulfur, and urea.
      3)Use an over-the-counter topical corticosteroid like 1% hydrocortisone cream. This should only be used short-term because it can thin the skin if you use it too frequently.
      4)Moisturizer with a well-formulated lotion or cream.

      To PREVENT KP:
      Since the exact cause is still unknown, there is no way to prevent that particular cause from occurring in the future. You can control the conditions of KP, however:
      1)Avoid harsh soaps like bar soaps
      2)Avoid scrubs
      3)Take a warm shower, pat dry, and then apply topical products.

      Improvement can take a few weeks to a one month with diligence, compliance, and patience depending on the severity of KP. If the over-the counter therapies are ineffective, then you should visit a board-certified dermatologist and request a prescription-strength retinoid, keratolytic agent(s), or immunomodulators. Or, you can pay for a series of chemical peels or microdermabrasion. Chemical peels are better than microdermabrasion unless your skin is too sensitive with the acids. Microdermabrasion is a waste of money in my opinion, but it is still an option.

      If you want product recommendations, then you can email me.

  29. QUESTION:
    Apple cider vinegar for KERATOSIS PILARIS skin?
    I have keratosis pilaris very badly, and have since birth, a few years ago I tried some very expensive lotion from the dermatologist and it never helped, it was thick and gunky and it just felt like vaseline on my skin. I hated it. Then I got into a relationship with a guy that didn't care that my skin was covered with keratosis pilaris, but we broke up and I'm thinking about getting back into the dating scene but I can't bring myself to do it because of how bad my skin is. It's gotten much worse over the past few months... I heard that you can put Apple cider vinegar on your skin after you get out of the shower to help with KP.
    ~Do you know if that works?
    ~What does apple cider vinegar smell like? Because it's going to suck if I have to rub that into my skin and walk around smelling like vinegar all the time.
    ~I've heard it works after a few weeks of using it, if it does, will i have to continue use to keep my KP gone, or will I be able to go without using it everyday on my skin?

    If you know anything else or any other remedies, please let me know.
    Does anyone else on here have it? My entire legs are covered with it. And my arms. But i don't have it anywhere else.... I hate it.

    • ANSWER:
      What did your doctor prescribed you? Did you used as instructed? Were you compliant and diligent? Did you avoid factors that could make it worse and could have impede the effectiveness of the prescription? The prescription could have worked. Or, it was just not the right one for you. If apple cider vinegar works, then cosmetic chemists would not have to synthesize strong prescription drug would they? Vinegar is a weak acid like an hydroxy acid you find in some skin care product. It is nothing special. Try it if you like. if you KP is severe, I highly doubt it will improve a thing.

      Perhaps you should find a second board-certified dermatologist. Have you tried salicylic acid chemical peels?

      The CAUSE(S):
      The exact cause is unknown, but keratosis pilaris (KP) is developed because of hyperkeratinization (disorder of inner lining of hair follicle). Excessive keratin (tough protein) blocks the opening of hair follicles, thus, leads to hyperkeratosis (thickening of the stratum corneum of epidermis). KP is observed as benign bumps that are usually white, sometimes red, and generally do not hurt or itch. KP affects 50-80% adolescent and 40% adults.

      To CORRECT KP:
      1)Wash the affected area with a gentle cleanser
      2)Use an over-the-counter topical exfoliant/keratolytic product with one or a combination of the following ingredients: glycolic acid, lactic acid, malic acid, mandelic acid, resorcinol, salicylic acid, sulfur, and urea.
      3)Use an over-the-counter topical corticosteroid like 1% hydrocortisone cream. This should only be used short-term because it can thin the skin if you use it too frequently.
      4)Moisturizer with a well-formulated lotion or cream.

      To PREVENT KP:
      Since the exact cause is still unknown, there is no way to prevent that particular cause from occurring in the future. You can control the conditions of KP, however:
      1)Avoid harsh soaps like bar soaps
      2)Avoid scrubs
      3)Take a warm shower, pat dry, and then apply topical products.

      Improvement can take a few weeks to a one month with diligence, compliance, and patience depending on the severity of KP. If the over-the counter therapies are ineffective, then you should visit a board-certified dermatologist and request a prescription-strength retinoid, keratolytic agent(s), or immunomodulators. Or, you can pay for a series of chemical peels or microdermabrasion. Chemical peels are better than microdermabrasion unless your skin is too sensitive with the acids. Microdermabrasion is a waste of money in my opinion, but it is still an option.

      If you want product recommendations, then you can email me.

  30. QUESTION:
    secrets to getting rid of KP on my arms? please ive had it for 3 years and i cant stand 2 look at it anymore?
    kp.. i dont remember the exact name but its a skin thing, on my upper arms, its not itchy or painful or anything.. just there looking gross, kinda like acne. anyone tried anything that works for them? please help thanks so much.

    • ANSWER:
      The name of it is Keratosis Pilaris. I have it too, little white/red bumps on my upper arms/legs. Since it is caused by dead skin cells clogging the pores, the best solution would be exfoliation/microdermabrasion. Go to eBay and look up microdermabrasion cloth and click on the first auction. That is what has worked best for me so far. Also, put on an oil free moisturizer after exfoliating your skin. Best of luck!

  31. QUESTION:
    Small pimple like things on my arms. Please help?
    I've started to develop these little things on my arms And I pop them like pimples. I have been leaving red marks and I really want to know what they are. Any help would be great

    • ANSWER:
      This is hard to know what it is without seeing it but I have a similar condition on my arms. I have several red bumps with small white heads on them. They rarely itch nor are irritating. They get worse or brighter with the sun and hot water. This condition is called keratosis pilaris. Google photos and see if that's what you have. It's an over production of skin cells and is not curable. The only way I know to treat this is microdermabrasions. I had been doing them on my bumps and it helped a lot. Since its an overproduction of skin cells, it is not curable as the skin continues to produce. But the micros certainly help!

  32. QUESTION:
    How to take care of Keratosis Pilaris?
    Hello Peeps,
    Around the age of 13 i started getting these red bumps on my arm after a while i found out this was called Keratosis Pilaris. It's being said that atleast 40 to 50% of the world population has it. How come i dont have the skin of models because they never have these weird red bumps. How can you take care of it? Will it decrease if i go tanning and what is the best way to take care of it. This sometimes has influence on my self confidence because not everyone has these red bumps and bumpy arms.
    Please help me ! :'(

    • ANSWER:
      The CAUSE(S):
      The exact cause is unknown, but keratosis pilaris (KP) is developed because of hyperkeratinization (disorder of inner lining of hair follicle). Excessive keratin (tough protein) blocks the opening of hair follicles, thus, leads to hyperkeratosis (thickening of the stratum corneum of epidermis). KP is observed as benign bumps that are usually white, sometimes red, and generally do not hurt or itch. KP affects 50-80% adolescent and 40% adults.

      To CORRECT KP:
      1)Wash the affected area with a gentle cleanser
      2)Use an over-the-counter topical exfoliant/keratolytic product with one or a combination of the following ingredients: glycolic acid, lactic acid, malic acid, mandelic acid, resorcinol, salicylic acid, sulfur, and urea.
      3)Use an over-the-counter topical corticosteroid like 1% hydrocortisone cream. This should only be used short-term because it can thin the skin if you use it too frequently.
      4)Moisturizer with a well-formulated lotion or cream.

      To PREVENT KP:
      Since the exact cause is still unknown, there is no way to prevent that particular cause from occurring in the future. You can control the conditions of KP, however:
      1)Avoid harsh soaps like bar soaps
      2)Avoid scrubs
      3)Take a warm shower, pat dry, and then apply topical products.

      Improvement can take a few weeks to a one month with diligence, compliance, and patience depending on the severity of KP. If the over-the counter therapies are ineffective, then you should visit a board-certified dermatologist and request a prescription-strength retinoid, keratolytic agent(s), or immunomodulators. Or, you can pay for a series of chemical peels or microdermabrasion. Chemical peels are better than microdermabrasion unless your skin is too sensitive with the acids. Microdermabrasion is a waste of money in my opinion, but it is still an option.

  33. QUESTION:
    my upper arms have lil pimple "like" things and whiteheads, as much as i moisturized, it doesnt work!!grr.
    my skin there is bumpy and uneven and some areas have different color patches, what is wrong? are their home remedies?? thank u

    • ANSWER:
      You may have Keratosis Pilaris, which makes a lot of bumps on your upper arms. There's no cure, but microdermabrasion and stuff like that can help. go to www.helpforkp.com

  34. QUESTION:
    I have small bumpy spots on the tops of my arms and my upper thighs, do I have Keratosis Pilaris?
    Hi ive has these spots on my arms and legs for YEARS, about 8 years. I just thought it would go away but its not. Im a 13 year old boy and i just want them to go away as it really damages my confidence. Like in P.E at school i try and hide them... I think i have keratosis pilaris and ive heard its incurable which makes me think im going to be like this forever :( My brother has alopecia so my mum does not like me talking about my 'puny' spots when my brother lives with a 'hair system' kind of thing. Are there any scrubs or creme i can use to make them les visable, my mum says i should just scrub away at them but no avail. Can someone help?

    • ANSWER:
      keratosis pilaris is a harmless skin condition that tends to occur during the winter time or when your skin gets dry and dehydrated. For the arms I think the easiest way to keep it under control would be to use a glycolic cleanser and a daily exfoliant (a glycolic daily exfoliant or a microdermabrasion scrub.) The bumps are probably too stubborn for a regular body scrub. Follow this with a body moisturizer containing sunscreen to seal in your moisture barrier and you should have smooth arms in no time.

      The glycolic cleanser that Natural skin shop sells is gentle enough to use every day and leaves you feeling so clean, but not dry or tight. Also the Clarisonic brush with a body wash also works great!

  35. QUESTION:
    What causes keratosis pilaris?

    • ANSWER:
      Causes of Keratosis Pilaris

      Keratosis pilaris is not a very well known skin condition. Up to 40% of adults all over the globe suffer from it, and over half of them don’t even know it. Keratosis pilaris is genetic in origin but the precise cause has not yet been determined. Still, many doctors believe that the cause of Keratosis pilaris is the overproduction of keratin inside the skin. This excess gets trapped inside the follicle, developing a bump.

      It is also thought to be a disorder of keratinisation in which the sticky cells that line the hair follicle form a horny plug instead of exfoliating. This widens the pores making them appear more obvious than elsewhere. Often a curled hair can be identified under the skin.

      Keratosis pilaris is a skin condition frequently seen on the upper arms, buttocks and thighs. The skin cells that normally flake off as a fine dust form plugs in the hair follicles. These appear as small pimples that have a dry ''sandpaper'' feeling. They are usually white, but when inflamed they appear rather red. They usually don't itch or hurt, except with extreme changes in temperature.

      This condition is particularly common among teenagers (up to 80%). Its manifestation is very common on the upper arms, especially on the external side of the arm. It may occur in babies where it tends to be most obvious on the cheeks. It may remain for years but in most cases it gradually disappears usually before age 30. Keratosis pilaris is unsightly but completely harmless. It is usually worse during the winter months. The worsening is directly associated with low humidity, skin dryness and tight clothes that “rub” the bumps at al times. Some people have stated that this condition worsened during pregnancy and/or after childbirth.

      Some doctors as well as patients believe that food is related with keratosis pilaris. According to their own experience, spicy foods tend to increase the bumps and make them more noticeable. On the other hand, patients that reduced or eliminated milk and its derivatives from their diet claimed to have had a considerable improvement.

      Treatment for keratosis pilaris is not necessary, and unfortunately, it often has disappointing results. With persistence, most people can get improve this aesthetic condition by moisturizing and replenishing the lipid content of the skin regularly.

      The plugged pores can be removed by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth, stiff brush, or 'Buf-Puf'. Also, a good microdermabrasion proceeding can help get rid of all the excess keratin.

      Prescription medicines may help, including some antibiotics like Erythromycin and Bactrim. If the swelling or redness of the bumps is getting worse, you should discuss with your doctor the use of topical retinoids. The derivatives of vitamin A can be very harsh for the skin, so be aware of all the symptoms you develop.

  36. QUESTION:
    why do we get a chicken skin? how do we get rid of it?
    i just noticed that some of the areas in my skin gets chicken skin :( what is the cause of this? How do i remove them

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis Pilaris (KP) is a very common skin condition often referred to as "chicken skin". If you have keratosis pilaris, you are not alone. Worldwide, keratosis pilaris affects an estimated 40 to 50% of the adult population and approximately 50 to 80% of all adolescents. Varying in degree, cases of KP can range from minimal to severe.

      Most people with keratosis pilaris don't know they have it. While KP resembles goosebumps, it is characterized by the appearance of small, rough bumps on the skin. Primarily, it appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms, but can also occur on thighs and buttocks or any body part except palms or soles. (Often confused with acne.)

      Keratosis pilaris is unsightly but completely harmless. KP tends to be worse during the winter months or other times of low humidity when the skin dries out. It may also occur and/or worsen among pregnant women or show up after childbirth.
      Keratosis Pilaris (aka: chicken skin bumps) on back of arm - Click here for products used to treat KP
      Keratosis Pilaris (KP) cannot be cured, however
      it can be treated.

      There is no cure for keratosis pilaris, since KP is a chronic, genetic follicular disease, however treatments are available. Results from treatments vary and can often be disappointing. With persistence, most people will see satisfactory improvement. It is recommended that treatment not be discontinued because the buildup of keratin (the hard protein in the skin, nails, and hair) will continue to reform around the hair follicles.

      » Products used to treat keratosis pilaris include: Glycolic Acid (AHA), Lactic Acid, Urea, Vitamin A Treatments, Microdermabrasion... Click here for treatment options.

  37. QUESTION:
    Does exfoliation really help with KP?
    Well, for my KP, I exfoliate with Apricot Scrub and then I pat my legs dry. Next, I rub Clindamycin lotion on them, and every other night I use Tretinoin cream. My legs are SMOOTH right now, and the bumps seem to be going away somewhat, but do you really think this will help my KP?

    • ANSWER:
      Physical exfoliation is not helpful for KP, rather chemical exfoliation. Yikes, you use apricot scrub?! That stuff can cause micro tears on your skin.

      The CAUSE(S):
      The exact cause is unknown, but keratosis pilaris (KP) is developed because of hyperkeratinization (disorder of inner lining of hair follicle). Excessive keratin (tough protein) blocks the opening of hair follicles, thus, leads to hyperkeratosis (thickening of the stratum corneum of epidermis). KP is observed as benign bumps that are usually white, sometimes red, and generally do not hurt or itch. KP affects 50-80% adolescent and 40% adults.

      To CORRECT KP:
      1)Wash the affected area with a gentle cleanser
      2)Use an over-the-counter topical exfoliant/keratolytic product with one or a combination of the following ingredients: glycolic acid, lactic acid, malic acid, mandelic acid, resorcinol, salicylic acid, sulfur, and urea.
      3)Use an over-the-counter topical corticosteroid like 1% hydrocortisone cream. This should only be used short-term because it can thin the skin if you use it too frequently.
      4)Moisturizer with a well-formulated lotion or cream.

      To PREVENT KP:
      Since the exact cause is still unknown, there is no way to prevent that particular cause from occurring in the future. You can control the conditions of KP, however:
      1)Avoid harsh soaps like bar soaps
      2)Avoid scrubs
      3)Take a warm shower, pat dry, and then apply topical products.

      Improvement can take a few weeks to a one month with diligence, compliance, and patience depending on the severity of KP. If the over-the counter therapies are ineffective, then you should visit a board-certified dermatologist and request a prescription-strength retinoid, keratolytic agent(s), or immunomodulators. Or, you can pay for a series of chemical peels or microdermabrasion. Chemical peels are better than microdermabrasion unless your skin is too sensitive with the acids. Microdermabrasion is a waste of money in my opinion, but it is still an option.

  38. QUESTION:
    I have a strange skin condition, I have these red bumps on my upper arms and thighs that Ive had all my life.
    Ive had these all my life and they're stupid. They dont harm me they just look ugly when i wear shorts or a very short sleeved t shirt. I dont know how to get rid of them. Does anyone know what I can do to get rid of them? Here is a picture I took of them on my thigh. http://i18.photobucket.com/albums/b148/cutiepi0204/08-05-08_1351.jpg

    • ANSWER:
      My sister has had it all her life (upper arms & thighs) and tried different treatments. She doesn't treat it any more and has gotten used to it. It's not noticeable on her until she points it out. I've got it too and I don't treat it either.

      It's called Keratosis Pilaris (KP) and is a very common skin condition often referred to as "chicken skin". Nearly half of the world's population has it to some degree.

      There is no cure, and KP is harmless.
      more information about it here:
      http://www.keratosis-pilaris.org/

      Some treatments for it are Glycolic Acid, Lactic Acid, Urea, Vitamin A Treatments, Microdermabrasion and are listed at this link:
      http://www.helpforkp.com/keratosis_pilaris_treatment_index.html

  39. QUESTION:
    Cure for redness of KP?
    I was diagnosed with KP early on in life, like age 6, having redness and bubmps on my face and upper arms. On my most recent visit to the dermatologist's, she said that I could only treat the bumps of my keratosis pilaris with medicated creams that she prescribed for me. She said that I couldn't do anything about the redness on my face, saying that it was just a "part of who I am." Yeah, well, that disapointed me, as I'm 16 and I want a change. :) When I went to the derm's a couple years ago, I was told that there was a laser treatment that could help the redness. Is there such a thing? What about Microdermabrasion? Please tell me that there are others out there like me!

    • ANSWER:
      There's no treatment that works for everyone, but some people have had some successes. Go here: http://www.keratosispilaris.org/ and read what others have to say about what they've tried. Dermabrasion and laser treatments are among those discussed.

  40. QUESTION:
    How do I "fix" a light skin condition of mine?
    I'm kind of embarrassed to ask this, but I've noticed some light bumps, similar to goose bumps, on my upper arms, back, and between my chest, and shoulders. I've tried to do some research myself, but the closest thing I found was Keratosis Pilaris (chicken skin), but these bumps aren't host to any kind of discoloration. It's very small patches, the largest being on my left arm (four inches long, two across)

    At first I thought they were just zits or patches of dead skin, but they haven't been affected by any sorts of treatment I've put them through. I'm a generally hygienic person (wash my sheets every week, change pillow case daily, two showers a day, never wear the same clothes), but it's become a bit annoying.

    The only time I notice it is when I'm in the shower, which are hot at night, is there anything I can do for them?

    TL;DR - Very mild case of chicken skin on upper body.

    • ANSWER:
      I have the exact same condition as you, and you're right, it is keratosis pilaris (or "chicken skin", as you mentioned). There is really nothing you can do about this - it's genetic.

      There is a website called DermaDoctor.com where you can buy several different things to treat KP, such as body scrubs, chemical peels, microdermabrasion kits, medi-exfoliation, lotion, body and face peels, bionic scrubs, and more. The items are a bit costly though (which is why I haven't tried any of them yet), but you might wanna check it out if you have the means for it. The site and products have good reviews.

      If you can't afford to spend + (like me) for chicken skin removers and what not, you can try Aquaphor lotion for extremely dry skin, which is what I use, I apply it in the morning after my shower and at night before I go to bed. My arms have the KP the worst, but I also have it mildly on my inner thighs right above my knees and a tiny bit on my chest. But arms mainly.

      I would also use a bath pouf to shower with, or an exfoliating sponge and scrub your arms and wherever else you have the bumps, and that should help somewhat. Don't use over drying ingredients or harsh chemicals.

      I am very hygienic as well - I shower twice a day, always wear clean clothes, have clean sheets, etc.. so it seems like it doesn't even make sense for us to have this. It may be caused by over hydrating? Since you take two showers a day as do I, it makes me think it might be related to being in water too often...like when your fingers start to prune. I'm not a dermatologist though, but it's just a thought!

      Hope this helps!

  41. QUESTION:
    What is a good face and body wash?
    I am having itchy, dry skin all over my nose! My skin is always clear, and i have no idea what is going on. I used sunnipindi, (an herbal selection with turmeric) which helped, but my nose is still bumpy. I can't even describe the texture. I am looking into the bliss fabulous foaming face wash. As for my body, keratosis pilaris (a skin disease) runs through the family, and now it's summer and my arms look weird. I only have it on my arms, not anywhere else on my body. My dermatologist prescribed me Salex cream, but it stings. I want a good scrub for it, that ex foliates dead skin well. There is a bliss fabulous foaming body wash, but i don't know if it will work. The Philosophy "be someone" salt scrub in water lily or green tea has a nice smell, but i son't know if it will work.

    I have dry and sensitive skin. For those of you out there with dry and sensitive skin too, what do you use? Also, i don't have an acne problem. I typically get a tiny red pimple before my period, so i need suggestions for that, too. I don't wear makeup, so i don't need awash that will remove makeup, and i don't attempt to cover up pimples. Thanks for the help.

    • ANSWER:
      ok well first, for your pimple id try using a spot treatment that contains sulfur. the sulfur sucks the pimple dry over night or dramatically reduces it the next day. so you wont need any cover up or anything and wont be stuck with it for a week or longer. mine are usually gone within 3 days (1 night with the product, and then the next two just washing my face) after starting using it and its not even the one with the highest sulfur concentration.

      for your nose, you should have mentioned if you started using a new product recently or possibly if you over exfoliate your skin. if you exfoliate your skin multiple times a week (even two if you have dry skin) then one of the symptoms is dry patchy skin.
      when i didnt know what the difference was in skin care, i exfoliated my skin on a regular basis and my nose was always peeling. which is strange because exfoliation should take care of those dry spots and peeling skin.

      for your keratosis pilaris, check out dr brandt microdermabrasion cream, theres one for face and one for body. and on the box it says it can help treat keratosis pilaris. its super fine crystals in the exfoliant that dont irritate your skin and does an excellent job clearing those pores.
      im guessing your dr's cream is either a retinoid, that helps exfoliate your skin to clear those follicles, or a pore refining cream.
      if its not a pore refining cream, id recommend sampling one. itll reduce the visible size of your pores, making those spots less noticeable.

      as for a face wash, i have no idea what type of face wash to suggest. just make sure its for dry or sensitive skin.
      although my friend whos works in the skin care industry told me that all face washs are pretty much equal. so it wont matter if you use neutrogena or Sisley.
      unless you have a reaction to certain chemical ingredients it wont matter too much. but if you have the money id buy a nicer one, simply because im a believer in what you pay for is what you get.
      but just make sure you do some research.

  42. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to get flawless skin from top to bottom?
    I'm 20 years old, I hate my hormones and genes

    I hate my moles, uneven skin tone , blemishes, pimples, Keratosis Pilaris, birthmark, etc. from my face to the feet very much…I wanna erase the entire imperfections. I blame my hormones & genes.

    Is it possible to have skin like a newborn baby or celebrities who are obsessed with beauty? How can I achieve that? I’ve tried exfoliation, healthy foods, etc but no results...

    Thank you so much. Longer answers are most welcome!
    Thank you, Bless you!!! ♥

    • ANSWER:
      . Drink enough water
      We know, we know. You've heard this a million times, but staying hydrated remains one of the most significant things you can do to improve your complexion. This tip is so easy, but it's also the first thing I tell women to do to take better care of their skin. Because the skin is one of the last organs to get hydrated when you drink water, it really shows if you have or haven't been drinking enough water."

      2. Microdermabrasion is a truly effective exfoliator—most other scrubs should be trashed.
      "When we're young, our skin cells turn over about every 28 days," Sobota explains. "But as we age, cells turn over 35, 40, or even every 50 days. What you need are products and treatments [like microdermabrasion] that prompt skin to turnover and essentially trick it into thinking it is younger."

      3. You need sunscreen, but not tons of it.
      Both dermatologist Dr. Eric Schweiger and Sobota agree that using sunscreen daily is one of the very first changes you should make to improve your skin.

      "You only need a shot glass-size amount to cover the entire body, which means the amount that goes on your face is about the size of a quarter," she says.

      4. Protect yourself against the sun, even when you're inside.
      Even if you're sitting in a cubicle all day, you could be getting exposure to sunlight that can damage and age your skin. "If you sit near a window, UVA rays can come through and take a toll on your skin," Sobota warns. "There's even some evidence that fluorescent lighting can have an impact. Most of us are cautious outside, but you really need to touch up your sunscreen just like you powder your nose."

      How do you do this without stripping off your makeup and starting your beauty regimen over or adding goopy sprays over your foundation? Sobota recommends powder sunscreens (like this product she uses) that you can dab on.

      5. SPF makeup? It just doesn't cut it.
      "It's a nice try, a good buffer, but the amount of SPF in makeup and what you get in sunscreen are not equal," Sobota says.

      6. Apply Retinol carefully—more is actually worse
      Retinol is a form of vitamin A that is used to combat acne as well as the signs of aging by spurring skin turnover and increasing collagen. It is available in prescription-strength formulas through a dermatologist, but can also be found in lower concentrations in cosmetics and creams. Although people might be tempted to apply it often, Dr. Schweiger says that will only irritate the skin more.

      "People used to think that to get the benefits of Retinol, the skin had to really peel. But really, this is just a side effect of using it too much," he says. "Instead, I recommend to most patients to use it three times a week. They see fewer side effects and might avoid that redness and peeling we associate with it."

      7. Workouts don't have to lead to breakouts.
      If you're one of those people who feels great about exercising, but not so great about the breakouts you get from excessive sweating, you don't have to sacrifice your time on the treadmill for fabulous skin. Acne-prone exercisers might just find the solution in the gym locker room.

      "Right after your workout, shower or wash your face right there at the gym. And since you're already there, take advantage of the gym's steam room for a few minutes. This will open up pores and reduce your chance of breaking out," Dr. Schweiger notes.

      8. Get your vitamin C, and not just in your diet.
      Eating lots of broccoli or adding orange juice to your morning meal may help your body ward off cardiovascular disease and boost your health, but to really see the benefits of Vitamin C on your skin, you have to apply it topically.

      "Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant," Sobota says. "It fights free-radical damage, which makes it wonderful for anti-aging."

      Over-the-counter products that contain vitamin C "won't accomplish your goal" of getting more beautiful skin, Sobota says. But prescription-strength products can make a big difference in keeping the skin looking young.

      9. You don't need lots of products, you just need the right ones.
      "Most patients I see have spent tons of money on a drawer full of insufficient products," Sobota says bluntly. "A visit to the drug store is just not going to cut it for most of us."

      "You should be using the correct products with the proper ingredients for your skin, your goals for how you want to look, and your health. Most of us don't need any more than three or four products total for great skin. If you're buying and using lots of things, even if you got them for a much lower price at the drug store, and you're not getting the results you need, then none of it's doing any good. It's a waste!"

  43. QUESTION:
    I have dry red bumps on my cheeks?
    After a few days of forgetting to moisturize, I found small red bumps on my cheeks. It burns when I try to put moisturizer on it, and after picking at one of them, a scab forms [ along w/ the redness still there ].

    • ANSWER:
      These little red bumps are most likely keratosis pilaris. This is a harmless skin condition that tends to occur during the winter time or when your skin gets dry and dehydrated. The easiest way to keep it under control would be to use a glycolic cleanser and a daily exfoliant (a glycolic daily exfoliant or a microdermabrasion scrub.) Follow this with a moisturizer containing sunscreen to seal in your moisture barrier and you should have a smooth face in no time.

      The glycolic cleanser that Natural skin shop sells is gentle enough to use every day and leaves you feeling so clean, but not dry or tight. (I even use it as my body wash!)

      www.naturalskinshop.com

  44. QUESTION:
    i have Keratosis Pilaris on my legs?
    well,i have it every where but it seems to be worse on my legs(when i shave i cut off the bumps and start bleeding) and i want to know wat to use for this condition i have...

    i also want to know how to get rid of it on my butt? (i wash everyday but i dont see any differences)

    • ANSWER:
      Natalie,
      Keratosis pilaris – KP - is often cosmetically displeasing but medically completely harmless. KP is frequently noted in otherwise healthy people. KP usually improves with increasing age. KP may even spontaneously clear completely after puberty. However, more frequently the condition is chronic with periodic exacerbations and improvements. Many adults still have the skin condition into their 40s and 50s. Many treatment options and skin-care recipes are available for controlling the symptoms of KP. Many patients have very good temporary improvement following a regular skin-care program of lubrication. As a general rule of thumb, treatment needs to be continuous. Since there is no available cure or universally effective treatment for KP, the list of potential lotions and creams is long. It is important to keep in mind that as with any condition, no therapy is uniformly effective in all people. Complete clearing may not be possible. In some cases, KP may also improve or clear spontaneously without any treatment. General measures to prevent excessive skin dryness, such as using mild soapless cleansers, are recommended. Frequent skin lubrication is the mainstay of treatment for nearly all cases. Best results may be achieved with combination therapy using topical products and physical treatments like gentle exfoliation, professional manual extraction of whiteheads, facials, microdermabrasion, and chemical peels. Rather than shaving, with all the resultant problems that you have been having, I would suggest that you use one of the creams available, waxing, or electrolysis. I wish you well.

      ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED.

      It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms.

      The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions.

      I add a link with details of this subject

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
      Keratosis_pilaris

      Hope this helps
      matador 89

  45. QUESTION:
    skin and hair problems?
    1) i have chicken skin and it sucks. my face looks like it is full of small pimples or zits but they're actually chicken skin. (i got it from my mom) i want to remove them so badly. can you give me a cure for it?

    2) my hair is short. it's growing very slowly. Can you give me tips on how to ake it grow faster? even just a little bit faster.

    *answering any of the two will be fine. please help.

    • ANSWER:
      ok so i searched for the chicken skin thing. apparently its medical term is keratosis pilaris. the web site i found said "Products used to treat keratosis pilaris include: Glycolic Acid (AHA), Lactic Acid, Urea, Vitamin A Treatments, Microdermabrasion... " This is the link to that website http://www.helpforkp.com/. About the hair thing, you should definitely find a good vitamin. i actually take One Source- Hair, Skin, and Nails. You can buy it at wal-mart. Also a lot of women take prenatal vitamins for your hair. I know its weird because they are for women that are pregnant, but they contain a higher amount of a lot of important nutrients, so they help your hair and skin and so forth. make sure to use a good shampoo, no Suave or Herbal essences. Stick with Pantene Pro-v or a shampoo called Pro-Vive. Its in a pink bottle at walmart. They are a little more expensive but way worth it. Also its good to switch shampoos every 3 months. I switch back and forth from the 2 shampoos i just named to keep my hair looking great. A good face wash is St.Ives Apricot scrub. it exfoliates and leaves your skin looking great. also just to make you feel a little better about the chicken skin thing here is a quote from the web site: "If you have keratosis pilaris, you are not alone. Worldwide, keratosis pilaris affects an estimated 40 to 50% of the adult population and approximately 50 to 80% of all adolescents."
      So a lot of people have this and dont even know it! you are not alone hunni! i hope any of this information was helpful, and im sorry i wrote so much! lol. if you have anymore questions or need any help feel free to message me!

  46. QUESTION:
    i have red bumps on my arms..but they dont itch or bother me.. HELP! how do i get rid of them??
    ok welll all the girls on my dad's said have these red bumps on our arms... and my doctor said there because of hott showers and lack of moisure... is that true? and how do i get rid of them? =

    • ANSWER:
      It is keratosis pilaris (I'm not sure if thats spelled correctly). It is also known as KP. It is eczema inside the hair follicles. It is not contagious, but it is hereditary. Try aqua-glycolic body wash, or use an otc microdermabrasion on the affected area. Tanning also helps, it dries up the eczema.

  47. QUESTION:
    bumps at the hair root?
    on my arm, there are bumps. Like small skin colored bumps. i noticed that the hairs are leading into the bumps. and if i pluck out the hair, the hair root seems to be huge. and the bump doesnt go away. so is there anyway i can get rid of this and what is it?

    • ANSWER:
      it might be Keratosis Pilaris (KP), and since it's on your arms, that's my best guess.

      Sample treatment for a patient with mild to moderate keratosis pilaris:

      Wash area with Glysal cleanser once a day.
      Pat skin dry.
      Apply Salex or AmLactin lotion in morning.
      Apply tazarotene (Tazorac) or tretinoin (Retin-A) cream every other night.
      Get a monthly microdermabrasion and glycolic treatment with physician.
      Mild cases of KP may be improved with basic over-the-counter moisturizers such as Cetaphil or Lubriderm lotions. Additional available therapeutic options for more difficult cases of KP include lactic-acid lotions (AmLactin, Lac-Hydrin), alpha-hydroxy-acid lotions (Glytone, glycolic body lotions), urea cream (Carmol 10, Carmol 20, Carmol 40, Urix 40), salicylic acid (Salex lotion), and topical steroid creams (triamcinolone 0.1%, Locoid Lipocream), retinoic-acid products like Retin-A, Tazorac, and adapalene (Differin). There are also specially mixed "designer" combination, all-in-one prescription creams with multiple ingredients such as tretinoin 0.1%, hydroquinone 6%, and fluocinonide 0.05%. Another specially compounded combination prescription cream is a preparation of 2%-3% salicylic acid in 20% urea cream. These creams applied once or twice a day help to decrease the residual dry rough bumps.

      The affected area should be washed once or twice a day with a gentle wash like Cetaphil or Dove. Acne-prone skin may benefit from more therapeutic washes like Glysal, Proactiv, salicylic acid, or benzoyl peroxide. Lotions should be gently massaged into the affected area two to three times a day. Irritated or abraded skin should be treated only with bland moisturizers until the inflammation resolves.

      Occasionally, physicians may prescribe a short seven- to 10-day course of a medium-potency, emollient-based topical steroid cream once or twice a day for inflamed red areas. Intermittent weekly or biweekly dosing of topical retinoids seem quite effective and well tolerated, but the response is usually only partial. After initial clearing with stronger medications, milder maintenance regimens are used.

  48. QUESTION:
    Red Bumps... didnt get many answers first time I asked...?
    Ok, I am 20 years old and 25 weeks pregnant with my first (its a Boy :-D) and I have these red bumps on my legs and the backs of my arms. They are not razer burn and they dont hurt or itch. They just arnt very... um nice looking... lol. I have had them for a long time, even before I got pregnant. I have asked the doctor what it was and he told me to use a loofa sponge when I bath or shower but it does nothing. I wont even wear shorts or skirts... What they heck is this and why wont it go away?! Any tips?
    Thanks everyone for ur advice so far... but they get worse when I use lotion... and a little worse after I shave... no matter how much shaving cream or whatever I use. The dryer my skin gets the better they get but... I dont wanna walk around with my legs lookin all dry and icky. But they have not gone away even when I wait a few days to use lotion. I have tried lotion, loofahs, even bathing brushes. Oh laying on a tanning bed helps them too... but I cant do that right now until after my son is born.
    And... they are not NEARLY as bad on my arms.... they are hardly on my arms at all and actually not really noticable... but I can feel them.

    • ANSWER:
      My daughter uses betamide to get rid of them.
      works great, if you want 'scientific type' explanation- put it in the details and I'll respond after work.

      (here, found a quick review on Amazon for you:

      5 stars out of 5:
      Keratosis Pilaris Miracle, August 12, 2005
      Reviewer:E. A. Wiley (Austin, TX) - See all my reviews
      (REAL NAME)
      Keratosis Pilaris (or those bumps on the back of about 40% of the population's arms) is an incredibly common condition, but there are very little treatments for it. Microdermabrasion can help temporarily, but it is expensive and most be done often.

      This product really helps to keep the bumps under control. I can even shave my legs with it! (Quite a feat at times).

      If you suffer from random bumps on your arms or thighs, I recommend giving this product a try. It's completely worth the price.

      That sun thing gives it away! Are you allowed to see a dermatologist (aka do you have insurance?) Go see one =)
      Unfortunately I'm not a doctor, but I have read so much about derm conditions that it's nuts. My husband has some strange sweat gland condition and my daughter has the keratosis piloris. I don't remember the name of what you're talking about - I'm sorry! If you see a dermatologist and tell them that it gets better when dry and when in the sun, they will know what it is!
      I'll try to remember the name, but I am not very good at that =/

  49. QUESTION:
    Red bumps on the bottom of my legs?
    They're kind of a mix between red and brown, and they focus at the bottom of my legs. They don't really feel like anything. I tried waxing a spot the other day thinking they would just pull out, but it just got more irritated and red. My sister told me they were just enlarged pores, but I'm not really sure. I've been using aloe vera soap and lotion on them for almost a week and I haven't seen a difference. I have been wanting to shave, but I don't want to make it any worse than it already is.

    Here is a picture, it's kind of blurry though. xD
    http://i56.tinypic.com/15na8us.jpg

    • ANSWER:
      how old are you?

      if your in your puberty years theres a really high chance that its keratosis pilaris.
      its when keratin gets caught in the follicles - usually on arms and legs.
      those seem like a pretty mild case.
      it can get bad though, like big red bumps that look infectious

      to treat it, try exfoliating your skin. you can use a luffa and a regular body scrub if you want.
      but its recommended that you use something with really fine crystals to get the keratin out, usually a microdermabrasion cream.
      i got a microdermabrasion cream from dr brandt skin care and on the box it says it can help treat keratosis pilaris. although there is no real cure, an exfoliation can help get the keratin out.

      they also make a product called pores no more pore refiner. and this helps keep pores nice and tight after the keratin is out.
      its also really good for oily skin on your face. it keeps your skin nice and matte. i was expecting an unhealthy matte, but it made it really nice and minimized my pores too.
      it also has antimicrobial benefits since it uses tea tree oil.

      but look up some "mild cases of keratosis pilaris" and compare to your leg


microdermabrasion keratosis pilaris

Eczema Or Keratosis Pilaris

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    how do you get rid of keratosis pilaris?
    i have eczema, and this keratosis pilaris came during my flareup and i have never ever had it and now my whole body is covered in these skin coloured bumps, is there a way to get rid of this?
    any cleansing baths? or scrubs or remedies? i really just want my skin to go back to normal!
    is it normal for keratosis pilaris to just come out of nowhere? is it curable? are there any prescriptions like betamethasone or any other steroids that can fix it?

    • ANSWER:
      Treatments, elixirs, etc. are just going to be a waste.

      The quickest and easy fix is a chemical exfoliant (for example a Glycol based one that you would use on your face) or even a physical exfoliant will clear it up in as little as three weeks. Enjoy your clear skin!

  2. QUESTION:
    Will I ever be free of Psoriasis and Eczema?
    I've had Psoriasis since I was 13 in my ears and on my scalp, I am now 15. Around a year ago I had Eczema on the palm of my hands however it has returned around my knuckles and fingers.

    They say Psoriasis may one-day have a cure and the same goes for eczema I think. But is there a chance I will ever be rid of these two skin conditions. My brother has Eczema and Keratosis Pilaris but hes had it since he was born.

    Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      My eczema is controlled with diet alone. Its a jolly hard slog, but worth it. all the other advice is spot on, moisturise, moisturise and more moisturise!
      Dairy intolerances can be a major cause of allergic responses such as eczema (as in my case), and since living a totally dairy-free life since 1990 I can control it. This is not easy, but possible. I was a sufferer since the age of 7 and only found this cause/treatment when I was 25, so I know what it is like to suffer the hell of eczema.
      I know you are looking for quick fix miracle cure...but the problem is probably within you and not any amount of external preparations will 'cure' it.
      I would seriously seek medical advice, or dietetic advice on how to conduct a proper exclusion regime to try and eliminate certain food groups systematically. At your age you must do this under medical supervision, but I would certainly give it a go. You don't want to start using heavy steroids and harsh chemicals if you can help it.
      'moisturise and watch your food intake' - that's what I would suggest.
      good luck, we've been there too...
      BUT, remember your body is going through a hell of an hormonal rollercoster ride at the moment which could be upsetting everything much more than usual.

  3. QUESTION:
    Any treatment recommendations for Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have a skin condition called Keratosis Pilaris, which is rough bumps on upper arms and on thighs and legs. It is not eczema or acne, but it is like small red bumps on the skin. It is unsightly and I want to get rid of it. Any suggestions for lessening the appearance or getting rid of it? I've already tryed a loofa, multiple types of sponges, and moisturizing lotion such as Aveeno & Eucerin. Any advice will be appreciated, thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Small doses of the sun help - I won't say go and lay out but healthy sun helps -
      A lufa with a thick oil like Vaseline Intensive Care Cocoa butter
      helps soften the skin.

  4. QUESTION:
    What are some otc body products that reduce redness and inflammation?
    I have Eczema around my knees and elbows, Keratosis Pilaris on my arms and legs, and Psoriasis on my scalp. My skin is soooo red, what could help me?

    My dermatologist gave me a steroid ointment, but it doesn't work very well and it's not healthy, so I'm looking for an alternative.

    Any help is appreciated!

    • ANSWER:

  5. QUESTION:
    Refind vs unrefind coconut oil for skin?
    Hi there!

    I have 2 children (a 5 year old and a 10 month old). My 5 year old has very dry skin, some eczema patches, keratosis pilaris on her arms, legs and bum, cradle cap/dandruff and her hips regularly have dry cracked areas. My 10 month old, looks like she may follow in her sisters footsteps lol

    I have been reading a lot on cococut oil and how great it is for the skin. So I picked some up at the store. (Spectrum Organic Expeller Pressed Refined Coconut Oil. It's naturally refined with no chemicals etc) Since using it, my oldest daughters skin looks and feels softer, but she complains that it hurts more now. I began using it on my lips and they would dry and crack more than ever.

    Here is my question; do you think this is more of a reaction to the Coconut Oil itself? Or would it be worth scrapping this bottle and trying an unrefined oil?

    Thanks for your help!

    • ANSWER:
      I think you should go with the unrefined one, 1 because it smells good, and 2 its 2 times as better as refine, and its safer:) Good Luck!

  6. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris and I have it very severely. And I'm SO self conscious about it.
    I wanted to know how to get rid of it or just even make it less noticeable.
    I've tried scrubbing and lotion and all that stuff.
    Should I go to the doctor?
    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately there is not much that can be done for this condition. I have had a mild case of it all my life, my daughter's is worse, and my 10 year old grandson has it really badly on his arms and legs. If you want to go to a dermatologist, they might give you something for it, but from what I have read, not much can be done. A cortosteroid cream for eczema may help or Retin A (for acne), but most doctors recommend OTC treatments like Eucerin Cream.
      Something I found out though is that about 40% of the population has this disorder, so you are not alone. I know that is not of much consolation, sorry I couldn't give you better news.

  7. QUESTION:
    Are people with keratosis pilaris allowed to have dogs or any pets?
    i want a dog but my parents disagree because of my keratosis pilaris. i also heard things about "hypoallergenic dogs" but some believe that hypo dogs do not exist.

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris is a benign, genetic condition that is not aggravated by pets. It's just a buildup of keratin in the hair follicles. If you have eczema, that would be a different story. Eczema *can* be aggravated by pets because it is an allergic condition exacerbated by pet dander.

      Keratosis pilaris is usually just on the ams, neck, and shoulders -- and can be controllled with moisturizing exfoliating body scrubs, along with an exfoliating moisturizers like Carmol 10, Carmol 20, or AmLactin (these are available over-the-counter at your local pharmacy or on drugstore.com).

      There are pets that shed less than others -- although no dogs are "hypoallergenic". So, if you have eczema or other allergies or asthma, you would need to try some breeds with very short hair and that don't have a lot of pet dander (if you could have a pet at all). However, keratosis pilaris does not prevent people from having pets.

  8. QUESTION:
    What are these bumps on my arms?
    The bumps aren't itchy, red, or worse in the winter. My doctor examined it once and said that generally it's benign, but apparently I have a severe case. From what I've seen on other people's arms, yes, I do have a bad case. A lot of people in my school have it, but only my arms are noticeable, because of the darkness of the skin in that area. I tried scrubbing it with skin brightener, but it only worked the first time, scrubbing off the arm tan I got from playing tennis all summer. I know it's not acne, keratosis pilaris, or eczema.

    • ANSWER:

  9. QUESTION:
    Can I use this lotion for my new tattoos?
    I got a tattoo two days ago, I have been using Aquaphor since the first night. Could I use First Aid Beauty Ultra Repair Cream for my new tattoo? Here is a product description:

    This Ultra Repair Cream is a thick, rich, emollient product that hydrates deep down with exceptional penetration. This cream is for anyone with severely dry, scaly skin due to harsh winter weather, aggressive cosmetic treatments, or any of the following conditions: atopic dermatitis, irritant eczema, allergic eczema, and keratosis pilaris. With the help of colloidal oatmeal, shea butter, soothing eucalyptus oil, and ceramides, Ultra Repair Cream provides immediate relief and visible improvement for distressed skin. The FAB Antioxidant Booster defends skin from free radical damage and the cream deeply hydrates with exceptional penetration, providing immediate relief and visible improvement. The cream is immediately absorbed into the skin and can be used all over the body and on the face.

    What it is formulated WITHOUT:
    - Parabens
    - Sulfates
    - Synthetic Fragrances
    - Synthetic Dyes
    - Phthalates
    - GMOs
    - Triclosan

    I use it as a face moisturizer, so I already have it in the house.

    • ANSWER:
      That would be perfect! Another good one is Eucerin original formula.

  10. QUESTION:
    Why do my arms seem to have goosebumps all the time?
    I have these bunch of tiny dots a little bit
    lighter than my skin on both arms.
    It surely isn't keratosis pilaris because they are not red bumbs but a bit lighter than my skin complextion. The bumbs are not
    elevated ..unlike when I get proper goosebumps when I feel cold. They are flat and a bit lighter than my skin. I have them all year round..even when I'm feeling hot.

    Do you know what are these?

    • ANSWER:
      i used to have that when i was younger..but it was because of my eczema i believe. it eventually went away

  11. QUESTION:
    Can you use calmurid cream on your face?
    I have keratosis pilaris. Doctor diagnosed me last year. I have been using calmurid cream on my arms and legs since then. However now I have developed it on my cheeks. She said continue using the cream you have but when I got home the leaflet didn't say anything about using it on your face.

    • ANSWER:
      How does it work?

      This cream contains the active ingredients urea and lactic acid. It is used to moisturise and rehydrate dry, scaly skin.

      Dry skin results from lack of water in the outer layer of skin cells known as the stratum corneum. When this layer becomes dehydrated it loses its flexibility and becomes cracked, scaly and sometimes itchy. The stratum corneum contains natural water-holding substances, including urea, which retain water seeping up from the deeper layers of the skin. Water is also normally retained in the stratum corneum by a surface film of natural oil (sebum) and broken-down skin cells, which slow down evaporation of water from the skin surface.

      The skin dries out when too much water evaporates from its surface. This increases as we get older, and is made worse by washing, because hot water and soap remove the layer of natural oil on the skin surface.

      When urea is applied to the skin it penetrates the stratum corneum, where it readily absorbs and retains water. This increases the capacity of the skin to hold moisture, and the skin therefore becomes rehydrated.

      Lactic acid is known as a keratolytic. When applied to the skin it breaks down keratin, which is a protein that forms part of the skin structure. In conditions such as chronic eczema and ichthyosis, excessive amounts of keratin causes the skin cells to harden, and makes the skin become thickened and scaly. Lactic acid breaks down the keratin in the hardened and thickened skin, helping to shed skin cells from the area to which it is applied, and soften and improve the appearance of dry, scaly skin. This action also improves the ability of the urea to penetrate the skin and rehydrate it.

      The moisturising base of this cream also provides a layer of oil on the surface of the skin, which helps prevent water from evaporating from the skin surface.

      What is it used for?

      * Inherited, non-inflammatory dryness and scaling of the skin (ichthyosis, xeroderma)

      * Other dry, scaly skin disorders

      Warning!

      * This preparation is for external use only.

      * If you experience stinging when applying this medicine and this prevents you using it, the medicine can be diluted with an equal quantity of aqueous cream for a week of treatment. After this time you should be able to use it undiluted. Seek further advice from your pharmacist.

      * Avoid contact of this medicine with the eyes and the moist membranes lining the inside of certain parts of the body, eg mouth, nasal passages (mucous membranes).

      Not to be used in

      * Known sensitivity or allergy to any ingredient

      This medicine should not be used if you are allergic to one or any of its ingredients. Please inform your doctor or pharmacist if you have previously experienced such an allergy.

      If you feel you have experienced an allergic reaction, stop using this medicine and inform your doctor or pharmacist immediately.

      Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

      Certain medicines should not be used during pregnancy or breastfeeding. However, other medicines may be safely used in pregnancy or breastfeeding providing the benefits to the mother outweigh the risks to the unborn baby. Always inform your doctor if you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy, before using any medicine.

      * There are no known harmful effects when this medicine is used during pregnancy.

      * This preparation may be used safely by breastfeeding mothers, providing it is not applied to the breasts prior to breastfeeding. This will avoid ingestion by the infant.

      Side effects

      Medicines and their possible side effects can affect individual people in different ways. The following are some of the side effects that are known to be associated with this medicine. Because a side effect is stated here, it does not mean that all people using this medicine will experience that or any side effect.

      * Stinging on application

      The side effects listed above may not include all of the side effects reported by the drug's manufacturer.

      For more information about any other possible risks associated with this medicine, please read the information provided with the medicine or consult your doctor or pharmacist.

      How can this medicine affect other medicines?

      By smoothing and softening the skin this medicine can increase the absorption of other medicines that are applied to the skin. This can be useful in conditions such as eczema because it improves the ability of other medicines, such as corticosteroid creams, to penetrate the skin and reduce inflammation.

  12. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know if dead sea salt really helps skin conditions like eczema?
    I have Keratosis pilaris (a form of eczema) and I've been trying to find something to treat it. I've seen a lot of sites that sell dead sea products,they say it helps by cleaning out the skin follicles. What I'm wondering is if any type of sea salt really helps or if the companies lie to sell their products like most people do? I'm sure someone here has some experience with this type of thing and any help would be greatly appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      not sure if it helps eczema but i have a body lotion that contains dead sea salt that does wonders for the skin.i am not one to fall for the middle of the mall kiosks where the employee throws their product at you but this one is truly amazing...the name of the line is called SEACRET... www.seacretspa.com they also have mud masks and sea salts

  13. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of pimple like bumps on my arms?
    Someone told me it was eczema but I've tried all sorts of eczema creams and nothing seems to work. I've tried exfoliating, using pimple creams and nothing. Anyone have any suggestions short of going to a dermatologist?

    • ANSWER:
      you might have keratosis pilaris-a harmless skin condition. i have it on my upper arms and i just leave it alone. maybe trying exfoliating and a good lotion might help? if it doesn't -seeing a dermatologist can't hurt.
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/keratosis-pilaris/DS00769

  14. QUESTION:
    Do all the bumps of keratosis pilaris contain eczema?
    please give sources.
    if all the bumps have eczema, does that mean that people with keratosis pilaris are not allowed to have dogs or pets? please give sources.

    • ANSWER:
      No the bumps are formed by excess keratin that blocks the hair folicle and hardens (hyperkeratinization).

      My daughter and myself have this quite bad and I find baby oil added to the bath water really helps.

  15. QUESTION:
    Can anyone tell me how to lessen the appearance of my Keratosis pilaris?
    I have had this condition since I was a small child, it did go away in my late teens. It came back 1 year ago when I was pregnant, worse than ever! I only ever had it on my upper arms, but now it's also on my lower arms, thighs, back, and still spreading. I have tried a cream my doctor gave me but it did nothing. They are just so noticable, it's embrassing!

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, I have had a fast improvement to my KP from the herbal anti-eczema cream by Champori. Try it, it really works great and fast, too.

  16. QUESTION:
    I have Eczema and Keratosis Pilaris, anyone know of medications to help improve either?
    Any remedies, medications, etc to help the conditions get better? Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      I have both as well, so I have had to educate myself about them.

      The first thing you should know is that neither can be cured. They can be treated, which will reduce the appearance and make skin look and feel smoother, but nothing will make it go away completely.

      There are various types of eczema. The kind I get most often, and which I have every spring and summer, is the kind which causes blisters on the palms and soles of the feet. I have only had a few blisters on my palms over the years (I have had it for about ten years), but I get terribly itchy blisters on my feet which turn into rough dry itchy patches. I also had it on my forearms two summers ago, and that was a real misery. My doctor has prescribed creams for both types, and while they don't make it go away completely, they do help with the itching. Eczema is generally related to immune problems, so it can be caused by allergens like pollen, or costmetics, or even nickel in jewelry. I know from experience that the blistering type I get on my feet happens if my feet stay damp for a long time (like if I put on sneakers and my feet get soaked, and I have to keep the sneakers on until my feet dry out) or if I overmoisturize the soles of my feet. Ironically, proper hydration is one of the only non-chemical things you can do to help the problem--be sure you are drinking a lot of water. Other than that, you can moisturize and try and keep the patches from getting too dried out, which makes them worse. A doctor can give you cortisone or prednisone for inflammation in very bad cases, but my doctor said that thought in the dermatology community is that those should be used sparingly, and that topical creams should be used if possible. He refuses to give me Elidel, which is a fairly new treatment, because he says there is anecdotal evidence and scientific data that suggests it can be a carcinogen. Instead, he gives me anti-inflammatory creams. When I had it on my forearms, it covered them completely from wrist to elbow, and the worst breakout lasted for about two weeks--I had to apply a thick layer of cream and then lightly wrap my arms to keep the cream from rubbing off on other things. It cleared up, but left bumps which look and feel like KP, but which are not--they are simply left over bumps. He looks at them every time I see him, and has told me that eventually they will go away as long as I continue to moisturize and use a body scrub on my arms. He did warn me to not use too much scrub on my arms because it can irritate them and make it come back, so I exfoliate about twice a week on that part of my arms. I only exfoliate my feet after the blisters burst and leave the dry patches, and I am very careful about being gentle about it--for the first time ever I recently had a dry patch which cracked (ouch!), and the only thing that helped with that crack was a bandage and Neosporin--it kept it from getting worse, and helped the crack heal, as well as moisturizing the area. I just moisturize all over every day, and if something makes me itch, be it a new lotion, or detergent, or even something I eat, I make a mental note to stay away from it in the future.

      The KP is both harder and easier to deal with. It's a genetic condition, and about 50% of people have it. It's just due to too much keratin building up on the skin. The reason why it's harder to deal with, in my mind, is because once you settle on something to help it, you have to keep doing it, or it just recurs. The reason why it's easier to deal with is because you can buy a lot of stuff OTC to deal with it. The main ways of helping reduce the look of it include using a lotion or cream with an acid in it (glycolic acid, lactic acid, or urea), using microdermabrasion, or using scar cream. Another thing which isn't widely known is that exposure to sunlight helps it a bit--that's largely useless for most people, as they need to use sunscreen, but I have darker skin and can get some sun with no problems, so it does help my arms and legs (those are the only places I have it). The things which have worked best for me are simply exfoliating and using a lotion called AmLactin, which has lactic acid in it. Additionally, shaving helps my legs tremendously, so I shave all the way up. My doctor did tell me that you have to be careful with manual exfoliation or microdermabrasion, as they can be too harsh and irritate the skin, causing an outbreak of eczema! (I know--it's a really great example of a lose-lose situation). I know my KP gets worse in the winter, and he told me that's because the air is dry, and friction from clothing can make it appear worse. Your best bet it to experiment and find a regimen which works for you, and then stick to it. Also, hydration is important, so be sure to drink plenty of water and use lotion to help keep the moisture in your skin. There are some prescription strength creams for it, but my doctor won't give me those because they could cause eczema, as well, and I would rather deal with the KP than the eczema. I do know from experimenting and browsing the internet that there are some very expensive kits which are supposed to help with it, but I bought one and they aren't any more effective than just using an exfoliant and a lotion with acid in it, and they are really expensive. The one consolation with KP is that while it bothers those of us who have it, it is so common that many people don't even notice it--I have found that what looks like screaming little dots on my skin to me isn't even noticed by those around me, or even the girls at the day spa where I go regularly.

      So, to recap:

      For eczema you can get an anti-inflammatory cream from your doctor, and he or she may prescribe cortisone or prednisone for it if it gets really bad. Drink plenty of fluids, and avoid any triggers as much as possible. You can use gentle exfoliation and lotion to reduce the look of the patches once they begin to clear up, but be careful to not irritate the skin so much you cause another outbreak.

      For KP, drink plenty of fluids, and find a regimen which works for you which involves acid creams, or microdermabrasion or exfoliation (be careful with those two), and moisturize regularly. Once you experiment and find what works best for you, stick to it. And remember it isn't as noticeable to others as it is to you.

      Best of luck.

  17. QUESTION:
    What Should Use On My Dry Skin?
    Hi, I have dry skin and it's really bugging me. I have eczema and I have KP (keratosis pilaris) those little dots on your skin. These are both very mild. I have tried amlactan, but it irritates my skin. I think the fruit based lotions are better for me. So, what do you recommend?

    • ANSWER:
      I would totally recommend Dermal Therapy. I know they have a Facebook page, so check them out. They make skin products for people suffering from exactly what you're speaking about. I use a few of their products, and they have really worked for me.

      Good luck!

  18. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of this eczema on the bottom of my butt cheeks?
    For a year now I've noticed these bumps on the bottom of my butt cheeks, really mild though. Not noticeable unless you feel it.

    I tried putting lotion there for a while in case it was just dry skin. Then I tried tanning to see if it would disappear from that. I tried baby powder.. I just don't know anymore!

    I don't want to go to the doctor or anywhere like that, so is there any thing recommended I should buy at the store for it? Or any other home remedies?

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like keratosis pilaris to me: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keratosis_pilaris

      The options are AHA, BHA, and urea, all meant to break up the keratin in the pores, which makes the bumpy feeling.

      Some products with these active ingredients include: Neostrata lotions (glycolic or lactic acid), Paula's Choice 2% BHA body treatment, or Eucerin lotions that have urea high on the ingredient list.

      Hope this helps.

  19. QUESTION:
    What are these small itchy red bumps on my toddler's arms?
    There the size of a pimple, but there aren't any white heads, or puss, or anything like that. They're only on his arms, no where else. He constantly scratches them so it makes them more red, could even be making them spread. What could this be? It doesn't look like chicken pox, or impetigo...could it be eczema? is it just a rash? thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Could it be KP (Keratosis Pilaris)? I have them and they sometimes itch. They are just lots of red bumps which you can get on your arms or legs. 60% of teenagers have them, but many ages can get them (45% of the population). It is not harmful, but it cant be cured. I can be treated by exfoliation with salicylic acid and moisturizing. It looks a bit like chicken skin. It happens when excess keratin is produced and surrounds the hair follicles. This means the bumps are usually where hairs are.

      It might not be this, but if it is I hope it helps!

  20. QUESTION:
    Since keratosis pilaris is caused by a vitamin A deficiency, would eating food with vitamin A clear it?
    Like carrots, eggs, milk, etc? Would it help at all?

    • ANSWER:
      Aeris,
      I feel sure that if you would kindly publish your source for the statement that – “Keratosis pilaris is caused by a vitamin A deficiency,” all of us in the medical profession would be most grateful and interested to amend our present knowledge. I was under the impression, up until now, that the exact cause of Keratosis pilaris – KP, is unknown. It presents as a problem with overproduction of the keratin part of the skin called hyperkeratinization. An excess of the protein known as Keratin, accumulates within the hair follicles forming numerous tiny rough bumps on the skin. Sometimes, these bumps can become irritated causing the follicles to redden excessively. KP, up until now, has been thought to be partly inherited (genetic) in origin. About 50%-70% of patients with KP have a known genetic predisposition and a high rate of affected family members. Many individuals have a strong family history of KP or "chicken skin." The underlying cause may partly be related to hypersensitivity reactions and overall dryness of the skin. KP is also closely related to ichthyosis vulgaris, dry skin, allergies, seasonal allergies, rhinitis, asthma, eczema, and atopic dermatitis. So to learn that it is a vitamin A deficiency is both enlightening and pleasing. I look forward to your imminent post with the details and link and/or address and name of trhe medical establishment where this discovery was made, and the medical personnel responsible for this breakthrough.

      ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED.

      It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms.

      The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions.

      Hope this helps
      matador 89

  21. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know of a good way to control keratosis pilaris?

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris typically causes no pain or itching. Treatment is directed at softening the keratin deposits in the skin and may include medicated creams containing urea or lactic acid. Even with treatment, this condition tends to remain for years. If associated with eczema, keratosis pilaris may improve with treatment of the underlying eczema.

  22. QUESTION:
    How can i get rid of Keratosis pilaris?

    • ANSWER:
      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris, however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Most of the available treatments are purely symptomatic, the one thing they all have in common is need for repetition and ongoing commitment. Some who seek treatment with the disorder may be prescribed Tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream, often by request.

      Triamcinolone, most commonly sold under the trade name Aristocort, is a synthetic corticosteroid medically approved as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of eczema and also reduces the amount of keratin in pores. It may be of most help to those with keratosis pilaris by reducing red, inflamed bumps. Triamcinolone is typically applied three times a day.

      Tretinoin, most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by causing the outer layer of the skin to grow more rapidly, which decreases the amount of the protein keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. As keratosis pilaris is manifested through excess keratin in the skin, Tretinoin forms a more effective and core approach to treatment than Triamcinolone which forms a largely symptomatic approach. Tretinoin is typically applied once a day before bed.

      An alternative treatment is Adapalene, a retinoid medication which is a more stable compound, less sunlight sensitive and has less general side effects and may be just as effective as Retin-A. Treatment of KP with Adapalene would be considered an "off-label" use of the medication.

      As with Triamcinolone, Tretinoin or any other treatment, once therapy is discontinued, the condition reverts back to its original state. However, skin treated with Tretinoin may take several weeks or more to revert back to its pre-treatment condition, but may at the same time take several weeks or more to show optimal results with the condition commonly worsening initially as underlying keratin is brought to the surface of the skin. Tretinoin is considerably more expensive and dispensed in smaller quantities than Triamcinolone and other treatments. Although it may be the most effective treatment for keratosis pilaris, it is not considered the first line of treatment.[citation needed]

      Unfortunately keratosis pilaris has not been clinically researched for treatment in an unbiased manner, with all claims of success or improvement being purely marketed or anecdotal. The condition is often dismissed outright by practitioners as being presently untreatable,[citation needed] giving mere moisturizing suggestions or reassurance that the condition will improve or cease with age, typically after 30. General practitioners are often unable to identify the condition.[citation needed] Ignorance accompanied with the price, availability, quantity dispensed, time taken for optimal results to be achieved, more serious side effects, adverse reactions and worsening of the condition in the initial treatment phase, coupled with the cheaper, safer and easier availability of other treatments has hindered Tretinoin from showing its potential in the treatment of this condition.[citation needed]

      Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, creams and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Beta hydroxy acids may help improve the appearance and texture of the afflicted skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to the lactic acid, a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may be helpful but increases risk of skin cancer. Coconut oil may also be helpful if applied to afflicted areas while in the shower. Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing, such as tight fitting jeans, is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

  23. QUESTION:
    Part of my arm has a skin patch that feels like goose bumps?
    I already know what Keratosis Pilaris is, I have it on my upper arms.

    On my arm there is a patch of skin a bit bigger than a half dollar coin.

    The skin isn't really that bumpy, but it looks like goose bumps. What is it and how can I get rid of it? It has been there for around 3 years.

    • ANSWER:
      My son had that on his chest for years. We could never figure out what it was. I suspect it was eczema. We tried all kinds of creams and ointments. It eventually went away on its own. If it is really bothering you, you might want to see a dermatologist.

  24. QUESTION:
    I have tiny skin colored bumps on my face and arms?
    I have tiny little skin colored bumps on my cheeks and upper arms. I'm in 7th grade and its really embarrassing when people point them out. I've had them for about two years now and they're not acne. When I scratch them just white hard stuff comes out, but its not puss. I clean my face regurally but they don't go away. Do I need to moisturizer? I don't even know what they're called. Please help. I'm tired of these stupid things. 10 points to the best answer.

    • ANSWER:
      HELP HAS ARRIVED!!!!!!!!!!!

      I had this for years, my mom told me it was eczema. Most people say eczema is a name used for tons of different dry skin conditions that doctors can’t diagnose. I used eczema creams all through Jr. High and High School, all that did was make me feel greasy and uncomfortable with zero results.

      You probably have what is called Keratosis pilaris, Keratosis pilaris is a common, genetic follicular condition that causes the appearance of rough bumps on the skin. It most often appears on arms, thighs, hands, legs, sides, buttocks, or face (which on the face are often mistaken for acne). Worldwide, Keratosis pilaris affects an estimated 40% of the adult population and approximately 50%-80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. There are several different types of Keratosis Pilaris, including Keratosis Pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), Keratosis Pilaris Alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), Keratosis Pilaris Rubra Faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.

      Keratosis Pilaris is caused by Hyperkeratosis: when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin, which is cream colored, surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore, resulting in rough clogged pores. The openings are often closed with a white plug of encrusted sebum, the oily, waxy substance produced by glands in the skin to keep it from drying out. Hyperkeratosis is most likely caused by your body having a vitamin A & E deficiency.

      I started taking vitamin A & E pills at dinner every night and 90% of my white bumps on my cheeks, arms, and legs cleared up. My boss also had white bumps on her arms and tried taking the vitamins too, it worked nicely for her. You could try taking the vitamins, but if you stop taking them, your body will go back to being deficient in them unless you start eating more foods naturally containing vitamins A & E:

      Vitamin A: Liver, Red Pepper, Cayenne, Sweet Potatoes, Carrots, Dried Apricots, Cantaloupe, Spinach, Squash, Dried Herbs, Papaya, Mangoes, Green Peas, Tomatoes.

      Vitamin E: Sunflower Seeds, Almonds, Pine Nuts, Peanuts, Dried Apricots, Pickled Green Olives, Cooked Taro Root, Wheat Germ/Flax Seed/Corn/Canola/Soybean Oils, Hazelnuts, Broccoli.

      Both A & E: Paprika, Red Chili Peppers or Powder, Spinach

      If the bumps (clogged dry rough crusty pores) have a red or pink ring around them, it could just be that they are inflamed, or it could be some sort of skin infection, such as yeast, which lives on the skin naturally but could become an infection, or bacterial. If they are a little pink or red I would try an antibacterial soap.

      Antibacterial soaps are full of chemicals and poisons, some are so harmful they cause muscle weakness, such as in the heart and tongue, and should not be in stores. A natural alternative is a soap or lotion containing Tea Tree oil. Tea Tree oil has natural antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and antiseptic qualities. It also has beneficial cosmetic properties. Tea Tree oil has a faint medicinal scent to it like eucalyptus, which is why I would suggest a soap instead of a lotion. Products containing Tea Tree oil can be found in abundance at health and natural and heath stores, but is also available in main stream store such as Wal-Mart for as low as around .

      So in short, vitamin A, vitamin E, soap, and you should be good (: I wish you luck

  25. QUESTION:
    How do i get rid permanently of red dry bumpy skin?
    ever since i was little i have had this type of skin on the sides of my face, all over my arms, and some parts of my chest and i want it gone. ive tried everything, can someone plz recommend something to make it go away

    • ANSWER:
      You might have Keratosis Pilaris.

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris:
      1. Keratosis pilaris rubra: red, inflamed bumps
      2. Keratosis pilaris Alba: rough, white, bumpy skin
      3. Keratosis pilaris rubra faceii: reddish rash over the cheeks

      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris. However, there are effective treatments available that make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Most of the available treatments are purely symptomatic; the one thing they all have in common is need for repetition and ongoing commitment. Some seeking treatment with the disorder may be prescribed Tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream, often by request.

      Triamcinolone, most commonly sold under the trade name Aristocort, is a synthetic corticosteroid medically approved as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of eczema, which also reduces the amount of keratin in pores. It may be of most help to those with keratosis pilaris by reducing red, inflamed bumps. Triamcinolone is typically applied three times a day.

      Tretinoin, most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by causing the outer layer of the skin to grow more rapidly, which decreases the amount of the protein keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. As keratosis pilaris is manifested through excess keratin in the skin, Tretinoin forms a more effective and core approach to treatment than Triamcinolone, which forms a largely symptomatic approach. Tretinoin is typically applied once a day before bed.

      An alternative treatment is Adapalene, a retinoid medication that is a more stable compound, is less sunlight-sensitive, has fewer general side-effects, and may be just as effective as Retin-A. Treatment of KP with Adapalene would be considered an "off-label" use of the medication.

      As with Triamcinolone, Tretinoin or any other treatment, once therapy is discontinued, the condition reverts to its original state. However, skin treated with Tretinoin may take several weeks or more to revert to its pre-treatment condition, but may, at the same time, take several weeks or more to show optimal results, with the condition commonly worsening initially, as underlying keratin is brought to the surface of the skin. Tretinoin is considerably more expensive and dispensed in smaller quantities than Triamcinolone and other treatments. Although it may be the most effective treatment for keratosis pilaris, it is not considered the first line of treatment.

      Keratosis pilaris has not been clinically researched for treatment in an unbiased manner, with all claims of success or improvement being purely marketed or anecdotal. The condition is often dismissed outright by practitioners as being presently untreatable, giving mere moisturizing suggestions or reassurance that the condition will improve or cease with age, typically after 30. General practitioners are often unable to identify the condition. Ignorance, accompanied with the price, availability, quantity dispensed, time taken for optimal results to be achieved, more serious side-effects, adverse reactions, and worsening of the condition in the initial treatment phase - coupled with the cheaper, safer, and easier availability of other treatments - has hindered Tretinoin from showing its potential in the treatment of this condition.

      exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, creams, and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Beta hydroxy acids may help improve the appearance and texture of the afflicted skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to their containing lactic acid, a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may be helpful in moderation. Coconut oil may also be helpful if applied to afflicted areas while in the shower. Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, and, in many cases, will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing, such as tight-fitting jeans, is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

  26. QUESTION:
    shower gel that will help keratosis pilaris?
    I'm using coconut oil as a moisturiser and a generic moisturising shower gel which I'm not all impressed with. Any suggestion?

    Also is there any other advice people have for my skin? Worst area is my bum, thighs and just under my shoulder blades.

    • ANSWER:
      HELP HAS ARRIVED!!!!!!!!!!!

      I had this for years, my mom told me it was eczema. Most people say eczema is a name used for tons of different dry skin conditions that doctors can’t diagnose. I used eczema creams all through Jr. High and High School, all that did was make me feel greasy and uncomfortable with zero results.

      Keratosis pilaris is a common, genetic follicular condition that causes the appearance of rough bumps on the skin. It most often appears on arms, thighs, hands, legs, sides, buttocks, or face (which on the face are often mistaken for acne). Worldwide, Keratosis pilaris affects an estimated 40% of the adult population and approximately 50%-80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. There are several different types of Keratosis Pilaris, including Keratosis Pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), Keratosis Pilaris Alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), Keratosis Pilaris Rubra Faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.

      Keratosis Pilaris is caused by Hyperkeratosis: when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin, which is cream colored, surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore, resulting in rough clogged pores. The openings are often closed with a white plug of encrusted sebum, the oily, waxy substance produced by glands in the skin to keep it from drying out. Hyperkeratosis is most likely caused by your body having a vitamin A & E deficiency.

      I started taking vitamin A & E pills at dinner every night and 90% of my white bumps on my cheeks, arms, and legs cleared up. My boss also had white bumps on her arms and tried taking the vitamins too, it worked nicely for her. You could try taking the vitamins, but if you stop taking them, your body will go back to being deficient in them unless you start eating more foods naturally containing vitamins A & E:

      Vitamin A: Liver, Red Pepper, Cayenne, Sweet Potatoes, Carrots, Dried Apricots, Cantaloupe, Spinach, Squash, Dried Herbs, Papaya, Mangoes, Green Peas, Tomatoes.

      Vitamin E: Sunflower Seeds, Almonds, Pine Nuts, Peanuts, Dried Apricots, Pickled Green Olives, Cooked Taro Root, Wheat Germ/Flax Seed/Corn/Canola/Soybean Oils, Hazelnuts, Broccoli.

      Both A & E: Paprika, Red Chili Peppers or Powder, Spinach

      If the bumps (clogged dry rough crusty pores) have a red or pink ring around them, it could just be that they are inflamed, or it could be some sort of skin infection, such as yeast, which lives on the skin naturally but could become an infection, or bacterial. If they are a little pink or red I would try an antibacterial soap.

      Antibacterial soaps are full of chemicals and poisons, some are so harmful they cause muscle weakness, such as in the heart and tongue, and should not be in stores. A natural alternative is a soap or lotion containing Tea Tree oil. Tea Tree oil has natural antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and antiseptic qualities. It also has beneficial cosmetic properties. Tea Tree oil has a faint medicinal scent to it like eucalyptus, which is why I would suggest a soap instead of a lotion. Products containing Tea Tree oil can be found in abundance at health and natural and heath stores, but is also available in main stream store such as Wal-Mart for as low as around .

      So in short, vitamin A, vitamin E, soap, and you should be good (: I wish you luck

      Also, ontop of everything listed above, oils like (yes coconut) sunflower, extra virgin olive, jojoba, almond, and argan oil wont clog pores, I would try moisturizing for a few days with lotions containing some of those to soften the KP, then one day of thorough exfoliating to scrape the KP build up on your skin away

  27. QUESTION:
    What's the best creme for dry, patchy skin?
    I would scratch my skin a lot in the same spot and now there's kind of a darker mark there. Also it looks like a light case of crocodile skin on my leg. What's the best not too expensive creme for that?

    • ANSWER:
      Aquaphor Healing Ointment Advanced Therapy (*Est. for 14 oz.) is liked by both professional reviewers and users. It is hailed as a solid multipurpose lotion that can soften and moisturize all areas of the body, as well as soothe sunburns, irritated skin and diaper rashes. Its main ingredient is petrolatum, which serves as a barrier to protect skin from moisture loss. Paula Begoun, beauty expert and author of the book, Don't Go to the Cosmetics Counter Without Me, says that Aquaphor is "a gentle formula that does a formidable job of protecting skin that is dry, cracked or irritated." She recommends the Advanced Therapy lotion over the Original version (*Est. for 14 oz.), though, because it contains a few extra ingredients that are very beneficial to the skin, namely glycerin, a humectant that draws moisture from the environment to the skin, and bisabolol, an anti-irritant that reduces inflammation.

      Editors at Allure magazine also give Aquaphor Healing Ointment high marks and say they used it on dry elbows and feet, razor burn and a "staggering" list of other skin conditions. Users at MakeupAlley.com and Amazon.com give this body lotion high ratings for being gentle but effective at treating eczema and a host of other skin ailments. One user at MakeupAlley.com insists that Aquaphor is especially helpful for dry, flaky feet. She said that she "slathered it on with socks, left on overnight and voila! Feet back to normal." Some users do complain, however, that this body lotion's thick consistency is greasy and say it can be a bit messy to apply. Julyne Derrick, beauty guide for About.com says that it feels a bit like "slathering your body in Vaseline," but she also notes that it works and that a little goes a long way. However, Aquaphor may be too heavy for regular use, especially for those with oily skin.

      Nivea Crème (*Est. for 6.8 oz.), is another example of a highly rated but affordable body lotion that is suitable for those with dry skin. It contains mostly emollients and glycerin (which effectively binds water to the skin). Consumers at MakeupAlley.com and Drugstore.com give it high marks as well, calling it a thickemollient moisturizer that is excellent for extremely dry skin. Many complain, though, that this lotion can be difficult to rub in when skin is wet because it doesn't mix well with water and shouldn't be applied after a shower, so it works better as a night cream. Nivea claims that the Crème can be used anywhere on the body but is best for rough spots such as knees, feet, elbows and hands.

      For those that want a daily, lightweight body lotion, experts point to Lubriderm Advanced Therapy Triple Smoothing Body Lotion (*Est. for 13.5 oz.). The lotion contains glycolic acid, an alpha hydroxy acid (AHA) that gently exfoliates and smoothes skin. Editors at Allure magazine praise this budget-priced formula for leaving skin feeling as soft as "an eight-ply cashmere sweater." Users at Drugstore.com and MakeupAlley.com give the lotion high marks, as do editors at Real Simple magazine who say the AHA is excellent for clearing up keratosis pilaris (KP), a common condition that creates tiny bumps on arms or thighs. Users say this lotion also helps clear up body acne (due to the AHA) and smoothes away dry, flaky skin; it also absorbs quickly, especially if applied after bathing. Readers at Shape magazine say Lubriderm soaks right into the skin, allowing them to get dressed right away.

      In addition to AHA, Lubriderm Advanced Therapy contains glycerin to draw moisture to the skin, as well as lubricating ingredients such as dimethicone, fatty alcohols and palmitate to add moisture, Shape magazine editors praise Lubriderm for including vitamin E, an antioxidant with moisturizing capabilities, but there are only trace amounts -- not likely enough to make a significant difference. The lotion does contain a slight amount of fragrance, which users say is light and generally pleasing. Manufacturers warn that AHA can cause sun sensitivity and may result in a higher risk of sunburn. A broad-spectrum sunscreen is recommended while using Lubriderm Smoothing Lotion and for a week after discontinuing use. For top sunscreen recommendations see our companion report on sunscreen.

      On the other end of the price spectrum is Elizabeth Arden Prevage Body Total Transforming Anti-Aging Moisturizer (*Est. 5 for 6.8 oz.). Manufacturers promote the cream for its antiaging properties and for minimizing the appearance of scars, stretch marks and cellulite as well as lightening age spots and discolorations. They credit the idobenone Prevage contains, calling it "the most powerful antioxidant" available.

  28. QUESTION:
    How can i get rid of these red spots on my legs? Is it even possible x/?
    This condition is not due to shaving, and it is not ingrown hairs. This has always been what my legs look like and my twin sister has the same thing. We're 21 yrs old and we both HATE this. I know, i know, the media and public has taken a toll on us, but how can it not when we don't feel comfortable in our own skin? These "dots" are NOT bumps, and are present at every pore on our WHOLE entire legs. I even have them on my butt -_- I assume my sister does too. We also have them on our higher arms, below the shoulder and above the elbow. Nowhere else on our body. Now my question is, if anybody has ever dealt with this and found a solution please tell me what you did!!! Again, this is NOT because of shaving, dry skin, ingrown hairs, etc. Trust me, I know my body and this is more of a skin problem that has been with my sister and I our whole lives. Thank you in advance for trying to help.

    • ANSWER:
      It is possible that you are dealing with keratosis pilaris on your thighs as well. The wearing of tight jeans will make the condition worse. One way to minimize the appearance of keratosis pilaris is to gently loofah the skin no more than once a day. Follow up by drying the skin gently and finish with a moisturizer that has either urea or alpha hydroxy acid as one of the ingredients. You should know that individuals with keratosis pilaris are often plagued with other skin conditions such as eczema, dry scaly skin, hay fever or other allergies. If you believe that the markings on your thighs are something different, it would be appropriate to seek a dermatological opinion.

  29. QUESTION:
    Do i have keratosis pilaris or arm acne?
    ok well on both of my arms. there are these little tiny white bumps on the upper forearm. i dont know what they are. ive tried to pop them but nothing comes out of them.
    if u have any ideas of treatment or what you think it is let me know!

    • ANSWER:
      HELP HAS ARRIVED!!!!!!!!!!!

      I had this for years, my mom told me it was eczema. Most people say eczema is a name used for tons of different dry skin conditions that doctors can’t diagnose. I used eczema creams all through Jr. High and High School, all that did was make me feel greasy and uncomfortable with zero results.

      You probably have what is called Keratosis pilaris, Keratosis pilaris is a common, genetic follicular condition that causes the appearance of rough bumps on the skin. It most often appears on arms, thighs, hands, legs, sides, buttocks, or face (which on the face are often mistaken for acne). Worldwide, Keratosis pilaris affects an estimated 40% of the adult population and approximately 50%-80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. There are several different types of Keratosis Pilaris, including Keratosis Pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), Keratosis Pilaris Alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), Keratosis Pilaris Rubra Faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.

      Keratosis Pilaris is caused by Hyperkeratosis: when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin, which is cream colored, surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore, resulting in rough clogged pores. The openings are often closed with a white plug of encrusted sebum, the oily, waxy substance produced by glands in the skin to keep it from drying out. Hyperkeratosis is most likely caused by your body having a vitamin A & E deficiency.

      I started taking vitamin A & E pills at dinner every night and 90% of my white bumps on my cheeks, arms, and legs cleared up. My boss also had white bumps on her arms and tried taking the vitamins too, it worked nicely for her. You could try taking the vitamins, but if you stop taking them, your body will go back to being deficient in them unless you start eating more foods naturally containing vitamins A & E:

      Vitamin A: Liver, Red Pepper, Cayenne, Sweet Potatoes, Carrots, Dried Apricots, Cantaloupe, Spinach, Squash, Dried Herbs, Papaya, Mangoes, Green Peas, Tomatoes.

      Vitamin E: Sunflower Seeds, Almonds, Pine Nuts, Peanuts, Dried Apricots, Pickled Green Olives, Cooked Taro Root, Wheat Germ/Flax Seed/Corn/Canola/Soybean Oils, Hazelnuts, Broccoli.

      Both A & E: Paprika, Red Chili Peppers or Powder, Spinach

      If the bumps (clogged dry rough crusty pores) have a red or pink ring around them, it could just be that they are inflamed, or it could be some sort of skin infection, such as yeast, which lives on the skin naturally but could become an infection, or bacterial. If they are a little pink or red I would try an antibacterial soap.

      Antibacterial soaps are full of chemicals and poisons, some are so harmful they cause muscle weakness, such as in the heart and tongue, and should not be in stores. A natural alternative is a soap or lotion containing Tea Tree oil. Tea Tree oil has natural antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and antiseptic qualities. It also has beneficial cosmetic properties. Tea Tree oil has a faint medicinal scent to it like eucalyptus, which is why I would suggest a soap instead of a lotion. Products containing Tea Tree oil can be found in abundance at health and natural and heath stores, but is also available in main stream store such as Wal-Mart for as low as around .

      So in short, vitamin A, vitamin E, soap, and you should be good (: I wish you luck

  30. QUESTION:
    Is Eczema related to allergy?
    I've eczema and Keratosis pilaris... Lots of acne on face and hands, these have started in last few months..

    I was prescribed anti-allergic medicine for another problem (for 3 days). And my Keratosis pilaris and all the acne on face and hands were cleared like magic.

    Then since I've stopped the anti-allergic medicine, after a week, the acne (Keratosis pilaris) seems to come back again.

    What should I do?

    Again take anti-allergic medicine? WIll it cure the condition?

    • ANSWER:
      i've had acne since i was a toddler and tried all types of products. I used a soap call faiithsoap that got rid of my eczema completely and it never came back. I let my bf use it )he had terrible acne & it got rid of it completely too!

  31. QUESTION:
    What genetic diseases/skin conditions occur in association with keratosis pilaris?

    Please... anyone with a REAL answer?

    • ANSWER:
      KP is a genetic skin disorder and it is hereditary. There have been suggestions made that KP might be linked with a deficiency in Vitamin A.
      "Follicular keratosis refers to orthokeratosis involving the follicular ostium and infundibulum. It may be isolated [as in standard keratosis pilaris (KP)] or associated with other pathologic processes, including follicular inflammation, atrophy, scarring, and alopecia [keratosis pilaris atrophicans (KPA)]. These are reaction patterns that occur alone or as part of a wide variety of syndromes"
      The disorder may be associated with eczema (dermatitis).

  32. QUESTION:
    i have little red bumps on my arms and legs. how do i get rid of them?
    they are NOT pimples or eczema. they are just bumps on the skin. i have had them for as long as i can remember. and i would just like to have soft smooth skin.

    • ANSWER:
      I'm pretty sure you have Keratosis Pilaris. I have it too. They're little reddish bumps but many all over my upper arms. I've heard the salicylic acid works, but I've been exfoliating my arms with a loofah. It smooths it down a bit to make it less bumpy.

  33. QUESTION:
    Help with treating keratosis pilaris?
    Hi so I am a 16 yr old girl and I think I might have keratosis pilaris. You know when you get those white bumps on your arms and thighs that look like goosebumps. well I recently noticed them becoming more visible. My mom says not to worry about it but I was just wondering if anyone else has this problem. If so, how can I treat it? vaseline? exfoliate? please I need some advice thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris

      Definition
      Keratosis pilaris is a common skin condition in which a protein in the skin called keratin forms hard plugs within hair follicles.

      Causes, incidence, and risk factors
      Keratosis pilaris is harmless (benign), does not get worse over time, and often disappears with age. It is more common in patients who have very dry skin, or who have atopic dermatitis (eczema). It seems to run in families.

      In mild cases, small bumps, similar in appearance to "goose bumps," are found on the backs of the upper arms. The texture is that of very coarse sandpaper.

      Bumps may also appear on the buttocks and thighs. Less commonly, bumps appear on the face and may be mistaken for acne.

      Individual bumps are small, skin-colored papules that form within hair openings (follicles). The condition is generally worse in winter and often clears in the summer.

      Symptoms
      • Fine, bumpy texture to skin over the outer upper arm and thigh or elsewhere
      • Skin-colored bumps the size of a grain of sand
      • Slight pinkness may be seen around some bumps

      Signs and tests
      Physical examination is usually all that is needed for your health care provider to make this diagnosis. Testing is usually not necessary.

      Treatment
      Moisturizing lotions are often soothing and may help the appearance of the skin. Skin creams with medications containing urea, lactic acid, glycolic acid, salicylic acid, tretinoin, or vitamin D may be recommended by your physician. However, improvement often takes months and the bumps are likely to come back.

      Expectations
      Keratosis pilaris may fade slowly with age.

      Calling your health care provider
      Call for an appointment with your health care provider (or discuss the condition during a routine visit) if you suspect that you have keratosis pilaris and the condition does not respond to use of over-the-counter moisturizing lotions.

  34. QUESTION:
    What are these bumps on my arms?
    They look like pimples and ive had them for about two years. They are from my shoulders to my elbows on both arms. I take a shower every day but they wont go away. Any advice on what they are and how to treat them would be very helpful. Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      NOOOOO
      It isn't eczema!
      i had eczema before..and it still reoccurs but what you have is Keratosis Pilaris.
      here is how to get rid of it:
      http://www.ehow.com/how_4867610_rid-keratosis-pilaris.html

      I have it and i still havent gotten rid of it..because i havent tried haha

  35. QUESTION:
    Is there a way to get rid of keratosis pilaris?
    I have this on my arms... I am 13. Is there anyway to get rid of it, or does it just stay there. Will it go away when I get older? Or could this just be something that has to do with me growing..puberty...
    and why the heck have I not got any answers yet??!! Do ya'll no know what keratosis pilaris is??!

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris is a common skin condition in which a protein in the skin called keratin forms hard plugs within hair follicles.
      Symptoms

      * Fine, bumpy texture to skin over the outer upper arm and thigh or elsewhere
      * Skin-colored bumps the size of a grain of sand
      * Slight pinkness may be seen around some bumps

      Treatment

      Moisturizing lotions are often soothing and may help the appearance of the skin. Skin creams with medications containing urea, lactic acid, glycolic acid, salicylic acid, tretinoin, or vitamin D may be recommended by your physician. However, improvement often takes months and the bumps are likely to come back.
      Causes

      Keratosis pilaris is benign, self-limiting, and often disappears with age. It is more common in patients who tend to have very dry skin, or who have atopic dermatitis (eczema). It seems to run in families.

      In mild cases, small bumps, similar in appearance to "goose bumps," are found on the backs of the upper arms. The texture is that of very coarse sandpaper.

      Bumps may also appear on the buttocks and thighs. Less commonly, lesions appear on the face and may be mistaken for acne.

      Individual lesions consist of small, skin-colored papules that form within hair openings. The condition is generally worse in winter and often clears in the summer.

  36. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of my goosebumps?
    Ok my arms legs nd sometimes stomich has these goosebumps but nt exactly person refer to dem as chicken skin how do i get it off i been having dem for years it bumpy nd nasty nt flakey little white wen i scrath it o it not pimples any tips on what it is nd how to get it off

    • ANSWER:
      It's called keratosis pilaris. Its plugged hair follicles on the upper arms, sometimes occurs on the legs. Occurs most often in children, most people grow out of it some don't though. Use Amlactin cream to smooth it down to dissolve the keratin plugs. There is no cure unfortunately, it may signal that you have a predisposition for eczema. Runs in families too. Sometimes they can look red if the skin gets irritated.

      Good luck!

  37. QUESTION:
    How can treat some bumps that i have on my elbows?
    they look red and white flakes and they are spreading. I have been using so many creams and they dont even go away. I even got them burned. they said there called chicken bumps

    • ANSWER:
      "Chicken bumps" or "chicken skin" is actually a condition called Keratosis Pilaris.

      The name keratosis pilaris comes from the process of “keratinization,” our body’s process for building up the epidermis, or outer-most layer of skin. When the body performs this process too much, too often, or in the wrong areas, excess skin collects around the hair follicles. This creates a miniature cone or clogged pore, much like a small pimple.

      While there is no cure for KP, there are some treatments that minimize the appearance of the areas affected such as:

      -The process of using exfoliating (scrubs and loofahs), moisturizing (lotions), softening (creams), and applying anti-inflammatory agents (sarnol hc lotion).

      -Alpha Hydroxy Acids (AHAs). Glycolic acid and Lactic acid are two AHAs used to minimize the bumps through chemical exfoliation. Lactic Acid, which comes in over-the-counter and prescription formulas, is also an effective ingredient for alleviating the appearance of KP bumps.

      -Urea. As with conditions that result in extremely dry and scaly skin, such as psoriasis, eczema, and ichtyosis, you may find your KP affected areas unresponsive to milder treatments. In this case you’ll want to try a product containing urea. You may have to see a dermatologist for some stronger versions of this.

      -Glytone’s KP Kit. As KP often responds well to a multi-faceted approach, consider a therapy regimen that incorporates more than one product, such as Glytone’s KP Kit. Since the goal of KP treatment is to exfoliate, moisturize, and prevent discoloring at the inflamed areas, you’ll find it handy to have both treatments and a gentle puff in one convenient package.

      -Vitamin A Treatments. Sufferers of acne and KP have used vitamin A creams such as Retin A, Tazorac and Differin for years. And while the potency of these products is undeniably effective at treating blemishes, the skin can become dry and pinkishly raw with overuse. Use a small amount of cream applied to the affected areas only once every other day or night. Stronger versions of this can also be obtained from a dermatologist.

      -Soothing Topical Anti-inflammatories. If youre having itching, this is the main thing that will help you. For an anti-inflammatory with the added benefit of itch relief, Sarnol-HC provides the effectiveness of 1% hydrocortisone. Sarnol HC Lotion’s base compounds help soften, smooth and moisturize the skin. Any other 1% hydrocortisone cream/lotion will work as well.

      If none of those treatments work for you, the strongest treatment yet is:

      -Microdermabrasion. Microdermabrasion therapies offered through visits to your dermatologist may be the last resort for sufferers of KP, but they can also be costly and inconvenient. However, there are a couple of at-home microdermabrasion products that, when used regularly, can have a similar glowing effect. Neova Microdermabrasion Scrub and Peter Thomas Roth AHA/BHA Face and Body Polish are excellent OTC alternatives.

      As with any long-term goal, persistence is the key to treating keratosis pilaris. It is, after all, a chronic condition that requires long term treatment. But chronic doesn’t mean panic. Regular treatment through the specialized products above will go a long way toward preventing new “chicken skin bumps.”

      Hope this wasnt too long, and very helpful for you.

      I have several relatives with KP, and simply exfoliating in the shower, moisturizing, and using hydrocortisone cream has worked wonders!

      Feel free to message me or email me with further questions, and see my source below for more information.

      RN

  38. QUESTION:
    *******How do I get flawless skin?*******?
    1. I have skin conditions
    -Keratosis Pilaris
    - Strawberry legs (shaving dark spots)
    - Eczema

    Is there a diet that will make my skin nice and smooth and spot free?
    What should I use on my skin?
    What kind of detergent brand is the best?

    Any tips would help

    THE MORE TIPS THE BETTER :3

    Thanks <3

    • ANSWER:
      keratosis pilaris is genetic, you cant do anything about it.but if you moisturize it feels less rough.
      strawberry legs, use tendskin after you shave. and scrub with an exfoliating body wash.
      eczema you can go to the dermatologist and they'll give you soemthing to get rid of it

  39. QUESTION:
    My sister has Keratosis Pilarsis on her arms. Can someone recommend a treatment or product to clear this up?
    She's had this condition for 6 years. She's been to many doctors--they've all told her there's no "cure." Any treatments that others have heard or used--with success--would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance for your help!

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment is directed at softening the keratin deposits in the skin and may include medicated creams containing urea or lactic acid. Even with treatment, this condition tends to remain for years. If associated with eczema, keratosis pilaris may improve with treatment of the underlying eczema.

  40. QUESTION:
    Refined vs Unrefined Coconut Oil?
    Hi there!

    I have 2 children (a 5 year old and a 10 month old). My 5 year old has very dry skin, some eczema patches, keratosis pilaris on her arms, legs and bum, cradle cap/dandruff and her hips regularly have dry cracked areas. My 10 month old, looks like she may follow in her sisters footsteps lol

    I have been reading a lot on cococut oil and how great it is for the skin. So I picked some up at the store. (Spectrum Organic Expeller Pressed Refined Coconut Oil. It's naturally refined with no chemicals etc) Since using it, my oldest daughters skin looks and feels softer, but she complains that it hurts more now. I began using it on my lips and they would dry and crack more than ever.

    Here is my question; do you think this is more of a reaction to the Coconut Oil itself? Or would it be worth scrapping this bottle and trying an unrefined oil?

    Thanks for your help!

    • ANSWER:

  41. QUESTION:
    I am so sick and tired of my weird skin problem?
    I have a freaky problem with excessively dry skin. I have been using a fingernail file to get rid of it but in a day or two it's right back. Naturally I can't file my entire body. It itches like you would not believe. There are no rashes, bumps or anything I can see. The flakes are white. I've looked at every skin condition there is and mine is not listed. I have no idea what is going on? (I used the file on my legs).

    • ANSWER:
      I had this for years, my mom told me it was eczema. Most people say eczema is a name used for tons of different dry skin conditions that doctors can’t diagnose. I used eczema creams all through Jr. High and High School, all that did was make me feel greasy and uncomfortable with zero results.

      You probably have what is called Keratosis pilaris, Keratosis pilaris is a common, genetic follicular condition that causes the appearance of flakes or rough bumps on the skin. It most often appears on arms, thighs, hands, legs, sides, buttocks, or face (which on the face are often mistaken for acne). Worldwide, Keratosis pilaris affects an estimated 40% of the adult population and approximately 50%-80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. There are several different types of Keratosis Pilaris, including Keratosis Pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), Keratosis Pilaris Alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), Keratosis Pilaris Rubra Faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.

      Keratosis Pilaris is caused by Hyperkeratosis: when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin, which is cream colored, surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore, resulting in rough clogged pores. The openings are often closed with a white plug of encrusted sebum, the oily, waxy substance produced by glands in the skin to keep it from drying out. Hyperkeratosis is most likely caused by your body having a vitamin A & E deficiency.

      I started taking vitamin A & E pills at dinner every night and 90% of my white bumps on my cheeks, arms, and legs cleared up. My boss also had white bumps on her arms and tried taking the vitamins too, it worked nicely for her. You could try taking the vitamins, but if you stop taking them, your body will go back to being deficient in them unless you start eating more foods naturally containing vitamins A & E:

      Vitamin A: Liver, Red Pepper, Cayenne, Sweet Potatoes, Carrots, Dried Apricots, Cantaloupe, Spinach, Squash, Dried Herbs, Papaya, Mangoes, Green Peas, Tomatoes.

      Vitamin E: Sunflower Seeds, Almonds, Pine Nuts, Peanuts, Dried Apricots, Pickled Green Olives, Cooked Taro Root, Wheat Germ/Flax Seed/Corn/Canola/Soybean Oils, Hazelnuts, Broccoli.

      Both A & E: Paprika, Red Chili Peppers or Powder, Spinach

      If the bumps (clogged dry rough crusty pores) have a red or pink ring around them, it could just be that they are inflamed, or it could be some sort of skin infection, such as yeast, which lives on the skin naturally but could become an infection, or bacterial. If they are a little pink or red I would try an antibacterial soap.

      Antibacterial soaps are full of chemicals and poisons, some are so harmful they cause muscle weakness, such as in the heart and tongue, and should not be in stores. A natural alternative is a soap or lotion containing Tea Tree oil. Tea Tree oil has natural antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and antiseptic qualities. It also has beneficial cosmetic properties. Tea Tree oil has a faint medicinal scent to it like eucalyptus, which is why I would suggest a soap instead of a lotion. Products containing Tea Tree oil can be found in abundance at health and natural and heath stores, but is also available in main stream store such as Wal-Mart for as low as around .

      So in short, vitamin A, vitamin E, soap, and you should be good (: I wish you luck

  42. QUESTION:
    I have a somewhat embarrassing problem, please help?
    I have a weird skin condition where I have pimples all over my arms. I also have some on my legs and a lot covering my entire butt. I've been trying to use proactive on it, but it doesn't help all that much. Any tips for getting it to go away?
    I have also had it for almost a year

    • ANSWER:
      I suspect that you have keratosis pilaris underlying the problem. This is a form of eczema or dermatitis that surrounds your individual hair follicles, and because of that, the inflammation swells the pores shut. That in turn, causes your oil glands to "back up" and eventuates into a pimple. The treatment should be aimed at the original problem, so that a good moisturizer containing lactic acid (Am Lactin) and some hydrocortisone lotion, should help u out.

  43. QUESTION:
    My brother has this skin condition, is it bad?
    Ok, so I've noticed my brother has this weird dryness on his skin.The pores are raised and it's in small patches: on both arms, below and above the elbow (so, there are 4 areas). One of them is really bad, it's very prominent and the skin color is lighter than the rest of his body.
    Should I be worried about it? Or is it just dry skin in need of some Vaseline?
    He used to swim a lot. Could it be because of that?

    • ANSWER:
      That sounds like either eczema or this little-known skin condition I've heard of called "keratosis pilaris", which I'm convinced I have. Neither are dangerous, they mostly require a good exfoliation and/or a lot of moisturizer. Both are harmless.

  44. QUESTION:
    Should I see a dermatologist for Keratosis Palaris?
    The little red bumps on my arm. I haven't tried anything to get rid of them, I just want the quickest, best results. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment

      While there is no cure for keratosis pilaris, there are palliative treatments available. The efficacy of these treatment methods is directly related to the individual's commitment and consistency of use.[citation needed]

      Creams containing the acid form of vitamin A, Tretinoin, have been shown to help. Most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, it is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by increasing the cell turnover rate of the outer layer of the skin, decreasing the amount of the keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. While keratosis pilaris is not acne, some believe this action may be of benefit to those with KP as well.[7]

      Another retinoid that has the potential to help with keratosis pilaris is Adapalene.[7] Benefits include increased stability when applied in conjunction with other topical medications, such as benzoyl peroxide. Adapalene is a moderator of cellular differentiation, keratinization, and inflammatory processes, having both exfoliating and anti-inflammatory effects.

      An alternative is the prescription medication Triamcinolone.[7] Most commonly sold under the trade name Aristocort, Triamcinolone is a synthetic corticosteroid, compounded as a cream, which has been medically approved as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of eczema. As the action responsible for alleviating eczema symptoms is, as with retinoid creams, the reduction amount of keratin in pores, the effect of Triamcinolone on KP is expected to be similar.

      As with Triamcinolone, Tretinoin or any other treatment, once therapy is discontinued, the condition reverts to its original state. However, skin treated with Tretinoin may take several weeks or more to revert to its pre-treatment condition, but may, at the same time, take several weeks or more to show optimal results, with the condition commonly worsening initially, as underlying keratin is brought to the surface of the skin. Tretinoin is considerably more expensive and dispensed in smaller quantities than Triamcinolone and other treatments. Although it may be the most effective treatment for keratosis pilaris, it is not considered the first line of treatment.[citation needed]

      The condition is often dismissed outright by practitioners as being presently untreatable,[citation needed] giving mere moisturizing suggestions or reassurance that the condition will improve or cease with age, typically after 30. Ignorance, accompanied with the price, availability, quantity dispensed, time taken for optimal results to be achieved, more serious side-effects, adverse reactions, and worsening of the condition in the initial treatment phase - coupled with the cheaper, safer, and easier availability of other treatments - has hindered Tretinoin from showing its potential in the treatment of this condition.[citation needed]

      Sulfur has been used for skin treatment predating modern medicine. Sulfur soaps, lotions, and exfoliants have been used successfully for treating KP. Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) supplements used with some success often require dosage as high as 25g per day. Side effects can include thickening of hair and nails, and pale skin.[8]

      Exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, creams, and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Beta hydroxy acids may help improve the appearance and texture of the affected skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to their containing lactic acid, a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight is helpful as well. Coconut oil may also be helpful if applied to afflicted areas while in the shower. Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, and, in many cases, will cause bleeding.

  45. QUESTION:
    3 days ago, certain area's of my back, arms and legs became red. Is this a rash and how do I treat it?
    A few days ago[3], certain area's of my back, thighs, legs and arms because unusually itchy and it has been getting worse. What can help reduce the itching?

    • ANSWER:
      okay,okay.well,if these itchy spots are coming out as sort of round bumps and after awhile they become scaly and flaky then chances are,you have aczema[atopic dermatitis] don't worry,it's nothing too serisous.depending upon the severity,it sounds like it isn't too bad yet.a few medicines that can help treat this if you do have eczema, are Triamcinolone Acetonide,and just a calming cream to soothe the itch would be Eucerin Calming Cream Moisturizer. See a doctor to get a prescription to the Triamcinolone Acetonide. I highly suggest you see a dermatologist before it gets worse. once you've had it fro awhile,then it's relevantly hard to defeat. i hope i have somewhat helped you. good luck,and please take my advice,for your safety.also,a good wayto deermine if you have eczema would be to check your upper arms and forehead to se if you have even slightly just little invisible bumps. that is called keratosis pilaris there's nothing you can do about it,but its nothing bad even in the slightest bit.trust me. all you need to worry about is the eczema.

  46. QUESTION:
    What could these red bumps be?
    My son and youngest daughter get red bumps on their faces and they have puss in them. I have been told that it's eczema, but don't know for sure. Our doctor didn't know either. We don't have a dermatologist close by so I'm open to suggestions, advice, etc. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      My answer would be keratosis pilaris.

      Keratosis pilaris is benign, self-limiting, and often disappears with age. It is more common in patients with atopic dermatitis (eczema) and seems to run in families.

      In mild cases, small bumps, similar in appearance to "goose bumps," are found on the backs of the upper arms. The texture is that of very coarse sandpaper.

      Bumps may also appear on the buttocks and thighs. Less commonly, lesions appear on the face and may be mistaken for acne.

      Individual lesions consist of a small, skin-colored papules that form within hair openings. The condition is generally worse in winter and often clears in the summer.

      Moisturizing lotions are often soothing and may help the appearance of the skin. Topical treatment with medications containing urea, lactic acid, Retin A (tretinoin), or vitamin D may be recommended by your physician. However, improvement often takes months and recurrence is likely.

      Outlook (Prognosis): Keratosis pilaris may fade slowly with age.

      The pediatrician says it is just a condition that is harmless. It is not an allergic reaction or a sign of poor hygene. I myself have it on my arms and thighs. So it didn't suprise me when my little boy got it too!

  47. QUESTION:
    Help: I have been diagnosed with keratosis pliaris?
    I was recently diagnosed with keratosis pilaris on the back of my arms by a family doctor. They prescribed some cream for it and it has helped a bit, but with summer coming up I am embarrassed to show my arms. It is minimal but there :( and the doctor said it could be worse. Is there any cure for it? Can a peel help? Help please.

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis Pilaris (KP) is a common skin disorder, typified by “chicken skin” bumps on upper arms, thighs, torso, buttocks and occasionally the cheeks. Excess skin forms around individual hair follicles, creating the characteristic minute, rough, grater-like bumps.
      As seen in
      Health Magazine

      Keratosis Pilaris affects almost 50% of the world’s population and is particularly likely to affect anyone prone to eczema, asthma or hayfever.

      It’s never a chore to attain flawless, smooth skin. KP Duty™ effectively eliminates crustiness, flaking, and dry, rough chicken skin – no prep work or scrubbing required.

      KP Duty™ is a concentrated treatment with potent antioxidant Green Tea, moisture replenishing Hyaluronic Acid and texturizing Dimethicone.

      Contains:
      Glycolic Acid - Powerful AHA
      Sodium Glycolate – Glycolic Acid salt with buffering action
      Green Tea – Botanical antioxidant with soothing anti-redness action
      Urea - Humectant
      Algae – Soothing botanical
      Sodium Hyaluronate –Potent hydrating agent
      Dimethicone – Barrier agent – reduces moisture evaporation

      • Dermatologist Tested & Approved
      • Non Comedogenic
      • Non Irritating
      • Allergy Tested
      • Fragrance Free
      • Dye Free
      • pH Balanced
      • No Animal Testing

  48. QUESTION:
    How to help Keratosis Pilaris?
    Ok, so apparently I have Keratosis Pilaris. How do I get rid of it? Thanks! :)

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris is a genetically transmitted disorder, that is in the same gene as eczema and hay fever. Since it's genetic, there is no cure for it, but frequently it can be made to be less apparent. There are two aspects to treating it: first is to make the skin less rough, which can be done with certain moisturizers containing lactic acid. Secondly is to reduce the inflammation, which can be done with either cortisone salves or products that avoid cortisone, such as Protopic or Elidel (both are prescription items). Sunlight is also beneficial. Good luck.

  49. QUESTION:
    HELP!!! How do I get rid of red pimples on my arms?!?
    I've had these red pimples on my arms (also on the back of my legs) for about 5 years I'm 15, they are a real problem. My mom got them at my age too and still has them. They are only on the back of my arms, the inside is spotless. They don't itch or burn. I've tried scrubbing them with a hard, rough sponge and mouisterising but that hasn't worked. Some of them look and act like pimples, if I squeeze them they pop and are either oily or pussy (I know, that sounds really gross). But some are just red bumps that are nothing like pimples. I exercise everyday and drink a lot of water (I don't drink fizzy drinks!!!), I also eat my veggies so it's not like I have an unhealthy lifestyle. My skin is really fair and having red arms is really not attractive at all. So please please please help me!!! Thank you!!!

    Ps. This is what they look like. I got the image off Google so hopefully the link works.
    http://d1535dk28ea235.cloudfront.net/preset_65/keratosis_pilaris.jpg

    • ANSWER:
      It isn't acne, it is a type of eczema. I have it too, although mine is not as noticeable now because of a few things. First, what laundry soap do you use? If you are using anything with perfumes or dyes, then don't. Have your Mom switch to a Free and Clear laundry detergent and softener, then rewash all of your clothes with it to remove any residues left by the other soap. When I switched it made a huge difference and I noticed most of the redness went away. As far as the bumps, I have noticed that cocoa butter helped. Other moisturizers did nothing (and I have used just about all of them). I have to apply it daily. Do not scrub the skin, it only makes it worse! I tried a pumice stone on mine, but when I stopped doing it, it got better. Body washes that have perfumes in it can make it worse as well, so I stick with a cocoa butter, milk body wash. Stop squeezing the bumps since that can cause scarring.


eczema or keratosis pilaris

Actinic Keratosis Solar Keratosis

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Anyone know about keratosis on the neck?
    i got a keratosis breakout on my neck and theyre really red and swollen, is there anything that could either relieve the redness or get rid of the breakout?

    • ANSWER:
      What is it?
      An actinic keratosis (AK), also known as a solar keratosis, is a scaly or crusty bump that arises on the skin surface. The base may be light or dark, tan, pink, red, or a combination of these. . . or the same color as your skin. The scale or crust is horny, dry, and rough, and is often recognized by touch rather than sight. Occasionally it itches or produces a pricking or tender sensation. It can also become inflamed and surrounded by redness. In rare instances, actinic keratoses can even bleed.

      The skin abnormality or lesion develops slowly and generally reaches a size from an eighth to a quarter of an inch. Early on, it may disappear only to reappear later. You will often see several AKs at a time.

      An AK is most likely to appear on the face, ears, scalp, neck, backs of the hands and forearms, shoulders, and lips - the parts of the body most often exposed to sunshine. The growths may be flat and pink or raised and rough.

      Why is it dangerous?
      AK can be the first step in the development of skin cancer. It is thus a precursor of cancer or a precancer.

      The most common treatment for AK, it is especially effective when a limited number of lesions exist. No cutting or anesthesia are required. Liquid nitrogen is applied to the growths with a spray device or cotton-tipped applicator to freeze them. They subsequently shrink or become crusted and fall off. Some temporary swelling may occur after treatment, and in dark-skinned patients, some pigment may be lost.

  2. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever heard of a skin disorder with two words, last one being Keratosis?
    I can't remember the first word but it looks and feels like small round rough patches on the surface of my skin, worse on my legs, ankles and top of my feet. I also have problems with skin tags on the underside of my upper arms, inside thighs and a few on my back. I am only a few lbs overweight so it's not due to that. My dermatologist told me what it was a couple of years ago and I cannot remember, he's not in practice now. If someone else has this or if you're a derm, I'd love to hear from you.
    I searched and now I'm pretty sure the name of this disorder is Seborrheic Keratosis. Anyone out there know anything about it?

    • ANSWER:
      I had a quick search and found this:
      SEBORRHEIC KERATOSIS
      A seborrheic keratosis is a benign skin growth that is very common among people over 40 years of age. The growths resemble flattened or raised warts, but have no viral origins and may exhibit a variety of colors, from pink or yellow through brown and black. Because only the top layers of the epidermis are involved, seborrheic keratoses are often described as having a "pasted-on" appearance.

      Because the tumors are rarely painful, treatment is not often necessary. There is a small risk of localized infection caused by picking at the lesion. If a growth becomes excessively itchy, or if it is irritated by clothing or jewelry, cryosurgery has been found to be highly effective in their removal. The main danger associated with seborrheic keratoses lies in their resemblance to malignant melanomas, which has sometimes led to a misdiagnosis of the cancerous lesions. If there is any doubt, a skin biopsy will allow a physician to make a correct diagnosis. A mutation of a gene coding for a growth factor receptor (FGFR3), has been found in 40% of seborrheic keratosis.

      I also found SOLAR KERATOSIS
      What is a solar keratosis?

      A solar keratosis is a small, rough, bump which develops on the skin. It is caused by a lot of exposure to the sun over many years. One or more may develop. It is sometimes called an actinic keratosis.

      What does a solar keratosis look like?

      Each one can range from the size of a pinhead to 2-3 cm across. Their colour can be light, dark, pink, red, the same colour as your skin, or a combination of these. The top of each one may have a yellow-white crust. They feel rough and dry, and are slightly raised from the surface of the skin. You can often feel them more easily than see them. Some redness may develop in the surrounding skin.

      Sometimes a finger-like growth of hard skin appears to come out of a solar keratosis (a 'cutaneous horn').

      Several solar keratoses may develop at about the same time, often in the same area of skin. Sometimes several join together and form a large flat-ish rough area of skin.

      Solar keratoses usually develop on areas of skin which have been exposed to the sun a lot. For example, on the face, neck, bald patches on the scalp, and the backs of the hands. They may appear in other areas in people who do a lot of sunbathing.

      There are usually no other symptoms. Rarely, you may get an itchy or pricking sensation from affected areas of skin.

      I hope that these help

  3. QUESTION:
    What does actinic keratoses do on a cellular level to the actinic lesions?

    • ANSWER:
      Actinic means changes caused by radiation. Keratosis means a disorder relating to keratin, a fibrous structural protein that is very hard by nature.

      Thus, actinic keratosis means a disease of keratin caused by radiation, in most cases solar radiation. It's a pre-cancerous malformation of the skin.

      Here's how it works: the epidermis is made up of three primary structural proteins, collagen, elastin, and keratin. In general terms, collagen makes it soft and waterproof, elastin makes it stretchy, and keratin composes the very outermost layers to protect the softer parts from damage. Since keratin is such a naturally hard material, it makes up a much smaller portion of the normal ratio.

      Calluses on hands or feet are the body's reaction to repeated minor abrasion. It ups the ratio of keratin in order to harden the skin and keep it from tearing.

      In actinic keratosis, damage from a radiant energy source (like the sun) destroys and damages the epidermal cells repeatedly over a period of time, resulting in the body upping the keratin level to harden the skin up, resulting in the ugly bumps and patches.

      Think of it like a callus, except instead of chafing making the skin toughen up, it's damage from the sun.

      -Dr. Finn

  4. QUESTION:
    Removal of pre cancerous spots on skin?
    I am due to have a number of sun spots removed with a low temperature liquid. Will this cause pain at the time or subsequent itching? The spots are on my neck and forehead.
    Rose P.

    • ANSWER:
      If you are talking about having precancerous actinic or solar keratosis frozen with liquid nitrogen applied with a long q-tip or a liquid nitrogen gun (very common ways of treating precancerous skin lesions) then I have had plenty of them frozen. It has been my experience that some will hurt and some won't, depending on size and location. The pain usually only lasts about as long as a hard pinch and does not itch after wards. This freezing does cause a blister which if not popped will be much less painful that if you pop it the first day and then have an open blister sore for 2-3 days. Make sure an apply antibiotic ointment as directed by your Dr and wear a band aid over the frozen spots and you should do fine.

      good luck

  5. QUESTION:
    Can you help me with a French to English translation?
    This French video, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bCtVt8z5Zg4, runs 3:39. Can someone please provide me an English transcript? Thanks in advance to anyone who can help.

    • ANSWER:
      A recent survey has demonstrated that Canadians don't associate some lesions to skin cancer. In fact, while more than half of them are worried of getting skin cancer, the large majority, that is 86%, has been unable to visually identify a pre-cancerous actinic keratosis lesion. Dr Joël Claveau, dermatologist, explains us the importance of early screening and treatment of this common skin infection.

      - Actinic keratosis, also named solar keratosis, is a usually unknown lesion, but it is important to recognize it since it's a precursor of spino-cellular and it's a sign of exposition to sun. Skin cancer screening is an increasingly important phenomenon. It is a problem that we, dermatologists, encounter every day in our offices, no matter the time of the year. Of course we tend to hear more abour skin cancer screenings when summer arrives or when we hold a prevention campaign, but it is important to be aware of that problem all year long, especially those who go to southern destinations during winter, or, for example, people who spend six months in Florida.

      Actinic keratosis lesions usually develop on the body parts that are the most exposed to the sun, such as baldness areas, forehead, face, ears, neck and hands. The lesions can be 3D, scaly or rough, and look like red stains, crusts or wounds. They usually show up on people older than 40 years old who have light skin, hair and eyes, or on people who have a history of bad sunburns or exposure to artificial UV radiation, for example, in tanning salons or under tanning lamps.

      - It's been years since dermatologists encourage people to examine themselves, to do a self-exam of their skin. So, a few times a year, it's good to examine yourself, to search for signs of carcinomas or melanomas. Then, when you have a suspect lesion, it is important to talk to your doctor or to a dermatologist. 75% of skin cancers are initially discovered by patients or their spouse. Different treatments available for actinic keratosis are liquid nitrogen for local lesions, chemotherapy creams, thepary with light and treatment to stimulate the immune system with a new formula of imiquimod.

      Zyclara is a new topical cream available with prescription approved by Health Canada for treatment of adults with multiple actinic keratosis lesions on the face or baldness areas.

      - Zyclara is a new imiquimod formula and its goal is to stimulate the immune system to get rid of the pre-cancerous lesions. The advantage of this treatment is that it can treat apparent lesions and non-apparent, under-the-skin lesions. Advantages of treating solar keratosis with a cream is that it allows the patient to treat himself at home, A new imiquimod formula allows a shorter, well-tolerated treatment.

      Dr Claveau adds that early screening and treatment of the actinic keratosis are the key to avoid its evolution into skin cancer. Canadians should keep an eye on their skin all year long. For more information about actinic keratosis and skin cancers with benign melanomas risks, contact your doctor.

  6. QUESTION:
    does it seem like i have skin cancer?
    i CONSTANTLY have new moles. and some of them itch? some hurt if rubbed. some are really light, others really dark. does it sound like i have skin cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      it sounds like you need to be checked out by a doctor, just in case. If the moles have to be removed, the doctor can do that quite quickly.

      the things you want too look out for are:

      Basal and squamous cell cancers

      Basal cell cancers and squamous cell cancers are most often found in areas that get exposed to a lot of sun, such as the head, neck, and arms, but they can occur elsewhere. Look for new growths, spots, bumps, patches, or sores that don't heal after 2 to 3 months.

      Basal cell carcinomas often look like flat, firm, pale areas or small, raised, pink or red, translucent, shiny, waxy areas that may bleed after a minor injury. They may have one or more abnormal blood vessels, a lower area in their center, and/or blue, brown, or black areas. Large basal cell carcinomas may have oozing or crusted areas.

      Squamous cell carcinomas may look like growing lumps, often with a rough, scaly, or crusted surface. They may also look like flat reddish patches in the skin that grow slowly.

      Both of these types of skin cancer may develop as a flat area showing only slight changes from normal skin.

      Actinic keratosis, also known as solar keratosis, is a skin condition that is sometimes pre-cancerous and is caused by too much sun exposure. Actinic keratoses are usually small (less than ¼ inch), rough spots that may be pink-red or flesh-colored. Usually they develop on the face, ears, back of the hands, and arms of middle-aged or older people with fair skin, although they can occur in younger people or on other sun-exposed areas of the skin. People with one actinic keratosis usually develop many more. Some can grow into squamous cell cancers, but others may stay the same or even go away on their own. Because they can turn cancerous, such areas should be looked at by a doctor. Your doctor can then decide whether they should be treated.
      Melanomas

      The most important warning sign for melanoma is a new spot on the skin or a spot that is changing in size, shape, or color. Another important sign is a spot that looks different from all of the other spots on your skin (known as the ugly duckling sign). If you have any of these warning signs, have your skin checked by a doctor.

      The ABCD rule is another guide to the usual signs of melanoma. Be on the lookout and tell your doctor about any spots that match the following description:

      * A is for Asymmetry: One half of a mole or birthmark does not match the other.
      * B is for Border: The edges are irregular, ragged, notched, or blurred.
      * C is for Color: The color is not the same all over and may include shades of brown or black, or sometimes with patches of pink, red, white, or blue.
      * D is for Diameter: The spot is larger than 6 millimeters across (about ¼ inch -- the size of a pencil eraser), although melanomas can sometimes be smaller than this.

      Some melanomas do not fit the rules described above, so it is important to tell your doctor about any changes in skin lesions, new skin lesions, or growths that look different from the rest of your moles.

      Other warning signs are:

      * A sore that does not heal
      * Spread of pigment from the border of a spot to surrounding skin
      * Redness or a new swelling beyond the border
      * Change in sensation -- itchiness, tenderness, or pain
      * Change in the surface of a mole -- scaliness, oozing, bleeding, or the appearance of a bump or nodule

  7. QUESTION:
    Do ultraviolet rays make you hot?
    If you wear a dark rain jacket in the summer, will you get hot from the suns UV rays even if it is cloudy? Do light colors keep you cooler?

    • ANSWER:
      Ultraviolet (UV) light is electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength shorter than that of visible light, but longer than X-rays, in the range 10 nm to 400 nm, and energies from 3eV to 124 eV. It is so named because the spectrum consists of electromagnetic waves with frequencies higher than those that humans identify as the color violet. UV light is found in sunlight and is emitted by electric arcs and specialized lights such as black lights. Classified as non-ionizing radiation, it can cause chemical reactions, and causes many substances to glow or fluoresce. Most people are aware of the effects of UV through the painful condition of sunburn, but the UV spectrum has many other effects, both beneficial and damaging, to human health. UVB exposure induces the production of vitamin D in the skin. The majority of positive health effects are related to this vitamin. It has regulatory roles in calcium metabolism (which is vital for normal functioning of the nervous system, as well as for bone growth and maintenance of bone density) immunity, cell proliferation, insulin secretion, and blood pressure. An overexposure to UVB radiation can cause sunburn and some forms of skin cancer. In humans, prolonged exposure to solar UV radiation may result in acute and chronic health effects on the skin, eye, and immune system. However the most deadly form - malignant melanoma - is mostly caused by the indirect DNA damage (free radicals and oxidative stress). This can be seen from the absence of a UV-signature mutation in 92% of all melanoma. UVC rays are the highest energy, most dangerous type of ultraviolet light. Little attention has been given to UVC rays in the past since they are filtered out by the atmosphere. However, their use in equipment such as pond sterilization units may pose an exposure risk, if the lamp is switched on outside of its enclosed pond sterilization unit.
      Health Concerns of UV Radiation In humans, it has been observed that prolonged exposure to solar radiation has deleterious effects on the -

      Skin,

      Eye

      Immune system.

      Severity of the damage is directly propotional to the UV wavelength, intensity and duration of exposure.

      Skin: Premature ageing- UV rays can accelerate ageing by damaging the collagen fibres of the skin and thereby reducing its elasticity.

      UV- A, although the least harmful, can induce the onset of premature wrinkling, also known as 'actinic degeneration', besides causing DNA damages.

      Sun tan- UV-A oxidizes the melanin granules close to our skin and stimulates the production of new ones. These new granules generate a tan which is a protective mechanism to prevent further skin damage

      Sun burn- Over exposure to the sun's UV-B rays may cause an injury to a blood vessel on the skin surface. This may lead to sunburn, which is the reddening and swelling of the injured area, and this may worsen after 24-72 hrs.

      Melanoma- This is the most serious form of skin cancer. Studies have shown that there is a strong link between sunburn in childhood and the onset of malignant melanoma in adults.

      UV B radiation causes DNA thymine base pairs to link resulting in mutations, which are the precursors of cancer. The American Cancer Society reports 44,200 new cases of melanoma and 7300 deaths each year.

      Other types of skin cancer that may result from UV exposure are basal and squamous cell carcinoma.

      Actinic Keratosis- Over dose of UV radiation could lead to a skin growth known as actinic kearatosis, which appears as a red and rough elevation on the skin. This commonly affects parts that are exposed to sunlight.

      Eyes:

      Over exposure to UV radiations are extremely hazardous to the eyes and it may result in

      Photokeratitis (Welder's flash) leading to cataract,

      Pinguecula formation

      Pterygium.

      Immune system:

      Over exposure to UV rays could result in immunosuppression and this has been cited as one of the reason for cancer development in patients.

      So the answer to your question is yes, if you wear a rain jacket in the summer, you can still get hot from ultraviolet radiation, even if it is cloudy. Light colors actually can make you cooler because light colors are better at not taking in so much light and heat, but if you wear dark colors like black, you are more likely to get hot because the dark color on your rain jacket, for example, will absorb a lot of heat and ultraviolet radiation. So color can play a big part in how hot you get. Hope I helped!
      Maxwell

  8. QUESTION:
    which of following is not a pre-malignant conditon?
    leucoplakia , solar keratosis, ertythroplakia & bowen's disease..

    • ANSWER:
      * Leukoplakia is usually harmless. Lesions often clear up in a few weeks or months after the source of irritation is removed. Rarely, it may become cancer.
      * Actinic keratosis (also called "solar keratosis" and "senile keratosis") is a premalignant condition of thick, scaly, or crusty patches of skin.
      * Erythroplakia frequently is associated with dysplasia, and is thus a precancerous lesion.
      * Bowen's disease (BD) (also known as "squamous cell carcinoma in situ") is a neoplastic skin disease, it can be considered as an early stage or intraepidermal form of squamous cell carcinoma. It was named after John T. Bowen. Erythroplasia of Queyrat is a form of squamous cell carcinoma in situ arising on the glans or prepuce, possibly induced by HPV.
      Answer: Leucoplakia.

  9. QUESTION:
    Removal of Actinic Keratosis (sun spots)?
    I had some sun spots frozen for removal, but one on my face was sort of big and they cut it away from the skin. Well I guess some of the skin had to be cut too and now I have a small indentation. Has anyone had this done and did the skin grow back? I plan on calling the dr. when the office reopens. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Actinic Keratosis

      Actinic keratosis (also called solar keratosis, sun spots or AK) is a pre-cancerous condition of thick, scaly or crusty patches of skin (actinic – caused by sunlight; keratosis – thickened scaly growth). AK is common in fair-skinned people and caused by long-term sun exposure. AKs may progress to invasive squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and are by far the most common lesion with malignant potential to arise on the skin. In the United States, AK represents the second most frequent reason for patients to visit a dermatologist. The frequency of AKs is directly related to sun exposure and skin type. AK can occur in patients as young as 20 or 30 years of age in areas of high sun exposure but is more common in patients aged 50 years and older.

      http://www.magenbiosciences.com/pages/actinic-keratosis.html

  10. QUESTION:
    what type of cancer is Kertosis. My mother has been told this is what is on her legs?

    • ANSWER:
      i'm sure that they told her what kind of keratosis but here is some info for you the rest can be found on the website listed in sources. I wish the best for your mother.

      An actinic keratosis (AK), also known as a solar keratosis, is a small crusty, scaly, or crumbly bump or horn that arises on the skin surface. The base may be light or dark, tan, pink, red, or a combination of these... or the same color as your skin. The scale or crust is horny, dry, and rough, and is often recognized by touch rather than sight. Occasionally it itches or produces a pricking or tender sensation. It can also become inflamed and surrounded by redness. In rare instances, actinic keratoses can bleed.
      The skin abnormality or lesion develops slowly and usually reaches a size from an eighth to a quarter of an inch (2mm to 4mm) but can sometimes be as large as one inch. Early on, it may disappear only to reappear later. You will often see several AKs at a time. An AK is most likely to appear on the face, lips, ears, scalp, neck, backs of the hands and forearms, shoulders and back — the parts of the body most often exposed to sunshine. The growths may be flat and pink or raised and rough.
      Why is it dangerous?
      AK can be the first step in the development of skin cancer. It is thus a precursor of cancer or a precancer.
      If treated early, almost all AKs can be eliminated without becoming skin cancers. But untreated, about two to five percent may progress to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), the second most common form of skin cancer. In fact, some scientists now believe that AK is the earliest form of SCC. Although SCCs are usually not life-threatening when detected and treated in the early stages, they can grow large and invade the surrounding tissues. On rare occasions, they metastasize or spread to the internal organs.
      Another form of AK, actinic cheilitis, develops on the lips and may evolve into a type of SCC that can spread rapidly to other parts of the body.
      If you have AKs, it indicates that you have sustained sun damage and could develop any kind of skin cancer — not just squamous cell carcinoma. The more keratoses that you have, the greater the chance that one or more may turn into skin cancer. People may also have up to 10 times as many subclinical (invisible) lesions as visible, surface lesions...

  11. QUESTION:
    I have solar keratosis... what does that mean?

    • ANSWER:
      Solar Keratosis or Actinic keratosis is a skin condition characterized by rough, scaly patches on the skin of your face, lips, ears, back of your hands, forearms, scalp and neck. The cause is frequent or intense exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays, typically from the sun. Many doctors consider actinic keratosis to be precancerous because it can develop into skin cancer.

      Actinic keratoses, also known as solar keratoses, grow slowly and usually cause no signs or symptoms other than patches or small spots on your skin. These lesions take years to develop, usually first appearing in older adults. Left untreated, about 2 percent to 5 percent of actinic keratoses develop into a serious form of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma.

      You can reduce your risk of actinic keratosis by minimizing your sun exposure and protecting your skin from UV rays.

      If treated early, almost all actinic keratoses can be eliminated before developing into skin cancer. However, if left untreated these spots or patches may progress to squamous cell carcinoma, a serious form of skin cancer, in a small percentage of people with normally functioning immune systems.

      An actinic keratosis may be the earliest form of squamous cell carcinoma. This type of cancer usually isn't life-threatening if detected and treated early. However, actinic keratoses can grow to be large and invade surrounding tissues, some spreading (metastasizing) to other parts of your body. The more keratoses you have, the greater your chance of developing skin cancer.

      Treatment
      It's impossible to tell exactly which patches or lesions will develop into skin cancer. Your doctor or a dermatologist can discuss with you which treatment is appropriate for you.

      Actinic keratosis treatment options may include:

      Freezing (cryotherapy). An extremely cold substance, such as liquid nitrogen, is applied to skin lesions. The substance freezes the skin surface, causing blistering or peeling. As your skin heals, the lesions slough off, allowing new skin to appear. This is the most common treatment, takes only a few minutes, and can be performed in your doctor's office.

      Creams or ointments. Some topical medications contain fluorouracil, a chemotherapy drug. The medication destroys actinic keratosis cells by blocking essential cellular functions within them. Another treatment option is imiquimod (Aldara), a topical cream that modifies the skin's immune system to stimulate your body's own rejection of precancerous cells.

      Chemical peeling. This involves applying one or more chemical solutions — trichloroacetic acid (TCA), for example — to the lesions. The chemicals cause your skin to blister and eventually peel, allowing new skin to form. This procedure may not be covered by insurance, because it's considered cosmetic.

      Scraping (curettage). In this procedure, your surgeon uses a device called a curet to scrape off damaged cells. Scraping may be followed by electrosurgery, in which a pencil-shaped instrument is used to cut and destroy the affected tissue with an electric current.

      Photodynamic therapy. With this procedure, an agent that makes your damaged skin cells sensitive to light (photosensitizing agent) is either injected or applied topically. Your skin is then exposed to intense laser light to destroy the damaged skin cells.

      Laser therapy. A special laser is used to precisely remove the actinic keratoses and the affected skin underneath. Local anesthesia is often used to make the procedure more comfortable. Some pigment loss and scarring may result from laser therapy
      .
      Retinoids. Drugs in this class include orally administered isotretinoin (Accutane), and topically applied adapalene (Differin) and tretinoin (Vesanoid). These medications may be effective at both treating and preventing actinic keratosis. However, isotretinoin is recommended only in high-risk cases because it may cause serious side effects, such as inflammation, bone spurs and hair loss, and birth defects if taken during pregnancy.

      Dermabrasion. In this procedure, the affected skin is removed using a rapidly moving brush. Local anesthetic is used to make the procedure more tolerable.

      Talk to your doctor about your treatment options. The procedures have various advantages and disadvantages, including side effects, risk of scarring, and the number of treatment sessions required. Actinic keratoses are usually very responsive to treatment. Afterward you'll likely have regular follow-up visits to check for new patches or lesions.

      In the future, limit time you in the sun, especially between the hours of 10am & 4pm when it is most dangerous. Always wera sunscreen. Never use tanning beds or use tanning accelerator products.Be aware of sun-sensitizing medications. Some common prescription and over-the-counter drugs can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight like:

      some antibiotics
      certain cholesterol, high blood pressure meds
      diabetes medications
      birth control pills
      nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others)
      acne medicine isotretinoin (Accutane)

      Always ask your Dr. or Pharmacist if any medication prescribed causes any sun-sensitivity.

      My husband was diagnosed with this 2 years ago & he used a topical cream, had some minor redness and skin peeling & has never had anymore problems. He used Solaraze Gel, you can get this by prescription from your Dr. If you have insurance this helps, as it is a bit expensive, but it really works! Hope this info helps, Good luck!

  12. QUESTION:
    tell me about this cancer?
    lung cancer(squamous cell carcinoma)

    i know surgery can be an option but my dad's lungs r weak because of enfasemia(spelling srry) and his heart as well. What r the odds of surgery?

    Also, if surgery isnt an option, i know chemo takes heart cells and my dad has a weak heart. 35% works (heart valve, and defibulator/pacemaker) so how will chemo effect that?

    Also, what are some symptoms after chemo/radiation?

    thank u so much
    is a higher dosage of chemo needed?

    • ANSWER:
      I am not sure, but I think your dad has two different kinds of cancer or you have the names mixed up. I am not trying to be insulting here. I have included the definitions of both conditions and their web sites. I hope you find what you are looking for. Best of luck to your dad. I am a survivor of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma and my Mother died of lung cancer.

      Squamous cell carcinoma is the second most common cancer of the skin. More than 250,000 new squamous cell carcinomas are diagnosed every year in the United States. Middle-aged and elderly people, especially those with fair complexions and frequent sun exposure, are most likely to be affected.

      The cancer develops in the outer layer of the skin (the epithelium). Some squamous cell carcinomas arise from small sandpaper-like lesions called solar (sun) or actinic keratosis. It is possible for squamous cell carcinoma to spread to other areas of the body; therefore, early treatment is important.

      Definition of lung cancer: Cancer that forms in tissues of the lung, usually in the cells lining air passages. The two main types are small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer. These types are diagnosed based on how the cells look under a microscope.

  13. QUESTION:
    What is on my lip?
    I have this small rough patch of skin on my upper lip. It feels weird, so I dug the dry skin off and now it HURTS. I have no idea what this is, but I really would like to know. It doesn't seem a cold sore or anything like that though, even though I've never had one. Any ideas?
    P.s. It is NOT herpes kids, if you don't have a REAL idea, don't answer. If I had herpes, I'd know, i'm pregnant too. They test you for EVERYTHING when your pregnant.

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like it might be actinic keratosis.You're most likely to develop actinic keratosis if you have one or more of these risk factors:

      A history of frequent or intense sun exposure or sunburn
      Pale skin
      Blond or red hair, especially when coupled with blue, hazel or green eyes
      A tendency to freckle or burn when exposed to sunlight
      ____________________

      The signs of actinic keratosis include:

      Flat to slightly raised, scaly patches on the top layer of your skin
      Lesions on your skin ranging in color from pink to red to brown, or flesh-colored

      Patches or lesions caused by actinic keratosis usually are 1 inch or less in diameter and primarily are found on areas exposed to the sun, including your face, lips, ears, back of your hands, forearms, scalp and neck. There may be a single lesion or several lesions.

      This condition also known as solar keratoses, grows slowly and usually cause no signs or symptoms other than patches or small spots on your skin. These lesions take years to develop, usually first appearing in older adults. Left untreated, about 2 percent to 5 percent of actinic keratoses develop into a serious form of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma.

      I would suggest making an appointment Monday with a Dermatologist & getting a diagnosis confirmation. If it is actinic keratosis, the doctor will most likely prescribe a cream or gel like Solaraze for easiest treatment. If you would like to read more about this condition: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/actinic-keratosis/DS00568/DSECTION=1

  14. QUESTION:
    Big red dot/bump on my dog's nose. help!!!!!!!!!!?
    This morning when I woke up I noticed a rather large and slightly raised red dot on my dogs nose. Do you have any idea what it could be or how to treat it?

    • ANSWER:
      There are a couple of possibilities now you ruled out a plastic dish dermatitis!
      Dalmations have a white background and the white furred dogs can be a bit more likely to have a skin problem from over exposure to the sun. Solar dermatitis is seen in dalmatians. It is also called Actinic keratosis.
      It can be a precursor to a nasal tumor or carcinoma. You can read about these here
      http://www.vin.com/VINDBPub/SearchPB/Proceedings/PR05000/PR00392.htm
      One more possibility is a histiocytoma which looks rather like a wart in bright red or strawberry color. You can see them here
      www.marvistavet.com/html/body_histiocytoma.html
      Even if it looks like a histiocytoma an unusual lump like this should be checked out by your vet. It could be just a keratitis which can be peeled back, or a wart that will go away on its own, or it might be something that needs removal.
      If it has to come off taking it while its small is your best bet.
      Hope this helps you!


actinic keratosis solar keratosis

Treatment Of Seborrheic Keratosis

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How to remove seborrheic keratosis?
    This may sound an odd question.
    I have read that seborrheic keratosis can be removed with cryosurgery (freezing the Keratosis) so therefore can it be removed using an over the counter treatment that freezes warts?
    I know that most of you will say that this type of procedeure should be done under medical supervision but are Seborrheic warts that different from common warts?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes any cryo will work.

  2. QUESTION:
    How long does it take to remove skin tags?
    I'm trying to get rid of one by tying a string around it, (well about to) and i was wondering how long it would take to remove it. Thanks if you help any.

    • ANSWER:
      Skin Tag
      http://www.medicinenet.com/skin_tag/page2.htm How are skin tags treated?

      There are several effective medical ways to remove a skin tag, including removing with scissors, freezing (using liquid nitrogen), and burning (using medical electric cautery at the physician's office).

      Usually small tags may be removed easily without anesthesia while larger growths may require some local anesthesia (injected lidocaine) prior to removal. Application of a topical anesthesia cream prior to the procedure may be desirable in areas where there are a large number of tags.

      Dermatologists (skin doctors), family physicians, and internal medicine physicians are the doctors who treat tags most often. Occasionally, an eye specialist (ophthalmologist) is needed to remove tags very close to the eyelid margin.

      There are also home remedies and self-treatments, including tying off the small tag stalk with a piece of thread or dental floss and allowing the tag to fall off over several days.

      The advantage of scissor removal is that the growth is immediately removed and there are instant results. The potential disadvantage of any kind of scissor or minor surgical procedure to remove tags is minor bleeding.

      Possible risks with freezing or burning include temporary skin discoloration, need for repeat treatment(s), and failure for the tag to fall off.

      There is no evidence that removing tags causes more tags to grow. Rather, there are some people that may be more prone to developing skin tags and may have new growths periodically. Some patients even require periodic removal of tags at annual or quarterly intervals. Do skin tags need to be sent for pathology?

      Most typical small skin tags may be removed without sending tissue for microscopic examination. However, there are some larger or atypical growths that may be removed and sent to a pathologist for examination under a microscope to make sure that the tissue is really a tag and nothing more. Additionally, skin bumps that have bled or rapidly changed may also need pathologic examination. While extremely rare, there are a few reports of skin cancers found in skin tags.
      What else could it be?

      While classic skin tags are typically very characteristic in appearance and occur in specific locations such as the underarms, necks, under breasts, eyelids and groin folds, there are tags that may occur in less obvious locations.

      Other skin growths that may look similar to a skin tag but are not tags include moles (dermal nevus), nerve and fiber-type moles (neurofibromas), warts, and "barnacles" or "Rice Krispies" (seborrheic keratosis).

      Warts tend to be rougher, with a "warty" irregular surface whereas skin tags are usually smooth. Warts tend to be flat whereas tags are more like bumps hanging from thin stalk. While warts are almost entirely caused by human papilloma virus (HPV), tags are only sometimes associated with HPV.

      Groin and genital lesions resembling skin tags may actually be genital warts or condyloma. A biopsy would help diagnose which of these growths are not skin tags. Very rarely, a basal cell skin or squamous cancer or melanoma may mimic a skin tag, but this is very uncommon.

      Is there another medical name for a skin tag?

      Medical terms your physician or dermatologist may use to describe a skin tag include fibroepithelial polyp, acrochordon, cutaneous papilloma, and soft fibroma. All of these terms describe skin tags and are benign (noncancerous), painless skin growths. Some people refer to these as "skin tabs" or warts. However, a skin tag is best known as a skin tag.

      http://www.medicinenet.com/skin_tag/page2.htm

  3. QUESTION:
    What could be the cause of my itchy rash?
    A few days ago I started to develop a very itchy rash. It is mostly on my arms and legs (the inside of my arms, inside of my thighs, back of calfs, back of biceps).

    It looks like little red bumps all over. And it does itch! I don't know of any different lotions or sheets or food or anything that I have done different lately.

    Is this most likely an allergic reaction to something? Or what could it be caused from? I have no other symptoms. But I am freaking out! Any thoughts?

    • ANSWER:
      If you have slept in a new location you may have been victim to bedbugs.

      If you have been home and nothing new it may be dry skin.

      It may be a food allergy - if this is the case try to limit yourself to bland food like sweet potatoes for a day and see if it helps.

      It may be dry skin - apply lotion over the body.

      You may have poison oak - don't take a bath.

      If you have pets you may have a reaction to them suddenly - take a shower and wash all clothing and bedding. in fact, you should just do this no matter what.

      The location of the rash makes me suspect that you may have been exposed to scabies, wash all clothing and see a doctor or nurse. Some hospitals allow you to call the advice line at 8am and request a same day appointment in the urgent care clinic - this will save you the $$ copay of the ER. for some reason scabies are found in nursing homes, and I hear rumor that you can get it from rotting oak branches. If it is scabies you need a really toxic lotion that only the doctor can give you.

      If it is fungal - a flat rash with hardened skin, no bumps or obvious breaks in the skin, - put tea tree lotion on it, and possibly get a prescription for fluconizole lotion. also try using Lotrimin.

      If it seems prickly and moves on to become a more fluid filled mass of blistering skin then most likely it's Shingles - don't go near children under 1 year old since if it is shingles you can give them chickenpox !!! It's how the virus has stayed alive for so many centuries. Shingles is treated by doctors. Valtrex is the brand name and there is alternative generic stuff out there for less $$ so if you are diagnosed with shingles I recommend asking for something covered by your insurance or a generic form.
      Heat rash makes good sense to me, but just to be safe, take some Benedryl if you are not allergic to anything you know of. If Benedryl makes your rash die down a little, you may be having an allergic reaction. Measure the circumference of your biceps and thighs, arms and calfs, and make note of the size, measure again in the morning if you have not seen a doctor yet. If it has become worse you may need Emergency treatment.

      Make a note to take to the doctor which needs to include:
      color, size, location, when did it erupt, any changes in the rash since it erupted (like spreading), if it's painful or tender, list the symptoms like fever, headache or intestinal distress you are having. Have a history of prior allergies on that list, and any history of skin disorders, infections, sexual history, or recent bites by any insect or rodent exposure. Also bring a complete drug history for at least the past 6 months.

      To be safe get tested for syphillys and HIV while at the doctors.

      It could be anything like, acne vulgaris, dermatomyositis, follicular mucinosis, fox-fordyce disease, lichen planus, mono, vasculitis, pityriasis rosea, polymorphic light eruption, psoriasis, rosacea, seborrheic keratosis, syringoma, or signs of Lupus. It could also be a reaction to antibiotics, benzodiazepines, lithium, phenylbutazone, gold salts, allopurinol, isoniazid, or salicylates. It could also be a result of Dermatitis, Erythema Multiforme, Herpes simplex or Zoster (aka; Shingles), insect bites, tinea, or ???

  4. QUESTION:
    What are seborrheic keratoses and how do you get rid of them at home?

    • ANSWER:
      Seborrheic keratosis is a benign form of skin tumor. The origin is unknown. It commonly appears after age 40. The tumors appear as wart-like growths in a variety of colors. They may appear in large numbers on the surface of the body. They are usually painless and benign, but may become irritated and itch. They may be cosmetically disfiguring and psychologically distressing as a result.

      Your treatment choices are:
      (1)Cryotherapy, the use of extreme cold to remove seborrheic keratoses. Cryotherapy is the preferred treatment for most seborrheic keratoses, especially flat or slightly raised growths.

      (2)Curettage, in which your health professional uses a spoon-shaped instrument (curette) to remove the growth. Regrowth is common after curettage alone.

      (3)Electrocautery (or electrodesiccation), which sends a low-voltage electrical charge through the tip of a needle to burn off a growth. This treatment is sometimes combined with curettage.

      (4)Excision, the removal of the growth with a scalpel after your doctor injects a local anesthetic. Excision may cause scarring.

      (5)Laser, an intense beam of light that burns and destroys the growth.

  5. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever heard of a skin disorder with two words, last one being Keratosis?
    I can't remember the first word but it looks and feels like small round rough patches on the surface of my skin, worse on my legs, ankles and top of my feet. I also have problems with skin tags on the underside of my upper arms, inside thighs and a few on my back. I am only a few lbs overweight so it's not due to that. My dermatologist told me what it was a couple of years ago and I cannot remember, he's not in practice now. If someone else has this or if you're a derm, I'd love to hear from you.
    I searched and now I'm pretty sure the name of this disorder is Seborrheic Keratosis. Anyone out there know anything about it?

    • ANSWER:
      I had a quick search and found this:
      SEBORRHEIC KERATOSIS
      A seborrheic keratosis is a benign skin growth that is very common among people over 40 years of age. The growths resemble flattened or raised warts, but have no viral origins and may exhibit a variety of colors, from pink or yellow through brown and black. Because only the top layers of the epidermis are involved, seborrheic keratoses are often described as having a "pasted-on" appearance.

      Because the tumors are rarely painful, treatment is not often necessary. There is a small risk of localized infection caused by picking at the lesion. If a growth becomes excessively itchy, or if it is irritated by clothing or jewelry, cryosurgery has been found to be highly effective in their removal. The main danger associated with seborrheic keratoses lies in their resemblance to malignant melanomas, which has sometimes led to a misdiagnosis of the cancerous lesions. If there is any doubt, a skin biopsy will allow a physician to make a correct diagnosis. A mutation of a gene coding for a growth factor receptor (FGFR3), has been found in 40% of seborrheic keratosis.

      I also found SOLAR KERATOSIS
      What is a solar keratosis?

      A solar keratosis is a small, rough, bump which develops on the skin. It is caused by a lot of exposure to the sun over many years. One or more may develop. It is sometimes called an actinic keratosis.

      What does a solar keratosis look like?

      Each one can range from the size of a pinhead to 2-3 cm across. Their colour can be light, dark, pink, red, the same colour as your skin, or a combination of these. The top of each one may have a yellow-white crust. They feel rough and dry, and are slightly raised from the surface of the skin. You can often feel them more easily than see them. Some redness may develop in the surrounding skin.

      Sometimes a finger-like growth of hard skin appears to come out of a solar keratosis (a 'cutaneous horn').

      Several solar keratoses may develop at about the same time, often in the same area of skin. Sometimes several join together and form a large flat-ish rough area of skin.

      Solar keratoses usually develop on areas of skin which have been exposed to the sun a lot. For example, on the face, neck, bald patches on the scalp, and the backs of the hands. They may appear in other areas in people who do a lot of sunbathing.

      There are usually no other symptoms. Rarely, you may get an itchy or pricking sensation from affected areas of skin.

      I hope that these help

  6. QUESTION:
    do u know seborrheic keratoses remover?
    I have so meny keratoses in my neck, so I need help to remove them

    • ANSWER:
      It is not something you can do yourself, check with your doctor.

      Because the keratoses are superficial, their removal shouldn't result in much scarring. Local anesthetics can be used to make the treatment painless. There may be a little discomfort as the treated area heals. Most often liquid nitrogen (cryosurgery) is sprayed on the spots, and produces blisters that lift up the seborrheic keratosis. These form into scab-like crusts that fall off within a few weeks. Occasionally there may be a small dark or light spot or a scar. These will fade over time. Sometimes part of the growth will eventually return.

  7. QUESTION:
    treatment for seborrhic keratosis?
    I have had tender chapped lips for two years since I got a severe sunburn on them. I recently had a lip biopsy to check for lip cancer and got the diagnosis of seborrheic keratosis. My lips look normal but I would love to do something to heal them instead of having to apply chapstick constantly to prevent discomfort and drying. Is there any treatment I can do to help them heal?

    • ANSWER:
      Coconut oil . Eat it daily... just a tablespoon of it, and use it as a balm for your lips. Chapstick has ingredients in it that are not good for you, and those ingredients make you have to apply it more frequently. Go all natural.

  8. QUESTION:
    What help is available for Suberic Keratosis?

    • ANSWER:
      Seborrheic Keratoses are not harmful, but they are annoying - especially the large ones. Most insurance companies will not pay for removal treatments because they are benign and pose no threat to your health. If you don't mind paying out of pocket, your dermatologist can use liquid nitrogen to freeze them, or can numb the skin surrounding them and use electrocautery and a curette to scrape them off, or use a blade to cut them off.

  9. QUESTION:
    does someone help me with info ref to Seborrheic Keratosis ?

    • ANSWER:
      "Seborrheic keratosis is one of the most common types of noncancerous (benign) skin growths in older adults. In fact, most people develop at least one seborrheic keratosis at some point in their lives.

      A seborrheic keratosis usually appears as a brown, black or pale growth on the face, chest, shoulders and back. The growth has a waxy, scaly, slightly elevated appearance. Occasionally, it appears singly, but multiple growths are more common. Typically, seborrheic keratoses don't become cancerous, but they can look like skin cancer.

      These skin growths are normally painless and require no treatment. You may decide, however, to have them removed if they become irritated by clothing or for cosmetic reasons.

      A seborrheic keratosis usually has the appearance of a waxy or wart-like growth. It typically appears on the head, neck or trunk of the body. A seborrheic keratosis:

      * Ranges in color from light tan to black
      * Is round- to oval-shaped
      * Has a characteristic "pasted on" look
      * Is flat or slightly elevated with a scaly surface
      * Ranges in size from very small to more than 1 inch (2.5 centimeters) across
      * May itch

      You may develop a single growth or cluster of growths. Though not painful, seborrheic keratoses may prove bothersome depending on their size and location. Be careful not to rub, scratch or pick them. This can lead to inflammation, bleeding and infection.

      Causes

      The exact cause of seborrheic keratoses is unclear. They tend to run in some families, so genetics may play a role. Ultraviolet (UV) light may also play a role in their development since they are common on sun-exposed areas, such as the back, arms, face and neck.

      See your doctor if:

      * Many growths develop over a short time. Normally, seborrheic keratoses appear one or two at a time over many years.
      * The growths get irritated or bleed when your clothing rubs against them. You may want the growths removed.
      * You notice suspicious changes in your skin, such as sores or growths that grow rapidly, bleed and don't heal. These could be signs of skin cancer.

      Screening and diagnosis

      Your doctor can diagnose seborrheic keratosis by inspecting the growth. To confirm the diagnosis or to rule out other skin conditions, your doctor may recommend removal for examination under a microscope.

      Typically, seborrheic keratosis doesn't become cancerous, but it can resemble skin cancer. If your doctor suspects skin cancer, he or she will take a small sample of your skin (biopsy) for analysis in a lab. A biopsy can usually be done in a doctor's office using local anesthesia.

      Treatment of seborrheic keratoses usually isn't necessary. However, you may want them removed if they become irritated, if they bleed because your clothing rubs against them, or if you simply don't like how they look or feel.

      This type of growth is never deeply rooted, so removal is usually simple and not likely to leave scars. Your doctor can remove seborrheic keratoses using several methods, including:

      * Freezing with liquid nitrogen (cryosurgery). Cryosurgery can be an effective way to remove seborrheic keratosis. However, it may not work on large, thick growths, and it may lighten the treated skin (hypopigmentation).
      * Scraping the skin's surface with a special instrument (curettage). Sometimes curettage is used along with cryosurgery to treat thinner or flat growths. It may be used with electrocautery.
      * Burning with an electric current (electrocautery). Used alone or with curettage, electrocautery can be effective in removing seborrheic keratosis. This procedure can leave scars if it's not done properly, and it may take longer than other removal methods.

      Keep in mind that most insurance companies and Medicare won't pay for the removal of seborrheic keratoses if done only for cosmetic reasons. Medical reasons for seborrheic keratosis treatment include intense itching, pain, inflammation, bleeding and infection."

      "Characteristics of Seborrheic Keratosis
      The wicked witch with a wart on her nose probably had a Seb K not a wart. So how can you tell if that bump on your face or chest is actually a Seb K? They do have some defining characteristics.

      * Stuck on - They are classically described as looking like someone took clay or a blob of dirt and "stuck" it on the skin. The edge of the seborrheic keratosis is not attached to the underlying skin making it appear that it could be removed by picking it off with your fingernail. This is because seborrheic keratoses arise from the epidermis, or top layer of skin. They don't extend deep into the skin like warts. What you see is what you get.
      * Warty surface - Seborrheic keratoses may look like warts but they don't contain human papilloma viruses that cause warts. As they develop some can have a very rough surface with deep pits and fissures almost like cauliflower being pulled apart.
      * Smooth surface with horn pearls - Some seborrheic keratoses don't have a rough surface. If they are smooth, they contain tiny bumps that look like seeds that are lighter or darker than the surrounding tissue. These are called horn pearls and they are actually bits of keratin that develop in a whirling, circular pattern. Sometimes these horn pearls are best seen with a magnifying glass.
      * Itching - For some reason seborrheic keratoses tend to itch especially the older we get. Some people will unintentionally manipulate or "pick at" a seborrheic keratosis and cause it to be further irritated. If irritated enough, the skin around it can become red and the seborrheic keratosis itself can bleed. This can be alarming to savvy skin-watchers who know that a doctor should see any lesion that bleeds.

      What can be done about Seborrheic Keratosis?
      The first and usually the best choice is to leave them alone. They may get larger, but they are not precancerous so leaving them there for the life of your skin is not a problem. Seborrheic keratoses are usually removed because they itch, they interfere with clothing or jewelry, or they are cosmetically unacceptable. That last option is a judgment call. The warty thing on an 80-year-old man's nose may not be as big of a deal as the one on a 40-year-old woman's nose.

      Removing Seborrheic Keratosis
      If you decide to have a seborrheic keratosis removed, there are several ways to do this.

      * Liquid Nitrogen - A small seborrheic keratosis can be frozen with liquid nitrogen. Liquid nitrogen works by freezing and destroying the cells but leaving the connective tissue foundation intact. The lesion frozen forms a blister as the water is released from the now-dead cells then crusts over as that water dries. When the crust falls off after several days, the skin underneath has begun to repair itself. Liquid nitrogen can leave a scar as the repaired skin may have more or less pigment producing cells. The scar is usually flat though unless you have a tendency to form keloids.
      * Shave - Another way seborrheic keratoses can be removed is to shave them off. Because their attachment to the underlying skin covers less area than the lesion itself, shaving can be a viable option. Seborrheic Keratoses are shaved off with a flexible razor blade going just deep enough to get only the seborrheic keratosis cells and leave normal skin. Shaving too much normal skin off can leave a divot in the skin as a scar. After the lesion is shaved, a chemical agent such as aluminum chloride or silver nitrate is applied to the wound to stop any small surface bleeding. Silver nitrate is a dark brown color and the resulting wound after the shave is dark brown. This color will usually go away after the skin repairs but some of that pigment can remain. For this reason, silver nitrate is usually not used on the face.

      Unusual-Looking Growths
      Sometimes seborrheic keratoses can be very difficult to distinguish from melanoma. Especially when they first appear, they can have several of the characteristics of atypical growths. They can have an irregular border and color variation throughout the lesion. You should not hesitate to see your doctor about any skin rashes or bumps that concern you."

  10. QUESTION:
    itchy feeling under my skin on my arms?
    I cannot explain exactly but scratching the surface of my skin does not help, its just an itchy feeling near my elbows and it really bothers me, seems to be below.. cannot be in bones but?

    • ANSWER:
      There are many causes of itching, including:

      Aging skin
      Atopic dermatitis
      Contact dermatitis (poison ivy or poison oak)
      Contact irritants (such as soaps, chemicals, or wool)
      Dry skin
      Hives
      Insect bites and stings
      Parasites such as pinworm, body lice, head lice, and pubic lice
      Pityriasis rosea
      Psoriasis
      Rashes (may or may not itch)
      Seborrheic dermatitis
      Sunburn
      Superficial skin infections such as folliculitis and impetigo

      Generalized itching may be caused by:

      Allergic reactions
      Childhood infections (such as chickenpox or measles)
      Hepatitis
      Iron deficiency anemia
      Kidney disease
      Liver disease with jaundice
      Pregnancy
      Reactions to medications and substances such as antibiotics (penicillin, sulfonamides), gold, griseofulvin, isoniazid, opiates, phenothiazines, or vitamin A

      http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003217.htm

      Keratosis Pilaris

      The bumps all over your body are most likely keratosis pilaris. Initial treatment should be intensive moisturizing. Try a cream such as Acid mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 after bathing, and re-apply the cream again several times daily.

      If this does not help, change to a medicated cream containing urea (Carmol, Vanomide, U-Kera, Ultra Mide, Nutraplus) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily - it may be too irritating to use more often. More aggressive home treatment can be done if ones skin can tolerate it. The plugged pores can be removed by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth, stiff brush, or 'Buf-Puf'.

      Prescription medicines that may help include antibiotics (Erythromycin, Bactrim) if the spots are very red and Tazorac Cream. Tazorac, a relative of vitamin A, may cause irritation in some people.

      http://www.aocd.org/skin/dermatologic_diseases/keratosis_pilaris.html
      http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pilaris/article.htm

  11. QUESTION:
    Best treatment for scarring/dark spots?
    Hi! Can someone please give suggestions for dark marks on the skin left from acne? Make up suggestions, cleanser, etc. Also if you could give your personal experience with products youve used that were and arent affective. Thankyou and 10 points for best answer and no teasing please!!

    • ANSWER:
      Believe it or not there are a small number of products out there that can really help you in your case. Trouble is finding the right one. I myself experimented for years before I found the right product.

      Salicylic Acid 20% Gel Peel is the best product that I have found and would recommend to anyone.

      What it treats: Acne, Acne Scars, Blackheads/Whiteheads, Dry Skin, Sun-damaged Skin, Blotchy Pigmentation, Fine Wrinkles, Loss of Elasticity, Large Pores, Bumps, Age Spots, Eczema, Seborrheic Keratosis, Hyperkeratosis, Actinic keratosis, and Rosacea.

      How to use: Apply twice a week for six weeks, and then pause for one month. Leave on face 3 to 5 minutes depending on your skin's sensitivity.

      The main thing to keep in mind is that "IT TAKES TIME" with any product or procedure that you decide to try. But make sure to hang in there and be persistent. Use this product just as directed and you will see results.

      Also keep in mind that you are beautiful no matter what, don't forget that!!! ;-)

  12. QUESTION:
    Best treatment for scarring/dark spots?
    Hi! Can someone please give suggestions for dark marks on the skin left from acne? Make up suggestions, cleanser, etc. Also if you could give your personal experience with products youve used that were and arent affective. Thankyou and 10 points for best answer and no teasing please!!

    • ANSWER:
      Believe it or not there are a small number of products out there that can really help you in your case. Trouble is finding the right one. I myself experimented for years before I found the right product.

      Salicylic Acid 20% Gel Peel is the best product that I have found and would recommend to anyone.

      What it treats: Acne, Acne Scars, Blackheads/Whiteheads, Dry Skin, Sun-damaged Skin, Blotchy Pigmentation, Fine Wrinkles, Loss of Elasticity, Large Pores, Bumps, Age Spots, Eczema, Seborrheic Keratosis, Hyperkeratosis, Actinic keratosis, and Rosacea.

      How to use: Apply twice a week for six weeks, and then pause for one month. Leave on face 3 to 5 minutes depending on your skin's sensitivity.

      The main thing to keep in mind is that "IT TAKES TIME" with any product or procedure that you decide to try. But make sure to hang in there and be persistent. Use this product just as directed and you will see results.

      Also keep in mind that you are beautiful no matter what, don't forget that!!! ;-)

  13. QUESTION:
    does seboherric keratosis go by themselves ,as mine seem to be going / chaging colour?

    • ANSWER:
      Seborrheic keratoses are pigmented superficial epithelial lesions that are usually warty but may occur as smooth papules. Cause is unknown. They tend to develop in older people and have a stuck-on appearance with a verrucous, velvety, waxy, scaly, or crusted surface.
      Treatment is usually not required unless the growths become irritated or are cosmetically displeasing.
      If treatment is needed, growths may be surgically removed or removed by cryotherapy (freezing).

  14. QUESTION:
    which's the quick treatment cream for dark spot on face with prize?
    quick treatment cream for dark spots with prize

    • ANSWER:
      Black spots over the face can result from a number of condition. Therefore the management varies. To name a few conditions, these can be seen in freckles, melasma, dermatoses papulosa nigra, seborrheic keratosis, etc.

      Visit your dermatologist atleast for the diagnosis. Accordingly the various modes of treatment available can be suggested.

  15. QUESTION:
    remove seborrheic heratoses how to?
    remove seborrheic keratoses

    • ANSWER:
      Most of Caucasian people are effected by Seborrheic Keratosis sooner or later, women and men alike. The degree of impact vary. It seems does not impact people with darker skin colors with exception of African Americans.

      I had spots of Seborrheic Keratosis and went to Kaiser Permanente dermatologist. The derm looked me into eyes and said: "It is yours for life..." I found her being mean, not knowledgeable, and:
      1) Got determined to find effective Seborrheic Keratosis cure that I can easily do at home myself
      2) Dump Kaiser Permanente insurance.

      I have been doing research on Seborrheic Keratosis treatments, and all the advice was very discouraging: do not treat at all, liquid nitrogen at doctor's office, mechanical removal by scraping off at doctor's office, laser. All actual treatments are in doctors office and can leave scarring, do not offer prevention.

      In the past I used brief acids application to Seborrheic Keratosis spots with some success, but it was taking time, and I was not getting dramatic results. This time I decided to use really high glycolic acid concentration and do not wash it off, but rather leave it on the skin to do its work.

      Treatment
      Day 1, Day 2
      Prepared 30-35% glycolic acid solution
      Poured it into a sprayer bottle
      Sprayed acid solution on my back
      Did not wipe, it did sting quite a bit, but I was able to tolerate it. Went to bed without rinsing off the solution

      Day 3, Day 4
      (I think it might be optional)
      Sprayed Greater Celandine (Chelidonium majus, aka. 'Tetterwort') extract
      Did not wipe. Went to bed without rinsing off the solution

      Touchups and Maintenance
      If some stubborn spots are staying there, spot / touch up application is needed. Maintenance treatments are possible on as needed basis.

      Outcome
      Skin got reddish-pink, Seborrheic Keratosis sports were destroyed. Crust appeared on same of the sports, and some spots were disappearing unveiling skin. Seborrheic Keratosis was killed!!!

      Now skin is still healing, but I can see that I was able to achieve my goal, e.g. at home Seborrheic Keratosis treatment. Just in case to prevent any possible discoloration of the skin I am applying Reviva Lightening cream on the entire surface area.

      Recommendations
      Be careful, do patch test before proceeding with the treatment. Start with lower concentrations to see if it will be sufficient. I used spray to deliver the treatment solution, and think it provides less solution then when applied directly.
      Based on the Seborrheic Keratosis sports location it might be preferable to perform treatments in winter when you are wearing more cloths. So that people around do not see the irritated skin.

      Alternative Treatment
      After I done my own treatment regimen I found info on similar approach with high concentrations of H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide) supported by clinical studies. The recommended concentration between 23% - 80%. And in the majority of cases 35% food grade H2O2 could be used.

      For preventive maintenance they recommend taking periodically baths with H2O2 added.

      When I need a treatment next time I am thinking of trying H2O2, and looking into having baths with it for maintenance.

  16. QUESTION:
    i had a keratin on my shoulder 2 year ago it was burnt off but it has come back under and around the scar and?
    my son was also 21 when he had a radical neck dissection from scamous cell will mine become the same

    • ANSWER:
      If your lesion was truly a keratosis, it will not trun into anything malignant, as a keratosis (seborrheic keratosis) is always a benign lesion. On the other hand, if you had an "actinic keratosis", this is a premalignant lesion, which can evolve into a squamous cell carcinoma. The fact that yours has come back after having been treated makes me think that you might have had an actinic keratosis, or possibly even a true squamous cell carcinoma at the time of the original surgery. Was a biopsy performed at the time of the original treatment?

  17. QUESTION:
    does anyone know anything about hyperkeratosis?
    symptoms, diagnosis, progosis, treatment...

    • ANSWER:
      Hyperkeratosis is a thickening of the outer layer of the skin, which contains a tough, protective protein called keratin. This thickening is often part of the skin's normal protection against rubbing, pressure and other forms of local irritation, and causes calluses and corns on hands and feet or whitish areas inside the mouth. Other forms of hyperkeratosis can occur as part of the skin's defense against chronic (long-lasting) inflammation, infection, the radiation of sunlight or irritating chemicals. Less often, hyperkeratosis develops on skin that has not been irritated. These types of hyperkeratosis may be part of an inherited condition, may begin soon after birth and can affect skin on large areas of the body.
      Symptoms-
      Many forms of hyperkeratosis are painless. However, corns, calluses and plantar warts can cause a great deal of discomfort.
      Diagnosis
      Depending on your specific pattern of skin symptoms, your doctor will ask whether you have a family history of skin problems, and whether you have a personal history of allergies, frequent sun exposure, use of dentures or orthodontic dental appliances, unconscious chewing on your cheek or tongue or use of smokeless tobacco.
      Sometimes, your doctor can diagnose the cause of your hyperkeratosis by reviewing your history and symptoms and by examining your skin. This often is the case with corns, calluses, warts and chronic eczema. If you have chronic eczema that could be allergy-related, the doctor may suggest that you have allergy testing.
      If your doctor suspects that you have seborrheic keratoses, he or she may use a handheld magnifying lens to examine the affected skin for horn pearls. These are very tiny white or black balls of keratin that can usually be seen on the skin in areas of seborrheic keratoses. In some cases, a biopsy may be taken to confirm the diagnosis. In a biopsy, a small piece of tissue is removed to be examined in a laboratory. If your doctor suspects that you have actinic keratoses, you may need to have a skin biopsy to confirm the diagnosis and rule out skin cancer.
      If your child develops hyperkeratosis in many areas of his or her body, your doctor may review your family history and skin symptoms to determine if your child has an inherited disorder.
      Prognosis
      Most forms of hyperkeratosis are local skin problems that have a good prognosis. Actinic keratoses can develop into squamous cell skin cancer.
      Treatment-
      The treatment of hyperkeratosis depends on the type and possible cause:
      Corns and calluses — Using moleskin or padding next to the affected area can help to relieve pain. Avoid further irritation that stimulates growth of the corn or callus. Never try to shave away or cut a corn or callus by yourself. Consult with your health care professional or a podiatrist.
      Warts — Your health care professional or dermatologist can remove warts by freezing them with liquid nitrogen (cryosurgery), vaporizing them with a laser or trimming them away surgically. If the treatment does not reach the layer of skin infected with the virus, the wart can come back in the same place. Repeat treatments may be necessary. Although warts can be treated at home with nonprescription remedies, self-treatment may take longer than treatments in a medical setting. Self-treatment may be more effective after you have been treated by a health care professional, especially if a wart appears to be large or deep. If you have diabetes or poor circulation, you should always be treated by a health care professional to avoid injury and infection.
      Chronic eczema — Your doctor usually will treat eczema by prescribing a corticosteroid ointment or cream for you to rub into the affected area. Moisturizing the skin is also very important.
      Lichen planus — Like chronic eczema, lichen planus usually is treated with corticosteroid ointment or creams.
      Actinic keratoses — Your doctor may use cryosurgery to remove a single actinic keratosis. Multiple keratoses can be treated with skin peels, laser therapy or dermabrasion.
      Seborrheic keratoses — These growths can be removed with cryosurgery with a scalpel.
      Inherited conditions — There is no cure for these conditions. To treat large areas of scaly skin, your doctor may suggest bathing with bath oil or rubbing special emollients into the skin.

  18. QUESTION:
    I have some scaly brown marks on hands!!?
    They have been appearing and spreading too I tried to scratch them off and it looks like a scar do I have thrush they are on the back of my hands and a few on my arms the first time I saw them was the day after I got in a pool do I have cancer or something

    • ANSWER:
      There are several possible causes.

      Age or Liver Spots
      Age and liver spots are a type of hyperpigmentation that cause brown to black spots on the face and other areas of the body. The brown spots are caused by an increase in melanin, the pigment that gives skin its color. Genetics plays a part in developing age or liver spots, but ultraviolet rays or sun exposure is the most common cause of age spots. Age increases the chances of developing brown spots as most individuals produce more melanin as they get older.

      Keratosis
      Actinic and seborrheic are types of keratosis that cause spots or discoloration on the skin. Actinic keratosis symptoms include rough or scaly patches or bumps with a red to brown appearance and may be painful or easily irritated. Actinic keratosis is caused by sun exposure and is often a precursor to skin cancer, but can be treated effectively when caught early. Seborrheic keratosis is common in adults and has a brown mole or wart-like appearance. Other than genetics, the exact cause of seborrheic keratosis is unknown, but the spots are considered harmless and may be removed for cosmetic reasons.

      Melasma
      Melasma causes brown or grey skin discoloration on the skin. The spots may show up individually or cover large areas. Melasma is more common in women than men. Hormonal changes, certain medications and genetics are factors in developing melasma and sun exposure may exacerbate the problem. Melasma caused by hormonal changes such as pregnancy, birth control or hormone therapy often resolves itself after pregnancy or when medication is stopped.

      Phototoxic Medication
      Phototoxic medications may cause skin to become sensitive to sunlight. Initially, the symptoms of phototoxic light sensitivity appear much like a sunburn or rash. The results of this "sunburn" may include hyperpigmentation or brown spots on the skin. Some drugs associated with phototoxic reaction include tetracycline, sulfonamides, acne medications, some antihistamines and certain arthritis medications such as quinine.

      Brown spots are often treatable via medication, dermatology treatments or excision. Age spots and melasma and other hyperpigmentation conditions may be treated with oral or topical medications, laser therapy, chemical peels or dermabrasion. Raised lesions such as moles or keratosis spots are usually removed by freezing, excising or laser treatments.

      Most brown spots are preventable. Sun exposure is the most common culprit in skin discoloration. Sun damage may not show up until later in life, but too much sun even as a child can significantly increase the chances of developing hyperpigmentation. The best defense against brown spots or more serious skin conditions is covering the skin as much as possible when outdoors. This includes longer sleeves, hats and sunglasses. Sunscreen should be applied as a part of a daily regime, especially on the face where sun exposure is most prevalent.

  19. QUESTION:
    WHAT ARE SOME Skin Diseases?
    What are some skin diseases and illnesses
    ANSWER QUICK WITHIN 1HR

    • ANSWER:
      •Acne
      Acne is the most common skin disease treated by physicians. It is a chronic condition that affects over 85% of adolescents and young adults. There are different types of acne that respond to different types of treatment.
      •Seborrheic Keratosis
      Seborrheic keratoses are benign lesions that don't necessarily look benign. They can have various colors, grow quickly, itch, and sometimes bleed. Fortunately, they are fairly easy to distinguish from skin cancers
      •Dermatitis
      The term dermatitis describes many classifications of rashes. The most common dermatitis is atopic dermatitis or eczema.
      •Herpes
      Oral and genital herpes are caused by the herpes simplex virus. An infection with this virus is life-long, however the rash can be controlled with medication. Herpes infections in pregnant women can cause serious infections for the baby.
      •Hives
      Hives are caused by an allergic reaction in the skin releasing the chemical histamine. Acute hives can usually be treated with medications but chronic hives, lasting longer than 6 months, require an investigation into the cause.
      •Infections
      Infections are caused when an outside organism gets into the skin. They are classified by the type of organism causing the infection - bacterial, fungal, or viral.
      •Psoriasis
      Psoriasis is a lifelong skin condition caused by changes in the immune system. The rash of psoriasis is very distinctive. In the last couple of years there have been many strides in the use of biologic medications that make psoriasis less of a "heartbreak".
      •Rosacea
      Rosacea is a common skin condition characterized by redness of the face and acne. We don't know exactly what causes rosacea, but there are effective medications and treatments to keep it under control.
      •Warts
      Warts are a common skin condition caused by the human papillomavirus. There are many effective treatments, and yes, duct tape is one of them.
      •Seborrheic Dermatitis
      Seborrheic dermatitis causes a characteristic rash on the hair-bearing areas of the face. Sometimes it can be controlled with dandruff shampoo.
      •Skin Cancer
      There are several types of skin cancer from the slow-growing basal cell carcinoma to the potentially fatal melanoma.

      Hope this helps

  20. QUESTION:
    how doctors remove moles?
    how do the doctors remove the moles dont tell me to do it at home because im not

    • ANSWER:
      Moles are pigmented macules, papules, or nodules composed of clusters of melanocytes or nevus cells. Their main significance (other than cosmetic) is their potential for being or becoming malignant. Lesions with characteristics of concern (changing or highly irregular borders, color changes, pain, bleeding, ulceration, or itching) are biopsied.(Merck)
      Moles may be removed surgically if they affect your appearance or have an increased cancer risk.(MedlinePlus)
      First, a diagnosis must be made. If the lesion is a seborrheic keratosis, shave excision, electrodessication or cryosurgery may be performed - usually leaving very little if any scarring. If the lesion is suspected to be a skin cancer, a skin biopsy must be done first, before considering removal. This is unless an excisional biopsy is warranted. If the lesion is a melanocytic nevus - one has to decide if it is medically indicated or not. Many insurance companies will not pay for cosmetic removal of benign moles.
      If a melanocytic nevus is suspected of being a melanoma, it needs to be removed and sent for microscopic evaluation by a pathologist by a method called skin biopsy. One can do a complete excisional skin biopsy or a punch skin biopsy, depending on the size and location of the original nevus. Other reasons for removal may be cosmetic, or because a raised mole interferes with daily life (e.g. shaving). Removal can be by excisional biopsy or by shaving. A shaved site leaves a red mark on the site which returns to the patient’s usual skin color in about two weeks. However, there might still be a risk of spread of the melanoma, so the methods of Melanoma diagnosis, including excisional biopsy, are still recommended even in these instances. Additionally, moles can be removed by laser, surgery or electrocautery.
      In properly trained hands, some medical lasers are used to remove flat moles level with the surface of the skin, as well as some raised moles. While laser treatment is commonly offered and may require several appointments, other dermatologists think lasers are not the best method for removing moles because the laser only cauterizes or, in certain cases, removes very superficial levels of skin. Moles tend to go deeper into the skin than non-invasive lasers can penetrate. After a laser treatment a scab is formed, which falls off about seven days later, in contrast to surgery, where the wound has to be sutured. A second concern about the laser treatment is that if the lesion is a melanoma, and was misdiagnosed as a benign mole, the procedure might delay diagnosis. If the mole is incompletely removed by the laser, and the pigmented lesion regrows, it might form a recurrent nevus.
      For surgery, many dermatologic and plastic surgeons first use a freezing solution, usually liquid nitrogen, on a raised mole and then shave it away with a scalpel. If the surgeon opts for the shaving method, he or she usually also cauterizes the stump. Because a circle is difficult to close with stitches, the incision is usually elliptical or eye-shaped.
      Electrocautery is also used for removing skin tags and only reaches the outermost level of skin so that scarring is not a problem.
      (Wikipedia)

  21. QUESTION:
    I have Keratosis Pilaris on my legs for the past 2 years. How can I treat this?

    • ANSWER:
      Do you mean keratosis follicularis, also called Darier's Disease? Pilar means hair, so I assume this is similiar, if not the same thing altogether. Characterized by black or brown, crusted, wartlike patches that can spread rapidly? Treatment usually includes large doses of topical or oral retinoids and oral or topical corticosteroids. Other forms of keratosis include actinic keratosis, keratosis senilis, and seborrheic keratosis.

  22. QUESTION:
    what is skin disease?
    iam just wondering

    • ANSWER:
      It is basically damage done to your skin from being exposed to ultra b rays and other sun rays. The skin starts t appear bruised black and dry. Skin disease can be caused by bactria appearing at adoolescence time (acne..)

      examples of skin disease...

      *Acne is the most common skin disease treated by physicians.

      *Seborrheic Keratosis

      *warts

      *Dermatitis -eczema.

      *Herpes -Oral and genital herpes are caused by the herpes simplex virus.

      *Hives are caused by an allergic reaction in the skin releasing the chemical histamine.

      Causes Of Lyme Disease

      Deer ticks cause lyme disease. There are many other ticks that can transmit the disease, but deer ticks are the most common carriers. These are pin sized ticks that thrive on blood of deer, mice and birds. These brown colored ticks stay in woody and grassy areas. They catch their prey when somebody is passing through the area. Once the tick attaches itself on the skin, it transmits the infection in two days. After visiting any such area, if you can locate all the ticks on your body and take them out, you can save yourself from lyme disease to a great extent. Lets talk more about this in prevention and treatment.

      cancer:
      These may indicate presence of SCC-

      A red bump on sun-exposed skin which does not go away. This will be found mainly on sun exposed areas - the face, head, hands, or shoulders.
      A growing irritated or reddish patch and forms a sore.
      A new skin growth that looking like a wart.
      A sore on the lower lip, that does not heal or an area of thickened skin on the lower lip, especially in smokers or tobacco chewers or those, whose lips are exposed to the sun and wind.
      Any diseased area of skin (lesion) can indicate SCC and should be examined if it has changed colour, shape, size, or appearance or has not healed after an injury.

  23. QUESTION:
    What could it be??????????????????
    A rash of a few red itchy spots started on my arm a couple of days ago, and now there are some on my shoulder and I found a few on my inner thigh. I'd like to know what they are? Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      There are various reasons behind itchy red spots that trouble a person at least once in the course life. The best way to know the causes of these spots is to check the body part they have affected. These red spots cause serious amount of itching which is intolerable. Some spots are filled with fluid that could get transmitted to other parts of body, due to itching. Besides being itchy, these red scaly structures sometimes appear on the entire body, while sometimes they get isolated at a certain part of the body. No matter what the location is, itchy red spots are normally associated with bacterial or fungal infections and skin disorders caused by the same.

      Rash
      There are different types of skin rashes that lead to itchy red spots on skin. Skin rash is caused due to a number of reasons, varying from an infection, allergic reaction, poisoning caused by chemicals or poisonous plants, candidiasis, vitamin deficiency and other such skin disorders. These rashes can later on get converted into itchy red spots.

      Blisters
      Blisters is a medical condition caused when an amount of fluid gets trapped between two layers of the skin. There are various reasons for blisters including sunburn or any kind of burn, herpes simplex, impetigo, athlete's foot, diaper rash, eczema, dermatitis herpetiformis, shingles, pustular psoriasis, chickenpox, measles, etc.

      Spider Naevi
      These spots have a circular structure at their center that has wavy red legs, like that of the spider. Color of these red spots changes when you press them, which makes it easy to identify them. Several reasons like rheumatoid arthritis, cirrhosis, thyrotoxicosis and even earlier stages of pregnancy may cause this kind of red spots on skin.

      Acne
      One of the very common reasons for spots on the skin are acne. Both acne and acne marks could be the reasons behind itchy red spots on the face and all over the body as well. Acne marks, that are called macules, which are flat as compared to the acne, are actually indicators of the healing process of acne. Hence, acne could be the cause behind itchy red spots.

      Other Causes
      Hives or urticaria are caused as a reaction of the body towards certain medications and allergies to certain things. In some cases, people suffer with hives when they are worried or nervous. Apart from hives, there are a few other reasons that could cause red spots all over the body. These reasons are - scabies, dermatofibromas, seborrheic keratosis, insect bite, folliculitis, infected ingrown hair, hidradenitis suppurativa, mononucleosis or kissing disease, dermatitis, heat rash, etc.

      Course of treatment for itchy red spots depends entirely on their underlying cause. As a result, proper medical intervention is needed, that could evaluate the causes of itchy red rash. In some cases, only physical examination would not be enough and their might be a need for the blood tests and tests of the cultures, for the health care provider to determine the cause for the spots. After thorough examination, he would suggest the course of treatment. Apart from that, maintaining healthy and hygienic habits will always be helpful. Keeping the affected area dry and clean, using water and a soft towel is important. Taking an oatmeal bath for itchy skin might also prove helpful.

  24. QUESTION:
    Sun affected Skin, Curiosity.?
    Tuesday i found a freckle like patch of skin. It has now grown to 2mm (W) x 5mm (L), looks like a scab, feels like a burn.

    Additional info:
    I spend alot of time outside toppless in the sun. No sun cream. Different colloured moles have appeared since, Shoulders are burnt.

    • ANSWER:
      James - What you describe is likely known as seborrheic keratosis (SK). SK are the most common benign tumor in older individuals. They have a variety of clinical appearances. Although no specific causes have been identified, they occur more frequently in sunlight-exposed areas. The frequency appears to increase with age. Seborrheic keratoses are benign but secondary tumors, and Bowen disease (squamous cell carcinoma in situ) or malignant melanoma may occasionally arise within the lesion. Seborrheic keratoses can also catch on clothing and become irritated. They can itch, grow, and bleed. Scratching seborrheic keratoses or trying to pick them off the skin can result in a secondary infection. People sometimes have many seborrheic keratoses, and they may obscure the detection of a dysplastic nevus or malignant melanoma. A variety of techniques may be used to treat SK. They include cryotherapy with carbon dioxide (dry ice) or liquid nitrogen, electrodesiccation, electrodesiccation and curettage, curettage alone, shave biopsy or excision using a scalpel, or a laser or dermabrasion surgery.
      Next, schedule a visit to a dermatologist MD for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment. My SKs have successfully been removed with carbon dioxide cryotherapy. Good luck!

  25. QUESTION:
    what is keratoses?

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a very common genetic follicular disease that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin and hence colloqually referred to as "chicken skin". Primarily, it appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms, but can also occur on thighs and buttocks or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet). Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40 to 50% of the adult population and approximately 50 to 80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. Varying in degree, cases of KP can range from minimal to severe.

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks) and related disorders.

      Most people with keratosis pilaris do not know they carry it. While KP resembles goose bumps, it is characterized by the appearance of small rough bumps on the skin. As a result, it is often confused with acne.

      Keratosis pilaris tends to occur as excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin, accumulates around hair follicles (process known as hyperkeratinization). Unattractive more than anything else, it most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy. Though people with keratosis pilaris experience this condition year round, it’s during the colder months when moisture levels in the air are lower that the problem can become exacerbated and the “goose bumps” are apt to look and feel more pronounced in color and texture.

      Although exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, and medicated lotions containing alpha-hydroxy acids or urea may improve the appearance and texture of affected skin, results are not permanent. There is no known cure for this condition

      ------------------
      Seborrheic keratosis (Seborrhoeic keratosis) a kind of benign skin growth that is very common among people over 40 years of age. The growths resemble flattened or raised warts, but have no viral origins and may exhibit a variety of colors, from pink or yellow through brown and black. Because only the top layers of the epidermis are involved, seborrheic keratoses are often described as having a "pasted-on" appearance.

      Because the tumors are rarely painful, treatment is not often necessary. There is a small risk of localized infection caused by picking at the lesion. If a growth becomes excessively itchy, or if it is irritated by clothing or jewelry, cryosurgery has been found to be highly effective in their removal. The main danger associated with seborrheic keratoses lies in their resemblance to malignant melanomas, which has sometimes led to a misdiagnosis of the cancerous lesions. If there is any doubt, a skin biopsy will allow a physician to make a correct diagnosis. A mutation of a gene codigng for a growth factor receptor (FGFR3), has been found in 40% of seborrheic keratosis.

  26. QUESTION:
    itching body?
    Why do itches in general occur? I am talking about random areas in the body. I always get this problem, it's really annoying. Can stress be related to this in any way?

    • ANSWER:
      You could have sensitive skin and prone to itch from almost anything. You could have tiny out breaks of eczema or allergies. Here is a website below that focuses on skin conditions.

      Diagnosis/Symptoms
      Skin Rashes and Other Changes(American Academy of Family Physicians)
      Treatment
      Dermatologic Surgery(American Academy of Dermatology)
      Dermatology Procedures(American Osteopathic College of Dermatology)
      Laser Surgery Information(American Society for Dermatologic Surgery)
      Prevention/Screening
      Skin Care: Top 5 Habits for Healthy Skin(Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research)
      Nutrition
      Your Meal Ticket to Healthy Skin(Cleveland Clinic Foundation)
      Return to top
      Disease Management
      About Ichthyosis: Skin Care Tips(Foundation for Ichthyosis & Related Skin Types)
      Skin Emergencies(National Center for Farmworker Health)
      Also available in Spanish
      Return to top
      Specific Conditions
      Acanthosis Nigricans(Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research)
      Boils and Carbuncles(Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research)
      Bullous Disease(American Academy of Dermatology)
      Common Growths(American Academy of Dermatology)
      Common Rashes: Granuloma Annulare, Lichen Planus, and Pityriasis Rosea(Cleveland Clinic Foundation)
      Corns and Calluses(Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research)
      Dandruff(Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research)
      Dermatographia(Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research)
      Dermatomyositis(National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) - Short Summary
      Dry Skin(Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research)
      Erythema Nodosum(American Osteopathic College of Dermatology)
      Granuloma Annulare(American Academy of Dermatology)
      Graves' Dermopathy: What Causes It?(Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research)
      Henoch-Schönlein Purpura(National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse)
      Ichthyosis Vulgaris(Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research)
      Intertrigo(American Academy of Family Physicians)
      Also available in Spanish
      Keratosis Pilaris(Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research)
      Lichen Nitidus(Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research)
      Lichen Planus(American Academy of Family Physicians)
      Also available in Spanish
      Lichen Striatus(American Osteopathic College of Dermatology)
      Mastocytosis(National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases)
      Molluscum (Molluscum Contagiosum)(Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
      Neurodermatitis (Lichen Simplex Chronicus)(Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research)
      Pityriasis Rosea(American Academy of Dermatology)
      Questions and Answers about Epidermolysis Bullosa(National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases)
      Questions and Answers about Lichen Sclerosus(National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases)
      Scalp Psoriasis vs. Seborrheic Dermatitis: How Are They Different?(Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research)
      Seborrheic Dermatitis: What It Is and How to Treat It(American Academy of Family Physicians)
      Also available in Spanish
      Seborrheic Keratoses(American Academy of Dermatology)
      Stevens-Johnson Syndrome(Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research)
      Sweet's Syndrome(Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research)
      Unexplained Dermopathy (Morgellons)(Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
      What Is Epidermolysis Bullosa?(National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases)
      What Is Lichen Sclerosus?(National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases)
      Return to top
      Related Issues
      Skin of Color(American Academy of Dermatology)
      Skin Problems in Construction(Center to Protect Workers' Rights) - Links to PDF
      Also available in Spanish
      Under-Eye Puffiness: How to Reduce It(Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research)
      Warnings for Makers of Compounded Pain Products(Food and Drug Administration)
      Your Dermatologist(American Academy of Dermatology)
      Return to top
      Pictures & Photographs
      Capillaritis(Logical Images)
      Cutaneous Horn(Logical Images)
      Dermatosis Papulosa Nigra(Logical Images)
      Dry Skin (Xerosis)(Logical Images)
      Epidermoid Cyst(Logical Images)
      Erythema Nodosum(Logical Images)
      Erythrasma(Logical Images)
      Fordyce Spots(Logical Images)
      Granuloma Annulare(Logical Images)
      Intertrigo(Logical Images)
      Keratoacanthoma(Logical Images)
      Keratosis Pilaris(Logical Images)
      Lichen Planus(Logical Images)
      Milia(Logical Images)
      Molluscum Contagiosum(Logical Images)
      Notalgia Paresthetica(Logical Images)
      Poikiloderma of Civatte(Logical Images)
      Pyogenic Granuloma(Logical Images)
      Razor Bumps (Pseudofolliculitis Barbae)(Logical Images)
      Scaly Skin (Ichthyosis Vulgaris)(Logical Images)
      Sebaceous Hyperplasia(Logical Images)
      Seborrheic Dermatitis/Dandruff(Logical Images)
      Seborrheic Keratoses(Logical Images)
      Skin Tag (Acrochordon)(Logical Images)
      Stasis Dermatitis(Logical Images)
      Stretch Marks (Striae)(Logical Images)
      Syringoma(Logical Images)
      Return to top
      Anatomy/Physiology
      Atlas of the Body: The Skin(American Medical Association)
      Return to top
      Clinical Trials
      ClinicalTrials.gov: Skin Diseases(National Institutes of Health)
      Return to top
      Genetics
      Genetic Findings Lead to Prenatal Testing and Counseling for Blistering Skin Disease(National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases)
      Genetics Home Reference: Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome(National Library of Medicine)
      Genetics Home Reference: Cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome(National Library of Medicine)
      Genetics Home Reference: Darier disease(National Library of Medicine)
      Genetics Home Reference: Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa(National Library of Medicine)
      Genetics Home Reference: Epidermolysis bullosa simplex(National Library of Medicine)
      Genetics Home Reference: Harlequin ichthyosis(National Library of Medicine)
      Genetics Home Reference: Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia(National Library of Medicine)
      Genetics Home Reference: Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome(National Library of Medicine)
      Mutations in Gene Cause Ichthyosis Vulgaris(National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases)
      Return to top
      Research
      Researchers Test New Ways to Assess Burden of Skin Disease(National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases)
      Return to top
      Journal Articles
      References and abstracts from MEDLINE/PubMed (National Library of Medicine)

      Article: Biobrane: a versatile tool in the armamentarium of the reconstructive...
      Article: Recent updates on genetics: teaching old dogmas new tricks.
      Article: Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis/nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy: a primer for radiologists.
      Skin Conditions -- see more articles
      Erythema -- see more articles
      Ichthyosis -- see more articles
      Return to top
      Dictionaries/Glossaries
      Dermatologic Surgical Procedures: Glossary of Terms(American Society for Dermatologic Surgery)
      Dermatology Terms(American Osteopathic College of Dermatology)
      Return to top
      Directories
      Find a Dermatologist(American Academy of Dermatology)
      Return to top
      Organizations
      American Academy of Dermatology
      American Society for Dermatologic Surgery
      National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases
      Also available in Spanish
      Return to top
      Statistics
      FASTATS: Dermatological Conditions(National Center for Health Statistics)
      Return to top
      Children
      Cradle Cap (Pediatric Seborrheic Dermatitis)(Logical Images)
      Erythema Toxicum(Nemours Foundation)
      Taking Care of Your Skin(Nemours Foundation)
      Also available in Spanish
      Whole Story on Skin(Nemours Foundation)
      Also available in Spanish
      Return to top

      http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/skinconditions.html

  27. QUESTION:
    I am 62 years old lady with hypertension for the last 35 years?
    I'm currently on Esidrex (Hydrochlorothiazide) 25 mg in the morning, Diovan (Valsartan) 180 mg in the morning, Diovan 80 mg at night and Tenormin (Atenolol) tablets 25mg at night. I have developed unexplained black skin lesions that are irregular in shape and not itchy. The periphery of the lesion is not raised.They are increasing in number. So far I have one on my back, one on the ear pinna and a new one is just starting on the tip of my nose. My doctor said Esidrex can cause skin rash, but have not seen it like this. Can any one tell me what this could be? Thank you.
    Yours,

    • ANSWER:
      Hydrochlorothiazide can rarely produce a rash that would make the skin red and potentially peel. It is not known to cause the type of rash you are describing. Diovan and Tenormin are also not known to lead to these type of skin lesions. It is really impossible to determine what your skin lesions are without seeing them. How long did they develop over? What is their approximate size?

      One possibility is Seborrheic keratosis, which are also known as age spots. These tend to develop as one ages and are completely benign. I will leave a link to pictures and you can see if this is similar to what you have. Skin cancer is also a possibility with any new skin lesions like you are describing. Dark irregular skin lesions are particularly concerning for melanoma. For this reason, I would suggest you have these lesions evaluated by a Dermatologist especially if your primary doctor is unsure of the diagnosis. Good luck.

      http://www.skinsight.com/adult/seborrheicKeratosis.htm
      http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/picture-of-seborrheic-keratosis

  28. QUESTION:
    FLAT skin moles, is it safe to remove with a sharp needle?
    I've been growing skin moles that are flat rapidly now-a-days. I've removed some in my hands and one on my foot. it's like old skin. do you think it's safe and nothing wrong will happen? Some on my hands are sensitive other not. So give all the advise/facts you have. My moles are flat like a tattoo, so I think it's like peeling old skin. Also can you guys give me info about moles; how they produce, why and will it ever stop! lol help! thx.
    well. Tina D I find like safety pin easier. the thought of using tweezers feels like a red mark or something will result in pulling a mole w/ tweezers, but thx for the advise
    I saw pics on google, L R and they are HUGE! my are like small polka dots. I have one that is pretty dark, and i got some stuff out. They say (Wiki) that they are common in 40 year olds. I am no way near 40!

    • ANSWER:
      Of course without seeing them, it would be hard to diagnose and it's probably best that a dermatologist was seen to make sure, but I'm guessing that what you might have is seborrheic keratosis.

      keratosis, seborrheic (basal cell papilloma, verruca senilis)
      (seb´rē´ik pap´lōm vroo´k sē´nilis),
      n benign, pigmented, superficial epithelial tumors that clinically appear to be pasted on the skin of the trunk, arms, or face. Characterized histologically by marked hyperkeratosis, with keratin cyst formation, acanthosis of basal cells, and melanin pigmentation, all above the level of the adjacent epidermis.
      http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/keratosis

      If, this is indeed what you have, you're not going to do any harm. They will grow back in most cases, however, and you run the risk of scarring.

      These are the most common form of non-cancerous growths in adults and are not benign although they often look like they are. For that reason, an annual check should be done to make sure that any serious lesions are not overlooked.

      It is considered by some to be genetic as well as a possible result of exposure to UV rays.

      The following are all methods of removal:

      * Freezing with liquid nitrogen (cryosurgery). Cryosurgery can be an effective way to remove seborrheic keratosis. However, it may not work on large, thick growths, and it may lighten the treated skin (hypopigmentation).
      * Scraping the skin's surface with a special instrument (curettage). Sometimes curettage is used along with cryosurgery to treat thinner or flat growths. It may be used with electrocautery.
      * Burning with an electric current (electrocautery). Used alone or with curettage, electrocautery can be effective in removing seborrheic keratosis. This procedure can leave scars if it's not done properly, and it may take longer than other removal methods.

      As I mentioned at the top of my post, this is, by no means, a diagnosis - just the most common form of moles, why they pop up, their treatment, etc.

      I'm afraid it's fairly certain to say that IF you do, indeed, have seborrheic keratosis, they won't go away or stop. They just increase in number each year. Sorry! The good news is that they ARE removeable and that they are not cancerous.
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/seborrheic-keratosis/DS00846/DSECTION=1

      Hope you found this helpful,
      LR

      Figure Skater, SK starts out very small and it's very flat almost blending with the skin. As I mentioned above, it's difficult without seeing your skin, to diagnose but this is one of the most common benign skin growths that occur. It was just the best educated guess I could give based on the info I had. If you have any more symptoms or "characteristics" I might be able to narrow it down for you. My best advice would be to see a dermatologist to make sure none of them are of suspicious nature. Try using the following guidelines to help you decipher the benign spots from those that are more suspicious in nature:

      The majority of malignant melanomas are brown to black pigmented lesions.

      * Warning signs include change in size, shape, color, or elevation of a mole.

      * The appearance of a new mole during adulthood, or new pain, itching, ulceration, or bleeding of an existing mole should all be checked by a health-care provider.

      The following easy-to-remember guideline, "ABCD," is useful for identifying malignant melanoma:

      * Asymmetry—One side of the lesion does not look like the other.

      * Border irregularity—Margins may be notched or irregular.

      * Color—Melanomas are often a mixture of black, tan, brown, blue, red, or white.

      * Diameter—Cancerous lesions are usually larger than 6 mm across (about the size of a pencil eraser), but any change in size may be significant.
      http://www.emedicinehealth.com/skin_canc...

  29. QUESTION:
    can an hpv strand that causes cervical cancer evolve into a strand that causes the genital warts?
    i was told by a doc. today that i have genital warts. i just had a pap 2 months ago and it was negative for everything. i have been diagnosed before with hpv-cervial cancer strand. i was told a year ago that it went away. the doc. today did no tests just looked and told me it was genital warts. i have also started getting them on my feet knees and hands. im not sure im convinced its genital warts at all. i will be going to the gyno to get an actual test but was wondering if there is anyone out there that might have any info or experience with this and could educate me more. i have done alot of reading and research on hpv and warts. this is just my last question. can hpv strand evolve into other strands? what i have down there looks more like a skin tag then a wart in my opinion.

    • ANSWER:
      No, low risk HPV types can’t morph into high risk HPV types. Most visible warts are of a low risk HPV types. That said people that have a visible genital wart infection can also carry a co-infection with high risk HPV types. They are over 30 high and low risk HPV types that can affect the genital area. Many people carry multiple HPV types. Once you have an HPV type you can’t get it again but our acquired HPV type can reactivate years after the initial infection. We can also acquire new HPV types with a new sex partner.

      Your past HPV test and Pap confirmed that you tested positive for abnormal cervical cell changes and high risk HPV types. The only FDA approved HPV test only screens for high risk HPV types of the cervix. Neither the Pap nor the HPV test includes cells of the vulva. Abnormal cells can take years to form or and they can regress. The HPV test looks at units of the virus per cell when the virus is in low viral load it will not show in any test.

      Warts of the hand and feet are of the large family of HPV types but not of the types that affect the genital areas.

      Skin tags of the penis and the vulva are often HPV. Skin tags are usually a result of some type of friction….panties lines areas could be skin tags because of the friction of the fabric.

      The skin tags or warts would be best examined by a dermatologist. Abnormal cervical cell change and your Pap smear are done with your GYN. A positive Pap with a positive HPV doesn’t always diagnosis a new HPV infection and a Pap may miss abnormal cell changes. It is important to always keep current with our Pap smears.

      The dermatologist suggestion is based on my own personal experience. I had an abnormal spot on the vulva GYN dismissed it dermatologist felt it should be excised the spot pathology confirmed high risk HPV. I was on long term treatments of 5 FU after the spot was excised. I also have had two LEEP due to high risk progressive HPV of the vaginal cuff.

      I wish you well.

      Other skin growths that may look similar to a skin tag but are not tags include moles (dermal nevus), nerve and fiber-type moles (neurofibromas), warts, and "barnacles" or "Rice Krispies" (seborrheic keratosis).
      Warts tend to be rougher, with a "warty" irregular surface whereas skin tags are usually smooth. Warts tend to be flat whereas tags are more like bumps hanging from thin stalk. While warts are almost entirely caused by human papilloma virus (HPV), tags are only sometimes associated with HPV.
      Groin and genital lesions resembling skin tags may actually be genital warts or condyloma. A biopsy would help diagnose which of these growths are not skin tags. Very rarely, a basal cell skin or squamous cancer or melanoma may mimic a skin tag, but this is very uncommon.

      http://www.medicinenet.com/skin_tag/page3.htm

      Genital warts
      Condylomata bearing HPV-6 or -11 have identical clinical
      manifestations and histology [2]. Recent studies have shown that about
      100% of GWs are caused by either HPV-6 or -11 but that 20–50% of
      lesions also contain co-infections with HR HPV types [3] and [4]. GWs
      do not usually result in major morbidity or mortality, but cause
      significant psychological morbidity and very substantial healthcare
      costs. Occasionally GWs persist for long periods of time and, rarely,
      such long-standing lesions may progress to malignancy. GWs are highly
      infectious, with a transmission rate of about 65% within sexual
      partnerships from an infected to a susceptible sexual partner, and an
      incubation period of between 3 weeks and 8 months, with the majority
      developing warts at around 2–3 months [3]. Once GWs have developed,
      they may show minimal change over time, become more numerous or
      larger, or regress spontaneously. The majority of placebo-controlled
      GW therapy trials show low rates of regression (around 5% complete
      clearance) in the short term, although in one study over 16 weeks 20%
      of women and 5% of men using placebo completely cleared their warts,
      and 38% of women and 22% of men using placebo cleared over 50% of
      their baseline warts [3]. Regressing warts contain significantly more
      CD4 positive T cells, both within the stroma underlying the lesions
      and the condylomata themselves, and greater expression of activation
      markers [3]. There is no report of the rate of spontaneous regression
      that may occur in the longer term. Following GW clearance with
      therapy, recurrence is common and is often seen within 3 months in 25%
      of cases, although rates of up to 67% have been observed [3]. In
      clinical practice recurrences are often seen at sites of previous
      lesions, and in these cases HPV infection in stem cells or
      slow-turnover cells at the site of previous clearance has persisted
      and then reactivated. The proportion of HPV-6/11 infections that are
      either completely cleared or persist in a latent form after clinical
      resolution is unknown, and, indeed, animal models suggest that both
      outcomes can occur [3].
      HPV-6/11 as a cause of cervical neoplasia
      HPV-6 and -11 are frequently associated with LSIL. A recent
      meta-analysis of 55 studies reported HPV-6 to be present in 8.1% of
      HPV-positive LSIL cases and HPV-11 in 3.2% of cases [25]. However, it
      remains unclear in what proportion of these HPV-6/11-positive LSIL
      cases there is concomitant co-infection with a HR type, and whether
      such HR co-infections would be "minority passenger" infections as
      described in GWs, or represent true multiple-morphology cervical lesions.

      Costs of HPV-6/11 disease
      The principal healthcare costs caused by HPV-6/11 are through GWs and
      RRP. Recent UK- and USA-specific data on the costs of treatment of GWs
      in routine clinical practice [38] and [39] estimated the cost of a
      single successful episode of treatment of a case of GWs to be £216 ($
      377) in the UK and $ 436 in the USA. Using the UK STI clinic 2004 GWs
      prevalence data, this equates to around £31 million ($ 54 million) per
      annum for the UK. One study from the USA estimated the annual direct
      healthcare costs of GWs as $ 200 million [40]. In a report from the
      Task Force on RRP, the annual cost for surgical procedures in the USA
      was estimated to be $ 109 million for JORRP and $ 42 million for AORRP
      [27]. In countries with cervical screening programmes there will also
      be significant costs associated with HPV-6/11-associated abnormal
      cytology and consequent procedures, although estimates of these costs
      are not available.

      http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/30521/description#description

      VULVAR INTRAEPITHELIAL NEOPLASIA:

      http://www.asccp.org/edu/practice/vulva/hpv_vin/hpv_vin_cases.shtml

  30. QUESTION:
    Is a growing mole normal?
    My mom has a lot of moles as she inherited this from his father (who also had a lot of colorful moles but never had any sort of cancer and lived up to 92 years). I haven't seen her in 6 years because she moved to another country to work. But when I saw her again this year, I saw a 2 centimeter mole that grew on her neck. It's black. I've never seen it before and she said that it just grew over the period of 6 years. I also remember such large moles on my grandfather.

    Is it normal?

    • ANSWER:
      You can not be sure it is a mole until a dermatologist tells you that it is a mole. It might be a seborrhea keratosis which is a common benign skin lesion that looks similar to a mole and can range in size from a small brown bump to a 2-3cm dark brownish lesion. Here are a few images.

      http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://courses.washington.edu/hubio567/melanoma/large/mel13.jpg&imgrefurl=http://courses.washington.edu/hubio567/melanoma/dx1.htm&h=512&w=602&sz=55&hl=en&start=6&um=1&tbnid=C0Aas2JuEw5hkM:&tbnh=115&tbnw=135&prev=/images%3Fq%3DSeborrheic%2BKeratosis%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26safe%3Doff%26rls%3DGGLJ,GGLJ:2006-32,GGLJ:en%26sa%3DN

      http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.crutchfielddermatology.com/images/SeborrheicKeratosis/001.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.crutchfielddermatology.com/treatments/Seborrheickeratosis/&h=304&w=211&sz=14&hl=en&start=64&um=1&tbnid=rW89ppZAgRSGnM:&tbnh=116&tbnw=81&prev=/images%3Fq%3DSeborrheic%2BKeratosis%26start%3D60%26ndsp%3D20%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26safe%3Doff%26rls%3DGGLJ,GGLJ:2006-32,GGLJ:en%26sa%3DN

      A seborrheic keratosis is often caused by UV exposure and grows slowly over a period of years. You can often see huge ones on some elderly people. They can be removed by excision or treated with a laser.

      Unfortunately they also often look very similar to a basal cell carcinoma so your mom's best bet is to see a dermatologist and have him take a look at it. good luck

  31. QUESTION:
    Curaderm BEC5 for skin cancer - reliable producer?
    Does anyone have any experience or personal knowledge (that you didn't just skim off the net) on Curaderm BEC5 - its effectiveness and reliable producers?

    I've looked at one site - Bionational. Anyone know them? Is their product reliable or misleading?
    http://www.bionational.com/xcart/catalog/Curaderm-p-11.html

    Please only respond if you actually have true experience and knowledge. Don't waste my time with wiki links, unrelated crap, or unsupported bull.
    Thanks, it's not for me but my father. He has undifferentiated perineural squamous cell carcinoma - a rare form of the more common squamous cell carcinoma. It is now along the tissue of the nerve sheath. It's located in the head and neck area and has aggressive potential.

    • ANSWER:
      If you want to treat a skin cancer with a topical treatment then why not use Aldara (imiquimod) which is at least FDA approved for actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinomas. It will soon be approved for squamous cell in situ skin cancers.

      http://www.aldara.com/carcinoma.html

      There are many reasons you should not try to treat yourself for skin cancers but since this is not a debate and I do not have time to answer you fully I will just give you a simple answer.

      I have treated well over 100 squamous cell skin cancers and also some basal cell skin cancers and many pre-cancers with Aldara. It was successful about 90% of the time. This was done under the supervision of a dermatologist.

      The FDA is moving quickly against all the various "black salve" escharotic (natural corrosive) skin cancer treatments so I'd be very careful about using any of them, regardless of what their web site promised. See a good dermatologist to make sure you actually have a skin cancer and not a common harmless seborrheic keratosis that needs no treatment.

      good luck

  32. QUESTION:
    15 mo old has a rash that comes and goes throughout the day? Ideas on what it could be?
    For the past 2 days he has had a rash that appears in the afternoon so, by bedtime it is at it's worst, which is just a few patches on his face and sometimes on his arm or leg, too. Then in the morning it is gone. Since it was gone this morning I didn't take him to the dr., but it is back again! Last night we gave him benydryl, which really upset his stomach so, I don't want to do that again. Any ideas about what could be breaking him out?
    By the way, he isn't eating anything new and nothing has changed in the past two days either. We are at home and still using same detergent and whatnot.
    He is actually on an antibiotic for an ear infection so, he doesnt need one! And no, that can't be what is causing it.

    • ANSWER:
      Main > Toddler > Common Problems
      Rashes
      atopic dermatitis (eczema): usually has its onset between two and six months with the development of itchy red areas on the cheeks, forehead, scalp, trunk and on the extensor surfaces of the arms and legs (elbows and knees). The skin may be thickened, shiny and oozing and is usually very dry. Treatment is with daily use of moisturizers and topical steroid creams during breakouts. This is usually a chronic problem that will continue to improve and get worse for many years. See the Eczema Treatment Guide for more information.
      contact dermatitis: many agents can cause rashes in infants from direct irritation of the skin. These can include harsh soaps and detergents, saliva from excessive drooling, and bubble baths. This type of rash usually has mild redness and itchiness and improves with the use of a moisturizer or lubricant to protect the skin. Many agents can also cause an allergic contact dermatitis with a more intense reaction in the skin 7-10 days after being exposed to it. Common things that can cause allergic skin reactions include poison ivy, cosmetics, and metals. The rash usually is very red, itchy, with oozing, crusting and swelling and will improve with a mild potency hydrocortizone cream.
      impetigo: a skin infection caused by a bacteria that begins as a tiny red bump and quickly turns into a honey colored crusted plaque. It is most commonly found around the nose, but can occur on any area of skin that has been damaged. Impetigo is treated with antibiotics. For minor infections a topical antibiotic cream can be used, but more extensive cases will require an oral antibiotic.
      infections: rashes are commonly associated with many different types of viral infections, including roseola (causes high fever for 3-5 days and then once the fever goes away, small red bumps appear on the trunk that spread all over the body), fifth disease (causes red cheeks and then a fine lace-like red or pink rash on the arms), and chickenpox (causes small red bumps that turn into vesicles that crust over). See the Guide to Common Infections for more information on infections that can cause skin rashes.
      keratosis pilaris: causes small pinpoint size red bumps and rough and dry skin on the cheeks and the back of the upper arms and legs. It is a chronic condition that is difficult to treat, but may improve with lubricants or topical keratolytic creams, such as Eucerin Plus or LacHydrin.
      molluscum contagiosum: this is a type of wart caused by a virus. The rash consists of small flesh colored, dome shaped bumps with a crater in the center. They can be grouped on any skin surface, but are usually located on the head, neck and diaper area. Treatment is not required and this type of wart will go away on its own over several months to years. Treatment for more extensive or persistent warts can be treated with cryotherapy. An antiviral cream called Aldara is currently being tested in children to help with this common problem.
      ringworm (tinea corporis): a fungal infection that causes circular or annular shaped, red scaly patches with clear centers. It is usually found on non-hairy areas of the face, trunk, arms and legs and is easily treated with an OTC antifungal cream applied twice a day for two to four weeks.
      seborrheic dermatitis: causes yellow or salmon colored greasy scales and patchy redness on the scalp (cradle cap), face, behind the ears and in skin folds. Most children clear up without treatment in three to four weeks, but more severe or persistent forms can be treated with and anti-seborrheic shampoo with selenium sulfide or a low potency topical steroid cream.
      warts: appear as irregular and rough bumps, most commonly on the arms and legs, but can occur on any skin surface. Warts are caused by an infection with the human papillomavirus, and usually do not cause any symptoms unless they are on the bottom of the feet or around the nails. Warts will go away on their own, but it may take one to two years for the process to be complete. Warts can be treated with cryotherapy, which uses liquid nitrogen to freeze the wart and surrounding skin to kill the virus, or by use of topical medicines that contain salicylic acid.


treatment of seborrheic keratosis

Ketatosis Pilaris

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Body wash and Keratosis Pilaris?
    The doc just said I had Ketatosis (the bumpy skins condition) it's on my arms and thighs mostly. I was just perscribed a lotion (Salex) for it but i need to find a new body wash, b/c mine currently oil in it and she said to avoid them. Does anybody else have a this problem and could suggest a new moisturzing Body wash for me!? I used to love the ones with lotion in them, made my skin much softer, but apparently they clog the pores and make the condition worse? :(

    i dont really want to try the expensive brands until i see how the lotion works

    • ANSWER:
      Try one made by neutrogena. I actually stopped using body washes and switched back to bar soap (neutrogena acne prone bar) and lather up with that, then use a sea sponge to help exfoliate. Also, by doing research online, they have linked kerotosis pilaris to having a vitamin E defficiency (which would be one reason it gets better during the summer-more sun exposure and that provides you with Vitamin E) I started taking vitamin E and that has helped with the appearance.

      Good luck to you!

  2. QUESTION:
    Is this a "viral infection"?
    I have these little hard bumps all over my upper arms. They're a little bit red but fairly small and invisible. They are also a little bit itchy, but not badly. My neighbour says it is a viral infection and if I pick one out my body will figure it out and make the rest just go away.
    Is she right? If not, what could it be?
    And no, I have no allergies and haven't been exposed to anything weird, and it's there 24/7 so it isn't heat rash.

    • ANSWER:
      I think it could be Ketatosis Pilaris. It is like mini pimples on your arms. I believe it is fairly hard to get rid of, but doesn't hurt your health. I would get it checked out with your dermatologist or use the over the counter treatments suggested. Good luck!

      Check this out:
      http://www.dermstore.com/features/KP/kpinfo.php

  3. QUESTION:
    Small Bumps on Back of legs, Chest and arms?
    I have had these small colourless/occasionally red bumps on my arms,legs and chest for years and have not really cared but now as i am 15 i am starting to worry that girls may find it off putting.

    i believe it slowly spreads and is mainly colorless on the arms but red on my upper chest area.

    this is a photo of the bumps on my upper bicep muscle and it ranges from around 10cm from my wrist all the way up to my shoulder blade. http://goo.gl/FZlLx

    Thankyou

    • ANSWER:
      You have Ketatosis Pilaris. It's is an uncurable skin condition that may fade with age. It is usually genetic. Although it can not be cured, it can be treated to look better. Just research, and go to your dermatologist!


ketatosis pilaris

Keratosis Pictures

According to the Dermatology Academy in America Alopecia Barbae is kind of Alopecia Areata. This disease is characterized by patches of baldness on the scalp where the hair seems to be missing. Alopecia Barbae on the other hand is similar but the bald patches in this disease appear in the beard rather than the head. These missing patches are often round or circular in shape. This is an indication that unlike Alopecia Areata, alopecia barbae is found only in men.

Treatment

The only known fact about the hair loss phenomenon is it's auto immune nature with which the body responds to certain things. The reasons may still be mysterious but the hair falls and then some years later it re grows. As the reason is unknown so is the recovery process, however there are some treatments that help in growing the hair follicles quicker than the normal process. These are often recommended by the experts.

1. Cortisone

The most common treatment for this disease of Alopecia Barbae is definitely the injections of Cortisone which are applied under the supervision of a dermatologist if not by the dermatologists themselves. The needles are inserted into the bald patch or area repeatedly. If the treatment succeeds the patient can look forward to the re-emergence of the hair in about four weeks time. There are however no guarantees concerning this particular treatment of cortisone. As far as the process is concerned it is quite painless with no side effects. The patient may feel just a tingling when the injections are applied and the area may seem sunken but it recovers by itself with the passage of time.

2. Topical Minoxidil

Another medicine that been proved as effective in treating the cases of Alopecia Barbae, is the Topical Minoxidil. The procedure of this treatment is also quite simple as it just involves applying a solution of the medicine that is 5% in concentration to the affected areas. Some other solutions which are 2% in concentration have not been that effective in the treatment and should be avoided. According to many experts the combination of Topical Minoxidil and Cortisone increases the effectiveness manifolds and also the chances of hair re-growth.

3. Anthralin

Another medicine that can be used to treat Alopecia Barbae and is in fact used is anthralin, which is also a recommended treatment for psoriasis. The physical appearance of anthralin is an ointment or cream that resembles tar. The process is simple, it involves applying the cream to the affected area where one needs hair growth. The cream is washed off after 30 mins to an hour of applying. Effective treatment by this medicine will result in hair re-growing after a period of about 12 or 14 weeks since the beginning of the treatment. The only concern with this procedure is the side effects, care should be taken not to leave the ointment on the area for any time in excess of the recommended time and also the patient should make sure to keep it away from eyes. Apart from these cares the medicine has been proven effective too.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    When do chemical peels start to work?
    I have really bad Keratosis pilaris all over my arms and forearms and i started using a chemical peel on friday, but my arms have not started to peel yet. When do my arms start to peel and how long after the acid peel does it start to work? I used another peel on my arms yesterday, so i am still waiting for it to work. Oh and its a 20% salicylic acid peel.
    what can i use then that is stronger?

    • ANSWER:
      With the salicylic acid peel it's mostly a lunch time peel. It's not strong at all. It doesn't peel a lot. May cause some irritation if you do not use sunscreen daily. This acid can be used twice a week. So you may be able to see some results in a day or two, or after two treatments. I use the TCA peel from makeupartistchoice.com (check it out). At first I brought the 8% and did a 2-layer peel. It showed some results but I wanted something stronger. That wasn't strong enough for me.Being i have acne scars. But it's advised to start with a 8% which is the lowest. that was a month ago, and I graduated to the 12%. I just did this last night so I'm waiting to see the results. will post on myspace with pictures soon. Look up TCA peels if you want to look for peel videos. hope this helps!

  2. QUESTION:
    How come there are red splotchy patches on my upper arms?
    They're dark pink-red and they're not that noticeable unless I'm looking in the mirror or taking pictures. There are also dry patches on my arms that aren't visible but tangible.

    • ANSWER:
      keratosis pilaris

  3. QUESTION:
    What are some Over the Counter treatments for Keratosis Pilaris?
    From doing some research, and looking at pictures, I believe I have keratosis pilaris (on my thighs). What are some over the counter treatments that work well to cure keratosis pilaris?

    • ANSWER:
      Because it is hereditary, there is no way to cure or prevent keratosis pilaris. However, it may lessen over time with age.

      In some patients, the condition clears up on its own. When it does not, patients may choose to seek treatment for cosmetic reasons. There are several treatments aimed at softening the keratin deposits in the skin to improve its appearance. They include:

      Moisturizing lotions. Dry skin makes the condition worse, so applying moisturizer twice daily is important. Lotions that contain urea help the skin retain moisture and products that contain lactic acid or salicylic acid help to dissolve and exfoliate the keratin. Moisturizer should be applied immediately after bathing.

      Loofah sponges or brushes. Rubbing the affected areas after a long soak in a hot bath may help to unclog the plugged hair follicles.

      Topical retinoids. Class of chemical compounds that are chemically related to vitamin A. These drugs regulate skin growth but can be very irritating.

      These are just a couple of the available treatment for keratosis pilaris. Take a look at this site for some additional information that I think you'll find helpful : ) It's great that you're educating yourself!

      http://skin.health.ivillage.com/acneblemish/keratosispilaris.cfm

  4. QUESTION:
    What are these little red bumps on my arms?
    I've noticed them for a week and a bit, and they aren't itchy, but if I scratch them they go red and really itchy and if I scratch the skin starts to bleed.

    Pictures:

    http://i46.tinypic.com/24xhnqp.jpg

    http://i49.tinypic.com/314duth.jpg

    thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      maybe it's keratosis pilaris or maybe allergies not sure though

  5. QUESTION:
    what should i do about foreign matter in prescription face lotion?
    my 4 yr old daughter uses a prescription cream (urealic cream) to treat her keratosis pilaris. with the previous prescriptions (same type) there wasn't issues. but this bottle has glass like fibers in it which irritates even my palms. the dermatologist told us these fibers shouldn't be in there, and the pharmacy said they do not mix this cream it comes pre-packaged from the company. I am thinking of seeking an attorney, how should i go about this

    • ANSWER:
      You should not use it ,take pictures(with time and date on it) of any affected areas for future reference and yes consult an attorney.The pharmacist should be taking the stock off the shelves and he could be in legal trouble also.Keep the bottle,your attorney might suggest to have it lab tested.See if you can get an alternative prescription in the meantime.

  6. QUESTION:
    What are these little bumps on my upper arms?
    when i scratch it, the area gets all red and im kinda self conciense about it and im only 13 and probably its not puberty. please help!

    • ANSWER:
      Maybe Keratosis Pilaris? (pictures in the source) A lot of people have this. It's hereditary and there is no cure. There are things you can treat it with to reduce it’s appearance. (check second and third links.) Hope this helps! Good luck!

  7. QUESTION:
    What can I do to get rid of acne on my upper arms?
    I am 32 and I have always had what I guess is acne on my arms. They are also red and blotchy. I would love to do something to make them look better for summer!

    • ANSWER:
      I have the same thing. My dermatologist called it keratosis pilaris. They are these little tiny bumps primarily on the upper arms that can cause the arms to look red and have an uneven tone. I use a mild soap (like Dove body wash) with a shower puff or loofah. After I get out of the shower while my arms are still a little damp I use LacHydrin lotion. It is a lotion with lactic acid which will smooth out the skin and make it even...it really works. You need to find a lotion with the lactic acid in it...it is not a prescription but it may need to be special ordered. Rite Aid ordered mine, I just asked in the RX department. It was about 18 dollars, but it lasts a long time, and is really worth it. I would do a search on KERATOSIS PILARIS and see if that might be it. Good Luck!

      I found a site that has pictures for you, it is HelpForKP.com

  8. QUESTION:
    How can i get rid of these red bumps on the back of my arms?
    I have had red little bumps on my arms for a while now, and im 16 and going to the beach i wanna look good! HELP??

    • ANSWER:
      Look up keratosis pilaris and see if the pictures look like the bumps on your arms..Don't use anything until you know what is causing them..ok??.:)

  9. QUESTION:
    Every year with the heat I get a rash on my hands?
    Every year as it heats up, I get a rash on my hands. This has been going on for the past four or five years. I cant remember it ever lasting for long periods of time, maybe a month or so but I hate the way it looks. They are small bumps primarily around my thumb and index finger not large or pus filled. There is no redness nor is there any discomfort. Can someone please tell me what this might be or if they have experienced anything like this.

    • ANSWER:
      search on internet for keratosis pilaris, see if the pictures resemble your appearance and see a doctor if it appears again, good luck

  10. QUESTION:
    what is a really good skin care product for red bumps?
    Ive always had these little red bumps on the back of my arms and on my thighs, and aside from that my skin is dry and just never seems to look good! does anyone know of any good skin care products that could help?

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds like to me you have skin condition called "Keratosis Pilaris" commonly know as "Chicken Skin." Unfortunately, this is a genetic condition... so there's not much you can do for it. If you are still young, there's a chance of you outgrowing it. Here's some information on it and ways to keep it under control.

      http://www.keratosis-pilaris.org/
      http://www.helpforkp.com/keratosis_pilaris_pictures.html
      http://www.helpforkp.com/keratosis_pilaris_about_kp.html
      http://www.helpforkp.com/keratosis_pilaris_tips_index.html#anchor_87
      http://www.helpforkp.com/keratosis_pilaris_treatment_index.html

  11. QUESTION:
    What are these weird red bumps on my arms?
    I've had them my entire life... and the only thing dermotologists give me is acne cream! That just makes it worse, it's not acne... the skin around them is red and they aren't acne-like at all. Does anyone else have these? Any tips on getting rid of them?

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like keratosis pilaris. The first link below has a picture - see if this is what yours looks like. KP is a very common, completely harmless skin condition. It is found most often on the back of arms and front of legs, but it can also appear on the face, torso, and backside - basically anywhere except the palms and soles. KP is a buildup of keratin (the stuff your hair and nails are made of) in the hair follicles. It disappears in adulthood for some people, but others (like me) are stuck with it forever. You can treat it, but there is no cure. You can use lotions that contain an alpha hydroxy acid (glycolic acid, or lactic acid if your skin is more sensitive) and urea. These lotions aren't easy to find, and you may have to go online. The only one I've found in the local stores is Eucerin Dry Skin Therapy Plus Intensive Repair Creme. The alpha hydroxy acids are basically a chemical exfoliant, and the urea helps hold moisture. Chemical exfoliants are better than mechanical (scrubs, loofahs, Buf-Puf, etc.) - scrubbing can make the problem worse.

      It takes a little while before you see results, and if you stop using the lotion, the bumps come back. Also, these lotions cause your skin to be more sensitive to the sun, so be sure to wear sunscreen.

  12. QUESTION:
    What are these bumps on my arms and how do I get rid of them?
    I have these weird bumps all over my upper arms and they're starting to spread to my forearms. I've always had them. They're red and sometimes white. I can scratch them off, but it doesn't do any good--there are too many and scratching doesn't really get rid of them. What are they? Can I get rid of them? My mom said they might be from not getting enough vitamins, but I don't think that's it. One of my sisters has them too I think, but no one else in my family does.

    • ANSWER:
      There is a large variety of skin conditions; so large that no one here can answer you so easily, at least without pictures. The best thing you can do is use Google to extensively research the symptoms. Such as, "red/white bumps, skin condition, itches" or whatever is the exact case. When you find a list of possible things it could be, look at them and look for pictures. Compare. If it looks like it's possibly it, use google image search on the terms you find.

      Or just go to a doctor who may refer you to a specialist.

      It sounds like this may be it:
      http://beauty.about.com/od/skinflaws/f/whitebumps.htm

      Keratosis Pilaris. This is google's image search results.

      http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&source=hp&q=keratosis+pilaris&gbv=2&aq=f&oq=&aqi=g9

      Unfortunately, it says it is incurable as it is hereditary. But it is treatable.

      Good luck.

  13. QUESTION:
    Can I wear a long sleeves shirt and still keep cool in the summer?
    http://www.rogerknapp.com/images/keratosis%20pilaris.jpg

    for a picture of keratosis pilaris
    I have this skin condition that I'm really not too proud to show off (Keratosis Pilaris for those that might know about it ), and I'm prone to wearing long sleeves in the summer to hide it. Does anybody know any way to continue wearing long sleeves throughout the hotter seasons, but still keeping relatively cool?

    • ANSWER:
      Yeah, sure! Just make sure it's made out of a light material!

  14. QUESTION:
    What are good creams,scrubs,lotions,soaps,etc. for keratosis pilaris?
    I have it and really bad! Here's a link showing a picture and definition.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keratosis_pilaris

    • ANSWER:
      Go to your doctor and ask for Triamcinolone Acetonide cream...I myself am a sufferer of Keratosis Pilaris and the cream really helps to moisturize the skin and make it more smooth...also get Alpha Hydroxy lotion or cream...it is usually in the cosmetics section and it is usually a face cream...but the alpha hydroxy acid in the cream/lotion helps to dissolve some of the kertain and make some of the bumps and redness go away...it doesn't take them away completely and you will probably have scars from it, but it helps improve the feel of your skin and some of the redness and inflamation

  15. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of these spots on my arm?
    I've had them for a while now and theyre really annoying. I would like to get them off. Here is a picture of them. Please help! http://s740.photobucket.com/albums/xx47/chillibacon7/?action=view&current=DSCF1257.jpg

    • ANSWER:
      does not look like keratosis pilaris. This seems just pitha (bile). May be it is the eating habits, may be it is the weather condition, may be it is humidity with heat. Probably you have been taking food items producing heat in the body. Like Mangoes, ice cream etc. in excess. Change in food habits, change in weather conditions will naturally rid of it. Upto three doses of Sulphur 30 for one day will cure this malady. Medicines should be taken in consultation with a homeopathic doctor.

  16. QUESTION:
    what are these little patches of permanent goose bumps ?
    I have had it for about a week now. They look like goose bumps. On both arms I have 6 of them on both arms. not itchy or sore. just patchs of permanent goose bumps. I don’t know if its related to diabetes cos I have been having signs and symptoms of diabetes the last couple of months. Also my hair is falling out. Don’t know if its related somehow. Or if it has anything to do with nutrition.

    • ANSWER:
      That is a difficult question to answer without looking at it, but it kinda sounds like keratosis pilaris. I don't think it's related to diabetes or any other condition. Here's a picture: http://girlalooshey.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/keratosis-pilaris.jpg

      You should see a doctor about the hair loss though--this may be caused from thyroid problems, birth control, or other hormonal problems.

  17. QUESTION:
    how to get rid of those red bumps on my arms?
    I don't have them too bad they're only noticible sometimes, but still any suggestions please?

    • ANSWER:
      Are you refering to this....
      keratosis pilaris
      google it and check for pictures to see if you have the same thing. My son has this and he was given a cream by his dr that helps to moisturize the bumps and it works well. He also uses Amlactin, but says it burns a little bit.
      Hope that helps.

  18. QUESTION:
    I have red dots on my arms and legs. Do I have a skin disease?
    I have these little red dots on my arms and legs all over. It isn't chicken pox or anything, it doesn't itch. Sometimes it isn't that bad, but when i get uncomfortable or nervous it gets really bad. I've had it most of my life, but these past couple of years it has gotten worse. So do I have some kind of a skin disease, and if I do, can I treat it or get rid of it somehow?

    • ANSWER:
      It could be Keratosis Pilaris, it's a hereditary skin disorder that a lot of people have. I have it, and it sucks because there is no cure. Fortunately for some, though, it can improve with age. It is the most prominent during adolescence and during the teen years, but for some it starts to clear up a little later on.(some have said that when they entered their mid twenties they noticed that it was less noticeable) There is some really useful information about it on this site that can help you determine whether or not that is the problem:
      http://www.helpforkp.com/

      You can find some info and the symptoms here:
      http://www.helpforkp.com/keratosis_pilaris_about_kp.html

      And pictures in case you want to compare:
      http://www.helpforkp.com/keratosis_pilaris_pictures.html

      If you do have it one thing you can do is try to moisturize it with lotion (it helps) One really good moisturizer is Eucerin Plus Intensive Repair Cream. Don't try to physically exfoliate the skin with things like lofa sponges. Those can be too abrasive and can make it worse. The Eucerin lotion I mentioned has things in it that exfoliates the skin for you, which will give you good results.

      If it's not Keratosis Pilaris, thank your lucky stars and be sure to see a dermatologist to see what the problem is and what you can do about it. I had a doctor tell me I was ZINC deficient, but even after taking Zinc for 6 months there was very little improvement. It's actually better in the summer time. In the winter there is less moisture in the air and dryness can make Keratosis Pilaris look worse (which is why moisturizing the skin is a good idea, it’s better to put lotions and creams on right after a shower)

      Good luck!

  19. QUESTION:
    How do I take bumps off of my legs?
    Hi, um everysince i was 5 years old i have these little tiny bumps on both of my legs. its hard for me to take them off. all i do is scratch them off but it bleeds and than the bump comes back soon. What can i do to permanently take them off? Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      It might be Keratosis Pilaris (AKA chicken skin), you can check out the website I listed below (it has pictures, treatment suggestions, etc...). It's fairly common, but there's no cure (but there are things you can try to make it less noticeable). http://www.helpforkp.com/

  20. QUESTION:
    I have these pimple like bumps on my thigh?
    I have these pimple like bumps on my thigh and they don't hurt they are just unattractive. They come and go when they please and I just wanted to know what they are and how to get rid of them. I don't think its a rash because I've had it for as long as I can remember. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      If you've had these bumps on your thighs for as long as you can remember, then I'd suggest that you Google "keratosis pilaris" and see if the pictures and description fit what you have. (I suspect that they will).
      If that is the diagnosis, then you can certainly read up on the many different types of therapy that have been tried on this condition, only to realize that there is no great form of treatment for them.

  21. QUESTION:
    My friend just had a harlequin baby, what kind of baby is that?
    She said it had problems and was a harlequin baby but what does that mean? Pictures would be helpful :)

    • ANSWER:
      Harlequin-type ichthyosis (also harlequin ichthyosis, ichthyosis congenita, Ichthyosis fetalis or keratosis diffusa fetalis), a skin disease, is the most severe form of congenital ichthyosis, characterized by a thickening of the keratin layer in fetal human skin. In sufferers of the disease, the skin contains massive, diamond-shaped scales, and tends to have a reddish color. In addition, the eyes, ears, mouth, and other appendages may be abnormally contracted. The scaly keratin greatly limits the child's movement. Because the skin is cracked where normal skin would fold, it is easily pregnable by bacteria and other contaminants, resulting in serious risk of fatal infection.

      Sufferers are known as harlequin fetuses, harlequin babies, or harlequins.

      The harlequin-type designation comes from both the baby's apparent facial expression and the diamond-shape of the scales (resembling the costume of Arlecchino), which are caused by severe hyperkeratosis. The disease can be diagnosed in the uterus by way of fetal skin biopsy or by morphologic analysis of amniotic fluid cells obtained by amniocentesis. In addition, doctors can now usually recognize common features of the disease through ultrasound, and follow up with 3D ultrasound to diagnose the condition.
      [edit] History
      The disease has been known since 1750, and was first described in the diary of a cleric from Charleston, South Carolina, the Rev. Oliver Hart

      "On Thursday, April 5, 1750, I went to see a most deplorable object of a child, born the night before of one Mary Evans in 'Chas'town. It was surprising to all who beheld it, and I scarcely know how to describe it. The skin was dry and hard and seemed to be cracked in many places, somewhat resembling the scales of a fish. The mouth was large and round and open. It had no external nose, but two holes where the nose should have been. The eyes appeared to be lumps of coagulated blood, turned out, about the bigness of a plum, ghastly to behold. It had no external ears, but holes where the ears should be. The hands and feet appeared to be swollen, were cramped up and felt quite hard. The back part of the head was much open. It made a strange kind of noise, very low, which I cannot describe. It lived about forty-eight hours and was alive when I saw it."

      At least 100 cases have been reported worldwide in modern times. Neither gender nor ethnicity seem to affect the likelihood of a child having the disorder. A disproportionately high number of children have consanguineous parents. Those from families with a history of severe skin disorders may have a higher risk of birthing a harlequin child.

      [edit] Features
      The features of sufferers are deformed facially and cranially. The ears may be very poorly developed or absent entirely, as may the nose. The eyelids are severely everted (ectropion), which leaves the eyes and the area around them very susceptible to trauma. They often bleed upon birth. The lips, pulled by the dry skin, are fixed into a wide grimace (eclabium). Arms, feet, and fingers are almost always deformed in such a way that they cannot bend properly, and may be below the normal size. They present hypoplasia in the fingers; therefore, they cannot grab things properly, or they can barely touch them. Polydactyly, a condition in which one has more than the usual number of toes or fingers, has also been found in these infants.

      They are extremely susceptible to changes in temperature due to their armor-like skin, which prevents normal heat loss. This can result in hyperthermia. Their respiration is also restricted by the skin, which impedes the chest wall from expanding and drawing in enough air. This can lead to hypoventilation and respiratory failure. Harlequins are often dehydrated, as their plated skin is not well suited to keeping water in.

      [edit] Treatment and prognosis
      In the past, the disorder was invariably fatal, whether due to dehydration, infection (sepsis), restricted breathing due to the plating, or other related causes. The most common cause of death was systemic infection and sufferers rarely survived for more than a few days. However, there have been improvements in care, most notably the drug Isotrex. Some patients have survived into adolescence and, in very rare cases, lived to adulthood.

      [edit] Notable cases

      [edit] United Kingdom
      Nusrit "Nelly" Shaheen (1984) is the oldest survivor with the condition in the UK. She is one of eight children, four who also suffered from the condition and passed away as young children. Nelly lives an active lifestyle and is studying sports coaching and leadership at Hereward College. She hopes to teach the course in the future.[1][2]

      A Real Families documentary broadcast on ITV1 in the United Kingdom in 2005 (and later rebroadcast in other countries) showed the lives of two pairs of sisters afflicted with the condition: Lucy and Hannah Betts (ages 18 and 15), and Dana and Lara Bowen (ages 8 and 1½). The girls all went th

  22. QUESTION:
    One of my goldfish have white hard dots on it's fin what Is It?
    One of my goldfish has little white dots on it's fin and is about 3" and I got another on the same day. My other one is about four inches and doesn't have any. What is it?

    • ANSWER:
      I wish people wouldn't jump to conclusions about ich. Please don't start treatment until you are sure that it's ich -- i.e. the white dots start to spread to the rest of the fish.

      If the white dots are on the lead (frontmost) ray of the pectoral fins, they could be breeding stars. See here for a picture:

      http://thegab.org/Articles/SexingGoldfish.html

      If the white dots are in the middle of the fin (any fin - dorsal, tail, pectoral) and they look like they're coming from inside of the fin rather than clinging on the outside (as ich would) then your goldie might be healing some broken rays in his fin.

      It could also be keratosis, which is a kind of 'rash' that doesn't hurt the fish. Here is a picture of what that looks like:

      http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s310/hilda619/C5.jpg

      And here is a thread which discusses it:

      http://thegab.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=13575&highlight=fin

      If it IS ich, here is a good guide to help you treat with salt:

      http://thegab.org/Articles/IchSaltTreatment.html

      Hope this helps you. White dots DON'T necessarily mean ich.

  23. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of bumps on my arms?
    they feel really bad and no lotion works so far but the only ones i used are for hands mainly because that is all I have in the house. Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      Where in you arms? There's a condition that is called Keratosis Pilaris in which a person have bump on the skin. Occurred more frequently in the outer upper arms, but it can happen in the rest of the arm as well. Look for more information and pictures to see if its the same condition you have. It is not contagious or something to worry about except for the appearance.

  24. QUESTION:
    I have little bumps on my legs, what are they and how do I get rid of them?
    The bumps are small and goosebump like. Some of them are red.

    • ANSWER:
      It might be Keratosis Pilaris, you can check out the website I listed below (it has pictures, treatment suggestions, etc...). It's fairly common, but there's no cure (but there are things you can try to make it less noticeable). http://www.helpforkp.com/ However it's also possible that it's just body acne I would try using Neutrogena Body Clear Body Wash.

  25. QUESTION:
    My doctor has told me i might be able to have Cryotherapy/Cryosurgery for my stage 3 cervical cancer?
    My cells are in progression to cancer but are not currently. im confused, First she said i have stage III cancer and then she says they have not reached full completion ?????

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Baby_amy.
      I am sorry you are going through this honey. Doctors are nut cases? Kaitlyn that is the most negative statement I've ever heard. My doctors are the sanest people I know.
      Found this at the National Cancer Institute;
      1. What is cryosurgery?

      Cryosurgery (also called cryotherapy) is the use of extreme cold produced by liquid nitrogen (or argon gas) to destroy abnormal tissue. Cryosurgery is used to treat external tumors, such as those on the skin. For external tumors, liquid nitrogen is applied directly to the cancer cells with a cotton swab or spraying device.

      Cryosurgery is also used to treat tumors inside the body (internal tumors and tumors in the bone). For internal tumors, liquid nitrogen or argon gas is circulated through a hollow instrument called a cryoprobe, which is placed in contact with the tumor. The doctor uses ultrasound or MRI to guide the cryoprobe and monitor the freezing of the cells, thus limiting damage to nearby healthy tissue. (In ultrasound, sound waves are bounced off organs and other tissues to create a picture called a sonogram.) A ball of ice crystals forms around the probe, freezing nearby cells. Sometimes more than one probe is used to deliver the liquid nitrogen to various parts of the tumor. The probes may be put into the tumor during surgery or through the skin (percutaneously). After cryosurgery, the frozen tissue thaws and is either naturally absorbed by the body (for internal tumors), or it dissolves and forms a scab (for external tumors).
      2. What types of cancer can be treated with cryosurgery?

      Cryosurgery is used to treat several types of cancer, and some precancerous or noncancerous conditions. In addition to prostate and liver tumors, cryosurgery can be an effective treatment for the following:
      * Retinoblastoma (a childhood cancer that affects the retina of the eye). Doctors have found that cryosurgery is most effective when the tumor is small and only in certain parts of the retina.
      * Early-stage skin cancers (both basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas).
      * Precancerous skin growths known as actinic keratosis.
      * Precancerous conditions of the cervix known as cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (abnormal cell changes in the cervix that can develop into cervical cancer).

      Cryosurgery is also used to treat some types of low-grade cancerous and noncancerous tumors of the bone. It may reduce the risk of joint damage when compared with more extensive surgery, and help lessen the need for amputation. The treatment is also used to treat AIDS-related Kaposi sarcoma when the skin lesions are small and localized.

      Researchers are evaluating cryosurgery as a treatment for a number of cancers, including breast, colon, and kidney cancer. They are also exploring cryotherapy in combination with other cancer treatments, such as hormone therapy, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or surgery.
      3. In what situations can cryosurgery be used to treat prostate cancer? What are the side effects?

      Cryosurgery can be used to treat men who have early-stage prostate cancer that is confined to the prostate gland. It is less well established than standard prostatectomy and various types of radiation therapy. Long-term outcomes are not known. Because it is effective only in small areas, cryosurgery is not used to treat prostate cancer that has spread outside the gland, or to distant parts of the body.

      Some advantages of cryosurgery are that the procedure can be repeated, and it can be used to treat men who cannot have surgery or radiation therapy because of their age or other medical problems.

      Cryosurgery for the prostate gland can cause side effects. These side effects may occur more often in men who have had radiation to the prostate.
      * Cryosurgery may obstruct urine flow or cause incontinence (lack of control over urine flow); often, these side effects are temporary.
      * Many men become impotent (loss of sexual function).
      * In some cases, the surgery has caused injury to the rectum.

      4. In what situations can cryosurgery be used to treat primary liver cancer or liver metastases (cancer that has spread to the liver from another part of the body)? What are the side effects?

      Cryosurgery may be used to treat primary liver cancer that has not spread. It is used especially if surgery is not possible due to factors such as other medical conditions. The treatment also may be used for cancer that has spread to the liver from another site (such as the colon or rectum). In some cases, chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy may be given before or after cryosurgery. Cryosurgery in the liver may cause damage to the bile ducts and/or major blood vessels, which can lead to hemorrhage (heavy bleeding) or infection.
      5. Does cryosurgery have any complications or side effects?

      Cryosurgery does have side effects, although th

  26. QUESTION:
    Can someone help me with these bumps on my face?
    I am actually unsure whether or not they are acne or pimples.
    They are skin colored, but sometimes they get a little red but not often.
    They are really small, but theyre often in groups....
    What are they and how can I get rid of them?!

    • ANSWER:
      i am not a doctor but it sounds like it may be keratosis pilarisi have this on my arms and legs a picture would help us help you better

  27. QUESTION:
    what are these red dots on my upper arms?
    They are not spots and are not raised above the skin. On close inspection they look like little bleeds under the skin, like I've been pricked with little needles. They are not uniform in shape and are mostly tiny. I have no other symptoms and generally have good health. They have not appeared anywhere else on my body and do not cause me any discomfort, I just wondered what they are :)

    • ANSWER:
      This is most likely a harmless skin condition called keratosis pilaris. It's cause when dead skin cells plug up your hair follicles instead of flaking off your skin. The can be red dots, or raised bumps that are usually red or skin colored. Do a google image search of keratosis pilaris and if your dots or bumps match the pictures, bingo. If not, then I'm not sure what else to tell you. The upper arms is usually the only place some people have it.

  28. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever heard of Keratosis Pilaris and do you think my fiance has it?
    He has all the symptoms of it... But this is the best picture I could find him. The picture doesn't do justice...It just shows some remnant of healed bumps on his face.

    http://i441.photobucket.com/albums/qq132/flowerjl/n21422755_33435337_9777.jpg

    • ANSWER:
      This appears to be acne, not Keratosis Pilaris. KP typically appears on the upper arms and sometimes neck -- usually not the face.

  29. QUESTION:
    How to get rid or help Keratosis Pilaris?
    I Need Help Ive Got Them Im Shure
    On The Bottom Picture where im lying down can you see them ? and if not is there anything to treat this or help it ??
    www.RebeccaJayne1992.piczo.com

    • ANSWER:
      If you do have keratosos Polaris it does tend to improve as you get older and can even disappear.
      Expensive vitamin creams are not the way to go, just a good moisturising cream, lac-hydrin or a lotion with salicylic acid, tepid showers not hot baths'.
      the bumps often get bigger in cold weather.
      You would do better to see your doctor, get a proper diagnosis and a prescription for one of the recommended creams or lotions

  30. QUESTION:
    Strange rash like thing on my face and arms?
    So for about a week or so I have noticed strange bumps on the upper part of my arm. A few days later I noticed the bumps were all over the side of my face and now it seems they've spread a little. The bumps arent very visible but I can feel them very well. You can see the bumps however it looks really weird and hard to explain. They arent red they just look like skin bumps and they dont look poppable. Any idea of what they are?

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like Keratosis pilaris. It's your skin producing to much keratin and causes the pores to get clogged. It is extremely common and carries no health issues with it and it is not contagious. It is most commonly on the upper arms and less commonly on the face (mostly the jaw line), back and bum too. I have it as well (on all the places I listed) and have had 3 different doctors give me 3 different things to try and none of them worked. It is pretty much impossible to get rid of. My family doctor has it as well and she told me she has tried everything known, and nothing has worked. Although it seems counterintuitive, super heavy greasy creams are the best thing for it. I have a very thick beeswax based balm that helps a little. Also, most people say it gets better in the summer and is worse in the winter but for me it is completely opposite. I hardly notice it in the winter and in the summer it gets so bad it looks like a rash- you may be like that too.

      Although they don't look poppable, if you squeeze really hard, white stuff will come out. I don't recommend that though.

      It's also important to exfoliate. Everyday if you can. Not too hard though or it will get inflamed. I use an exfoliating glove but do it lightly when doing it everyday.

      I'm just guessing that this is what you have. I haven't seen pictures. You should always check with your doctor.

      Look around at peoples arms tomorrow, you wouldn't believe how many people have this.

  31. QUESTION:
    Are the Spots on my thighs normal?
    I recently got a loaaaaaad of White heads on my thighs. What in the world?,

    Is it normal?

    • ANSWER:
      Have you shaved recently? Could be a shaving rash.

      Or, does it look like this:
      http://www.primehealthchannel.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/Keratosis-Pilaris-Pictures.jpg

      If so, it could be Keratosis Pilaris. (also known as 'chicken skin')

      I suffer from it, quite a lot of people do. Heres some more info on it:
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keratosis_pilaris

      Hope this helps

  32. QUESTION:
    help please! i have like chicken skin what do i do about it?
    its like little bumps on my legs, its not bad but it bothers me.

    • ANSWER:
      What this could be is Keratosis Pilaris. It is a skin condition that a lot of people have on the backs of their arms and on their legs. My brother and I both have it. What you can use is a lotion after you shower, something with Urea, Vitamin A, Lactic Acid or Alpha Hydroxy. Here is a sample of this: http://www.drugstore.com/products/prod.asp?pid=92480&catid=10400&aid=333840&aparam=2.nTDs3pHeE-kWvaV5Hmj_z2I73JBafgAA

      and here is the chicken skin: http://www.helpforkp.com/keratosis_pilaris_pictures.html

  33. QUESTION:
    Best reducer of Keratosis pilaris rubra faceii?
    My face looks like this : http://healthguide.howstuffworks.com/keratosis-pilaris-rubra-faceii-picture-a.htm on both sides.

    Does anyone recommend a cream that can significantly reduce the redness? It's really making me depressed now and I've tried foundation but it looks too obvious to my friends. Thanks
    14 years old myself and a male

    • ANSWER:
      I sympathise, I really do. I have this and so does my son.. don't know how old you are, but Mine faded dramatically when I reached 25, and although the skins is course, its not red anymore. and my sons story is the same.. there is a keratosis support group, can;t think of the exact name, but I bet if you google it, you will find it

  34. QUESTION:
    what are these bumps on my cheeks?
    i have these little bumps on my cheeks. i know it's
    not acne, zits, blackheads, or whiteheads.
    i've had them since i was a baby & i don't know
    what they are. i thought they were Keratosis pilaris, but
    they aren't red & they've never been red.
    i've tried using this thing called a buff puff, but
    they didn't go away. the wave & clearasil pads have
    been working for me, but they still won't go away.
    can anyone tell me what they are? & why they are
    on my cheeks?
    thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      I have exactly the same condition as you.
      They really p*ss me off!
      Mine are not red either, but look at these pictures, not all of them are red. http://images.google.co.uk/images?hl=en&biw=1280&q=Keratosis+pilaris&btnG=Search+Images&gbv=2&aq=f&oq=

      I have also used a buff puff, but all it does to them are make them go red and sore.
      I think we do actually have Keratosis pilaris, but sorry i dont know how to get rid f them
      I have been using this http://www.superdrug.com/content/ebiz/superdrug/invt/31178/31178_l.jpg but it dosent get rid of them, it does calm them down a bit and makes them softer,

      I also have them on my arms. Sorry i was not help. But if you ever find out what gets them to go away PLEASE let me know!

  35. QUESTION:
    Can I get rid of these spots on my legs?
    i've had these spots on my legs since I can remember, they have started to bother me recently and I wonder if there is any way I can get rid of them. They are not itchy or anything, just ugly.
    Pictures -
    http://img843.imageshack.us/i/legs012.jpg/
    http://img20.imageshack.us/i/legs005.jpg/

    • ANSWER:
      the picture link isn't working on my computer because it's really slow, but i'm guessing your spots are Keratosis Pilaris. you can't get rid of them, but they go away with time. i have them all over my legs too, and it sucks but nobody really notices them

  36. QUESTION:
    How To Get Rid Of Pimples On My Legs?
    Its Like I Have Goose Pimples On My Legs All The Time Even When Im Not Cold Some Times There A Bit Red!

    • ANSWER:
      Do the bumps look like the picture on here, or similar? (don't worry, it's not gross):

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keratosis_pilaris

      Except the bumps are on your legs instead of your arms, of course?

      If so, you have Keratosis Pilaris, and it can't be cured because it's hereditary. However, you can do what the first answer said and see if that works. I have KP on my upper arms, and I'm going to try some things to get rid of them so I can wear t-shirts to school.

  37. QUESTION:
    I have little redish bumps on my arms. What are they?
    i am a female, and ever since 4th grade i have had these little red bumps above my elbow on my arms. they don't hurt but the just look odd. Does anyone else have these?, know what they are? or know how to get rid of them?

    • ANSWER:
      I have little redish bumps on my upper arms as well. My dermatologist said they are called "keratosis pilaris rubra". Here is a picture of it http://keratosispilaris.org/images/kp/arm_01.jpg

      This is from their website
      "Why KP occurs?

      The bumps of KP result from the way in which scales are shed from the outer skin around KP affected hair follicles. In these follicles, the outer skin scales are excessively adherent and do not shed easily. This phenomenon is known as abnormal keratinization or hyperkeratinization. The fact that it is localized to the individual follicles and occurs in each and every one in a certain area, explains its characteristic "millions of bumps" appearance.

      Sometimes, this hyperkeratotic buildup entraps the hair within the follicle. The trapped hair gets bunched up and may lead to a red irritated bump that may fill with pus. These pus filled red bumps are often confused with bacterial folliculitis or acne.

      People with a history of skin allergies are most susceptible to this condition. The papules tend to occur in association with allergic dermatitis and several types of xerotic (dry) skin disorders. Both of these conditions have a strong hereditary link.

      Keratosis pilaris tends to be more severe during the winter months or other times of low humidity when skin dries out. Areas where relative humidity is low have a higher incidence of Keratosis Pilaris."

  38. QUESTION:
    how do i get red of bumps on my arm?
    i have a bunch of little bumps on my upper arm how do i get rid of these?

    • ANSWER:
      It might be Keratosis Pilaris, you can check out the website I listed below (it has pictures, treatment suggestions, etc...). It's fairly common, but there's no cure (but there are things you can try to make it less noticeable). http://www.helpforkp.com/ However it's also possible that it's just body acne I would try using Neutrogena Body Clear Body Wash.

  39. QUESTION:
    Could this possibly be skin cancer?
    I just noticed a small mole-looking thing on my back yesterday. Its a reddish-brown color and about half the diameter of a pencil eraser. Should I be concerned? However, it does not bleed and is not tender or sensitive to touch.

    • ANSWER:
      skin cancers:
      malignant melanoma- usually from a dark changing mole....better to catch them flat, more raised means the deeper theyre going. if a moles is multicolored, changing colors suddenly or black get it checked asap.new mole doesnt mean changing u can get new moles into 50s and 60s their okay as long as they dont change after the initial show up. also melanoma doesnt need sun

      aks(precancers), squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carinoma- all from the sun, any red scaly spot that doesnt go away or comes&goes often or bleeds needs to be checked out, the most common story for a basal cell is it started like a pimple but wouldnt go away. theres also keratoacanthoma which is a quick growing form of a squamous cell...they can double in sz in 1week.

      *general rule if it goes away on its own and doesnt come back its generally benign.

      hope this helped u...... brownish red could be an angioma or a sebborehic keratosis.... google those see if pictures match up at all.

  40. QUESTION:
    Black Women Please Help!!! How do I Get Rid of Strawberry Legs!?
    Hello.

    I have large black spores over my legs. Sort of like strawberry seeds. Also around my elbows. I didn't know what they were until I watched a raven Simone YouTube video where she complained about the same issue.

    I was wondering if anyone who has had this problem can be able to assist me with getting rid of it.

    Please answer if you have a solution.

    Thanks!!

    • ANSWER:
      google Keratosis Pilaris & see if your condition looks like the picture. this condition will get worse in the winter & a little better in the summer. it is a condition of the hair follicle. it is chronic.
      some things you can do to reduce these "strawberry seeds":
      1) rub LAC-HYDRIN lotion on the affected areas daily (get in the lotion section of your drug store) or
      2) rub a retinoid (like RETIN-A) on the affected areas daily (if your skin gets too dry moisturize with CeraVe or Cetaphil)
      it will take about a month doing either of these regimens to see a difference.
      good luck!

  41. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of this?!?
    My arms are very dry and reddish with little dots all over them, i've scrubbed them and put lotion on them and everything but it won't go away!! is there a way to get rid of this?

    • ANSWER:
      It might be Keratosis Pilaris, you can check out the website I listed below (it has pictures, treatment suggestions, etc...). It's fairly common, but there's no cure (but there are things you can try to make it less noticeable). http://www.helpforkp.com/

  42. QUESTION:
    I have a type of keratosis. Any cures?
    I've heard everything between having surgery and shaving it off. I've also heard that it goes away pretty quickly. Mine is spreading. I can't even find any pictures on medical sites that look like mine. Please help!
    And yes, I have been to the doctor. C=

    • ANSWER:
      There are Keratosis Pilares kits available. Some of my clients have found that the Genesis Kit (you can look up Genesis Pharmaceutical, Inc. to order) has worked. About 5 years ago I had a patient that we tried microdermabrasions on & it worked.
      Since this is not a conventional way of treating Keratosis (but I have seen great results), discuss this alternative with a reputable cosmetic/medical office.
      Please don't try to shave the bumps! you could cause permanant scarring & a whole new problem.
      Good Luck!

  43. QUESTION:
    I just noticed small red bumps on my inner thigh in a line...should i be concerned?
    The bumps are painful and go in a line from smallest and get larger. When I squeezed one a clear fluid came out. I've never seen anything like this before and I was just wondering what it could be from. Thank you :)

    • ANSWER:
      i need more detail or description or a picture. My guesses based on what you've said is that you've got a very mild case of keratosis pilaris. Either that, or it's just an average pimple. If it's keratosis, it would be very mild because you only have it in one line. But again, I would need more detail to better understand your condition and help you out.
      Hope this helps.

  44. QUESTION:
    need help with my freckle look alike thing on my skin?
    it is very rare for an asian to have freckles
    so i really feel disgusted looking at them
    but i'm not sure whether mine is freckles.
    they appeared on my whole arm only.
    they are very tiny
    sometimes there are small white stuff that looks like pimple. but it is not painful like pimple.
    so when i squeeze them, white stuff will come out. but this however only appeared on the sleeve area and not the arm area
    any idea what is it?
    how to get rid of them?

    • ANSWER:
      Check this link:

      http://www.emedicine.com/derm/topic211.htm#Multimediamedia1

      If any of the pictures look like your arm, it would be keratosis pilaris. Best thing to use on that is a moisturizer that has exfoliating things like lactic or glycolic acid in them. Quite a few body lotions have them, I use Eucerin.

  45. QUESTION:
    I have bumps on the back of my arms, how do I get them to go away???
    I have had them forever and I totally need help. People comment and all. The skin is so red and dry too. Don't tell me to use a loofah, cuz I do. I use it so much my skin is red all day.

    • ANSWER:
      It may be keratosis pilaris - a very common (and harmless) skin condition that feels like permanent goosebumps. It is most commonly found on the backs of arms or tops of legs, but can also appear on the face, buttocks, torso - basically everywhere except the palms and soles.

      Check out the first link below for a picture of it. If that looks like what you have, stop using the loofah - it just irritates the skin further. There are lotions available that help get rid of the bumps, but they don't work for everybody. Look for something that contains both urea and glycolic acid or another alpha hydroxy acid (lactic acid, for example). One that's fairly easy to find is Eucerin Dry Skin Therapy Plus Intensive Repair Creme. You have to use the lotion every day, but eventually the skin will become smooth. Unfortunately, if you stop using the lotion, the bumps will come back. It can't be cured, just treated. Also, alpha hydroxy acids make the skin more sensitive to the sun, so be sure to wear a sunscreen or sunblock whenever you go outside for more than a couple of minutes.

  46. QUESTION:
    Think I have keratosis pilaris?
    I have little red spots on mainly the top of my arms and the top of my legs. I'm pretty sure it's keratosis pilaris. I looked at some pictures and it seems like it anyway. I was just wandering would I need to go to the doctor to get something to treat it? Or do I have to put up with it because I've read a lot of stuff saying there is no cure :/ Does anyone know anything I can buy or home remedies?
    Thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      I have it. No cure but you can scrub and use special lotions. Doesn't really do much so I just deal with it. My kp is mild though.

  47. QUESTION:
    I have little bumps on my arms, mostly on the top towards my shoulders. They don't itch, or hurt...?
    I'm just wondering if they're the cause of dry skin and what I can do to get rid of them. They're annoying. Please help.

    • ANSWER:
      It might be Keratosis Pilaris, you can check out the website I listed below (it has pictures, treatment suggestions, etc...). It's fairly common, but there's no cure (but there are things you can try to make it less noticeable). http://www.helpforkp.com/ However it's also possible that it's just body acne I would try using Neutrogena Body Clear Body Wash.

  48. QUESTION:
    Small bumps at base of neck and chest?
    I have some small unightly bumps at the base of my neck and on my chest. While unsightly, they do not itch, hurt, burn or contains puss. They are between 1 and 3mm and some of the larger ones looks a bit flat. If you have any idea what this is please let me know.
    Here are some recent pictures - http://www.flickr.com/photos/14670203@N08

    I saw a dermatologist but he hasn't a clue and guesses that it is keratosis pillaris. The keralac lotion that he prescribes isn't working.

    • ANSWER:
      it looks like some sort of rash or irritation, perhaps an allergic reaction, but I'm no doctor. if it's something that's worrying you then I'd go ahead and seek a second opinion perhaps from a better doctor.

  49. QUESTION:
    What in the world is wrong with me?? Please help?
    I've got small bumps all over my stomach. They're very visible but not itchy and they don't hurt. Plus I think they've spread from this morning..... I've never been allergic to anything though....Any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      You might have a condition called keratosis pilaris. It causes little painless bumps on your skin. It usually happens on the backs of arms and on legs but I have had it on my stomach before. I use a lotion called amlactin and it helps to make the bumps less obvious. It is pretty common, especially in women. You should look it up and find some pictures. I've included a link to a kp website. I hope this helps :)


keratosis pictures

Actinic Seborrheic Keratosis

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever heard of a skin disorder with two words, last one being Keratosis?
    I can't remember the first word but it looks and feels like small round rough patches on the surface of my skin, worse on my legs, ankles and top of my feet. I also have problems with skin tags on the underside of my upper arms, inside thighs and a few on my back. I am only a few lbs overweight so it's not due to that. My dermatologist told me what it was a couple of years ago and I cannot remember, he's not in practice now. If someone else has this or if you're a derm, I'd love to hear from you.
    I searched and now I'm pretty sure the name of this disorder is Seborrheic Keratosis. Anyone out there know anything about it?

    • ANSWER:
      I had a quick search and found this:
      SEBORRHEIC KERATOSIS
      A seborrheic keratosis is a benign skin growth that is very common among people over 40 years of age. The growths resemble flattened or raised warts, but have no viral origins and may exhibit a variety of colors, from pink or yellow through brown and black. Because only the top layers of the epidermis are involved, seborrheic keratoses are often described as having a "pasted-on" appearance.

      Because the tumors are rarely painful, treatment is not often necessary. There is a small risk of localized infection caused by picking at the lesion. If a growth becomes excessively itchy, or if it is irritated by clothing or jewelry, cryosurgery has been found to be highly effective in their removal. The main danger associated with seborrheic keratoses lies in their resemblance to malignant melanomas, which has sometimes led to a misdiagnosis of the cancerous lesions. If there is any doubt, a skin biopsy will allow a physician to make a correct diagnosis. A mutation of a gene coding for a growth factor receptor (FGFR3), has been found in 40% of seborrheic keratosis.

      I also found SOLAR KERATOSIS
      What is a solar keratosis?

      A solar keratosis is a small, rough, bump which develops on the skin. It is caused by a lot of exposure to the sun over many years. One or more may develop. It is sometimes called an actinic keratosis.

      What does a solar keratosis look like?

      Each one can range from the size of a pinhead to 2-3 cm across. Their colour can be light, dark, pink, red, the same colour as your skin, or a combination of these. The top of each one may have a yellow-white crust. They feel rough and dry, and are slightly raised from the surface of the skin. You can often feel them more easily than see them. Some redness may develop in the surrounding skin.

      Sometimes a finger-like growth of hard skin appears to come out of a solar keratosis (a 'cutaneous horn').

      Several solar keratoses may develop at about the same time, often in the same area of skin. Sometimes several join together and form a large flat-ish rough area of skin.

      Solar keratoses usually develop on areas of skin which have been exposed to the sun a lot. For example, on the face, neck, bald patches on the scalp, and the backs of the hands. They may appear in other areas in people who do a lot of sunbathing.

      There are usually no other symptoms. Rarely, you may get an itchy or pricking sensation from affected areas of skin.

      I hope that these help

  2. QUESTION:
    which of the following neoplastic lesions originates in the dermis rather than in the epidermis?
    A. squamous cell carcinoma
    B. Actinic keratosis
    C. Dermatofibroma
    D. Seborrheic keratosis

    • ANSWER:
      I think it's C, based on the presentation of the lesion, but check your text book or ask a doctor, they'd know on the spot

  3. QUESTION:
    Red spot on forehead, been there for months... what could it be?
    I have had this red spot on my forehead for over 6 months; it isn't raised like a pimple and doesn't hurt... it's just there. Its about the size of a pencil eraser. I have tried to put anti-redness cream on it and that didn't work. Any ideas of what it could be and how to get rid of it?

    • ANSWER:
      It is difficult to answer not knowing your age. It could be an cherry angioma, a scratched off seborrheic keratosis, actinic keratosis or basal cell carcinoma. Your best option is to see a dermatologist since you may need a skin biopsy for official diagnosis.

      Good luck!

  4. QUESTION:
    Best treatment for scarring/dark spots?
    Hi! Can someone please give suggestions for dark marks on the skin left from acne? Make up suggestions, cleanser, etc. Also if you could give your personal experience with products youve used that were and arent affective. Thankyou and 10 points for best answer and no teasing please!!

    • ANSWER:
      Believe it or not there are a small number of products out there that can really help you in your case. Trouble is finding the right one. I myself experimented for years before I found the right product.

      Salicylic Acid 20% Gel Peel is the best product that I have found and would recommend to anyone.

      What it treats: Acne, Acne Scars, Blackheads/Whiteheads, Dry Skin, Sun-damaged Skin, Blotchy Pigmentation, Fine Wrinkles, Loss of Elasticity, Large Pores, Bumps, Age Spots, Eczema, Seborrheic Keratosis, Hyperkeratosis, Actinic keratosis, and Rosacea.

      How to use: Apply twice a week for six weeks, and then pause for one month. Leave on face 3 to 5 minutes depending on your skin's sensitivity.

      The main thing to keep in mind is that "IT TAKES TIME" with any product or procedure that you decide to try. But make sure to hang in there and be persistent. Use this product just as directed and you will see results.

      Also keep in mind that you are beautiful no matter what, don't forget that!!! ;-)

  5. QUESTION:
    Best treatment for scarring/dark spots?
    Hi! Can someone please give suggestions for dark marks on the skin left from acne? Make up suggestions, cleanser, etc. Also if you could give your personal experience with products youve used that were and arent affective. Thankyou and 10 points for best answer and no teasing please!!

    • ANSWER:
      Believe it or not there are a small number of products out there that can really help you in your case. Trouble is finding the right one. I myself experimented for years before I found the right product.

      Salicylic Acid 20% Gel Peel is the best product that I have found and would recommend to anyone.

      What it treats: Acne, Acne Scars, Blackheads/Whiteheads, Dry Skin, Sun-damaged Skin, Blotchy Pigmentation, Fine Wrinkles, Loss of Elasticity, Large Pores, Bumps, Age Spots, Eczema, Seborrheic Keratosis, Hyperkeratosis, Actinic keratosis, and Rosacea.

      How to use: Apply twice a week for six weeks, and then pause for one month. Leave on face 3 to 5 minutes depending on your skin's sensitivity.

      The main thing to keep in mind is that "IT TAKES TIME" with any product or procedure that you decide to try. But make sure to hang in there and be persistent. Use this product just as directed and you will see results.

      Also keep in mind that you are beautiful no matter what, don't forget that!!! ;-)

  6. QUESTION:
    Do you have any secret beauty tips?

    • ANSWER:
      1. Drink 8 glasses of water a day (Great for skin)
      2. Herbs are EXTREMELY good for you, your health, and even your appearance (even though it's not really a secret)
      3. Brush your teeth for at least two minutes if you plan on kissing someone. (Brush after every meal/snack but wait 10 mins. before)
      4. ALWAYS be gentle to your hair, teeth, & skin when your brushing, combing, exfoliating and/or using beauty products.
      5. Body Brushes are great for exfoliating. (Yup, that's right...your whole entire body)
      6. Avocados, beans, nuts, and fruits like oranges and bananas help your skin looking youthful.
      7. Always use sunscreen daily even when there is snow on the ground. (even when your inside of a building in case your near or in front of a door or window that can expose you to the sun.
      8. When it comes to skin & skin care products you want have products that have Vitamin A, Vitamin C, and Glycol Acid. Glycolic Acid helps skin conditions like acne (as well as Vitamin A), blackheads, whiteheads, pustules, eczema, age spots, dry skin, pre-cancerous growths, psoriasis, hyperkeratosis, actinic keratosis, and seborrheic keratosis. As vitamin C allows for collagen synthesis and soaks up damaging free radicals, which are essential for healthy skin.
      9. Green tea is healthy for your skin and hair.
      10. Avoid putting hair products directly on your scalp, it'll clog up your pores.
      11. Avoid using styling products with alcohol, because the alcohol dries up your skin.
      12. When using fragrances such as perfumes or colognes only apply little cologne as possible and on the following areas of the body: inner ankles, upper thigh (in between thighs, near groin), behind ears, neck, armpits, and area between biceps and forearms.
      13. Oatmeal is good for your skin, even the Arabians and Egyptians used oatmeal back in like 2000 B.C. and great for rashes, bug bites, and itchy skin.
      14. finally, the best sunscreens have TiO2 or ZnO because they are great for protecting your skin, for example, use can reduce age spots.

  7. QUESTION:
    mole removal..... is it possible?
    Hey guys,
    So, I have this mole on the side of my face. Its light brown in color, raised and a little bigger than the size of an eraser. I have been annoyed by this mole for too long. It's very noticeable and I catch people looking at it all the time. I always wear my hair down because of it ( since its far back enough that my hair mostly covers it). I'm turning 21 soon and I want to get it removed.
    I made an appointment at a dermatology place. Its this wednesday (appointments are very hard to get), I've been waiting for months now. ONLY thing is... I was looking through their website and they say they "provide evaluation and removal of warts, cysts, keloids, benign lesions (such as skin tags and seborrheic keratosis), pre-cancerous skin lesions (such as actinic keratosis), and skin cancer." The issue is... it dosent say they remove moles. Do you think that since they do other skin growths they do moles anyway? And can I get a removal on the same day as my appointment?

    • ANSWER:

  8. QUESTION:
    Anti Cream Wrinkle That Reverses Aging?
    is There Any Real Solution to delaying aging with anti crem wrinkle products ?

    • ANSWER:
      Not a cream. The answer is Glycolic acid. I do home peels, 50% strength. I buy it from Amazon. The results are absolutely amazing. Reduces fine lines and wrinkles to almost nothing. It has tightened my pores and made my skin so smooth. I was getting those lines smokers get around their lips... gone! Forehead lines gone! Lines around eyes gone! It's even tightening up the droopy lines from nose to corners of mouth! I can't say enough about it. It works!!! The molecules are small enough to pentrate the skin cells and promote them to regenerate collagen. I copied this from Wikipedia if you'd like the science. Try it, you will be so happy you did.
      From Wikipedia:
      Due to its excellent capability to penetrate skin, glycolic acid finds applications in skin care products, most often as a chemical peel performed by a dermatologist in concentrations of 20 to 70% or at-home kits in lower concentrations between 10 and 50%. In addition to concentration, pH also plays a large part in determining the potency of glycolic acid in solution. Physician-strength peels can have a pH as low as 0.6 (strong enough to completely keratolyze the epidermis), while acidities for home peels can be as high as 2.5.[5] Glycolic acid is used to improve the skin's appearance and texture. It may reduce wrinkles, acne scarring, hyperpigmentation and improve many other skin conditions, including actinic keratosis, hyperkeratosis, and seborrheic keratosis. Once applied, glycolic acid reacts with the upper layer of the epidermis, weakening the binding properties of the lipids that hold the dead skin cells together. This allows the stratum corneum to be exfoliated, exposing live skin cells.

      One last thing, the best part is, with glycolic acid peels your skin doesn't actually peel like with the other acids.

  9. QUESTION:
    i had a keratin on my shoulder 2 year ago it was burnt off but it has come back under and around the scar and?
    my son was also 21 when he had a radical neck dissection from scamous cell will mine become the same

    • ANSWER:
      If your lesion was truly a keratosis, it will not trun into anything malignant, as a keratosis (seborrheic keratosis) is always a benign lesion. On the other hand, if you had an "actinic keratosis", this is a premalignant lesion, which can evolve into a squamous cell carcinoma. The fact that yours has come back after having been treated makes me think that you might have had an actinic keratosis, or possibly even a true squamous cell carcinoma at the time of the original surgery. Was a biopsy performed at the time of the original treatment?

  10. QUESTION:
    purple dots on lips and inside of the mounth?
    I saw someone with thaT

    • ANSWER:
      This could be the cause or the source of those bumps.....

      Acne (Pimples)
      Actinic Keratosis
      Boils
      Cysts
      Erythema Nodosum
      Gout
      Insect Sting Allergies
      Keloid
      Melanoma
      Melanoma 101 Introduction to a Deadly Skin Cancer
      Skin Tag
      Other Causes of Bumps on Skin
      Basal cell carcinoma
      skin cancer)
      Dermatofibroma
      Enlarged lymph nodes
      Granuloma annulare
      Hemangioma
      Infections/abscesses
      Intradermal cyst
      Keratoacanthoma
      Lipoma
      Metastatic carcinoma
      Neurofibromatosis
      Nevi (moles)
      Pyogenic granuloma
      Polymorphic light eruption
      Rheumatoid nodules
      Sebaceous gland
      hyperplasia
      Sebaceous (epidermoid) cysts
      Seborrheic keratosis
      Splinters or other foreign bodies
      Squamous cell carcinoma (skin cancer)
      Skin rash
      Soft tissue sarcomas
      Xanthomas

  11. QUESTION:
    Small reddish-brown dot on face?
    I just noticed that I have a small, pin-sized dot right next to my left cheek bone.
    It's been hurting.. & kind of has a tingly feeling.
    it's not itchy, and it's pretty flat... like its a stain on my skin.
    anyone know what this could be?

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      It could be just a broken blood vessel or some sort of temporary blemish, but it could also be a cancerous or pre-cancerous lesion (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, actinic keratosis, seborrheic keratosis). These are usually very easily treated. I recommend you show it to a good dermatologist.

  12. QUESTION:
    I have some scaly brown marks on hands!!?
    They have been appearing and spreading too I tried to scratch them off and it looks like a scar do I have thrush they are on the back of my hands and a few on my arms the first time I saw them was the day after I got in a pool do I have cancer or something

    • ANSWER:
      There are several possible causes.

      Age or Liver Spots
      Age and liver spots are a type of hyperpigmentation that cause brown to black spots on the face and other areas of the body. The brown spots are caused by an increase in melanin, the pigment that gives skin its color. Genetics plays a part in developing age or liver spots, but ultraviolet rays or sun exposure is the most common cause of age spots. Age increases the chances of developing brown spots as most individuals produce more melanin as they get older.

      Keratosis
      Actinic and seborrheic are types of keratosis that cause spots or discoloration on the skin. Actinic keratosis symptoms include rough or scaly patches or bumps with a red to brown appearance and may be painful or easily irritated. Actinic keratosis is caused by sun exposure and is often a precursor to skin cancer, but can be treated effectively when caught early. Seborrheic keratosis is common in adults and has a brown mole or wart-like appearance. Other than genetics, the exact cause of seborrheic keratosis is unknown, but the spots are considered harmless and may be removed for cosmetic reasons.

      Melasma
      Melasma causes brown or grey skin discoloration on the skin. The spots may show up individually or cover large areas. Melasma is more common in women than men. Hormonal changes, certain medications and genetics are factors in developing melasma and sun exposure may exacerbate the problem. Melasma caused by hormonal changes such as pregnancy, birth control or hormone therapy often resolves itself after pregnancy or when medication is stopped.

      Phototoxic Medication
      Phototoxic medications may cause skin to become sensitive to sunlight. Initially, the symptoms of phototoxic light sensitivity appear much like a sunburn or rash. The results of this "sunburn" may include hyperpigmentation or brown spots on the skin. Some drugs associated with phototoxic reaction include tetracycline, sulfonamides, acne medications, some antihistamines and certain arthritis medications such as quinine.

      Brown spots are often treatable via medication, dermatology treatments or excision. Age spots and melasma and other hyperpigmentation conditions may be treated with oral or topical medications, laser therapy, chemical peels or dermabrasion. Raised lesions such as moles or keratosis spots are usually removed by freezing, excising or laser treatments.

      Most brown spots are preventable. Sun exposure is the most common culprit in skin discoloration. Sun damage may not show up until later in life, but too much sun even as a child can significantly increase the chances of developing hyperpigmentation. The best defense against brown spots or more serious skin conditions is covering the skin as much as possible when outdoors. This includes longer sleeves, hats and sunglasses. Sunscreen should be applied as a part of a daily regime, especially on the face where sun exposure is most prevalent.

  13. QUESTION:
    list skin conditions that are treatable?
    hollistic therapy course

    • ANSWER:
      * Acne
      * Actinic keratosis
      * Angioma
      * Athlete's foot
      * Aquagenic pruritus
      * Atopic dermatitis
      * Baldness
      * Basal cell carcinoma
      * Bed sore
      * Behcet's Disease
      * Blepharitis
      * Boil
      * Bowen's Disease
      * Bullous pemphigoid
      * Canker sore
      * Carbuncles
      * Cellulitis
      * Chloracne
      * Chronic dermatitis of the hands and feet
      * Cold sores
      * Contact dermatitis
      * Creeping eruption
      * Dandruff
      * Dermatitis
      * Dermatitis herpetiformis
      * Dermatofibroma
      * Diaper rash
      * Dyshidrosis
      * Eczema
      * Epidermolysis bullosa
      * Erysipelas
      * Erythroderma
      * Ferguson's Disease
      * Friction blister
      * Genital wart
      * Hidradenitis suppurativa
      * Hyperhidrosis
      * Ichthyosis
      * Impetigo
      * Jock itch
      * Kaposi's sarcoma
      * Keloid
      * Keratoacanthoma
      * Keratosis pilaris
      * Lice infection
      * Lichen planus
      * Lichen simplex chronicus
      * Lipoma
      * Lymphadenitis
      * Malignant melanoma
      * Melasma
      * Miliaria
      * Molluscum contagiosum
      * Nummular dermatitis
      * Paget's disease of the nipple
      * Pediculosis
      * Pemphigus
      * Perioral dermatitis
      * Photoallergy
      * Photosensitivity
      * Pityriasis rosea
      * Pityriasis rubra pilaris
      * Porphyria
      * Psoriasis
      * Raynaud's disease
      * Ring worm
      * Rosacea
      * Scabies
      * Scleroderma
      * Sebaceous cyst
      * Seborrheic keratosis
      * Seborrhoeic dermatitis
      * Shingles
      * Skin cancer
      * Skin Tags
      * Spider veins
      * Squamous cell carcinoma
      * Stasis dermatitis
      * Tick bite
      * Tinea barbae
      * Tinea capitis
      * Tinea corporis
      * Tinea cruris
      * Tinea pedis
      * Tinea unguium
      * Tinea versicolor
      * Tinea
      * Tungiasis
      * Urticaria
      * Vitiligo
      * Warts

  14. QUESTION:
    what is hypercaritosisfelicularis?

    • ANSWER:
      Hyperkeratosis

      Hyperkeratosis results when an excess of proteins called keratins are produced. In humans, the term typically refers to a thickening of the skin which can result.

      Examples
      Calluses and corns
      warts
      eczema can lead to hyperkeratosis
      keratosis pilaris
      lichen planus causes hyperkeratosis inside the mouth
      actinic keratosis
      seborrheic keratosis
      several ichthyoses causes hyperkeratosis.

  15. QUESTION:
    I have Keratosis Pilaris on my legs for the past 2 years. How can I treat this?

    • ANSWER:
      Do you mean keratosis follicularis, also called Darier's Disease? Pilar means hair, so I assume this is similiar, if not the same thing altogether. Characterized by black or brown, crusted, wartlike patches that can spread rapidly? Treatment usually includes large doses of topical or oral retinoids and oral or topical corticosteroids. Other forms of keratosis include actinic keratosis, keratosis senilis, and seborrheic keratosis.

  16. QUESTION:
    Name a really gross skin disease I can do my project on....?
    something interesting and NOT common

    • ANSWER:
      Check it out! I typed skin disease in Wikipedia and it gave me this list:

      This is a list of diseases of the skin.

      Acne
      Actinic keratosis
      Angioma
      Athlete's foot
      Aquagenic pruritus
      Atopic dermatitis
      Baldness
      Basal cell carcinoma
      Bed sore
      Behcet's Disease
      Blepharitis
      Boil
      Bowen's Disease
      Bullous pemphigoid
      Canker sore
      Carbuncles
      Cellulitis
      Chloracne
      Chronic dermatitis of the hands and feet
      Cold sores
      Contact dermatitis
      Creeping eruption
      Dandruff
      Dermatitis
      Dermatitis herpetiformis
      Dermatofibroma
      Diaper rash
      Dyshidrosis
      Eczema
      Epidermolysis bullosa
      Erysipelas
      Erythroderma
      Ferguson's Disease
      Friction blister
      Genital wart
      Hidradenitis suppurativa
      Hyperhidrosis
      Ichthyosis
      Impetigo
      Jock itch
      Kaposi's sarcoma
      Keloid
      Keratoacanthoma
      Keratosis pilaris
      Lice infection
      Lichen planus
      Lichen simplex chronicus
      Lipoma
      Lymphadenitis
      Malignant melanoma
      Melasma
      Miliaria
      Molluscum contagiosum
      Nummular dermatitis
      Paget's disease of the nipple
      Pediculosis
      Pemphigus
      Perioral dermatitis
      Photoallergy
      Photosensitivity
      Pityriasis rosea
      Pityriasis rubra pilaris
      Porphyria
      Psoriasis
      Raynaud's disease
      Ring worm
      Rosacea
      Scabies
      Scleroderma
      Sebaceous cyst
      Seborrheic keratosis
      Seborrhoeic dermatitis
      Shingles
      Skin cancer
      Skin Tags
      Spider veins
      Squamous cell carcinoma
      Stasis dermatitis
      Tick bite
      Tinea barbae
      Tinea capitis
      Tinea corporis
      Tinea cruris
      Tinea pedis
      Tinea unguium
      Tinea versicolor
      Tinea
      Tungiasis
      Urticaria
      Vitiligo
      Warts

  17. QUESTION:
    does anyone know anything about hyperkeratosis?
    symptoms, diagnosis, progosis, treatment...

    • ANSWER:
      Hyperkeratosis is a thickening of the outer layer of the skin, which contains a tough, protective protein called keratin. This thickening is often part of the skin's normal protection against rubbing, pressure and other forms of local irritation, and causes calluses and corns on hands and feet or whitish areas inside the mouth. Other forms of hyperkeratosis can occur as part of the skin's defense against chronic (long-lasting) inflammation, infection, the radiation of sunlight or irritating chemicals. Less often, hyperkeratosis develops on skin that has not been irritated. These types of hyperkeratosis may be part of an inherited condition, may begin soon after birth and can affect skin on large areas of the body.
      Symptoms-
      Many forms of hyperkeratosis are painless. However, corns, calluses and plantar warts can cause a great deal of discomfort.
      Diagnosis
      Depending on your specific pattern of skin symptoms, your doctor will ask whether you have a family history of skin problems, and whether you have a personal history of allergies, frequent sun exposure, use of dentures or orthodontic dental appliances, unconscious chewing on your cheek or tongue or use of smokeless tobacco.
      Sometimes, your doctor can diagnose the cause of your hyperkeratosis by reviewing your history and symptoms and by examining your skin. This often is the case with corns, calluses, warts and chronic eczema. If you have chronic eczema that could be allergy-related, the doctor may suggest that you have allergy testing.
      If your doctor suspects that you have seborrheic keratoses, he or she may use a handheld magnifying lens to examine the affected skin for horn pearls. These are very tiny white or black balls of keratin that can usually be seen on the skin in areas of seborrheic keratoses. In some cases, a biopsy may be taken to confirm the diagnosis. In a biopsy, a small piece of tissue is removed to be examined in a laboratory. If your doctor suspects that you have actinic keratoses, you may need to have a skin biopsy to confirm the diagnosis and rule out skin cancer.
      If your child develops hyperkeratosis in many areas of his or her body, your doctor may review your family history and skin symptoms to determine if your child has an inherited disorder.
      Prognosis
      Most forms of hyperkeratosis are local skin problems that have a good prognosis. Actinic keratoses can develop into squamous cell skin cancer.
      Treatment-
      The treatment of hyperkeratosis depends on the type and possible cause:
      Corns and calluses — Using moleskin or padding next to the affected area can help to relieve pain. Avoid further irritation that stimulates growth of the corn or callus. Never try to shave away or cut a corn or callus by yourself. Consult with your health care professional or a podiatrist.
      Warts — Your health care professional or dermatologist can remove warts by freezing them with liquid nitrogen (cryosurgery), vaporizing them with a laser or trimming them away surgically. If the treatment does not reach the layer of skin infected with the virus, the wart can come back in the same place. Repeat treatments may be necessary. Although warts can be treated at home with nonprescription remedies, self-treatment may take longer than treatments in a medical setting. Self-treatment may be more effective after you have been treated by a health care professional, especially if a wart appears to be large or deep. If you have diabetes or poor circulation, you should always be treated by a health care professional to avoid injury and infection.
      Chronic eczema — Your doctor usually will treat eczema by prescribing a corticosteroid ointment or cream for you to rub into the affected area. Moisturizing the skin is also very important.
      Lichen planus — Like chronic eczema, lichen planus usually is treated with corticosteroid ointment or creams.
      Actinic keratoses — Your doctor may use cryosurgery to remove a single actinic keratosis. Multiple keratoses can be treated with skin peels, laser therapy or dermabrasion.
      Seborrheic keratoses — These growths can be removed with cryosurgery with a scalpel.
      Inherited conditions — There is no cure for these conditions. To treat large areas of scaly skin, your doctor may suggest bathing with bath oil or rubbing special emollients into the skin.

  18. QUESTION:
    what is skin deases?
    types of skin deseases & prevention

    • ANSWER:
      t's the largest organ of our bodies. It weighs about six pounds and holds us together. It's our skin.

      Skin provides the outer covering for our bodies and protects us from heat, light, injury and infection. The skin regulates our body temperature by releasing fluids to cool us... in other words, sweat... and keeping heat in when it's cold. The skin also stores water, fat and vitamin D, all things we need to survive and live.

      The skin is made up of two main layers:

      * The outer epidermis
      * The inner dermis

      The epidermis is mostly made up of flat scale-like cells called squamous cells. Under that are some round cells called basal cells. The deepest part of the epidermis also has what are called melanocytes. They produce melanin, which is what gives our skin its color.

      Under the epidermis is the dermis which contains the vessels for the blood and the lymph. It's also where the hair follicles and the glands are. Those glands are what produces sweat (to help cool us) and sebum, which is an oil that keeps the skin from drying out. Both oil and sweat get to the surface via the pores.

      There are a number of conditions that can change the look and the condition of the skin. Follow the links below to learn about them.

      Acne: see Acne
      Actinic keratosis: see Skin Cancer
      Actinic lentigines: see Actinic Lentigines
      Athlete's foot: see Tinea: Ringworm, Athlete's Foot and Jock Itch
      Birthmark, mole/nevi: see Moles/Nevi
      Birthmark, vascular: see Vascular Birthmarks
      Cancer: see Skin Cancer
      Cavernous hemangiomas: see Vascular Birthmarks
      Chloasma: see Melasma/Chloasma
      Dermatitis: see Eczema and Dermatitis
      Dermatofibromas: see Dermatofibromas
      Eczema: see Eczema and Dermatitis
      Head lice: see Lice
      Hemangiomas, (birthmarks): see Vascular Birthmarks
      Impetigo: see Impetigo
      Jock itch: see Tinea: Ringworm, Athlete's Foot and Jock Itch
      Keratosis pilaris: see Keratosis Pilaris
      Lice: see Lice
      Lichen planus: see Lichen Planus
      Macular stains: see Vascular Birthmarks
      Melasma: see Melasma/Chloasma
      Moles: see Moles/Nevi
      Molluscum contagiosum: see Molluscum Contagiosum
      Nevi: see Moles/Nevi
      Pityriasis rosea: see Pityriasis Rosea
      Port wine stains: see Vascular Birthmarks
      Pseudofolliculitis barbae: see Pseudofolliculitis Barbae (razor bumps)
      Psoriasis: see Psoriasis
      Rashes: see Rashes
      Razor bumps: see Pseudofolliculitis Barbae (razor bumps)
      Rhinophyma: see Rosacea and Rhinophyma
      Ringworm: see Tinea: Ringworm, Athlete's Foot and Jock Itch
      Rosacea: see Rosacea and Rhinophyma
      Seborrheic keratosis: see Seborrheic Keratosis
      Strawberry hemangiomas: see Vascular Birthmarks
      Tinea: see Tinea: Ringworm, Athlete's Foot and Jock Itch
      Vascular birthmark: see Vascular Birthmarks
      Vitiligo: see Vitiligo
      Warts: see Warts

  19. QUESTION:
    skin condition sounds like keritinosites?

    • ANSWER:
      I can think of 2 possibilities.
      1) Keratolysis. This is the separation or loosening of the horny layer of the epidermis or a disease characterized by a shedding of the epidermis recurring at more or less regular intervals. This link is to a picture of pitted keratolysis http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/imagepages/2460.htm
      2) Keratosis. This is a lesion on the epidermis marked by the presence of circumscribed overgrowths of the horny layer. Different forms include seborrheic, actinic and pilaris. This will take you to a like to view images of the various types.
      http://vsearch.nlm.nih.gov/vivisimo/cgi-bin/query-meta?v%3Aproject=medlineplus&query=Keratosis&x=61&y=5

  20. QUESTION:
    i been noticing...?
    I notice that i have little red bumps in my arm like acne ive tried everything to get rid off it but i just cant can anyone please help me!

    • ANSWER:
      First you need to provide further information, where in your arm? Does it hurt? Does it itch? What have you tried to get rid of it? How long have you been having it? When did it start showing up? All these are important information to provide when seeing a doctor or asking a health care provider which you should do to truly determine what is causing your condition as well as learn ways to prevent/treat... but here is my best answer...

      People often describe localized swollen areas on, or under, the skin as lumps or bumps. While bumps on, or under, the skin may result from conditions that give rise to a skin rash, many other conditions can result in solitary raised lumps on the skin. Infections, tumors, and the body’s response to trauma or injury can all lead to lumps or bumps that appear to be located on or underneath the skin.

      Depending upon the cause of skin lumps or bumps, they may vary in size and be firm or soft to the touch. The overlying skin may be reddened or ulcerated. Skin bumps may or may not be painful or tender, depending upon the cause of the lesions.

      Causes of Bumps on Skin

      Acne (Pimples)
      Actinic Keratosis
      Boils
      Cysts
      Erythema Nodosum
      Gout
      Insect Sting Allergies
      Keloid
      Melanoma
      Melanoma 101 Introduction to a Deadly Skin Cancer
      Skin Tag

      Other Causes of Bumps on Skin

      Basal cell carcinoma (skin cancer)
      Dermatofibroma
      Enlarged lymph nodes
      Granuloma annulare
      Hemangioma
      Infections/abscesses
      Intradermal cyst
      Keratoacanthoma
      Lipoma
      Metastatic carcinoma
      Neurofibromatosis
      Nevi (moles)
      Pyogenic granuloma
      Polymorphic light eruption
      Rheumatoid nodules
      Sebaceous gland hyperplasia
      Sebaceous (epidermoid) cysts
      Seborrheic keratosis
      Splinters or other foreign bodies
      Squamous cell carcinoma (skin cancer)
      Skin rash
      Soft tissue sarcomas
      Xanthomas

      So next time provide further information...

      I'm not a Doctor...I'm just a Corpsman...

  21. QUESTION:
    Strange scabs on arm - possibly infected? Need help.?
    Need advice on this as I can't go to my GP until friday at the earliest.
    So basically I've got these 2 scabs on my upper arm. They started off as just an itchy patch, possibly eczema? But i've never had eczema before. The scabs appeared after I scratched my arm a lot. They're yellowy orange in colour with some black, but I think the black could be from clothes fabric. They're quite flaky and parts come off in the shower etc. When they come off they reveal red raw skin underneath and some clear thin liquid comes from my arm. There's now a ring of red around each scab, which led me to think that they're infected.

    Sounds disgusting I know but I need some sort of diagnosis, I heard it could be impotigo but i'm not too sure. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds like you've scratched off the top layer of skin and the ring of red is an inflammatory response to that. My first thought was something like seborrheic keratosis or actinic keratosis, but the only way you're going to get a real diagnosis is to go to the doctor.

  22. QUESTION:
    Curaderm BEC5 for skin cancer - reliable producer?
    Does anyone have any experience or personal knowledge (that you didn't just skim off the net) on Curaderm BEC5 - its effectiveness and reliable producers?

    I've looked at one site - Bionational. Anyone know them? Is their product reliable or misleading?
    http://www.bionational.com/xcart/catalog/Curaderm-p-11.html

    Please only respond if you actually have true experience and knowledge. Don't waste my time with wiki links, unrelated crap, or unsupported bull.
    Thanks, it's not for me but my father. He has undifferentiated perineural squamous cell carcinoma - a rare form of the more common squamous cell carcinoma. It is now along the tissue of the nerve sheath. It's located in the head and neck area and has aggressive potential.

    • ANSWER:
      If you want to treat a skin cancer with a topical treatment then why not use Aldara (imiquimod) which is at least FDA approved for actinic keratosis and basal cell carcinomas. It will soon be approved for squamous cell in situ skin cancers.

      http://www.aldara.com/carcinoma.html

      There are many reasons you should not try to treat yourself for skin cancers but since this is not a debate and I do not have time to answer you fully I will just give you a simple answer.

      I have treated well over 100 squamous cell skin cancers and also some basal cell skin cancers and many pre-cancers with Aldara. It was successful about 90% of the time. This was done under the supervision of a dermatologist.

      The FDA is moving quickly against all the various "black salve" escharotic (natural corrosive) skin cancer treatments so I'd be very careful about using any of them, regardless of what their web site promised. See a good dermatologist to make sure you actually have a skin cancer and not a common harmless seborrheic keratosis that needs no treatment.

      good luck


actinic seborrheic keratosis