Problem Skin Remedies

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What is the best acne medication to even skin tone?
    I have problem skin-it's either really really oily and gross or it's really really dry and flaky, but it's always blotchy and uneven, so if you've used a face wash that evens your tone, would you mind sharing?

    • ANSWER:
      Ive suffered with acne for 5 years now. One easy home remedy is using fresh lemon on your face which helps clear acne and acne scars Please go to: http://www.acne.org/lemon-juice-applied-…
      But what truly made the difference was when a friend told me recently that eliminating dairy products from your diet can help get rid of acne. I thought id give it a try since i have nothing to loose considering all the MONEY and time i have spent on acne products and facials in the past.

      It took about 3 weeks to see a noticeable difference and 4 weeks later the only remains on my face are a few scars which will heal over time. I stopped eating/drinking milk, cream, ice cream, cheese and basically anything with high milk contents. I still eat some yogurt a few times a week because i still want some calcium intake and yogurt is also very good for your intensinal flora. I will also buy some calcium tablets.

      After all these years of medication, expensive facial treatments, laser treatment anything you name it, i have done it, i can finally say im free from acne. I have to say though that i was shocked because of all the research ive done and doctors ive been to, never ever mentioned anything about dairy products and how they may be a major cause of acne. I also did more research about why milk may be a huge factor in acne and it came up with because of the hormones in milk that are produced by a cow when the cow is pregnant. It all makes sense and
      finally after all these years i have found the cure for acne.

      Forget the products for now stop eating any dairy products and see if there is any difference.
      Give it a go you have nothing to loose!

      Also if you don't believe me or need a back up source read these 2 websites i found:
      http://acne.about.com/od/acnetriggers/a/…
      http://www.acnehelp.org.uk/dairy.htm

  2. QUESTION:
    best way to get rid of acne scars/hyperpigmentation for fair skin?
    Ok well I have these hideous places on my face that are red and purple in color. I know that they will fade within 6-24 months but what is the best method to get rid of the problem for my skin type? Medication, treatment, home remedies, anything will be helpful at this point, I just want it to get better.
    Oh I'm currently using proactiv only at night because it dries my skin out a lot and I always put moisturizer with spf 15 on day and night.

    • ANSWER:
      Acne scars are the blemishes or the watery spots occurring on the skin and spoiling the smoothness of the skin. They get problematic owing to the delay in recovery. Some might prolong their stay on the skin forever. Though it is always advisable to see a doctor for acne treatment, one can even try some natural remedies for treating this acne problem. This natural treatment can certainly return the natural glow of the skin.

      Drinking plenty of water: Quoting some experts, water is the best treatment available for acne scars. Water is an amazing cleanser and has rejuvenating properties too. Hydrated body helps to cleanse the dead skin cells from the body. Also, growth of the new skin cells is facilitated when there is enough water in the body.

      Increase your intake of lemon juice: Citric acid, present in the lemon juice, is effective for treating acne scars. It facilitates rapid shedding of the dead skin cells; while also promoting the growth of the new and healthy cells.

      Vitamin rich fruits and vegetables: People having acne must exercise an increased love for fruits and vegetables, as they are rich in essential minerals and vitamins that are helpful for restoring the natural beauty of the skin. The juices contained in the fruits help to maintain the water balance in the body. Thus a rich intake of fruits and vegetables is certainly a primary step towards getting a healthy looking skin.

      Intake of balanced diet: Just like any other disease, a large part of the healing process depends on the diet. A nutritious and a balanced diet is a must for ensuring a healthy and a glowing skin. A healthy diet also supplies all the essential nutrients necessary for fighting the infections that can complicate the acne scars.

      The application of Aloe vera gel on the scars also helps in getting rid of the acne scars. Tomato is also helpful for treating acne scars as it contains Vitamin A that controls the overproduction of sebum that is primarily responsible for causing acne scars. The antioxidant properties of tomato are also responsible for rejuvenating the damaged skin.

      Other treatments for acne can include using honey, fullers' earth, rubbing ice cubes over the infected area or even using rose water. Following these natural remedies will certainly help you getting rid of acne.

      Good Luck...

  3. QUESTION:
    What are some easy ways to keep skin clean looking great?
    I have a big problem with oily skin and wanted to know if there are any home remedies?

    • ANSWER:
      Drink about 8+ cups of water a day.
      People don't believe me that this is all it takes but I stopped playing for Clean and Clear exfoliaters because I've been simply drinking water.

      It also helps if you do a simple wash with cold water and soap before you go to bed and when you wake up.

  4. QUESTION:
    Anyone know any home remedies for scaly eyelids?
    I have a problem where my skin under the eyebrow at the inner corner of my eyes are scaly (tiny bumps) and dry. I really have no idea why but I was wondering if anyone had any remedies to cure this problem.

    • ANSWER:
      Your eye lids do not produce there own oils to keep them hydrated. Overtime, with rubbing or sun or... they will become red and quite dry and at times very dark. You need to use Artistry Replenishing Eye Creme. I use it daily with amazing results when my eye lids became very dry. Go to http://Arcameda.com and search for eye. Go to my profile to email me if you have any questions.

  5. QUESTION:
    Home treatments for acne and bumpy, textured dry skin?
    The problem area of my face is my forehead. In the summer my skin is usually really nice, like it's soft and clear and I only get one or two pimples. But in the winter my skin goes all weird and it gets dry and all textured looking, and I get pimples and little bumps. I think it's because my skin is pretty dry.
    Are there any home/hollistic remedies for dry, problem skin? A lot of acne mask recipes are for oily skin, but I think my skin is really dry and that's why it's all wrinkled and pimply looking.
    I think honey is good? But what else?

    And like I said, this is really only on my forehead, not really anywhere else on my face.

    • ANSWER:

  6. QUESTION:
    What are some home remedies to detox the body?
    I have been experiencing adbominal bloating and problems with my skin lately. I have taken laxatives and herbal teas and nothing seems to help the bloatness. I want to cleanse my body from the inside out.......and just don't know how to do it!

    • ANSWER:
      Detoxification

      Home Remedies

      The body tends to heal itself if given the right support. Fruit, vegetables and herbs are a gentle way to promote healing.

      Herbs used in Detoxification

      Dandelion
      Dandelion is held in high regard as a detoxifier. Dandelion stimulates the elimination of toxins from every cell in the body. It is often used in comprehensive treatments for the liver. Dandelion also increases bile production and stimulates its flow to the gallbladder. The polysaccharide insulin found in dandelion is said to have white blood cell and immune-boosting properties.

      Licorice Root
      Licorice Root is regarded as an important herb for treating kidney ailments and is also recommended for the liver and respiratory tract. Licorice Root's antioxidant, antiviral, and antibody-stimulating properties make it a liver protectant and detoxifier.

      Cascara Sagrada
      Cascara Sagrada supports healthy bowel function by acting as a mild laxative. This herb can also be helpful in the treatment of gallstones and liver ailments. It also increases secretions of the stomach, liver and pancreas and is a potent cleansing herb.

      Black Walnut Hulls
      Black Walnut Hulls are known to help remove parasites from the intestinal tract and facilitate the removal of toxic buildup and fatty materials.

      Milk Thistle
      Milk thistle is best known as a liver tonic. The active ingredient is silymarin, which is reputed to repair liver damage due to alcohol, drugs (over-the-counter, prescription, and illicit), hepatitis, and exposure to toxins. In Germany, physicians are so impressed with the liver-protecting effects of milk thistle that they routinely prescribe this herb to patients with liver disorders. Milk thistle also strengthens and protects the liver in otherwise healthy people.

      Fruit and vegetable juices assist in detoxification.
      Fruit and vegetable juices are the cleansers, energizers, builders, and regenerators of the human system. A combination of either fresh, raw fruit or vegetable juices will supply all the enzymes, vitamins, minerals, protein and fats critical to increased vitality! By adding live juices to one's diet as a daily routine, many have experienced a rejuvenating effect and healing of various illnesses such as cancer, leukemia, arthritis, high blood pressure, kidney disorders, skin infections, liver disorders, alcoholism and smoking. Supplying the body with easily-absorbed nutrients, while the body is cleansing itself in the fasting state, avoids the dangers of total abstinence associated with water fasting. Be confident that this method is both safe and beneficial.

      Grapes: There are between 40 and 50 different varieties of grapes that come in a rainbow of greens, whites, reds and purples. Grapes fill the mouth with an explosion of delicious flavors. Grapes are an excellent source of potassium, which encourage an alkaline blood balance and also stimulate the kidneys and regulate heartbeat. The restorative power of grapes is phenomenal, cleansing the liver and removing the uric acid from the body. In France, many people go on a grape fast during harvest time. Studies have shown a lower incidence of cancer in the areas of France where this grape fast is practiced yearly.

      Asparagus: Available in early spring. It can be expensive due to the difficulty in cultivating. Its claim to fame is the amino acid aspargagine that is destroyed by cooking. Aspargagine is a strong diuretic, stimulating the kidneys. Asparagus is a great blood cleanser and excellent for healthy bowel maintenance.

      Parsley: Ancient civilizations have used parsley in medications and in poultices on wounds, boils, cysts and to draw the pus out of an infected cut. Parsley is one of the highest sources of life-giving chlorophyll, which acts like iron to oxidize the blood. Chlorophyll will help neutralize the strong odor of garlic, and is used in chewing gum to sweeten breath. It is a cleanser of the kidneys, liver, and urinary tract. Parsley is effective for upset stomachs by stimulating digestive enzymes. Excellent for the colon by encouraging the peristaltic wave in the intestines.

      Spinach: Never cook spinach. Oxalic acid is destroyed when heat transforms it into oxalic acid crystals that are harmful to the kidneys. It also binds to iron, making it unabsorbable.

      Sweet Potatoes
      Besides being a yummy source of beta-carotene, sweet potatoes and yams have an unusual health side effect: they can remove heavy metals from the body. In fact, doctors in the Soviet Union have prescribed a diet that's heavy on the spuds for factory workers continually exposed to toxic chemicals.

      Sweet potatoes contain something called "phytochelatins". This helps them bind to harmful substances like copper, cadmium, mercury and lead which most of us are exposed to on a regular basis from air pollution. The phytochelatins help pass these toxins out of the body."

      Cranberry Juice
      A powerful healing tonic filled with quinine, which changes to hippuric acid in the liver. Hippuric acid is able to assist in the removal of purines, uric acid, urea and toxic build-up in the prostate gland, testicles, kidneys and bladder.

  7. QUESTION:
    What methods can be used for skin lightening after sun exposure?
    Perhaps any skin creams or home remedies

    and by the way people i think that if its ok to fake tan then its ok to bleach skin to. I have a lot of dark marks from previous acne, and although my skin has cleared up, it has left me with darker marks and a darker over all complections. Any good creams to get rid of this or creams that can lighten the skin, ones that work.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,

      Researchers discovered that plants like Melaleuca Alternifolia or Tea Tree Oil, Arctium lappa and Azadirachta indica have amazing anti-fungal, antiseptic and antibacterial characteristics and they are effective in the treatment of other problems as well, not only in the case of acne. In the same manner, Bulbine frutescence and Aspalathus linearis known as Rooibos have the power to heal and are full of antioxidants, preventing the infection of the skin, thus the apparition of acne. Finally yet importantly, Lavender Essential Oil proved to be an excellent circulatory stimulant as well as antiseptic, working miracles in the case of injuries, burns and scars.

      Used regularly when necessary, ClearSkin-A is nature’s answer to a clear skin and will not dry or upset the skin like some other products do. Try ClearSkin-A cause it works for me.

      ClearSkin-A Gel contains:

      Tea tree essential oil (Melaleuca alternifolia) is a traditional remedy of the Aboriginal tribes of Australia. Studies have shown that it has exceptional benefits for the skin. Tea Tree Oil was included in the wound dressing kits of the Australian troops in World War 2. It is one of few essential oils which can be used undiluted without irritating or drying the skin.

      Burdock (Arctium lappais) used naturopathically to support the health of the skin, with wonderful clarifying properties. It has been studied for its ability to promote and support health in cells.

      Rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) is an indigenous shrub, which grows exclusively on the slopes of the Cedarberg Mountains in the Western Cape province of South Africa and has been used by traditional healers of the area for centuries. Known worldwide for its anti-oxidant properties, the soothing effect of Rooibos on the skin is also evident.

      Bulbinella (Bulbine frutescence) is indigenous to South Africa and is widely used as a home remedy and by traditional healers for the skin. Bulbinella is effective in supporting skin health and is highly recommended for the natural first aid kit. It's clear and soothing gel forms an invisible 'seal' over the skin, providing ongoing skin conditioning and support throughout the day.
      Ginger essential oil is extracted from ginger root and provides a toning and tightening effect on the skin - supporting healthy pores

      Lemon grass essential oil is extracted from lemon grass, and this oil is well-known in the east for its wonderful health promoting properties on the skin and its support of a clear complexion.

      Bitter Aloe (Aloe ferox) is derived from a hardy plant indigenous to the south eastern Cape of South Africa; aloe was even used in Ancient Egypt, supporting the skin of the royal family! Studies have shown this herb to have skin supportive properties.

      Gotu cola (Hydrocotyle asiatica) is a plant that grows throughout Africa and Asia and is used both topically and internally to cleanse as well as support circulation. It has also been studied with regards to supporting the skin.

      Witch hazel (Hamamelis Virginianum) is a plant whose integral component is in the medicine chest of many Native Americans, and for very good reason! Hamamelis is known for its astringent properties and has an excellent toning effect on the skin.

      The products are created using Full Spectrum Approach™ (FSA), a set of standards and processes that combines the best quality, laboratory-tested, raw ingredients, good manufacturing practices and a Full Spectrum manufacturing method to guarantee you products of the highest quality, safety and effectiveness.
      Read article at http://www.powerfulremedies.com/acne/52-acne-2514

  8. QUESTION:
    How to whiten my skin? Any natural remedies or home remedies ?
    Hi everyone,
    I have problem with my skin. It's getting darker and darker. I moved from Europe to Hawaii and
    now during this 4 years I have problem with my skin. Thanks for reply.

    • ANSWER:

  9. QUESTION:
    Effectively clearing pores of dry and dead skin cells?
    I have a problem of my skin getting blocked with dead and dry skin cells, making my skin look dull and the pores obviously being blocked. I wash my skin daily with facewash and apply vitam e regulary, but i still come up with this bothersome problem. Anyone know of an effective remedy or solution to clearing pores?? Please let me know, txs for the information.

    • ANSWER:
      Sure....too easy.
      Use a mild exfoliation once a day (or once every two days if your skin is dry) use gently in small circular motions and rinse well. Only use warm (not hot) water, it's okay to steam your skin gently using hot water in the shower but don't put it on your skin as it can create open cappilaries. Pat dry and spray with witch hazel, this will thoroughly cleanse and tone your skin. I wouldn't use Vitamin E on my face as it does tend to clog pores. I make up a mixture in a spray bottle of witch hazel and rose hip oil this mist does both tricks perfectly. Best of luck, Jul

  10. QUESTION:
    How to fix the dry/flaky skin on and around my nose?
    My skin on my forehead and chin are a little shiny, but I can take care of that with makeup.

    The problem is the skin on my nose won't stop flaking! It looks disgusting! It's also flaky around my nose and above my upper lip. I need to put makeup on it because I put makeup all over my face (it's weird-looking to not do just my nose) and it still looks horrible. I also have a few blackheads, but they're not too noticeable. It's the flaky-dryness that makes me feel even uglier. How do I get rid of this?

    Any inexpensive cremes or remedies? Please and thanks so much!

    10 pts. to best answer. ♥
    No, I live in California. Thanks for the answers so far. :) I'll see.

    • ANSWER:
      Vitamin E is great for this. It comes in oil & cream form (I prefer the cream by far). It's an old school method that works wonders.

      Before bed, try exfoliating your nose lightly to get off any dead skin, then apply the Vitamin E cream to the skin as needed. In the morning your skin will be soft & will get better.

      It can be found at the drug store, it's really cheap & effective.
      I use the 'Fruit of the Earth' brand, but all of these will work & can be found everywhere.
      http://www.walgreens.com/q/vitamin-e-cream

  11. QUESTION:
    Natural remedies to reduce acne and redness?
    Because it's summer now, I've been sweating a lot, causing many problems for my skin. My skin is already naturally rosy, yet when I sweat it becomes bright red. Also, I keep breaking out in the heat. I've already stopped wearing cover up to help it clear up, and I gave up on chemical based products because they are too harsh for my sensitive skin. What are some natural, homemade remedies I could make to help clear up my skin and reduce redness?

    • ANSWER:

  12. QUESTION:
    what human medications can i put on my dogs skin?
    my dog is itching and scratching herself raw. what human ointments can i use on her skin? what home remedies can i try?

    • ANSWER:
      You need to know why your dog is doing this. If it's fleas then the pooch needs to get some sort of bath or flea treatment. If it is dry skin then oatmeal baths and other shampoos can help. Aloe Vera is also helpful if the dog does not lick it off. If it is mange then you need to see a vet about treatment. If it is boredom then you need to give the dog more attention and exercise to get them tired out.

      My dog has allergies that are seasonal. He will scratch and bite himself until the point of wounds. I give him Benadryl. 1 pill every 12 hours and he is 40lbs, (I get 100 pills of generic for 5 bucks at Walmart) call a vet to ask about the amount your own dog should use. Yes, my vet put us on this prescription and it is very common to be on a Benadryl regiment.

      Knowing why is the most important part of fixing the problem, and will save you money from trying everything and coming up sort in the long run.

  13. QUESTION:
    What skin products should I use on my face?
    Here's the thing, I have very sensative skin so I can't use anything harsh at all on my face. Lately I've been getting red blotches on my face. I know that diet can have something to do with it but I've been eating normally, so I don't think that's had any effect. The stuff I use on my skin at the moment is cetaphil, that's it. I want to know if anyone has any suggestions on how to get my skin looking healthy and non blotchy. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Products actually differ from skin to skin. Depends what type of skin you've got whether its Oily, Normal Or Dry. Try using some mild face wash.

      HERE ARE SOME TIPS HOW TO DEAL WITH SENSITIVE SKIN:

      >> Problems Faced by People with Sensitive Skin

      People with sensitive skin face many problems. The redness, irritation and blotchiness associated with sensitive skin can be uncomfortable and embarrassing. It can be annoying having to avoid everything that may cause sensitive skin to flare up. Providing the right sensitive skin care can be particularly difficult, as many skin products will have a negative effect.

      >> Dealing with Sensitive Skin <> Food Intake and Hydration <> Herbal Remedies <<

      Herbal remedies are very good for sensitive skin, because they are free from the harsh chemicals that can cause skin problems. Generally, products that contain natural ingredients will be better for your skin and less likely to cause a sensitive skin reaction. Try the following remedies for some special sensitive skin care.

      Use almond or jojoba oil to cleanse your face.

      Comfrey steeped in water can make a good toner.

      Make a facial exfoliate by mixing grapefruit with oatmeal.

      Make a face mask out of fruit.

      Cucumber and yoghurt also makes a good face mask for sensitive skin.

      Licorice is a good product for sensitive skin. Look for skin care products that contain licorice.

      Green tea has anti-inflammatory properties, which may help prevent sensitive skin reactions.

      Aloe Vera can soothe skin that is red, irritated and blotchy. Apply directly to the skin.

      Hope this helps!! =)

  14. QUESTION:
    How can I make my skin beautiful and flawless like in those face wash commercials?
    So I have extremely white skin! Like it is SO white that it is close to impossible to find a foundation that is light enough to match my skin tone! My skin is also really sensitive! Like on a scale of sensitive 1 being not sensitive at all and 10 being REALLY sensitive. My skin would be around 7 and a half... Is there any tips, tricks, or treatments I can look into to so I can get that amazing beautiful flawless skin? Thanks in advance! Blessings :)

    • ANSWER:
      for acne,fair complexion,tanning,sunburn,all kind of marks,all kind of dark
      spots,make up tips,hair issues n other skin n hair problems
      u can refer to dis website
      http://skincaretipps3505.notlong.com
      (copy n paste the above link in browser to open it)
      it has got so many tips n free beauty samples
      for curing acne and all your skin problems.
      u ll also find good home remedies for all skin problems

  15. QUESTION:
    How to get my hair to get thicker and longer by july and problems with acne?
    i just got a bob and the back is cut and i got it a week ago so my hair will be healthier.One side is heathier than the other and when i was younger i had really thick hair but i started to use the hot comb and flat iron so now it's thin i'm going to a different school next year and i want my hair to be long and thicker and my friends said that black gel would make it grow and carrot oil will make it thicker but i don't no if it's true.I need help fast!!I also have a problem with my skin.My skin is oily and my nose is always shiny and i want to get clear skin fast and i want to no what is the best soaps to use.I heard dial soap is good.

    • ANSWER:
      I can help you with both your skin and hair.

      You can have fast growing long and thick hair, but you have to attack your hair growth on the inside and the outside. If you want to stimulate your hair growth then you need a good hair growth plan of attack that has three necessary components: a healthy eating plan, substantial water intake, and a high quality hair growth and hair care product. Also, I suggest you purchase an all-natural hair growth product. Unnatural hair growth or thickening products can having severe side effects not only to your hair, but also to your body. The best natural hair growth product on the market is Beauty 4 Ashes A Double Portion Super hair growth shampoo and conditioner. They are loaded with powerful essential oils, natural herbs, and vitamin rich nutrients your hair needs to survive. Also, they contain Aloe Vera, Citrus Fruits, Jojoba, Rosemary, and Sage. It has worked miracles for my clients who have older and thinner hair. Although, I don't know your age I am sure that it will work well for you also. Beauty 4 Ashes hair growth products are very impressive and some of my clients experience several inches of growth in 5 months.

      As for your skin, here are some things that you can do from home to treat your oily skin and one great natural product that works great. If you use both of these religiously I think it will stomp your extra shine and give you a great complexion.

      Home Remedy Skin Care

      Part 1: Get a bowl and mix together some baking soda, honey, and olive oil. Wet your face, and massage the mixture into your skin for 30 to 60 seconds. The mixture should feel grainy, but not rough.

      Part 2: Place a warm washcloth on your face for 10 to 15 seconds, to open and unclog pores.

      Part 3: Get some Aloe Vera Gel from the nearest whole foods store and use it as facial moisturizer.

      Besides doing this, or buying Accutane or Proactiv, several of my clients have used No More Shame 24 hour Acne Eliminating Kit. The kit contains a good all-natural face scrub that has ingredients that will help your complexion. It works well because it contains essential oils. Essentials are extremely potent, yet gentle solutions that kill bacteria and fungus and control your skin's oil production. This is critical for you because you need to balance your skin's oil, not strip it. The scrub also has aloe and vitamin e, which are good for your skin. My clients' with oily skin have seen drastic improvements in their skin tone, reasiness, and texture by using the scrub. You can find it online at wwwdiscoverb4acom.

  16. QUESTION:
    Why do people give advice on skin care if they are absolutely clueless?
    You should not be answering questions online for people with skin problems, chances are they will try your remedy screw up their skin and no one can be held liable. If you do NOT know what you are talking about don't you think it's time to stop giving advice?

    • ANSWER:
      because they want points, however people shouldnt rely on yahoo answers 100% afterall we are just random people lol

  17. QUESTION:
    What are some drugstore skin care products for boys?
    My little brother is eleven an he's starting to get skin problems, so I want to get him a cleanser and moisturizer. His skin type is normal/combo, and his skin is relatively clear, except for his nose, where he gets pimples and gets so many blackeads on. I was wondering what I should get him (Cetaphil?). Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,

      yup its a serious problem ...but don't worry for every problem there is a solution available...see at initial stage don't go for skin care products first try this homemade remedies to cover up pimples and blackheads...

      get aloe vera leaves, and put the gel on his skin at night and wash it off the next morning
      (avoid yellow gel this makes skin itchy for 5 min)
      aloe make skin nice and pimples get smaller each time of use

      used lemon before by spreading a lot but makes pimples smaller (use it at night and wash off next morning)

      if these tips r working then its gud ...if not then i recommend u should go for skincare products but make sure u read its pros/cons and its ingredients...

      more tips is given in the resource u will chk it hope it might helps u and u r brother:)

      Have a Gud Day!!

      Thanxs,

      David

  18. QUESTION:
    How can I make my skin look brighter and healthier?
    Natural remedies or products, please. I just basically want it too look brighter and healthier.

    • ANSWER:
      Here is my skin care routine and it works wonders. It’s good for ANY skin type and is a great routine for anyone wanting to improve their skin, no matter what age, sex (yes boys can use it too), or skin problems you may have. The problem with most of the products out there in the market is that they contain detergent which will remove dirt, oil, and makeup but it also strips your skin of water. It's not labeled as detergent in the ingredients but it's called Sodium Laureth Sulfate or Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (check the ingredients on your current cleanser). When your skin is dehydrated, it breaks down more quickly and will cause you to age faster because you lose elasticity in your skin (starts to droop and wrinkle). That's why most skin care is a huge marketing ploy. They sell you stuff that appears to work so you use it but then you begin to age prematurely so they can sell you wrinkle creams and things of that nature much faster than you ordinarily would need them... Detergents also leave a residue on your skin that causes blackheads. If you follow this regime and do it twice a day (morning & night) I promise you will have much clearer skin and you'll be slowing down the aging process.

      Step 1 Eye Makeup Remover: Find one that is half oil, half water that you need to shake up before using. These remove makeup fast with less rubbing needed so you won’t be irritating your eyes as much. Remove all eye and brow makeup with this. I use Clarins Instant Eye Makeup Remover which you can buy at Sephora or some department stores (.00).
      Step 2 Cream Cleanser: Get a cream cleanser that is NOT water activated. Simply squeeze out an amount about the size of a quarter into your DRY hands and rub it together, then onto your DRY face in circular motions, avoiding the eye area. You can then rinse it off with water or a damp washcloth but make sure you don't use any water when you are working this into your face at first. I use Boots Botanics Organic Nourishing Cleanser which I got at Target (.99).
      Step 3 Alcohol-Free Toner: Use it on two cotton pads and wipe off your face in downward and outward strokes. Toner will remove any excess cleanser on your face, leaving it completely clean and fresh. I use Neutrogena's Alcohol-Free Toner from Target (.49).
      Step 4 Day Moisturizer & Night Cream: A daytime moisturizer will help act as a barrier for your skin to hold in moisture (not oil) so even if you are oily, use one! If you're worried about shine, go for an oil-free formula and if you are dry, use a richer moisturizer. At night, use a night cream (not the same daytime moisturizer) because night creams replenish the moisture you lost during the day. Just be sure mineral oil is not one of the ingredients in the NIGHT cream (can be in the day moisturizer) because mineral oil acts as a seal so nothing will penetrate your skin if that is in it. I use Boots Expert Light Moisturizing Lotion for day from Target (don’t know price but it wasn’t expensive) and Boscia Recharging Night Moisture from Sephora (.00).
      Step 5 Eye Cream: Even if you have no wrinkles there yet, use a day eye cream. When you start to see wrinkles, you will need to get a night eye cream as well as your daytime one. Use a tiny amount (about half the size of a grain of uncooked rice) and rub it between both ring fingers. Then starting by the side of the nose, gently tap it into the skin while moving across the bone surrounding the eye and over your brows. Do not rub it all over your eyes and your lids because the skin there is extremely thin and cannot take so much moisture. I use Clarins' Eye Contour Gel which you can buy at Sephora or some department stores ( .00).
      Step 6 Lip Balm & Chapstick: Lip balm replenishes moisture in your lips so it will heal chapped lips. Chapstick only acts as a seal to help protect your lips from getting chapped but it does not add moisture to them. Be sure your lip balm does not contain wax (unless it's beeswax as that is natural), petroleum, petrolatum, or mineral oil. I use Burts Bees from Target (I think it’s .99).
      Step 7 Yoghurt Mask: Go to the grocery store and find either a lemon, orange, or pineapple-flavored yoghurt (any brand is fine) and apply it all over your face and let it sit for 10-15mins. Do this every day if you have bad acne or just 1-2 a week to exfoliate. Rinse it off with lukewarm water. The cultures in yoghurt help neutralize the bacteria in pores (a blemish is simply a bacteria-filled pore) and the citric acid in the lemon, orange, or pineapple will help you exfoliate the top layer of skin which will be much better than using a scrub.
      I hope this has helped but if you have any questions or need clarification, pls feel free to e-mail me. You can get my e-mail on my profile.

  19. QUESTION:
    Can my doberman eat raw chicken with her dry food?
    My Dobie, Aceah has skin problems. So I researched home remedies to help her be more comfortable in her own skin. I found that feeding dogs raw meat such as chicken and beef gives them a lot of the nutrients that they should be getting. I just want to know can I mix little chops of raw chicken in with her Kibbles and Bits dog food. Can I?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes - even the bones! Chicken wings are cheap and most dogs love them.
      Cooked chicken bones are a no no because when cooked can shatter and choke,
      but raw chicken bones are soft and are safe for doggies. Vets recommend them!
      You might also give her a teaspoon of fish oil (EFAs) in her food - good for her skin!

  20. QUESTION:
    What natural remedies work to reverse baldness?
    What natural remedies work to reverse and prevent baldness? My doctor says I have the early symptoms of a classic case of female pattern baldness. What do you think I should do?

    • ANSWER:
      Male or female pattern baldness are from the sae problem. Hair loss is often linked to poor diet, especially consumption of fried foods, hydrogenated oils and INFECTION (including bacterial, viral, fungal or parasitic) that may be in the scalp itself (often causing dandruff) or it may be a systemic infection. It's also linked to mineral deficiencies, intestinal infections (where waste products backup into the liver, that can affect the head and scalp. Mineral deficiencies can be caused by infections ANYWHERE in the body and a deficiency in co-factors that allow the body to even absorb what is consumed. Lack of sunlight, heavy metal exposure (especially due to bad dentistry that is rampant in the U.S. now due to the materials, chemicals, and procedures being followed as a "standard of care" dentistry), etc.

      If your hair is coming out in clumps, that is typically a parasite. Since it is "female" pattern baldness, that is typically due to dihydrotestosterone (a derivative of testosterone) "DHT" that hardens the galea (skin on top of the head) and chokes the hair follicle to death, resulting in hair loss.

      This type of hair loss can be slowed and even reversed by eating a high quality Oat Grass because the Oat Grass prevents the formation of the DHT.

      There is some genetic issues, but contrary to popular belief, it is very small. Most are due to the above factors.

      I found a great source for the Oat Grass in capsules that contain no excipients and works for most of my clients. Go to: (800) 370 - 3447 and order the Oat Grass and take lots of it. I think you will see a big difference. I would also get two other nutrients they sell. The Oat grass comes in a product they call "Greens Mix" and I get it in capsule for (they also sell it in powder, but most prefer the capsules). It is part of a 3 nutrient combination they call, "super food trio." I would get all three because this will give you most everything your body needs as a supplement each day and will only make you healthier.

      Also, if you are experiencing excess testosterone or a low estrogen issue, you may want to consider an endocrine issue that could be contributing to this problem. Sometimes, PCOS happens because the ovaries are enlarging due to deficiencies in fat. If you are on a LOW FAT diet, or LOW SALT diet, you need to free yourself from the lies you have been told about fat and salt that is rampant misinformation being spread by people, doctors, etc. that have no clue what they are talking about when it comes to nutrition.

      I strongly urge you to seek out a Certified Nutritional Therapist (not just a nutritionist) and have them test you for deficiencies. They can test you and tell you exactly what nutrients your body is lacking and help you with the correct supplements and quantities of that specific to you deficiency and also recommend diets that will make you healthy instead of that "make believe health" you get from drugs that ALWAYS damage your body in some way.

      good luck to you

  21. QUESTION:
    What is the best way to clean oily skin?
    Lately my skin has been extremely oily. I wash my face three times a day and use blotting sheets but it doesn't seem to help. I literally look greasy all the time and it's grossing me out. Anybody have any good suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      Don't worry!
      It takes a week for improvement and a month to have a total transformation.
      Wash your face 3 times a day (like normally) with cool refreshing water. Oil hates cold water :]
      Use a facial scrub or cleanser just for blemishes or blackheads or just for oily skin.
      Make sure it is OIL-FREE and it won't let you have clogged pores.
      Salicylic acid dries out the skin so that's when you bring in the OIL-FREE moisturizer.

      I use Clinique Gel Creme. Totally refreshing and cool! I absolutely love it :]
      Try not to sweat a lot. It's summer so bring in a fan eat lots of fruit and veggies.
      Exercise, that's probably the problem for your skin.
      Once a week at your local gym?
      Keep doing this and you will see improvement :]

      Home remedy:
      BE CAREFUL!
      Freshly squeeze a lemon or lime into a bowl. (Not on your face it would probably go onto your eyes.
      Wash your hands thoroughly and dip them into the bowl and rub it on your face.
      Be careful not to hit your eyes tho O_o <--- my eyeeeee!!
      Then take the left over lemon slice and rub it onto the oiliest part if your face like either nose or chin.
      Rinse!

      Hoped this helped and good luck :]

  22. QUESTION:
    How do you tighten your skin and make your face flawless?
    My skin is ageing and I think it's due to prolonged exposure to the sun. It's no longer tight and I have brown spots and acne scars. What do I do? Is there any DIY I can do? I prefer not to buy so many products at the market.

    • ANSWER:
      Well here are some home remedies you can try.

      To tighten the skin, use eggwhite every night and leave it on for half an hour on cleansed face. After which rinse off thoroughly.

      For brown sports or age sports, you can use juice of lemon and dab on those spots only(on clean face). leave on for 15 minutes and rinse off.

      For acne scars, try St Ives' AHA masque . Use it once or twice a week. Your acne scar will lighten visibly.

      Above all, depending on your skin type, do use a sunblock on a daily basis. SPF 30 or above. Use a gel sunblockl if you have acne prone skin. If not, you can try coppertone spf 30.
      This will help prevent more brown spots from developing.

      If you have the time, try this herbal cleansing soup which will help with all the above:
      Ingredients:
      1. two black mushrooms
      2. half a burdock
      3. 1 carrot
      4. half a white carrot
      5. 1 stick of celery

      dice the ingredients to equal sizes and boil them for about an hour. For the first week, you can take the soup three or four times in a row. For the 2nd week you can reduce to twice a week and carryon with the same dosage.

      You will notice a pink glow immediately after the first intake.
      Its a detox soup which will help with lightening the scars and of course melting away all those brown spots and prevent new ones from forming.

      And oh, do stay from fried potatoes and cheeze and fried corn for at least half a year til your problems are resolved.

      All the best :)

  23. QUESTION:
    What is your skin care regime to fight acne?
    What masks or home remedies do you use? Id like to change mine and itd be great if i could get some ideas to fight my acne.

    • ANSWER:
      The Over-The-Counter stuff is just wasting your money. Trust me, I've spent thousands of dollars from when I was 13yrs old until I was 19. I decided to go see a dermatologist at 19, and the stuff they've had me on had helped through time. I am 21 now, and no more breakouts. All that I have to worry about now is the scars that I have from the past. Talk to a dermatologist about your problem and what you would like to try (if you would like to try topical remedies, or oral medications). They will work with you to find out what works well for you. The doctors knows what's best for you. Each individual person's skin and body system works differently with different things. Therefore, it's hard to tell you that my remedy would work for you as well. You really gotta talk to a dermatologist to figure out what works well for your own skin.

      Also, most dermatologists have lots of samples for you to try out first, before you actually fill your prescription. And if they give you any medications, you have to give it at least 3 months minimum in order to tell if it really works or not. Most medications don't sink into your system quickly. It took me over 7 months to see the full results of this product called Ziana Gel.

      I hope this helps.

  24. QUESTION:
    How do you lighten facial skin using regular vinegar?
    I have kind of light skin, maybe a few shades lighter than wheat. However if you're Indian you know that sometimes skin tone changes depending on the time of year or day.. I don't know why but that's how it is. Anyways I wanted to lighten my facial skin by a few shades using regular vinegar. Does anyone know how I'm supposed to dilute it? How long do I keep it on?

    And please don't tell me not to, I've already decided to since I hate my skin and want to do this.

    • ANSWER:
      i know exactly what you mean im mexican and i have the same problem. If you have a dark complexion, you may feel the need to lighten it. Dilute vinegar equally with water, and use to cleanse and rinse your face. Allow to air dry to seal in moisture. Or, use the vinegar/water mixture in place of an astringent or toner. Vinegar is chemically acetic acid, and is capable of whitening and brightening, as well as making skin smoother and more radiant. It has also long been used for a skin softener. Apple cider or other natural vinegars are recommended, though some people use distilled white vinegar.
      Apply almond oil at bedtime to your face. It will not only remove skin blemishes it will also remove fine lines like crows feet and laughter lines.
      Apply fresh orange juice or orange pulp to your skin to lighten them. Wash after 30 minutes in cold water.
      Take vitamin E and Vitamin C as supplements. Both of these are great antioxidants and help in the growth of healthy new cells very necessary for a glowing and whiter skin.
      Take a tablespoon of organic yogurt and mix one tablespoon of chickpea powder. Add a few drops of rose water to make a smooth paste. Apply this to your face and leave it on for 15-30 minutes. Rinse off with cold water.you can have more beauty home made remedies from the source given.best of luck

  25. QUESTION:
    Remedies for the occasional break outs and those nasty black heads on the nose ?
    Any remedies or things you have found to work?

    • ANSWER:
      I use a face wash called PanOxyl Wash 10% (face wash with 10% benzoyl peroxide in it) it peels your skin the tiniest bit to get rid of the spots and for the specific problem areas for the breakout i also follow it up with PanOxyl 10% Cream which basically strengthens the peeling around the spot area, within a day the spot is dead and the next day it's practically gone.

      And wherever you put the cream it stops spots from forming in that area for the next time!

      Good luck!

  26. QUESTION:
    What home remedy is good to close facial pores?
    Since a young girl, I have always had oily skin. Now that I'm older, my pores are noticeable, this is where my low self esteem come into play. What can I use to close these pores on my face?

    • ANSWER:
      You can safely, quickly and permanently reduce pores by massaging using an essential oil - olive, sweet almond and grape seed oil and certain others are excellent. They have been used by specialists to treat/cure acne as they lessen skin's production of oil, they do not clog or cause breakouts (See USER'S happy response below ***).

      First tighten skin by opening mouth 3/4" and pulling lips firmly back against teeth. Use finger tips and front of fingers and sometimes palms depending where on face you massage. Do forward and back massage - a circular motion will not work. Do over and over firmly and quite vigorously. For quickest results do each day for 15 to 30 min.(Doesn't have to be all in one session).

      Pores will greatly minimize in as little as 2 to 3 days. If massage entire face you will quickly have a smooth, radiant, tight, totally blemish free, healthy skin and you will not need to use any other product or treatment ever again - not even moisturizers. Oils are perfect natural moisturizers.

      ***REPLY FROM A USER: To Mukunda M. from
      wannabeblue28 - "Omg, I've been following your advice and massaging my face vigorously with oil for the last three days and I see results already! Thank you ever so much....this could be the solution to my all my skin problems. I'd messaged earlier asking about the pores on my face. They're very large and EVERYWHERE. I have a massive event coming up in a month. Could I do it twice daily to speed up the process? "

      SOURCE(S): 20+ years extensive research seeking safe natural treatments/cures for skin conditions, skin enhancement and anti aging/rejuvenation

  27. QUESTION:
    What are some tips for getting clearer skin?
    What like "home remedies" or products do you use to prevent breakouts? also what is a fast, safe way to remove pimples and blackheads? thanks for the help!

    • ANSWER:
      Try the following tips I found for u .do not use chemicals on skin. Follow these instructions and do let me know if they worked on your skin. I’m sure they will!

      1. Put toothpaste on your pimple before you go to bed, should help reduce swelling overnight. Make sure it is the paste not the gel. One of the most popular acne home remedies.

      2. Wash your face twice a day in warm salty water. This should leave your face oil free without aggravating the acne.

      3. Apply a paste of fresh methi (fenugreek) leaves over the face every night for 10-15 minutes and washed with warm water. This will prevent acne, pimples, blackheads, and wrinkles.

      4. Place strawberry leaves on the acne, the alkalinity helps to reduce the swelling.

      5. Extract juice of one lemon and mix with equal quantity of rose water. Apply this mixture on the face and let it stay for about half an hour. Wash the face with fresh water. About 15 days application helps cure acne, pimples and reduces blemishes and scars.

      6. Another method is to massage the face with the skin of lemon before washing with lukewarm water.

      7. Apply fresh mint juice over the face every night for the treatment of acne, pimples, insect stings, eczema, scabies, & other skin infections.

      8. Eat plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables. At least 5 servings of fruits and vegetables should be included in your diet. All acne home remedies should include a healthy diet.

      9. A couple of garlic cloves, crushed and dabbed on the face 1-2 times a day. One of the smellier acne home remedies!

      10. Home face wash for acne: Mix together 1 or 2mls each of the following: witch hazel, tea-tree and sweet fennel essential oils, adding essential oil of geranium for women and essential oil of rosewood for men. Mix with 300mls of water. Shake before use, as the oils will float on top of the water during storage. Dab affected areas with cotton wool two or three times a day. The oils will clean and unclog giving antibiotic-like protection to the skin.

      11. Apply fresh lemon juice on the affected area overnight. Wash off with warm water next morning.

      12. Use 2-3 tsp. dried basil leaves to 1 cup boiling water. Steep 10-20 minutes. Cool, and apply with cotton ball.

      13. Grind orange peel with some water to a paste and apply on affected parts. One of the best acne home remedies.

      14. Clean face with cotton wool dipped in rose water 2-3 times a day.

      15. Mix 1 teaspoon lemon juice in 1 teaspoon finely ground cinnamon powder and apply on affected areas frequently.

      16. Nettle Tea is another solution, this tea has a herb that has some curing power and really helps work wonders on skin problems. Drink four cups a day to get the full benefit of one of the most powerful acne home remedies. Get nettle products here.

      17. Aloe Vera juice applied twice a day can greatly speed up the healing of acne lesions. You can buy Aloe Vera at vitacost.com

      18. Another lotion that uses bee propolis extract may also be effective. Mix eight ounces of water and 11 drops of bee propolis extract. One of the acne home remedies which has been proven effective with many people.

      19. Some herbal acne home remedies...
      Burdock leaf tea.
      Lavender essential oil (mix 1:10 with water)
      Tincture of calendula flowers.
      Tea tree essential oil (mix 1:10 with water)
      Liquefy cabbage leaves with witch hazel, strain and add two drops of lemon oil. Use as a lotion.

      20. Ice down the acne before bed, by morning it should be noticeably less swollen. Works best on larger pimples that have not yet formed a head.

      21. Take vitamin B5 and zinc supplements daily to strengthen the skin's resistance to acne.

      22. Mix mint juice with turmeric powder and apply on affected area. Leave for 15-30 minutes and wash off with lukewarm water.

      23. Mix some vinegar and salt in a bowl. Pour a little bit in your hand and rub it on the pimples. Soak a face towel in it and dab it on the bumps. Leave it on for 15-20 minutes and rinse it off.

      24. Blend cucumber and make a paste. Apply this as a mask on your face and leave it for 1/2 hour and then rinse. This refreshes your skin and prevents acne.

      25. Mix corn flour with egg white and apply on your face. Let is dry completely for 1/2 hour. Dip your hands in warm water and massage your face and wash off. This when repeated regularly gives you a smooth skin.

      26. Mix sandalwood paste with rosewater and apply on the face. Rinse off after 30 minutes.

      27. Essential oil face mask for acne: Use a mask base powder, such as fuller's earth or kaolin powder. Use distilled or filtered water to make a paste. Mix 1 heaped teaspoon of base powder to 3 drops of essential oil. Add approximately 2 tablespoons of the water in, to make a fluid yet balanced paste. Essential oils to add in the mask either separately or try smaller amounts together; cypress oil 1 drop, lemon oil 2 drops, sage oil 1 drop.

      28. Mix the paste of tender neem leaves with turmeric and apply of affected area. An eastern approach to acne home remedies.

      29. Grind some nutmeg with milk and apply on affected area. Pimples disappear like magic without leaving a mark.

      30. Make a mixture of lime juice and rose water. Apply on face and leave it for 15-20 minutes. Rinse off with lukewarm water.

      31. Make a paste by mixing 3 tablespoons of honey and 1 teaspoon of cinnamon powder. Apply this paste on the pimples before sleeping and wash it next morning with warm water. Repeat for two weeks, pimples will disappear forever.

      32. Rub fresh garlic on and around pimples. Pimples will disappear without a mark with regular applications.

      33. Mix 1 tsps groundnut oil with 1 tspn fresh lime juice to prevent formation of blackheads and pimples.

      34. Ground drumstick pods and leaves and mix mixed with fresh lime juice, and apply on pimples. This is also good for blackheads and dark spots.

      35. First wash face and then dab acne with cotton balls soaked in vinegar.

      36. Mix groundnut oil with an equal amount of fresh lime juice and apply on face. leave for 10-15 minutes and wash. It may be applied daily to prevent formation of blackheads, acne and pimples.

      37. Apply juice of raw papaya (including the skin and seed) on swelling acne, pimples.

      38. Apply fresh lime juice mixed to a glass of boiled milk as a face wash for acne, pimples, blackheads, and cracked skin.

      39. Apply ripe Tomatoes pulp on acne, pimples and kept up to 1 hour, then wash.

      40. Make a paste of roasted & powdered pomegranate skin with fresh lime juice and apply over acne, boils, pimple, blackheads and whiteheads.

      41. Apply grated potatoes as poultice to treat skin blemishes, wrinkles, boils, pimples, blackheads, whiteheads, etc.

      42. Make a paste of ground radish seeds with water and apply on face to remove blackheads.

      43. Apply a paste of ground sesame seeds with water as poultice for inflammation of the skin due to allergies, skin rashes, and pimples.

      44. Large pores on facial skin can be treated with paste of sandalwood powder with masoor dal.

      45. Use an oatmeal or almond mask thoroughly to cleanse your face. Mix either oatmeal or almond powder with enough rose water to make a soft paste that spreads easily on the skin. Rub it on your skin with your fingertips, paying special attention the problem areas. Leave to dry for about 15 minutes and then rinse off with cold water. This is very good in getting rid of blackheads.

      46. A solution made out of one and a half cups of hot water and half a tablespoon of boric powder is an ideal remedy for blackheads, Saturate a face napkin in this hot solution and press on to the skin, repeat twice. Extract blackheads carefully with a blackhead remover and sterilized cotton wool. Pat on an astringent.

      47. Honey is a great remedy for skin blemishes and acne because the honey kills bacteria.
      These are some effective home remedies for the treatment of acne and blackheads.

  28. QUESTION:
    How do I fix my dry skin when moisturizers don't work?
    My skin has been really, really dry lately. And I've tried two different moisturizers but neither of them are helping much, and I think one of them might be making it worse. Is there any thing I can do to fix my dry skin?
    My skin is sensitive and I've been using a moisturizer from MaryKay called Velocity and then one from Neutrogena that's an oil-free moisturizer with SPF 35 in it.

    • ANSWER:
      Can you give us more information about yourself and your skin? If your skin is not staying moisturized it may be a complaint that needs treatment rather than putting more moisturizer on it.

      Do you work with cleaners/chemicals or anything that could be damaging the natural oils in your skin? Is the dry skin in a specific area or do you have patches in different areas.? Any family history of skin problems. Have you tried different moisturizers and not just the nice smelling ones? This isn't a comprehensive list of questions, so try to think of anything that could be a mitigating factor.

      I suffer from psoriasis which means I suffer from an array of symptoms from just dry skin up to thick calluses on my knuckles and knees. Always seek medical advice for something that doesn't sort itself out after a reasonable period of time. It's amazing how easy it is to turn something trivial into something chronic by not dealing with it early.

      Next:

      - Always use a good moisturiser. You can put your pretty perfume ones on over the top, but the first one on your skin has to do the job properly. A lot of moisturizers out there are just greases or glycerins that make you smooth and shiny, but don't really assist the skin in a way that benefits you. Do your research and buy a medically beneficial moisturizer. It will probably be cheaper than what you are using now too.

      - Consider Bio-Oil or any products based on PurCellin oil. I use these regularly and I have to say that they penetrate deeper into the skin than any other product I use, AND their effect lasts longer than my other products too. It soaks right through my dry skin and even with my skin condition I can go a couple of days without having to moisturize again.

      - Experiment. I remember a couple of years ago my girlfriend started to get a bit spotty and she rushed to try different remedies, and new soaps, gels, and make-ups, but nothing seemed to help. Eventually I managed to convince her to just stop using anything, and I took her to the supermarket and bought her all new toiletries, but I only bought her the neutral ph, simple, unperfumed, mild, and gentle alternatives. Her skin slowly improved.

      We can be too aggressive with our skin sometimes and forget that it doesn't just hold our organs in, but it is an organ itself. Washing too often, or with the wrong things, or too harshly will damage it, and that damage will accumulate. Sometimes you just need to give it a break and give it time to heal. If you do that and it doesn't recover itself, then that is the time to start slowly bringing your lotions back in to play, but use them sparingly and see what real difference they make, compare them, find what works, and how they work, and come up with a simple, efficient skin care regime you can stick to.

      Good luck.

  29. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of acne the fastest and cheapest way? preferably home remedies?
    I'm 16 and i have rarely ever had acne. i was really lucky, and i used proActive every night. But this past month, i have has a lot of little blemishes all over my face, like under the skin so they are hard to treat.
    My friends just say it's stress related, and that's why they started showing up now.
    What's the fastest and cheapest way to clear acne under the skin? Preferably a home remedy because i'm not allowed to buy any beauty products.

    • ANSWER:
      The very word "acne" conjures in many people's minds either past or present struggles with self image, embarrassment and feelings of helplessness if they've ever suffered this skin condition, or are currently suffering varying degrees of acne.

      Our skin's appearance is very important to us personally of course, but it seems to have been only made more important by the emphasis of "flawless skin" in beauty magazines, tabloids and other media outlets that our society has become so enthralled with. It's no wonder that the skincare industry has enjoyed growth and profits in leaps and bounds over the past fifteen to twenty years.

      So, what can you do, besides enlist the help of an expensive dermatologist or skin care spa to help combat acne and prevent new breakouts on your own, for next to nothing - or better yet, free? Well, we will focus on things you can change in your diet to get rid of or dramatically reduce acne breakouts, since what we put in our mouths is more key for the skin's appearance and health than most people may think.

      There are many schools of thought on what to avoid and what to include in the diet if you are to attain and maintain clear skin. However, one thing remains pretty clear, and that is the avoidance of sugary foods and caffeine. I cannot tell you how many times I have experienced major breakouts that I can directly attribute to the consumption of sugar or caffeine in excess.

      Sure, it's ok to have a sweet snack (a small one!) here and there, and not suffer the consequences of a few new pimples, but by and large it is prudent to either strictly limit sugar or try to eradicate it all together if you have problem skin.

      Sugar has many destructive properties that are bad for overall health, but it's recently also been proven to have properties that accelerate the aging process of the skin when chemically broken down by our bodies, and also to lend a hand in the inflammation of skin cells.

      Inflammation is a direct cause of acne, since it is, by definition an inflammatory skin condition, so we can safely say that sugar is indeed a category of food to be avoided in the quest to be acne free, oh and also to keep your skin young too!

      OK, enough about sugar, now let's move onto to another culprit behind acne. Caffeine can have similar effects on the skin to sugar, since it actually may increase inflammation, especially in some people who are more caffeine-sensitive than others (like myself).

      With all the super caffeinated beverages out on the market today, it's no wonder we're all not walking around with broken out faces. I suspect that teens especially are susceptible to the caffeinated drink rage, which is unfortunate because they may be unknowingly aggravating their skin and causing breakouts at the age where they are more apt to break out anyway.

      Caffeine can also produce an uneven and "bumpy" texture of the skin. Beverages aren't the only culprit either, since there are many supplements, pills and diet aids that contain stimulants that will break your skin out faster than you can say "energy". Caffeinated drinks and other products containing stimulants should be avoided if you want to avoid rough, broken out skin.

      If you want to try to neutralize inflammation caused by eating foods that increase skin volatility as mentioned above, a good suggestion is to start drinking lemon water.

      Not only is drinking lemon juice infused water a refreshing difference from plain old water, but water with about an eighth of a lemon (preferably organic) squeezed into it can help neutralize acidity in the body caused by acid-producing foods, which in turn limits inflammation.

      Seriously, begin to drink lemon juice infused water for a few days and I'd be surprised if you don't see at least a little difference in the way your skin looks.

      If you want to get really adventurous, add a sprinkle or two of cinnamon, again preferably organic, to your water, and you may also enjoy a bit of a revved up metabolism as well as a more stabilized blood sugar level, as research is showing cinnamon has excellent benefits for blood sugar stabilization. Why do I mention blood sugar? Well, because a stable blood sugar level helps to lower inflammation, and it also helps reduce the effects of stress and anxiety which can trigger higher levels of androgens in the body, which are the very hormones that cause acne.

      And there you have it, free or very cheap, easily incorporated, and dare I say "pleasant" ways to combat acne. Not only do these suggestions help reduce breakouts, they are also generally beneficial to your health in other numerous ways. Who says everyone needs a dermatologist or expensive skin care regimens to achieve pristine skin?

  30. QUESTION:
    What are the best supplements for acne prone skin?
    I have sensitive/oily/ acne prone skin. Recently Ive been breaking out more than usual, I think it might be from either my change of diet which is I don't eat meat or chicken, only fish/seafood and also I stop using birth control pills. I definitely think that my skin problem might have do with either or both things. I been using all natural facial products containing tea tree oil and witch hazel. I want to start taking supplements that will also help clear my breakouts. Any suggestions from experience.
    Thanks in advance!

    • ANSWER:
      Orange juice can be an effective remedy for pimples and acne. It can also be used for scar and blemish removal.

      • Orange and green papaya is used to remove whiteheads, boils and spots. It also contains the papain enzyme, which is effective in skin whitening

      thanks bye tc ...

  31. QUESTION:
    How many natural acne remedies can i do a day?
    i know alot of natural acne remedies that i would likie to try out but i dont know hoe many i should do a day. For example, how many times can i wash my face a day(with plain water)?

    • ANSWER:
      That depends on what kind of skin you have. If like me you have Oily, problem skin, washing my face more than twice a day will cause it to break out. I've realised that soap is probably the worst thing I can use. The soap washes away my 'natural oil' and my skin will then try to replace it and therefore cause excess grease and spots.

      Using as hot as possible water also helps my skin. Maybe it's worth a go?!

      If you're in the UK, try 'Boots Acne relief' tablets. They come in an olive colour box. I think they are brilliant, and highly recommended.

  32. QUESTION:
    How to make my skin acne clear and blemish free?
    My skin some times can become a little bit dry but not often because i treat it. But i need help to make my skin acne clear and blemish free i sometimes have little spots now and then and i want it gone. Any products?

    • ANSWER:
      I used home remedies with my acne. I started taking zinc for my acne. Here are some tips that might be helpful:
      1) Tea Tree Oil
      2) Lemon juice
      3) Apple cider vinegar
      4) Bamboo extract or Sarna lotion – good for rosacea, psoriasis, eczema
      5) Bio Oil or BB cream for dark spots or scars
      6) Toothpaste is very effective for acne leave on face for about 20 to 30 minutes then wash.

      Applied lemon juice or apple cider vinegar to face or you can drink it through using it in water a few drops a day. Will help with both acne, and scars as well. Another way you can get rid of acne is by taking bamboo extract something I started when I had the problem really does work. Hope this works for you.

      OR: Here are seven best methods to clear up blemishes.

      Tea-Tree Oil
      Tea tree oil is a popular home remedy for acne. An essential oil is diluted and applied topically to acne lesions. How is tea tree oil believed to work? Tea tree oil contains a constituent called terpinen-4-ol that's thought to be responsible for most of tea tree oil's anti-bacterial activity. Because tea tree oil can kill bacteria, applying topical tea tree oil to acne lesions is believed to kill Propionibacterium acnes, the skin-dwelling bacteria involved in acne.To treat mild, occasional breakouts.
      How it works: Distilled from the leaves of an Australian shrub, tea-tree oil contains antibacterial and anti-microbial compounds called terpenoids that help kill the bacteria that, when trapped behind oil in a plugged pore, lead to acne breakouts. Try Burt’s Bees Herbal Blemish Stick (, burtsbees.com). A roller-ball tube makes for easy application.Studies testing tea-tree oil against the gold-standard acne treatment, benzoyl peroxide, have shown that while the latter works more quickly, tea-tree oil is equally effective over time. And it results in fewer annoying side effects—namely, dryness and redness.

      Sulfur
      If you have sensitive skin.
      How it works: A time-tested, gentle acne fighter, sulfur “acts like a sponge to draw oil out of blocked pores,”. This dries up pimples and keeps sebum production in check, helping to prevent future blemishes. Sulfur has a distinct smell—think rotten eggs. Most preparations that use it contain a masking fragrance. However, to play it safe (and avoid scaring off coworkers), apply these products at night.

      Salicylic Acid
      To treat and soothe red, inflamed blemishes.Salicylic acid can have a calming, anti-inflammatory effect on pimples. “It also breaks down the ‘cement’ between cells in clogged pores to help unplug them,”
      Salicylic acid is less irritating than more potent treatments, so it may be better for those with dry skin. It also tends to work well on stubborn blackheads.

      Retinoids
      Nightly to prevent breakouts.
      How they work: Retinoids, which include over-the-counter retinol and prescription-strength Retin-A, reduce acne by altering the oil chemistry on the skin. “They help stop dense sebum from getting stuck within the pores,” says Gross. Without oil deposits, bacteria can’t grow and cause blemishes. Since retinoids can make skin sensitive to the sun, doctors recommend using them at night (and being diligent about wearing sunscreen during the day). To avoid irritation, apply every other evening to start, gradually working up to nightly use. Bonus benefit: Retinoids have been shown to increase collagen production and plump fine lines, making them a good choice if you’re dealing with acne and wrinkles.

      Blue-Light Therapy
      If you want the latest preventive treatment—and don’t mind plunking down some cash for it.
      How it works: Once or twice a week, you use a handheld device to aim a beam of blue light onto your skin. “Its wavelength hits and kills acne-causing bacteria,” so any brewing pimples never come to the surface.This method will not address existing blemishes. Doctors typically suggest combining blue-light therapy with other remedies, such as topical treatments. To make things easy, consider a blue-light device that comes in a kit. At-home devices are smart alternatives to multiple costly treatments at a doctor’s office.

      Oral Antibiotics
      If you experience painful bumps below the skin surface and your pimples leave lasting marks. “Oral antibiotics act from the inside to kill the bacteria that cause acne,” says Keri. They also reduce the inflammation associated with pimples, so deep-seated blemishes hurt less and leave fewer scars.

      Doctors usually prescribe them to get a severe condition under control and may then switch to topical treatments. Some antibiotics must be taken on an empty stomach, so read the label carefully.
      http://www.realsimple.com/beauty-fashion/skincare/face/ways-to-treat-acne-00000000038296/page9.html

  33. QUESTION:
    Home remedies that helps get rid of fleas on a puppy?
    Hi.
    I was wondering does annyone know any home remedies to help get rid of a puppie's fleas?
    i can't take it to a vet because my mommy doesn't want
    to drive it since it's extremely far from my house
    and i don't think that i can afford it.
    and i'm scared to use those chemical stuff at the stores
    because my puppy is still sort of young..
    so yeah..
    help please.

    • ANSWER:
      If you live near grass, your dog is exposed to fleas. And while fleas have always been considered an itchy nuisance there is more danger to your dogs from fleas than just the irritation.
      Some dogs are allergic to flea bites and dogs can get tape worms from ingesting the fleas that they might ingest when they are using their mouths to scratch.
      If you happen to have an immediate problem, then there are a few things you need to do.
      The first thing to do if your dog has been exposed to a large number of fleas is to bathe the dog thus drowning the fleas. If you don't have flea shampoo on hand you then don't worry about it, hot soapy water does a good job of getting rid of the fleas on the dog at the moment.
      If bathing isn't possible, you can make up Lemon Skin Tonic. Lemons are very good for the skin and contain limonene which is not only a great repellent, but actually dissolves the flea's waxy coating, causing dehydration and death of the flea. Press on "Lemon Skin Tonic Recipe" below for directions.
      You can also make your own herbal flea powder. This is an effective discouragement to fleas returning to your dog. Press on "Herbal Flea Powder Recipe" below for directions.

      Herbal Flea Powder Recipe: http://baloghshih-tzus.com/fleapowder.html

      Lemon Skin Tonic Recipe:
      http://baloghshih-tzus.com/skintonic.html

  34. QUESTION:
    What to do about new dry skin?
    I've never had a problem with dry skin before but this year it's horrible. Mostly on my face and head and neck. Anybody know of something I could try to help it out? I can't use lotion, especially on my face because I break out so easily. Any home remedies?

    • ANSWER:

  35. QUESTION:
    What is the cause of the dark and light patches on my kids skin?
    My son has a few patches of whiter skin on his torso. My daughter has a few patches of darker skin on her torso and arms. Is this a coincidence, or is it some kind of related genetic pigment disorder? In both children, the patches were not present at birth, but showed up several months later. The texture of the discolored patches on both skin is fine, it's just the skin color that's different.

    • ANSWER:
      They are most likely caused by a fungal condition called tinea versicolor, or pityriasis versicolor. Patches are generally on the chest, back, upper arms, and occasionally on the neck and face.

      The patches can range from white to pink and from tan to dark depending on the babies skin tone. They will generally become more noticeable if the baby is hot/sweaty or their skin gets tanned.

      Patches may look odd, but they're probably nothing to worry about. It poses no health problems for your baby. It tends to flare up in the summer and prefers oily skin.

      If the spots are small and mild and your baby doesn't seem uncomfortable - ask the doctor whether it's okay to treat them with an over-the-counter dandruff shampoo that contains selenium sulfide (Selsun Blue).

      Put a thin layer of the shampoo on all the affected spots and spread it a couple of inches beyond their borders. Leave the shampoo on for ten to 15 minutes before rinsing it off. If you do this every night for a few weeks, the fungus should disappear. It can take a few months for the skin color to return to normal, though.

      If this home remedy doesn't work, take them to the doctor.

  36. QUESTION:
    How can i protect my sensitive skin and prevent acne when working at a restaurant?
    I've been breaking out since I've started working at this restaurant 2 weeks ago. My skin is usually acne free and nice but is sensitive. I have my daily face wash and moisturizing ritual in the morning and at night. any serious tips will be great.

    Thanks for your help!

    • ANSWER:
      The tricky part about acne is that the problem can
      actually become worse if you overmedicate. That's
      because acne medication can overdry the skin, causing
      a boost in your skin's Sebum (oil) production. This
      results in...you guessed it - more acne.

      So what's the long term solution? Find gentler
      solutions or even natural acne cures that won't
      shock your body into more breakouts.

      Here's what I recommend...

      Glycerin based facewash:
      Glycerin is gentler and will balance the
      pH levels in your skin.

      Antibacterial Soap:
      For body acne, try using an antibacterial soap
      to slowly dry out the skin. If your skin gets too dry,
      switch to a moisterizing soap like Dove to
      counterbalance the effect.

      Don't Overwash:
      Wash your face only 2 times a day max and gently
      pat dry with a towel.

      Moisterize:
      Use a gentle face moisterizer if the glycerin based
      face wash drys you out too much. I like using
      Aveeno moisterizers personally.

      Change Your Diet:
      Eat almonds, fiber, drink lots of water and avoid
      excess sugar intake. Food really does make a difference.
      This is because the food you put into your body has a
      direct effect on your Sebum (oil) production. By eating
      the right foods, you'll minimize oily skin, thereby
      preventing breakouts.

      Egg Whites:
      If acne medication isn't working or causing new breakouts,
      try applying egg whites to the pimples at night before bed.
      This natural remedy works by gently drying out the clogged
      pores and clearing up the pimple.

      Oatmeal Masks:
      One of my favorite natural skin conditioners is wearing an
      "oatmeal mask". The oatmeal with smooth your skin while
      simultaneously absorb toxins and oils from your pores.
      Try this for a few days straight. Wear the oatmeal mask
      for 10 minutes, then wash off. You'll have a nice
      glowing complexion right after.

      Lemon Juice:
      Lemon juice also dries up pimples and kills any bacteria
      in the infection.The citric acid also balances your skin's
      pH levels to prevent future breakouts.

      Honey:
      Yes, despite your initial beliefs, honey is FANTASTIC for
      skin care. Actually, you may notice on many moisterizers
      that honey is an ingredient. Much like the lemon solution
      above, honey balances the skins pH levels. Test out this
      sticky remedy by dabbing pimples with honey and leaving it
      on for 5-10 minutes. You can apply full honey masks to your
      face but I prefer the oatmeal masks instead.
      They're less messy.

  37. QUESTION:
    How can i get rid of pimples that are continuously giving me problems on my chest and stomach region?
    tips, remedies, cremes etc....

    • ANSWER:
      Acne is a bacteria that needs to be killed. Witch Hazel is also works great.. it is a little smelly, but you can use a cotton ball or wash cloth. It will tke away the oiliness. `Tea Tree Oil will kill out the bacteria or weaken it enough not to bother you. Apply it to the effected areas with a q-tip or cotton ball after you have washed.

      You should get a good multivitamin(highly suggest) with vitamin a,c,e,d and zinc.. this should help tons! Eating carrots also helps.. there is beta-carotene (Vitamin A) in them which helps prevent acne and repair the skin. Take zinc, zinc is a antibacterial agent. Make sure to dink plenty of water and get good rest at night.

      Azelaic Acid is a great natural acid that reduces the growth of bacteria, restores the skins cells and reduces inflammation. Try using a topical with Azelaic Acid in it.. it is safe.

      Also, change/wash your pillow case and sheets every other day.

      There are ways to put moisture back into your skin and heal it, such as: drinking lots of water, making sure you are eating enough fat/omega-3 oils. Lotions with mineral oil can dry out the skin, use one with out it! Emu Oil ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emu_oil ) contains vitamin A and E, Sapogens ( makes skin softer), and Oleic acid (a skin cell regenerator, anti-wrinkel agent) - walgreens sells emu oil.. i would think walmart would as well.

  38. QUESTION:
    Skin treatment or home remedies to bring acne to the surface of the skin?
    I have PCOS so I suffer from acne. Sometimes my skin becomes clearer after I had my period, but the problem is that, even if it's clear, there still are some trapped underneath the surface. Sometimes I'm tempted to squeeze them out but I don't like the scar it leaves. Can you recommend some home remedies or over-the-counter products for this? I prefer home remedies, though, because I'm still a student and I can't afford too pricey stuff.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      I also have PCOS and had acne starting pretty young. The breakouts are probably due to the hormone imbalance. I noticed improvement with medications to lower testosterone. When I couldn't afford the meds I used saw palmetto, but not sure if that helped too much. One product I think has totally helped is salicylic acid at home chemical peels (they are not as bad as they sound). It is amazing! After a few uses, there was noticeable improvement. I get mine on Amazon for around , but it last a long time and is worth it.

  39. QUESTION:
    What are home remedies for cold sores and acne?
    Please only mention remedies with basic products that anybody would have at home. Thank you :)

    • ANSWER:
      There is this new popular cream that people have been talking about.

      It prevents future and existing acne, diminishes scars, and lightens skin and blemishes. Fast results too! (It's been claimed that major results can be seen within a week and no later than two weeks)

      Before and After photos are available at the given ebay site.

      This person is providing 1-3 week trial samples (Only for ONE DOLLAR.. definitely a deal) on ebay at:

      Search up "Cee En's Acne Solution" on ebay.

      First 100 customers can get the item for for one week trial and up to 3 weeks. Or you can purchase 1 month supply for or 6 month supply for 0

      It's expensive, but the product DOES work.

      My sister and cousin who both have major acne have tried the product and they both give it thumbs up. I have also heard many great feedbacks about this cream.

      I don't have a problem with acne, but it seems to have great results on my sister who has moderate to severe acne. Her acne swelling went away overnight.

      check the seller's feedbacks on the cream

      I hope this helps. =)

  40. QUESTION:
    Can you use a regular hydrocortizone cream on cats for skin problems due to fleas?
    I've already applied a frontline flea treatment but her skin is so dry and scabby and irritated. Looking for effective low cost way to treat her and make her feel better.

    • ANSWER:
      They DO make hydrocortizone creams specially for cats, and dogs, too. But if you're looking for a cheaper remedy, try vaseline. This will also keep the fleas from irritating existing sores, and it won't hurt the cat's system if they lick at it. Jusy try and not apply too much.

  41. QUESTION:
    Where can I find some good home remedies for skin and hair?
    I remember my mom always had all of kinds of home remedies and I can't remember any of them.

    • ANSWER:
      Olive oil has`worked miracles for me. I had`many serious skin problems and severe flaking scalp and unhealthy hair. I stopped using cleansers, and other products and shampoos and they started clearing up. Then daily l thoroughly massaged scalp and skin with the oil and it permanently got rid of every problem. I have continued to have a` virtually blemish free, healthy skin, healthy scalp and strong growing hair. I have not needed to use any other treatment.

  42. QUESTION:
    How to have good skin and how to treat huge pores?
    Hey, How do i make my skin looking good in a natural way? And how can I naturally treat my huge pore size?
    Thankz.

    • ANSWER:
      Pimples

      A simple soap and water routine can help dry out pimples. Make sure your child washes her face at least three times a day, with soap and water. If your child's skin is very oily, she should apply soap before wetting her face.

      Camphor solution dries out pimples, and it soothes the skin. Keep a bottle handy so you can pat the solution onto the problem areas at regular intervals. If a pimple-head has already formed, put a hot towel on the pimple repeatedly until it comes out. Then pat on some camphor.

      Onions are also useful in dealing with pimples. Cut a few onions and cook them in lard until they become transparent. When they have cooled, tie the mixture in a muslin cloth and apply it to the pimples in the form of a poultice.

      Blackheads

      Soap and water combined with a steam routine seems to be the best approach. Add dried lime flowers to a pint of boiling water and steam the face in this solution for 10 minutes. As a result, pores will open up. Press the skin around the blackheads with cotton wool or tissue. Then close the pores with an astringent solution, and wash with soap and water. A steam face bath with Epsom salts added to it is also effective. If the blackheads are still clinging on stubbornly, pat some almond oil on them and gently squeeze them out.

      You can also try a solution made of 6 ounces of distilled water and 27 grains of soda bicarbonate. Rub this solution over the blackheads.

      Milk also helps treat blackheads. Wash the face with warm water and then sponge it for fifteen minutes with tepid milk every day.

      Apply a little warmed honey to the face, and wash off after fifteen minutes.

      Exfoliate your skin with a facial scrub, twice a week. Make your own homemade exfoliating scrub. Dissolve four ounces of powdered almonds, two ounces of glycerine soap and one ounce of multani mitti in a little water. Then rub this solution onto the blackhead-affected areas on your face.

      Large pores

      While there is no permanent remedy to close large pores, astringents do help to temporarily tighten and close them.

      Buttermilk has astringent qualities. Apply it on your face and leave it on for 15 minutes before washing off with cool water.

      Egg white also helps tighten skin. Beaten egg white should be applied on the face with cotton wool and washed off after 15 minutes.

      Tomato juice contains Vitamin C and potassium and works wonders on large pores. It can be used alone or mixed with curd or multani mitti to make an excellent pore-closing paste. Lettuce juice is another alternative.

      Pastes made of cornmeal or oatmeal have also been found to help closing pores. The paste should be made with hot water, applied and left on for about half an hour. It should then be washed off with cool water.

      Powdered alum mixed with hot water or rosewater and egg white is also good for tightening and closing large pores.

      You can also make a good skin tonic using equal parts of vinegar and water.

      As in the case of pimples, camphor works well towards tightening and closing open pores. A few drops of camphor spirit mixed with rose water or cool water makes a nice pore-tightening solution.

      The most important tip of all: start taking care of your child's complexion from the outset, so she never has to endure the pain associated with far-from-perfect skin. After all, prevention is better than cure.

      Some more easy-to-implement body care tips.

      1.Watermelon juice clears the skin of all its blemishes leaving it fresh and lovely. Grate a watermelon, squeeze out the juice and apply it on your face for 15 minutes. Now wash it with hot water and then splash on cold water.

      2. Fenugreek leaves (methi) cure pimples, blackheads, dryness and early appearance of wrinkles. Make a paste of these leaves and apply it every night. Next morning, wash off with warm water. This improves your complexion.

      3. Tea leaves and lemon juice helps prevent hair fall. They also lead to soft and shiny hair. You need to boil the leaves in water and strain out the tea. Add a little lemon juice to this concoction and wash your hair with it. Rinse your hair thoroughly.

      4. Bengal gram flour (besan) mixed with curd can be applied daily on your face and hair! It will not only give you a glowing complexion, but also long and lustrous locks.

      5. Orange juice is great for an instant glow. All you need to do is dip your fingers in the juice and pat your cheeks, chin, neck and forehead. Wash off after ten minutes.

      raw unpasteurized apple cider vinegar
      to open the pores and loosen dirt and grease from your face turn off the heat from a pan of distilled water, add 3 tablespoons apple cider vinegar to a quart of the hot water. drape a towel over the pan and your head to steam clean your pores. take a cotton ball, dip in vinegar and pat over skin to remove loosened dirt. repeat 2 more times. then spray or dab on
      chilled vinegar and equal part of distilled water to close your pores and tone your skin. do twice weekly, also can use the chilled vinegar water as a toner 2 times daily.
      it is amazing ....
      i also drink the vinegar, 1-2 tablespoons in water with honey in the morning..and i use the vinegar water as a toner 2 times daily..

      raw unpasturized apple cider vinegar..
      the following 2 testimonials can be seen at http://www.earthclinic.com/cures/acne.ht...
      Angelina O, has found that applying ACV topically to her face several times a day (4 or more times) has cured her of a "very bad complexion". She reports that she applies it straight and that while it burns her skin a bit, it still works like a miracle!

      Cheryl writes, "My daughter developed a case of moderate acne, and after trying a number of different things for over a year which helped very little or not at all, she started drinking 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar three times a day and applying it topically once at night. She has been acne free for two months. It took about three weeks to clear up."

      to drink, add to water and honey, or to apple juice.

      you can get the vinegar at the health food store, or in some super markets.

  43. QUESTION:
    Ive got a serious skin problem on my scalp and need help?
    When i was 14 i had a little dry skin spot on the edge of my hairline at the top of my forehead. It slowly over the years spread to my whole scalp. Dermatologists have been 0 help over the years, and store/prescription brand shampoos help, but then almost become immune. i shave my head and that helps. putting lotion on makes it seem like it doesn't exist. but slowly that is becoming less helpful. its red and itches and the itch gets worse with the length of my hair.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,

      If I were you I would em "mr.l" for him to explain further, eh?

      Although I have seen that most root problems for 'skin' issues for myself and others has usually been from long and or short term allergic reactions to 'something' COMBINED WITH a weakened lymph liver kidney and immune systems - IF the following symptoms would ever occur - I think the worst rash one might possibly have rapidly acquired is from deadly bacterial meningitis, but bacterial meningitis would be very rare.

      The two quotes below are from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacterial_Meningitis

      “IF a rash is present, it may indicate a particular cause of meningitis; for instance, meningitis caused by meningococcal bacteria may be accompanied by a characteristic rash.”

      “The MOST common symptoms of meningitis are headache and neck stiffness associated with fever, confusion or altered consciousness, vomiting, and an inability to tolerate light (photophobia) or loud noises (phonophobia). SOMETIMES, especially in small children, only nonspecific symptoms may be present, such as irritability and drowsiness.”

      For further details see: http://www.cdc.gov/meningitis/about/faq.html

      For further information on itch rash illnesses and for long term solutions TO THEM ALL - the following link has considerable info within a ‘report’ I recently posted:

      http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20091113104039AAbnGet

      I truly hope what you learn will help you to decide on the correct choices that will remedy your painful malady in the future.

      My best to you and yours,

      AI – self taught nutritionIsT >[(-:]

  44. QUESTION:
    Are there any good home remedies out there for acne?
    I have a combination of dry and oily skin. I have from mild to moderate acne. Its now that bad but I am self conscious of it. I mainly break out in my t-zone. My bumps sometimes get red. Right now though my face just has small bumps. They aren't red or anything. I want perfect, smooth skin.

    • ANSWER:
      I've had a lot of problems with acne and Ive been to numerous dermatologists. The only thing that got rid of it was accutane (roaccutane). Other things you can do include taking zinc and vitamin A supplements. You can ask you pharmacist for a cream containing benzoyl peroxide. In your pharmacy you will also find washes made specifically for acne prone skin - I use Effaklar K.

  45. QUESTION:
    What home remedies can I use on my cat that keeps chewing off her fur?
    She is constantly over-grooming, to the point of patches of fur starting to disappear. She's done this before, and she usually stops after a while, but this last time it's gotten a lot worse, and she even caused a scab (presumably). Without resorting to another trip to the vet, what home remedies could I use to dissuade her from this bad habit?

    • ANSWER:
      There are a couple of reasons your cat could be over-grooming:

      1. Dermatitis - if she has a primary skin problem, like a staph infection or ringworm, she will itch and overgroom. This cannot be treated effectively with home remedies, but thankfully is not as common as other causes.

      2. Food allergies - fairly common in domestic animals. Grains and chicken are the most common allergens. Cats do not need grains in their diet, so try introducing a diet based on a protein that she's never been exposed to (duck, venison, rabbit, kangaroo, etc). Animals develop food allergies after prolonged exposure, so it's very possible for her to be allergic to her food if she's never had a problem with it before. Some cats have sensitive GI tracts, so you may want to switch her over gradually. It can take 1-2 months to see improvement with food allergies.

      3. Flea allergies - VERY common in cats. If she is not on effective flea control, you should consider that a highly probable source of itching. The best flea medications are prescription through your vet. Be careful if you decide to use non-prescription products on your cat. Anything with permethrins, pyrethrins, or chrysanthemum extract is TOXIC to cats and will cause neurological damage. Check labels carefully and never use dog products on cats. Flea allergic animals often groom away fleas so effectively that you never see the fleas. If she is not on flea control, try it before deciding that she doesn't have any on her.

      3. Environmental allergies - unfortunately cats can also have environmental allergies just like people. These are harder to handle as there isn't a good way to prevent exposure to most of the allergens: pollens, mold, etc. There are medications to reduce sensitivity, but most vets will only prescribe them after ruling out all of the other causes, as they have side effects like damping the immune response.

      4. Stress - it is not uncommon for cats to have "psychogenic alopecia", which is basically neurotically grooming themselves to the point of having bald spots. Some cats do this in response to a specific stressor, which you may be able to discover and eliminate. If there is tension between her and another cat in the household, that could also cause this problem. Other cats develop this out of boredom. If you are seeking a way to eliminate boredom, there are a lots of neat tips and tricks to be found through Google as "Enrichment" or "Homemade toys" for your cat. Playing with her or setting up problem solving games may give her something to do and reduce her stress.

      I would like to encourage you to try to suss out the root of her issue before just trying to make her fur taste bad, as she may have a real problem that is causing her to act this way.

      To the individual who for some reason believes that veterinarians are in a conspiracy with food companies I can only say this:
      I can tell you that as a vet student my course on nutrition was taught by a veterinary nutritionist who was board certified in veterinary internal medicine, not a pet food rep. Our gastroenterology course was also taught by an internist. No one has ever taught a medical or nutritional course to us who was not a doctor, either in veterinary medicine or a PhD in a related field. They were all employed by the university, not pet food companies.
      I can also tell you that while working in the veterinary hospital we never marketed the food we had available or pushed food simply because of a "deal" with pet food companies. We frequently recommended foods that we did not carry and recommended that clients their own judgment and preference in selecting foods.
      I know that, as in all things, there are clinics who are swayed into over-recommending specific brands, but it is not a universal practice. There is also currently a great deal of effort in the veterinary field to standardize and police the relationship between clinics and food/pharmaceutical companies, so that the best health care is offered without bias.

  46. QUESTION:
    What are some natural remedies that can get rid of acne and acne scars?
    At first, it was just a couple of pimples on my face, but then it seem to cover almost my entire forehead. And now, I have some scars and back acne. I find it a little embarrassing, since both of my parents never have had this kind of problem. This has gotten worst since I returned back to high school for semester 2. (And yes, I'm certain it's acne. Also, my parents aren't willing to pay for a dermatologist.)
    Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      For face washes you can buy at the drug store; look at the active ingredients. Salicylic acid & benezoyl peroxide. Buy one of each. The first one is to treat current acne you have, & the second is to help keep it away long term. i would use one in the morning and one at night. Use moisturizer with Sunscreen (this will help with future scarring). The spot treatments, that come in a medium sized tube, don't just use on one spot. Spread it all over your face. This way your skin will be able to stop more pimples from starting.

      Home remedies; One time i used tooth paste, it helps reduce size immensely. Just put it on the pimple you want to treat. Not gonna lie it kinda burns. If you use it, i would put it on at night and wash it off with warm water in the morning.

      Hope this helps!!

  47. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of zits under the skin?
    I feel bumps on my skin but they aren't extremely visible. You can see them up close.My sister thinks they are zits under the skin. They are really irritating. Is there any product that might help me get rid of the zits? I really want softer,smoother, and most important healthier skin. I shower regularly so my face gets clean and I have been using Clean and Clear,the exfoliating stuff. I know that is for dead skin and everything but you never know. Please help me zap the zits!

    • ANSWER:
      The tricky part about acne is that the problem can
      actually become worse if you overmedicate. That's
      because acne medication can overdry the skin, causing
      a boost in your skin's Sebum (oil) production. This
      results in...you guessed it - more acne.

      So what's the long term solution? Find gentler
      solutions or even natural acne cures that won't
      shock your body into more breakouts.

      Here's what I recommend...

      Glycerin based facewash:
      Glycerin is gentler and will balance the
      pH levels in your skin.

      Antibacterial Soap:
      For body acne, try using an antibacterial soap
      to slowly dry out the skin. If your skin gets too dry,
      switch to a moisterizing soap like Dove to
      counterbalance the effect.

      Don't Overwash:
      Wash your face only 2 times a day max and gently
      pat dry with a towel.

      Moisterize:
      Use a gentle face moisterizer if the glycerin based
      face wash drys you out too much. I like using
      Aveeno moisterizers personally.

      Change Your Diet:
      Eat almonds, fiber, drink lots of water and avoid
      excess sugar intake. Food really does make a difference.
      This is because the food you put into your body has a
      direct effect on your Sebum (oil) production. By eating
      the right foods, you'll minimize oily skin, thereby
      preventing breakouts.

      Egg Whites:
      If acne medication isn't working or causing new breakouts,
      try applying egg whites to the pimples at night before bed.
      This natural remedy works by gently drying out the clogged
      pores and clearing up the pimple.

      Oatmeal Masks:
      One of my favorite natural skin conditioners is wearing an
      "oatmeal mask". The oatmeal with smooth your skin while
      simultaneously absorb toxins and oils from your pores.
      Try this for a few days straight. Wear the oatmeal mask
      for 10 minutes, then wash off. You'll have a nice
      glowing complexion right after.

      Lemon Juice:
      Lemon juice also dries up pimples and kills any bacteria
      in the infection.The citric acid also balances your skin's
      pH levels to prevent future breakouts.

      Honey:
      Yes, despite your initial beliefs, honey is FANTASTIC for
      skin care. Actually, you may notice on many moisterizers
      that honey is an ingredient. Much like the lemon solution
      above, honey balances the skins pH levels. Test out this
      sticky remedy by dabbing pimples with honey and leaving it
      on for 5-10 minutes. You can apply full honey masks to your
      face but I prefer the oatmeal masks instead.
      They're less messy.

      For more great remedies, CHECK OUT THE SOURCE LINK Below.

  48. QUESTION:
    Is there any good remedies on how I am able to get my face to look more natural without makeup?
    Over the past year I have started using more makeup than I usually do, with this I have turned out to get spots and other things. Is there any remedies or brands that can help my face to make it more healthier so I don't have to wear as much makeup?
    Its a bit of a tricky question but I have been trying to get my face back naturally for ages now.
    thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      I have the PERFECT thing! There are two facial cleansers/masks that I know of, that definitely get you that healthy glow! First of all there is one specific to your problem, for spots and basically unhealthy skin.

      First of all do you have dry or oily skin? If you have dry skin add extra olive oil to the remedy below, if you have oily skin, completely eliminate the olive oil ingredient.

      1 tablespoon powdered yeast
      Half a tablespoon of yogurt
      1 teaspoon of lemon juice
      1 teaspoon orange juice
      1 teaspoon carrot juice
      1 teaspoon olive oil

      mix into a paste and spread over face, stay with this mask on your skin for 15 minutes (until it gets hard and starts to dry) and afterwards wash it off with lukewarm water.

      This next mask, I assure you, works MIRACLES. I have to warn you though, it smells pretty bad :) Hey, Its worth it!

      1 tablespoon yogurt
      1 cut up peach
      1 tablespoon (mushed) garlic
      yolk of 1 egg

      you can mix the garlic into the yogurt first if you'd prefer. Blend this, and then apply to face, leave on for 15 minutes. Afterward RINSE off, do not wash with any other facial soap.
      The garlic serves as an antibiotic, so it heals your face, like Advil heals a headache. The egg tightens the skin and releases the excess oil that clogs up your pores. The peach gives your skin the nutrients and vitamins it needs to remain healthy, and the yogurt calms and relaxes your skin.

      Its really a miracle worker, you'll be glad you did it!

  49. QUESTION:
    what are some good home remedies for skin?
    i have bad skin problems i have combination skin and a lot of acne!

    also if you know any other home remedies for pms that would be great!

    • ANSWER:
      Grind nutmeg in raw milk. Apply profusely on the acne affected area. This is the best acne home remedy for all ages. Log on to http://tipsfromruby-acne.blogspot.com/ for a few home made tips to heal acne.


problem skin remedies

Lichenoid Keratosis Causes

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    i have black spot on my face (lichen Planus) does it remove properly?
    i am taking treatment from last 8 months this become light but not goes properly pls help

    • ANSWER:
      Cause

      The cause of lichen planus is not known, however there are cases of lichen planus-type rashes (known as lichenoid reactions) occurring as allergic reactions to medications for high blood pressure, heart disease and arthritis. These lichenoid reactions are referred to as lichenoid mucositis (of the mucosa) or dermatitis (of the skin). Lichen planus has been reported as a complication of chronic hepatitis C virus infection. It has been suggested that true lichen planus may respond to stress, where lesions may present on the mucosa or skin during times of stress in those with the disease. Lichen planus affects women more than men 3:2, and occurs most often in middle-aged adults. Lichen planus in children is rare.

      [edit] Clinical features

      The typical rash of lichen planus is well-described by the "5 P's": well-defined pruritic, planar, purple, polygonal papules. The commonly affected sites are near the wrist and the ankle. The rash tends to heal with prominent blue-black or brownish discoloration that persists for a long time. Besides the typical lesions, many morphological varieties of the rash may occur. The presence of cutaneous lesions is not constant and may wax and wane over time. Oral lesions tend to last far longer than cutaneous lichen planus lesions.

      Oral lichen planus may present in one of three forms.

      * The reticular form is the most common presentation and manifests as white lacy streaks on the mucosa (known as Wickham's striae) or as smaller papules (small raised area). The lesions tend to be bilateral and are asymptomatic. The lacy streaks may also be seen on other parts of the mouth, including the gingiva (gums), the tongue, palate and lips.
      * The bullous form presents as fuid-filled vesicles which project from the surface.
      * The erosive form presents with erythematous (red) areas that are ulcerated and uncomfortable. The erosion of the thin epithelium may occur in multiple areas of the mouth, or in one area, such as the gums, where they resemble desquamative gingivitis. Wickham's striae may also be seen near these ulcerated areas. This form may undergo malignant transformation.

      The microscopic appearance of lichen planus is pathognomonic for the condition

      * Hyperparakeratosis with thickening of the granular cell layer
      * Development of a "saw-tooth" appearance of the rete pegs
      * Degeneration of the basal cell layer
      * Infiltration of inflammatory cells into the subepithelial layer of connective tissue

      Lichen planus may also affect the genital mucosa - vulvovaginal-gingival lichen planus. It can resemble other skin conditions such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis.

      Rarely, lichen planus shows esophageal involvement, where it can present with erosive esophagitis and stricturing. It has also been hypothesized that it is a precursor to squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus.[citation needed]

      [edit] Differential Diagnosis

      The clinical presentation of lichen planus may also resemble other conditions, including:

      * Lichenoid drug reaction
      * Discoid Lupus Erythematosus
      * Chronic Ulcerative Stomatitis
      * Pemphigus Vulgaris
      * Benign Mucous Membrane Pemphigoid
      * Oral leukoplakia
      * Fricional keratosis

      A biopsy is useful in identifying histological features that help differentiate lichen planus from these conditions.

      [edit] Treatment

      Currently there is no cure for lichen planus but there are certain types of medicines used to reduce the effects of the inflammation. Lichen planus may go into a dormant state after treatment. There are also reports that lichen planus can flare up years after it is considered cured.

      Medicines used to treat lichen planus include:

      * Oral and topical steroids.
      * Oral retinoids
      * immunosuppressant medications
      * hydroxychloroquine
      * tacrolimus
      * dapsone

      Lichen Planus Treatment with homeopathy: A large sample study of 800 cases by Dr Rajesh Shah, M.D. at Homoeopathy India Foundation, India, has documented encouraging results in the cases of dermal and oral Lichen Planus. Homeopathy treatment uses ultra minute doses of substances like gold salts(Aurum muriaticum), Mercury salts (Mecurius solubus, Mercurius corrosive), as well as some nosodes. Homeopathy is claimed to be working at the immune level controlling the auto-immune activity underlying the pathogenesis of Lichen Planus.


lichenoid keratosis causes

How To Treat Keratosis Pilaris On Arms

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What are good treatments for treating Keratosis Pilaris on your face and arms?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris on my face and arms. I already drink lots of water, use some baby oil on my arms, and use a face cream/scrub. What would be a better alternative instead of using baby oil and face scrub. What is your favorite treatment. Btw, water helps a lot.

    • ANSWER:
      Scrubs containing AHA (glycolic acid)

  2. QUESTION:
    what are some ways i can treat Keratosis Pilaris alba?
    I have this on my fore arm close to my elbows but one has alot more. but i dont have alot still. but want to treat it

    Keratosis Pilaris alba

    what are some ways to help it go away or have less of these bumps?

    • ANSWER:
      Exfoliate

  3. QUESTION:
    any tips for treating keratosis pilaris?
    any tips for treating keratosis pilaris?
    i have it on my upper arms and thighs, it is quite severe and i am very self conscious about it, what could i try before going to the doctors

    • ANSWER:
      This condition usually gets worse in cold weather & clears up in the summer by itself. It tends also to be hereditary. See your doctor for a prescription, but there is another treatment you could try with petroleum jelly mixed with water or cold cream which may help flatten the bumps.Good luck.

  4. QUESTION:
    Is Webber Naturals, Omega 369 a good quality brand of vitamins?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris on my arms, and I've read that using Omega 369, fish oil and flaxseed oil to treat it, but I also read that it must be a good quality brand. I have Webber Naturals, I'm just not sure if its a good brand to use or not. Any answers?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, that's definitely a quality omega 3-6-9 brand. I work for the company that makes webber naturals and can tell you that we make it using pharmaceutical grade MEG-3 fish oils. It's really high quality stuff—the best-selling Omega-3 brand in Canada, Canadian manufactured and guaranteed pure. The website says, “Recent advances in distillation and testing technology in use for these premium oils mean that the standards of purity are much higher that what is required by NHPD regulations.”

      You can read more details about MEG-3 at http://www.meg-3.com. I hope it helps with your Keratosis Pilaris! All the best.

  5. QUESTION:
    What is the best way to treat the bumps on back of my arms?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris which looks like bumps on back of my arms and legs. Its really unsightly and I barely wear short sleeves because of it.. what can I do to get rid of them or make them less noticeable?

    • ANSWER:
      See a dermotologist

  6. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of arm acne?
    Or keratosis pilaris. I think that it is keratosis pilaris and I have a bad case of it on my arms. How do I get rid of it?

    • ANSWER:
      http://www.wikihow.com/Treat-Keratosis-Pilaris

      Do not pop it, it will cause blisters.

  7. QUESTION:
    Are there any other ways to treat keratosis pilaris?
    Okay, so i'vew had keratosis pilaris on my arms, legs, and lower back for my whole life. i've tried everything to make it better... tanning, lotion with alpha hydroxy acid, exfoliation, etc. but nothing really works. are there any other ways to make it go away, at least mostly? i'm so sick of it and it makes me very self-conscious... i don't ever wear short-sleeved shirts or anything...

    • ANSWER:

  8. QUESTION:
    My 9 year old daughter has keratosis pilaris. What would be the best treatment?
    My daughter is 9 years old and has keratosis pilaris on her upper arms and small amount on her face. She already complained that kids in the school noticed her condition. I went online and checked few websites but I couldn't find how exactly to treat it and what products are efective. Could anybody give us good advice? Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Take her to a dermatologist. Over the counter products are unreliable and you risk irritating her skin. A doctor can recommend further treatment and probably a prescription skin cream for her face and arms.

  9. QUESTION:
    How do I know if I have Keratosis Pilaris, and will it fade over years?
    I have these little bumps on my arms and legs (they almost cover them entirely) and sometimes have dead skin attached to the end of the hair. Is this keratosis pilaris?

    I use exfoliating gloves all the time but it doesn't seem to be working.

    I'm only a teenager, so it might fade but is there a chance that it won't?

    Thank-you (in advance)

    :) 8D

    • ANSWER:
      It seems like you have Keratosis Pilaris because i used to have the same exact thing. It may fade away, but if it hasn't faded when your 16 or so, you might have it your lifetime.

      If you would like to get rid of them, i have solutions because i tried these and it definetly worked for me.

      From now on, Put lotion on the area where bumps are present.
      And try to keep this area mosterized.

      There is a lotion out there to treat Keratosis Pilaris. It's called Amlactin. Usually found in Costco. It should be gone if you used it everyday when the bottle is half empty.

      If that does not work, see a local dermatologists for they can give you prescribed medicine for it.

      Hope i helped =]]

  10. QUESTION:
    Will a steroid cream administered to the skin show up in a drug test?
    I want to use a steroid cream on my arms to reduce the inflammation of my Keratosis pilaris. However, I'm nervous that somehow the steroid cream will show up as a positive for steroid use in a drug test. Is it possible?

    • ANSWER:
      Smith is right....

      The steroids that your doctor prescribes (like...cortisone or prednisone, i.e.) are called "corticosteroids" and are useful for treating a variety of illnesses that are usually immune-system related. These guys are legal with a prescription. These steroids would never make you "beef up"...no matter how much you took.

      Anabolic steroids are those drugs that people take for gaining muscle mass, etc...and are essentially synthetic testosterone and derivitives. The legality of these drugs depends upon their use...there are some legitimate medical uses. On the flipside, taking these would never help your K. pilaris.

      Any drug test you take wouldn't come back positive for steroids, because the only steroids they'd test for are the anabolic ones! :)

  11. QUESTION:
    how can I be cured from Keratosis pilaris?
    Keratosis pilaris is a skin condition in which keratin protein forms within hair follicles thus making the skin appear scaly or like chicken skin.Keratosis pilaris symptoms vary – it can be found on your face, arms or thighs. It can be very bumpy or very red or both.

    • ANSWER:
      Nothing helps except for carrot juice. Carrot juice has been shown to either cure and or significantly reduce the Keratosis Pilaris symptoms for some people. To get results however you will want to drink a pint of carrot juice daily until the Keratosis Pilaris symptoms begin to disappear. It is thought that the reason carrot juice is effective in treating Keratosis Pilaris is because of the high levels of vitamin A within the fresh juice. Vitamin A is one of the most important for the health of your skin, nails, and hair. You could buy it at Wal-Mart. You could also search on google for keratosis pilaris/carrot juice.

      Good luck!

  12. QUESTION:
    How Can I get rid of Keratosis Pilaris?
    I'm 14 and I have Keratosis Pilaris (Kp) everywhere. Kp is a common genetic skin condition where you get little bumps on your skin. But mine is on my arms, forearms, thighs, face, neck, chest, stomach, and on my shoulder blades. It wont go away. I used Amlactin (lotion) tried everything! Not to be all into myself or anything, but I am an attractive person, but I cant let girls touch me becuz of my rough skin. Its ruining EVERYTHING! How can I treat this thing, plz help!

    • ANSWER:
      I have KP on my arms and legs and I just recently bought KP Elements exfoliating lotion... My arms are so smooth and it even reduces the redness too. Even after the first application, I noticed a big difference. It's about for a small jar of it but it's definitely worth the money. I am very grateful they made this product!

  13. QUESTION:
    How can I get rid of these "permanent goosebumps"?
    I have these "permanent goosebumps" along my outer, upper arms and thighs. It's this skin condition called Keratosis Pilaris. I'll probably contact my dermatologist because I've had this forever and it's totally unattractive, but I was wondering if there was a way to treat it right at home?

    • ANSWER:
      I have the same exact thing, and yeah it's incredibly hard to get rid of and all my dermatologist subscribed random oily lotions, but at Sephora they have this lotion called DermaDocter: KP Duty and it's actually for keratosis pilaris. http://www.sephora.com/browse/product.jhtml?id=P73509
      they do go away a little as u get older but yeah they are annoying.

  14. QUESTION:
    Have any of you had success treating keratosis pilaris?
    I'm 30 and have it on my arms - it actually worsened after getting pregnant. Now I am desperate to get rid of it. Please let me know if you have found anything that works.
    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I'm going to second the suggestion for Amlactin - it is over the counter - though sometimes you have to ask the pharmacist for it, because sometimes its kept behind the counter. Its a 12% lactic acid lotion that dissolves the dead skin that causes the bumps. Lachydrin is another just like it. Get which ever you can, they are practically identical.

      Eucerin Intense smoothing is a 5% lactic acid and 10% urea lotion that does the same, but doesnt have the same sting factor. If you dont put it on right after a shower though, its sticky. The cream is a 2.5% lactic acid, 20% urea cream. Its more moisterizing, but its downright thick and greasy.

      Those are the standard treatments for KP - if after you have tried that for 6 weeks there is no improvement, see a doctor, you might require "the big guns"

  15. QUESTION:
    How to treat my keratosis pilaris?
    I've had this condition for a very long time. It is located on my arms, above the elbows. I never really cared about them, but I'm just so sick of them and want to treat it. I know it's not curable but I just need some kind of home treatment to lessen it. It is so unflattering when I wear strappy dresses or tank tops, and with spring coming up and all. Plus I always scratch them when I'm stressed and pick at them, which isn't good, because now there is scarring to go along with the bumps.

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      You're right that KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured, although it can be made less noticeable. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre…
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co…

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture in, such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin.
      Check out this site for some great, inexpensive, homemade exfoliants you can try anywhere on your body;
      - http://www.skinway.com/

      Do not scrub the affected areas too harshly. It's not the amount of pressure you apply to the area that matters, as much as it's the consistency of gently exfoliating those affected areas daily. Also, you would not want to bruise your sensitive skin.

      The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers (Hot water tends to dry out the skin) and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when the lower humidity tends to dry out the skin.

      Vaseline and other such petroleum-based products are NOT generally recommended as a moisturizer, because petroleum-based products actually suffocate the skin. Skin needs to breathe to heal. As well, if there's any bacteria on your skin when the Vaseline is applied, it makes a perfect breeding ground for the bacteria to grow.

      The moisturizers you've mentioned are good. You could also add olive oil to that list. Olive oil is a natural oil that will help moisturze but will not clog your pores.

      Make sure to be drinking more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc… And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3’s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3’s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 – 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-…

      Check out the sites below for more information....

  16. QUESTION:
    How do you treat Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have the condition KP (chicken skin) on my legs, upper arms and on the sides of my face. It's a condition where you get bumpy skin but is not itchy or irritated. Also wondering if I got it from the sun because it stops at my ankles and upper thigh. How do I get rid of it? Is there a type of cream or something? Please suggest products! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:

      1. How to prevent Sunburn* & scope for consequential skin cancer, Melanoma, etc: Expose Ur body and or the affected parts within 90 minutes from sunrise & within 60 minutes before sunset. Timely exposure of body ensures safe and sufficient production of Vitamin D by Ur body. During strong winds, no exposure to sunlight, please. Any extra exposure shall be @ Ur own risk for skin cancer/melanoma

      2. The symptoms cited---------an offshoot of blocked energy + accumulated toxins liver, lungs, Thyroid & Parathyroid, lymphatic system, Spleen, hormonal imbalance with a displaced solar plexus.

      ‘Target Therapy’ [Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies] proved to be effective for all types of cancer [including brain tumors, leukemia, melanoma, Crohn’s Disease, bone marrow cancer, breast cancer, etc., ] & all the most dreaded and incurable diseases.

      TARGET THERAPY* It is the God-given therapy communicated to the mankind through THE RIGVEDA, one of the Hindu scriptures.
      Target Therapy---Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies, [comprising Ayurveda, Homeopathy, Bio-chemic salts, Herbal Remedies, Yoga/Meditation, Magneto-therapy, Sidha, etc.,] U can have sizable & perceivable relief in 45-90 days. @ no/affordable costs, No side effects, and No Hospitalization.

      Dr.Vora designed it in such a way that the costs are the least for the survival/rescue of common man and the poor in villages, towns and metropolis on the globe; with NO insurance cover & NO money to bear the costs of chemo. It is most suitable to all the youngsters on this entire globe.
      U may study it, discuss with Ur family members/friends/acquaintances and slowly and steadily implement it for the best results.

      •No side effects and no risk. If it clicks, mostly possible, U shall have a cure. Lest, the therapy keeps mum. No extra risk. It is the most suitable line of treatment even for the terminally ill patients. Cancer cure/prevention is quite possible. U may try it for any incurable disease including cancer of any organ[s], post-surgical recurrence of tumors, Leukemia, HIV/AIDS, Crohn’s Syndrome, Gilbert’s Syndrome, colon cancer, Thalassemia, Alzheimer’s Syndrome, Muscular Dystrophy, Autism, bone TB., Tinnitus, all brain & spinal cord disorders, CLL, Crohn’s Syndrome, endometriosis, etc., ---it should aim @ [3] steps.
      1. Removal of toxins from all internal organs & purging through Normal Drainage systems, feces, urine, skin, lungs, menses [females].
      2. Activating all the internal organs to make each & every organ to function up to optimum levels, by purging out toxins.
      3. Supplying vitamins, nutrients, micro-nutrients, minerals, trace elements for invigorating the entire Immune system to produce antibodies.
      All items for a cure—available in Ur vicinity all over the globe.

      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse 'Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.

  17. QUESTION:
    Are there any lower budget or ideas that can/will help treat/reduce keratosis pilaris?
    I've got lots of em. Back of my arms, legs, thighs.

    • ANSWER:
      Use a soapless cleanser like Cetaphil's.

      Use lotions (Cetaphil, lubriderm), salicylic acid lotions, retin-A

      The problem is that the best treatment is often combo creams, which cost money. The other problem as you are aware, is that you require constant application, which will rack up the cost as well.

  18. QUESTION:
    How can I get rid of multiple little dotty pimples on my arm?
    My arms are filled with little pimples. Is this a normal thing? I`ve been putting on lots and lots of lotion, and scrub my arms in the shower every day to get rid of these little pimples but it doens't seem to work. The little dots are everywhere!

    • ANSWER:
      i forgot what its called, but the stuff for body acne will make it less noticeable. its not body acne, though, but the sacrylic acid in the soap will help it.

      here, more info:

      Keratosis pilaris is a harmless skin disorder that causes small, acne-like bumps. Although it isn't serious, keratosis pilaris can be frustrating because it's difficult to treat.

      Keratosis pilaris results from a buildup of protein called keratin in the openings of hair follicles in the skin. This produces small, rough patches, usually on the arms and thighs. Though quite common with young children, keratosis pilaris can occur at any age.

      Many people are bothered by the goose flesh appearance of keratosis pilaris, but it doesn't have long-term health implications and occurs in otherwise healthy people.

      Keratosis pilaris usually resolves without treatment. But if you're concerned about the appearance of your skin, your doctor can help you determine the best course of treatment, which includes self-care measures and medicated creams.

      ------------

      I Know that i've seen an article online about how sacrylic acid makes it less noticeable, but aparently those are eluding me right now, haha.
      i'll post them if i ever find it.

      Frequency:

      * In the US: Significant individual variation exists in the prominence and severity of keratosis pilaris, which affects 42% of the population. Some studies estimate that keratosis pilaris affects 50-80% of all adolescents. The disorder has a familial relationship, which is consistent with autosomal dominant transmission.

      Frequency is increased, reported at 74%, in individuals with ichthyosis vulgaris. Many older reports claim an increased incidence with atopic dermatitis, but more recent studies do not demonstrate this association. Hormonal influence may occur because a high prevalence and intensity of keratosis pilaris is noted during puberty and in women with hyperandrogenism.

      * Internationally: Incidence is similar to that observed in the United States.

      Medical Care:

      * Education and reassurance are the cornerstones of therapy for keratosis pilaris.

      * The noninflamed horny papules usually remit with age and increasing time, but they are resistant to most forms of short-term therapy.

      * Encourage tepid showers instead of hot baths, along with the use of mild soaps and a home humidifier.

      * An emollient cream may help alleviate rough surfaces in mild cases. A topical keratolytic agent such as lactic acid, salicylic acid, or urea preparations may be beneficial in more extensive cases. Several recent reports claim good results with 2-3% salicylic acid in 20% urea cream. Topical tretinoin therapy has also been used with varying degrees of success.

      * Lesions with significant inflammation may improve with the use of medium-potency emollient-based topical steroid preparations. Inflammation is usually reduced markedly by 7 days, at which point the steroid should be discontinued.

      HOPE THIS HELPED!!!

  19. QUESTION:
    How to treat keratosis pilaris?
    I have itl over my arms on the tops. I hate it and feel so uncomfortable in singlets and t-shirts. PLEASE HELP.

    • ANSWER:

  20. QUESTION:
    How can i treat my chicken skin?
    I feel i have a very strong case of keratosis pilaris (or chicken skin) nearly everywhere. its really ugly and i have been self conscious about it ever since ive had them. im 16 and iv had it ever since i can remember when i was really young. I have a lot on my upper arms, shoulders, upper back, thighs, and embarrassingly enough my butt :(
    please, i cant see a dermatologist for money's sake so can someone please help me?

    • ANSWER:
      apply aloe vera, it should smooth it out within 2 weeks.

  21. QUESTION:
    How can you treat keratosis pilaris?
    My niece has KP from both thighs to feet and on the back of her arms. I know you can't cure KP but what products can she use to try and improve it. She exfoliates every day and moisturizes but it doesn't make a difference. I was thinking of buying her some AmLactin but does that really work and what else can she try?

    • ANSWER:
      i have it on my thighs and i use eurecin dry skin therapy plus repair creme and it smoothes the skin and has reduced the KP, but its not completly gone. today i've just bought amlactin and i think that u should get her both. the euercin for after the shower and the amlactin for morning. hope it helps kp is really not pretty at all

  22. QUESTION:
    How to go from grenade to beautiful?
    It's my last year of junior high, and I've been the ugly girl literally since preschool/kindergarten. I just want my high school years to be better than previous years.. I just have no idea where to start.
    1. I'm really overweight, like at least 100 pounds. I'm 217 pounds when my normal weight is in the range of 107-120. I've tried everything but I just can't lose the weight or keep it off if I do manage to lose it.
    2. I have short legs and big feet. I wear 10 wide size shoes.
    3. My hair and skin are so unhealthy. My hair is dyed black and reddish blonde, kind of short and dull. It's also fine and brittle. My skin is combination, my nose, chin and forehead are really oily and my cheeks are dry. I also have major blackheads all over, but mostly on my nose, chin and cheeks, with a few on my forehead. I have mostly tiny whitehead type things on my forehead. I also have horrible keratosis pilaris on my legs, face and arms.
    4. I'm a really pastey white where my keratosis doesn't cover, and my body hair is coarse and dark. I like being pale, love it actually. Just not dead looking.

    How can I go from grenade to beautiful from now until around the last day of July when school starts? I'm already saving money for a shopping spree for a whole new wardrobe. Any answers are appreciated...

    • ANSWER:
      Ok, well im going to start off by saying YOU think your the ugly girl. Im sure many others dont but there is nothing wrong with wanting to change your looks so here it goes:

      Weight- If your serious about it, go to your doctor and see how they reccomend you losing weight. DONT STARVE YOURSELF!! It is so important, you wont even lose weight for a couple months after you do that, you will get bigger. So exercise and eat a diet your doctor thinks is right then you will be a healthy weight in a matter on months.

      Legs and Feet- I am 5'3 and have abnormally long legs, so I know how you feel. Theres nothing you can do about it. You cant do anything about your feet either. Look up Alessandra Ambrosio shes a Victoria's Secret model with short legs and big feet but shes gorgeous!

      Hair- Stop dying it until it gets healthier. What you should start out by doing is getting a moisterizing shampoo such as Herbel Essences Hello Hydration, it works great and its cheap! Then get a shine spray and heat protectant (if you use heat on your hair.) Last you could try Aussies split end protecter. I dont have split ends but you put it in your hair after a shower and let it dry. It leaves it so soft. After your hair is soft and how you want it go to a professional hair stylist and get it dyed. Also get your hair trimmed every month and a half!

      Skin- Go to a dermetologist they will know how to treat that. In the mean time, look for a cleanser for your face thats for combonation skin also get a spot treatment for your black heads, put it on every night before bed. Make sure you wash your face everyday and take off ALL makeup before bed.

      Pale- Im super pale too but I get super brown in the summer. Dark hair actually compliments pale skin (I have dark brown hair and blue/gray eyes) but I try to use self tanner because I dont like my porcelain skin. Im glad you do though! To work pale skin all you really have to do is wear the right colors of clothes (Green, Cream, Red, Peach, Look up more colors) and make sure your eye makeup isnt too dark. Look up makeup tutorials for pale skin on Youtube.

      Good luck! I reccomend shopping at places like Forever 21, Charlotte Russe, American Eagle, PINK and Victoria's Secret for cute teen clothes. (:

  23. QUESTION:
    How can i treat my KERATOSIS PILARIS?im kinda shy of showing my arms because i have it all over my arms?
    im shy of wearing short sleeved shirts because of my KERATOSIS PILARIS and it lowers my self esteem, i try to prick them every now and then and it tends to get darker and leaves scars, pls help me, how can i lighten this or prevent this?

    • ANSWER:
      Ooo, don't prick them. It will definitely be more beneficial if you don't pick at them/prick them. I've had it since I was really young and it's already starting to fade (I'm 22) My case isn't that terrible, I only have it on my arms and it's not severe... but I do know that it sucks. lol.

      So yeah, as far as treatment goes, there are lotions you can use but that's about it. There's no 'cure' for it, though. If you want to treat it without seeing a doctor, just go out and find a really thick non-perfume lotion and apply that one or twice a day. Keratosis Pilaris lessens in time and it should eventually clear up 100%. It can be embarrassing but it's a really, really common thing so don't let it lower your self esteem! I'm sure it's hardly noticeable to anyone but yourself.

  24. QUESTION:
    How can I lessen the appearance of Keratosis pilaris, also known as chicken skin?
    I've had for a long time and it has never really bothered me but I do want it to go away or at least not be too noticable. I have it on my arms (mainly my upper arms) and they has become less noticable on their own, which is nice but I also have it on my thys and legs. I want to treat it but I don't know exactly what to do. I've been searching for answers on the internet but I am wondering what wroks.
    Please help me.

    • ANSWER:
      Lac-Hydrin cream 12% (prescription in the US, OTC in Canada) has been VERY successful for this.

      If you're in the US, your doctor can write you a prescription....or if you know someone in Canada, they can mail it to you.

      You should wear a sun-screen with this though, as it makes you more susceptible to sunburn. But it works great for KP!

  25. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of bumps on the back of my arms?
    I have small bumps on the back of my upper arms. I used to think that they were caused by some kind of vitamin deficiency, but I take a multivitamin every day, and yet the bumps are still there. How do I get rid of them?

    • ANSWER:
      You have keratosis pilaris. You can go to a regular doctor or dermatologist to get some cream or lotion to treat it or you can also get a product called KP Duty at Sephora.

  26. QUESTION:
    I have little red bumps on my arms any suggestions?
    I have little tiny bumps on my upper arms on the sides, sometimes the bumps dry out. Are there any ways to make them less noticable or curing it?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, here is what you have:
      Keratosis pilaris is a harmless skin disorder that causes small, acne-like bumps. Although it isn't serious, keratosis pilaris can be frustrating because it's difficult to treat.

      "Keratosis pilaris results from a buildup of protein called keratin in the openings of hair follicles in the skin. This produces small, rough patches, usually on the arms and thighs. Though quite common with young children, keratosis pilaris can occur at any age.

      Many people are bothered by the goose flesh appearance of keratosis pilaris, but it doesn't have long-term health implications and occurs in otherwise healthy people."
      from: Mayoclinic.com

      Here are some treatment options for it:

      http://skincarerx.com/keratosis-pilaris.html

      Sometimes Keratosis pilaris clears up on its own, sometimes not, so the products on the website above are good options. Good luck!

  27. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of keratosis Pilaris and scaring?
    I have had kp since I was 6 months old, I am now 14! It didn't used to bother me to much when I was younger, it wasn't that noticeable. I have it on my upper arms my tighs and my face, it's liveable not so red more bumpy than anything, but with certain scrubs and the occasional pick they have scabbed and I always pick them so they have scarred that was about a year ago, so that's only on my upper arms, I then went on holiday couple months after and they tanned, I have used bio oil since then and it's defiantly less visible but I was wondering firstly how to get rid of kp tried everything and then how to get rid or make scarrs less visible ? Thanks x

    • ANSWER:
      Sorry to hear about your condition. Apparently, it goes away when you get older, but of course, you'd wanna be relieved off it as much as you could before then.

      I'm guessing you've already done some online research, but lemme just share some info I found, in case you haven't come across them yet.

      According to Dr. Myers in this article from Mind, Body, Green, KP is a symptom/sign of gluten intolerance http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-7482/10-signs-youre-gluten-intolerant.html

      Have you heard about this, and tried improving your diet? High-gluten food (if you go through the whole article) isn't really healthy for anyone anyway, so try cutting out or reducing your intake of food with any wheat or flour. That might make you sad, but lots of people are doing that and their skin problems dramatically improve, not to mention experience a big improvement in having more energy & weight-loss. The typical American food has so much processed & refined starches. It's best to avoid or cut back on eating them (less bread, pasta, baked goodies, fast food, junk food, etc) and eat more fresh, whole foods that's not so processed.

      One of the best sites to explore on health is http://www.naturalnews.com/ There's a search field there you can use. A few articles that came up under KP talked about lots of skin problems, and there are reports of people having good results using Coconut Oil (virgin, organic -- I get mine from Trader Joe's cuz they sell things cheaper there than any other natural-products store) on their skin. It generally helps heal skin, so it could be good for KP & new scars. Tea Tree Oil also came up as an effective remedy to treat or reduce KP symptoms.

      For scars, I recommend aloe vera, coconut oil, cocoa butter, & vitamin e oil. There are also skin care products for scars. I use a homeopathic scar control medicine oil for my scars/keloids, while others use store-bought creams with dimethicone (a silicone oil that reduces scars). Wish I could help you find & get these, but good luck.

      Hope this helps...

  28. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of red spots on arms and legs?
    When I was a teenager I suffered from moderate acne on my face. Now in my twenties, that acne has mostly cleared up, but I seem to have developed red spots on my arms and legs. How do I get rid of them? Would ordinary acne products work (I assume it's acne? It's little red bumps, and when squeezed they emit pus)? So far I have been recommended using a body scrub, which I have used with little success.

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      I have small red bumps on my arms identified as Keratosis Pilaris. You could have a form of this condition. There is no definite cure for it, only remedies that treat it for a short time. The good news is, It is not dangerous in any way, just an excess amount of keratin.

  29. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know what or how to treat pimple-like red spots on upper arms?
    For the longest time I've had these pimple-like red spots on my upper arms, below my shoulder. I have no clue what they are, but they are NOT pimples; however, when I squeeze one, it pops just like a zit would. What is this? I want to get rid of it as soon as possible. Any tips or pointers would be much appreciated. Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      if it is what i had, it is treated in a similar way as acne. go to the doctor and get some cream (acid based) for it. i use a tretinoin cream. it could be keratosis pilaris.

  30. QUESTION:
    Does keratosis pilaris get worse before it gets better?
    I've been using coconut oil to treat my KP for about a week, and I'm getting more smaller bumps on my arms (almost like goosebumps) so I'm not sure if it's more KP breaking out. Does it get worse before it gets better? Maybe I put too much oil on? I've already tried AMLactin.

    • ANSWER:
      Um no ketosis pilaris is not known for getting better (there is no known cure) so I suspect you're making it worse. Coconut oil is comedogenic.

      I haves heard that changing diet might work so maybe check that out.

  31. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of Keratosis Pilaris and Keratosis Pilaris Scars?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris for about 2-3 years now. I have KP on my upper arms, it looks kinda like acne, it's red and brown-ish. Will sunlight helps treat KP? thanks ! :D

    • ANSWER:
      I found that champori cream for psoriasis clears my kp better than anything else: takes just a few days and then my skin stays smooth for months on end. Try it: champori is available without prescription and comes with money back guarantee, so if it doesnt work for you - it's free.
      Best,
      Mol.

  32. QUESTION:
    I need to get rid of the litte bumps on the backs of my arms, any suggestions?
    I have used a 2%sacylic acid acne cleanser and a cream on them along with a loofa and a pumice stone. I got rid of the bumps on my right arm but the left is still bad. I want smooth, non red arms for my wedding in September. Please Help!

    • ANSWER:
      I have the same problem - have for as long as I can remember. I hate it, but I haven't been dedicated enough to keep it away. It is caused by dead skin cells building up around the hair follicles. Some people don't slough off skin as well as others. You need to do two things - exfoliate to remove the dead skin that is forming the bumps, and prevent new ones from forming by using an alpha hydroxy cream. You can use a loofah, a salt scrub, or even just a washcloth to exfoliate. I prefer the salt scrub - I use Philosophy's Amazing Grace Salt Scrub, but you can buy other brands that cost less. You can even create your own salt scrub by using regular table salt (and it's very cheap!). When you use a salt scrub, wet your arms but then blot most of the water off. If you don't do this, you lose a lot of the abrasive effect of the salt. Rub vigorously in circles for a minute or so, then rinse. You need to do this two or three times a week at first, then just once a week to maintain smooth skin.
      The second part is a moisturizing lotion with alpha hydroxy. Alpha hydroxy acid helps dissolve the bonds between dead, dry, flaky skin cells at the surface. You need to use this every day after you shower, when your skin is still moist. Read the lotion bottles - they advertise on the front if it contains alpha hydroxy. Look for lactic acid in the ingredient list.

      I originally thought the salicylic acid acne cleanser wouldn't help and would dry out your skin, but I just read that salicylic acid is a BETA hydroxy acid, and is also useful because it dissolves lipids (fats) in the pores, which alpha hydroxy acids can't do.

      The most difficult thing about treating this problem is that it is never cured. You have to keep up with the exfoliating and the moisturizing forever.

      Also, the link above is rather frightening, and is NOT the problem you're taking about. You probably have keratosis pilaris, which is VERY common. Try the one below.

      Okay, LAST edit, I promise. Neutrogena Body Smoothing Lotion with SPF 15 is supposed to be pretty good for KP. Check out the reviews at drugstore.com.

  33. QUESTION:
    how do you get rid of keratosis pilaris on your legs and upper arms?
    It's really annoying me because i've had it for awhile now (3 years) and i havent been wearing skirts and shorts for ages! I've tried different kind of creams that people have told me to use but they don't help!
    what can i use to get rid of them?

    • ANSWER:
      well here are some methods you can try to reduce them ..
      1. take warm showers not hot showers because hot showers can cause them to roughen up which would make it more noticeable .
      2. instead of wiping yourself dry pat yourself down with a towel
      3. after shower moisturise with lotion preferably one with no scent * some scented with perfume lotion may irritate )
      and here are some methods to reduce and to get rid of keratosis pilaris on this site .
      http://www.wikihow.com/Treat-Keratosis-Pilaris
      i hope this could help you i understand how keratosis pilaris can be irritating i've had it for most of my life and Truly hate them makes me feel really self conscious to wear skirts/shorts and tank tops which show the skin affected . if theses methods don't seem to make a difference you might want to go see a dermatologist for more methods to get rid of them

      good luck
      =]

  34. QUESTION:
    Natural way of healing KP on my 1 year old?
    My 1 year old daughter has Keratosis Pilaris on her face, arms and thighs. I really would rather not rub chemicals and harsh ointments on her skin. I especially would like to avoid products with a heavy mineral oil base. Does anyone know of a natural gentle product for treating KP? Thanks so much!

    • ANSWER:
      Poor kid, I dont know but I wish you luck..

  35. QUESTION:
    what can i do to stop keratosis pliaris?
    i have it on my face and it makes my skin all nasty looking. i also have it on my arms. i desperately need to get rid of it. what can i do to stop/control it?

    • ANSWER:
      keratosis pilaris is something that is sort of hard to treat. It doesn't usually happen in the face but more of the arms and legs. Are you sure it's not acne you are seeing n your face? Any hoo I would recommend exfoliating the area with a lactic acid or glycolic acid and then use a moisturizer on your face. Try Dermalogica products. I am an Facialist and iv'e found that Dermalogica is so gentle that it helps because it doesn't irritate the problem area.
      If you have it on your arms and such I would try the body hydrating cream because the hydroxy acids will help exfoliate and the plant oils hydrate the skin.
      For your face I would try the gentle cream exfoliant because it has Alpha hydroxy Lactic Acid, beta hydroxy Salicylic Acid.

  36. QUESTION:
    Suggestions on how to treat Keratosis Pilaris?
    Hey, if anyone else has Keratosis Pilaris, maybe you could give me some advice. I have KP on my arms, thighs, shoulders, etc. It wouldn't bother me as much if there wasn't so much scarring; but I have been scratching the affected areas for quite a while, and now there are scabs/scarring to go along with the KP. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to treat KP fast, like any good exfoliants or creams? Or can anyone relate to this situation?

    • ANSWER:
      kp is hereditary. Half the people in my family have it. If it is KP there should be others in your family that have it . I used Retin-a used to treat acne, when i was a teenager. and a good moisturizer containing aloe, shea butter, and/or vitamin e is best.
      By the time I was 20 it had cleared up a lot, My diet was also a lot better by then as well.

      I have no problem now... some people keep it ,mine went away.. good luck

  37. QUESTION:
    what are these little red dots over my arms and on my body?
    Some I've notice all these little red dots over my arms and chest/stomach. In two areas on my right arm the little red dots clustered around little bit. The dots don't hurt or anything but I am wondering what they are. Any ideas?
    The dots are mainly on the underside of my right forearm btw.
    The dots are really small and they are actually more pink than red
    There are fairly spread out and only appeared recently.

    • ANSWER:
      It's called Keratosis Pilaris. It's harmless and about 50% of all people have it. One way to treat it is with T/Sal shampoo. It has a certain acid in it that helps the KP go away. Use it about once a week and it will go away. You have to keep using it though, or the KP will come back. Hope I helped! :)

  38. QUESTION:
    Dermatology Help (Keratosis Pilaris?)- How to improve?
    My upper arms and thighs are covered in tiny dots which looks like a rash. It isn't itchy and I've had it for more than 10 years. My cousins have had it too. Right now, it is less spread out than when I initially got it. I know it is not contagious and that it hasn't spread. A previous dermatologist suggested that it was due to an excess keratin (Keratosis Pilaris). What can I do to stop it?

    • ANSWER:
      If you are looking keratosis pilaris treatment, do bear in mind that this condition does not need to be treated with conventional medication which may bring more harm than good. Start with the basics such as diet and skin care, and this will significantly improve your condition.

      First, include Vitamin E and the essential fatty acids, such as omega-3, omega-6, omega-9 & GLA, in your diet, as these help regulate abnormal proliferation of the outer skin layers. In other words, they help promote a healthy exfoliation process which in turn helps the skin rids the body of toxins. Daily cleansing of the body is how we help the process by washing away the dead skin cells from the body. In some cases, we may need to assist the exfoliation process with the use of exfoliating soaps or cleansers or body loofahs.

      Keratosis pilaris is a condition which indicates lack of moisture and imbalance immune system. You need to bring moisture back to your skin, by increasing water intake as well as moisturizing your skin. In addition, you need to restore balance through nutritions and detoxification to remove the toxins that are affecting your immune health.

      Urea Cream is often recommended for treating Keratosis pilaris. However, before you use urea creams, think about this. Nitrogen, which is a waste product of protein metabolism in humans, is removed from the blood and converted to urea. Urea is transferred into the urine and removed from the body. Medically it is used in creams, supposedly, to restore moisture. There are more natural and healthier alternatives for moisturizing the skin such as Vitamin E oil, borage oil, and a many others; why use a toxic waste byproduct to do the job. In addition, most of the prescribed creams that contain urea might contain other harmful ingredients that's not particularly good for the skin.

      Try these more natural skin care options instead:

      Elicina cream (http://bioskincare.com/keratosis-pilaris.htm)
      Rose Hip oil
      Burt's Bees Exfoliating soap
      Burt's Bees Vitamin E bath oil
      Borage Skin Therapy lotion by Shikai

      Consider a cleansing or detoxification program to rid the toxins from your system. Finally, you will need make sure your environment is allergen free. Apart from food allergens, try to avoid other possible allergens which may aggravate your condition such as chlorine treated water systems, pet dander, molds, dust mites, Amalgam fillings in teeth, fluoride in toothpaste, harsh detergents, and so on.

      In conclusion, it is good news to those affected that keratosis pilaris is harmless and easily treated. With the proper diet and change of lifestyle, you can overcome this condition easily. Go for natural treatment for keratosis pilaris to avoid even more toxins to get into your body system which in turn will worsen the condition. Take care of your diet and lifestyle, you are on your way to healthier skin.

  39. QUESTION:
    How do I fix these appearance downfalls?
    I have all these little random bumps on my thighs are the top of my arms and I need to make them go away but I have no idea what they are! I've had them for years. You can't really see them but you can feel them. Does anyone know what they could be? Theyre really little. And they NEED to go away soon! Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      Here you go...

      Keratosis Pilaris
      Keratosis pilaris (commonly called KP) appears as "chicken skin bumps" on the skin. These bumps usually appear on the upper arms and thighs. They also can appear on the cheeks, back and buttocks. Keratosis pilaris, while unattractive, is harmless.

      What Are the Symptoms of Keratosis Pilaris?
      This disorder appears as small, rough bumps. The bumps are usually white or red, but do not itch or hurt. Keratosis pilaris is usually worse during the winter months or other times of low humidity when skin becomes dry. It also may worsen during pregnancy or after childbirth.

      How Is Keratosis Pilaris Treated?
      Although the condition may remain for years, it gradually disappears before age 30 in most cases. Treatment of keratosis pilaris is not medically necessary; but, individuals with this condition may want to seek treatment for cosmetic reasons.

      The initial treatment of keratosis pilaris should be intensive moisturizing. A cream such as Acid Mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 can be applied after bathing, and then re-applied several times a day. Other treatments may include:

      Medicated creams containing urea (Carmol-20) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily
      Efforts to unplug pores by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth or stiff brush.

  40. QUESTION:
    What can i do to get ride of goose bumps on my legs?
    I have had some kind of goose bumps on my legs and on my arms since i was little does any one know if there is anything to do to remedy that?

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like Keratosis Pilaris if you have had it on your legs and arms you whole life. Little bumps on the backs of your arms and your thighs right? These bumps are a build up of keratin. You produce excess keratin and it gets trapped in the hair follicle causing a bump. There is no cure for KP but you can treat it everyday so it is not so noticeable. It gets worse in the winter and somewhat goes away in the summer for me. All I do is put lotion on right after I shower. But make sure the lotion you use has lactic acid and urea. They make a lotion and a scrub especially for KP at Sephora. Its by DermaDoctor. Really KP is different for everyone..some people have red bumps..some just have bumps with a white section in it. Some people scrub the areas but for me it just makes it worse. You have to try different things and look up KP on google and see what works for you.

  41. QUESTION:
    Are peels good for keratosis pilaris that is on the back and arms? If so, which one would work best?
    And be specific about which brand would work, please. Also (I keep getting mixed reviews on this) but are gold peels good or bad for the skin?

    • ANSWER:
      peels are not bad for the skin but they wont cure the problem..
      Start off with some gentle physical exfoliation. Twice a week, soak in a warm bath and then lightly scrub affected areas with a loofah or Buf-Puf. Moisturize well after you get out of the water. Look for urea, a skin-softening ingredient that's a favorite with dermatologists. You can find it in Gold Bond Ultimate Softening Shea Butter Lotion or Carmol 20. If you don't see any improvement after a few weeks, step up the treatment with chemical exfoliants.

      Again, start off gently. Some people are able to deal with stronger exfoliants while others will find themselves sensitive to certain products. Alpha-hydroxy acids are a good option for fighting rough skin. Glycolic and lactic acids are the most popular AHAs available over the counter. You can find glycolic acid available in DDF's Glycolic Exfoliating Wash 5% or DermaDoctor's KP Duty, a formula specially created to deal with the condition. You can find lactic acid in products like AmLactin (usually located behind the pharmacy counter) and Fresh Milk Bath and Shower Cream.

      Another option is vitamin A, or retinol. You can try prescription formulas such as Retin-A or Differin, but you can also go with an over the counter retinol line such as RoC or SkinCeuticals. Be careful and sparing when you use vitamin A products, however. Many people are sensitive to retinol and may experience peeling and irritation with the first several uses.

      f you're still not seeing much improvement after trying these options, see your dermatologist for a chemical peel or microdermabrasion. These options will help exfoliate stubborn cases of keratosis pilaris so that you can start treating the problem from there. Since the condition is caused by the skin's failure to exfoliate itself properly, keratosis pilaris is a continual problem. One chemical peel will not keep the skin smooth forever. Instead, view the peel as a jump-start and continue to treat the condition with at-home exfoliation.

  42. QUESTION:
    What are these small itchy red bumps on my toddler's arms?
    There the size of a pimple, but there aren't any white heads, or puss, or anything like that. They're only on his arms, no where else. He constantly scratches them so it makes them more red, could even be making them spread. What could this be? It doesn't look like chicken pox, or impetigo...could it be eczema? is it just a rash? thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Could it be KP (Keratosis Pilaris)? I have them and they sometimes itch. They are just lots of red bumps which you can get on your arms or legs. 60% of teenagers have them, but many ages can get them (45% of the population). It is not harmful, but it cant be cured. I can be treated by exfoliation with salicylic acid and moisturizing. It looks a bit like chicken skin. It happens when excess keratin is produced and surrounds the hair follicles. This means the bumps are usually where hairs are.

      It might not be this, but if it is I hope it helps!

  43. QUESTION:
    How To Get Rid Little Bumps On My Arms?
    I have a lot of little bumps on my arms. They've been there since I was small. Any way to get rid of them?

    • ANSWER:
      if you have what i have, it's call Keratosis Pilaris. VERY common. No cure, but there are certain creams that can treat it. You have to use them regularly, though, otherwise the bumps will come back

      check the site below

  44. QUESTION:
    What are the little red dots on my upper arms?
    I have very light skin. When I was 14, these little red dots appeared on my upper arms and have been there ever since. (I'm 22.5 now) What are they?? Is it Acne?? How can I get rid of them??

    • ANSWER:
      Its called keratosis pilaris...also known as chicken skin.
      May go away with age but not likely. Theres no cure for it but u can treat it. I recommend neutogena's transparent bar soap & eucerin dry skin therapy plus intensive repair cream. dont pick at it. always stay moisturized!

  45. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of bumpy skin?
    The upper half of my arms is quite bumpy. They feel like small pimples, but they are not lol.
    Are there any NATURAL remedies to get smooth skin?
    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      You have what's called keratosis pilaris, research it a bit. It is hereditary and there is not a cure for it.
      About 40 to 50 percent of the world has it. IT IS TREATABLE. Lot's of people in my family have it. My cousin told me that she used this mineral called ALUM to treat it. When I looked at her arms there wasn't a trace of the bumps anywhere!!! I use alum too, as a face mask. Alum can be bought at almost any store that sells spices and stuff( I got mine at this Afghan market) or order it online:)
      It is usually in a rough powder form when you buy it. I grind up the alum so it becomes softer and then mix it with water so it is like a watery paste like thing. Then I apply it on my face,once it drys on your skin it will be flaky. I sleep with this mask on and then in the morning I wash it off with face wash.
      It does tend to whiten skin a bit. Do the same thing I did except put it on your arms. Alum can be used for more than just keratosis pilaris, so research that as well, it is very useful. Hope this helps.

  46. QUESTION:
    How do i get rid permanently of red dry bumpy skin?
    ever since i was little i have had this type of skin on the sides of my face, all over my arms, and some parts of my chest and i want it gone. ive tried everything, can someone plz recommend something to make it go away

    • ANSWER:
      You might have Keratosis Pilaris.

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris:
      1. Keratosis pilaris rubra: red, inflamed bumps
      2. Keratosis pilaris Alba: rough, white, bumpy skin
      3. Keratosis pilaris rubra faceii: reddish rash over the cheeks

      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris. However, there are effective treatments available that make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Most of the available treatments are purely symptomatic; the one thing they all have in common is need for repetition and ongoing commitment. Some seeking treatment with the disorder may be prescribed Tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream, often by request.

      Triamcinolone, most commonly sold under the trade name Aristocort, is a synthetic corticosteroid medically approved as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of eczema, which also reduces the amount of keratin in pores. It may be of most help to those with keratosis pilaris by reducing red, inflamed bumps. Triamcinolone is typically applied three times a day.

      Tretinoin, most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by causing the outer layer of the skin to grow more rapidly, which decreases the amount of the protein keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. As keratosis pilaris is manifested through excess keratin in the skin, Tretinoin forms a more effective and core approach to treatment than Triamcinolone, which forms a largely symptomatic approach. Tretinoin is typically applied once a day before bed.

      An alternative treatment is Adapalene, a retinoid medication that is a more stable compound, is less sunlight-sensitive, has fewer general side-effects, and may be just as effective as Retin-A. Treatment of KP with Adapalene would be considered an "off-label" use of the medication.

      As with Triamcinolone, Tretinoin or any other treatment, once therapy is discontinued, the condition reverts to its original state. However, skin treated with Tretinoin may take several weeks or more to revert to its pre-treatment condition, but may, at the same time, take several weeks or more to show optimal results, with the condition commonly worsening initially, as underlying keratin is brought to the surface of the skin. Tretinoin is considerably more expensive and dispensed in smaller quantities than Triamcinolone and other treatments. Although it may be the most effective treatment for keratosis pilaris, it is not considered the first line of treatment.

      Keratosis pilaris has not been clinically researched for treatment in an unbiased manner, with all claims of success or improvement being purely marketed or anecdotal. The condition is often dismissed outright by practitioners as being presently untreatable, giving mere moisturizing suggestions or reassurance that the condition will improve or cease with age, typically after 30. General practitioners are often unable to identify the condition. Ignorance, accompanied with the price, availability, quantity dispensed, time taken for optimal results to be achieved, more serious side-effects, adverse reactions, and worsening of the condition in the initial treatment phase - coupled with the cheaper, safer, and easier availability of other treatments - has hindered Tretinoin from showing its potential in the treatment of this condition.

      exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, creams, and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Beta hydroxy acids may help improve the appearance and texture of the afflicted skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to their containing lactic acid, a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may be helpful in moderation. Coconut oil may also be helpful if applied to afflicted areas while in the shower. Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, and, in many cases, will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing, such as tight-fitting jeans, is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

  47. QUESTION:
    What do I do about these strange bumps on my arm?
    Okay, so as you can imagine, I have acne on my face. No big deal, I treat it daily, but that's not the problem.

    I have all these weird, acne-like bumps on my arm, and I can't get rid of them. They've been there forever. They are NOT mosquito bumps. Help!

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis Pilaris is a common skin condition that is mostly found on the upper arms, buttocks and thighs. Dry skin cells that normally flake off the skin, get caught in the hair follicles and clogs them up. This forms little pimples that have a dry rough texture. They are not painful or itchy but aren't very attractive and are known chicken skin.

      Keratosis Pilaris Treatment

      Keratosis Pilaris occurs mostly in teenagers on the upper arms. However, babies and adults can experience this condition on their faces, upper arms, legs and buttocks. It's a genetic follicular disorder that looks almost like "goose bumps" and are rather rough to touch.

      Primarily, it appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms, but can also occur on thighs and buttocks or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet).

      Worldwide, keratosis pilaris affects an estimated 40 to 50% of the adult population and approximately 50 to 80% of all adolescents, varying in degree from minimal to severe. It can last for a number of years but usual begins to disappear at the age of about 30 years old.

      Keratosis pilaris is a result of a process called hyperkeratinization. This is when there is an excess production of keratin (a natural fibrous protein of the skin, hair and nails) that builds up around the hair follicles. The skin becomes flaky and dry and if not removed from the skin it clogs up the hair follicles causing the small pimple like bumps that are visible on the skins surface.

      google 'oil pulling' - I have read that that can have dramatic effect and help the condition - reason is not well understood

  48. QUESTION:
    What order should I use my Skincare Products?
    I have:
    The Body Shop, Skin Clearing Facial Wash that removes impurities, for clearing looking skin
    The Body Shop, Black Head Exfoliating Wash that exfoliates to help unclog pores for clearer looking skin
    The Body Shop, Tea Tree Face Mask that instantly cools and lifts away impurities
    Clean & Clear, Deep Action Cream Wash that cleans down to the pores for clearer skin
    Garnier, Anti-Blackhead Deep pore wash

    I have normal to combination skin, but I also have Keratosis Pilaris, which is a condition where the body produces excess keratin (A natural protein in the skin). The keratin traps the hair follicles in the pore, which causes hard bumps to form on my arms, chest and face only. I also have cream that I use to treat this.

    I'm aware that some of these products may be used for the same thing, but I would like to know what would be the best products to apply to my skin, how often I should use these products, how long I may leave them on for, what order I should use them in and finally the instructions I should use with them.

    I apologize for the difficulty of my question, but I hope there is a knowledgeable person out there to answer correctly.

    Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      The order that you put them in sounds fine :)

  49. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris does anyone know of treatment that actually works?
    I dont have KP that bad i have it on my legs but mildly and a bit on the top of my arm, i want to really conceal it as i dont want to feel self concious showing skin, so does anyone know of any creams or any other treatments theyve heard of or tried before that help lessen KP

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Photo therapy is a great start. A local tanning salon has a bed called the Time Capsule. Instead of tanning bulbs it is filled with LED lights. This therapy has worked great for my daughter; she had a rather severe case that her dermatologist prescribed just about everything for and nothing worked. The only real reason we treated it so aggressively was because the bumps were on her face and in her eyebrows and they were painful. After 5 visits those on her face disappeared, and those on her body were much fewer. She is very happy with the results.


how to treat keratosis pilaris on arms

Dry Skin Disorder

This is advised as one of the affliction dry derma disorders anyone could ache from. It's absolutely difficult to amusement and actual abundant simple to aggravate. If you accept dermatitis, locations of your derma are abnormally dry and inflamed. These affronted locations as well tend to could cause a lot of discomfort. What makes it worse is its itchiness. Although unbearably itchy, you accept to never blemish the derma afflicted with dermatitis. This alone makes the action worse

Many types of disorders that affect the skin, including:

* Bacterial derma disorders
* Fungal derma infections
* Inflammatory derma disorders
* Skin cancer
* Viral derma disorders.

Skin Infections

Skin infections accept a viral, bacterial or fungal basis. Rashes acquired by athlete's foot, impetigo, and craven pox all abatement into this category. Bacterial and fungal derma infections are usually auspiciously advised with antibiotics and added medications. Viral derma infections accept to be combated by the physique 's own allowed system, although the affection associated with the infection can be treated. Derma disorders acquired by infections may arise as rashes or added types of lesions such as pustules.

Treatment

Baths and soaks are acclimated if analysis accepts to be activated to ample areas of the body. This address is a lot of generally acclimated in the anatomy of sitz baths for over-the-counter (OTC) treatments of balmy derma problems such as hemorrhoids. Baths are not generally acclimated to administer almighty decree drugs because of difficulties authoritative the bulk of biologic delivered

Powders are broiled forms of substances that are acclimated to assure areas area derma rubs adjoin skin" for instance, amid the toes or buttocks, in the armpits or groin, or beneath the breasts. Powders are acclimated on derma that has been ashen and damaged by damp (macerated). They may be alloyed with alive drugs such as antifungals.

Gels are water- or alcohol-based substances thickened after oil or fat. The derma does not blot gels as able-bodied as it absorbs affairs absolute oil or fat. Gels tend to be absolutely acid on accessible wounds and afflicted

Creams, the lot of frequently acclimated preparations, are emulsions of oil in water, acceptation they are primarily baptize with an oil component. (A balm is the opposite, some baptize alloyed mostly with oil.) Creams are simple to administer and arise to vanish if rubbed into the skin. They are almost non-irritating.

Lotions are agnate to creams but accommodate added water. They are in fact suspensions of cautiously dispersed, delicate actual in a abject of baptize or oil and water. They are beneath able than ointments, creams, and gels at carrying drugs and are advised of lower authority for a accustomed biologic concentration. Lotions accept a amount of benign effects.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What sort of skin disorder would cause knee puffiness?
    A friend of mine has developed a skin disorder that looks kind of like athlete's foot on his fingers. It gets bumpy and starts to pus, and then on his knees, he has these sort of balls that stick out, like a little smaller than golf balls, covered in dry skin. He refuses to go see a doctor. Any idea what this could be or how to treat it? Thank you so much for answering.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,i once knew a guy with exactly the same thing as what u have described.There is a name for it but i cannot remember.
      He should go to a doctor and if need be he or she will refer u to a skin specialist.I have excema bad at times so i know the drill.
      Hope this helps.
      Kindest Regards.
      Jody Tasmania Australia.

  2. QUESTION:
    What are these red dry skin patches on my sons cheecks?
    My son is 1 year 8 months old.

    He is very healthy and active.

    He has a small/medium patch on each side of his cheecks that are circluar, red, and hardish dry skin. It looks as if he is blushing, however, it is dry skin.

    Does anyone know what this could be? The cold? Hormones? Dry skin.

    Any remedies?

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      With that age group and that description, you are most likely dealing with atopic eczema. Why not point it out to your pediatrician the next office visit. If that's what it is, it's a genetic disorder, and he may have to deal with it on and off for quite a long time. In addition, it might be a marker of asthma or hay fever in him or the family tree.

  3. QUESTION:
    What according to you causes dry skin, damaged skin?
    What according to you causes dry skin, damaged skin?

    • ANSWER:
      Causes
      Though most cases of dry skin are caused by environmental exposures, certain diseases also can significantly alter the function and appearance of your skin. Potential causes of dry skin include:

      Weather. In general, your skin is driest in winter, when temperatures and humidity levels plummet. Winter conditions also tend to make many existing skin conditions worse. But the reverse may be true if you live in desert regions, where temperatures can soar but humidity levels remain low.
      Central heating and air conditioning. Central air and heating, wood-burning stoves, space heaters and fireplaces all reduce humidity and dry your skin.
      Hot baths and showers. Frequent showering or bathing, especially if you like the water hot and your baths long, breaks down the lipid barriers in your skin. So does frequent swimming, particularly in heavily chlorinated pools.
      Harsh soaps and detergents. Many popular soaps and detergents strip lipids and water from your skin. Deodorant and antibacterial soaps are usually the most damaging, as are many shampoos, which dry out your scalp.
      Sun exposure. Like all types of heat, the sun dries your skin. Yet damage from ultraviolet (UV) radiation penetrates far beyond the top layer of skin (epidermis). The most significant damage occurs deep in the dermis, where collagen and elastin fibers break down much more quickly than they should, leading to deep wrinkles and loose, sagging skin (solar elastosis). Sun-damaged skin may have the appearance of dry skin.
      Psoriasis. This skin condition is marked by a rapid buildup of rough, dry, dead skin cells that form thick scales.
      Thyroid disorders. Hypothyroidism, a condition that occurs when your thyroid produces too little thyroid hormones, reduces the activity of your sweat and oil glands, leading to rough, dry skin

  4. QUESTION:
    How do you get rid of purple bumps all over your arm? Is it a skin disorder?
    I have no clue what it is, but I have tiny purple and red bumps all over both my arms. We thought it was a heat rash, so I wore only t-shirts. No good. We thought it was dry skin, still no. Anyone know what it is? Shold I go see a doctor? If not, how can I cover it until it goes away.

    • ANSWER:
      they could just be pimples...

  5. QUESTION:
    What are dry itchy patches of skin on arms and face caused by?
    Where do these patches of red dry skin come from and what can help cure them or relieve the itch?

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like a regular case of normal dry skin, nothing too serious. There are quiet some different causes for dry skin:

      For most people it is a seasonal, temporary problem. It happens mainly in winter. The temperatures and air humidity drop dramatically during this period, drying your skin or making an existing skin condition even worse

      Or the other way around if you live in the desert, the high temperatures and low air humidity can also do a trick on your skin. The sun dries out your skin, nothing new; we all know that heat takes the water from it. But the UV rays also damage your skin deep inside. This leads to wrinkles and loose, sagging skin

      Hot bath or shower. Too many hot baths or showers break down the protective lipid barrier in your skin. This barrier in your upper skin layer is meant to protect you from the sun, wind, hot and cold like the brick walls protect your house

      Frequent swimming in chlorinated pools. The chloride does exactly the same to your skin as taking too many hot showers; it breaks down the lipid barrier of your skin leaving it open to the elements

      Air conditioning, fire places & central heating. These usually very convenient appliances also dry out your skin by reducing the humidity level in your house or office

      Harsh soaps and detergents. A lot of our modern day pretty harsh soaps and detergents do a good job at cleaning everything we want. But a nasty side effect is that they also break down the lipid barrier and dehydrate your skin. Deodorants, shampoos and anti bacterial soaps are the greatest culprits

      Insufficient nutrition. When you don't get enough vitamin A, B and / or E your skin will also dry out even quicker. Generally when your diet is not in balance it will show itself also in your skin

      One of the drawbacks of getting older is, as we all probably know, that the skin gets thinner, starts to wrinkle and get dryer

      Diseases like psoriasis, dermatitis, eczema, seborrhea or thyroid disorders also cause very dry skin

      Finally genetics also plays a part in getting dry skin; you can inherit the sensitivity for it from your parents. And also fair skinned people are more likely to have dry skin, especially when they get older

      There are many remedies you can use to get rid of dry skin and those itchy red patches, check: http://www.natural-homeremedies-for-life.com/home-remedies-for-dry-skin.html

  6. QUESTION:
    Is natural almond oil just as good for your skin as a more expensive daycream?
    I mean it is natural, greasy (good for dry skin) and there are no harmful preservatives in it.
    Or why would those expensive creams be more effective?
    They always seem to sell well when they contain various 'natural extracts', so why not go for the pure natural stuff?

    • ANSWER:
      Natural almond is good but more expensive than olive oil which works just as well. I´ve found using it is the best, proven way to give you a flawless skin, radiant glow and also to permanently cure many skin problems. If applied regularly and massaged into skin wih a quite strong, vigorous motion it gives even better results. Some skin clinics might tell you to massage gently - but it has proven to be only beneficial to many who have used it. The massage also tightens and rejuvenates skin and very noticeably lessens other signs of aging.
      You will not need to use ANY other products or treatments ever again. It naturally moisturizes skin. Only unhealthy skins need constant moisturizing and OTC products - many of which contain countless harsh chemical ingredients that harm skin and are cause of many skin disorders and skin aging. As are many soaps, face cleaners, washing too frequently and too thoroughly. Do web searches "Soaps, face cleaners harmful". "Shampoos harmful?" (Shampoos come in contact with skin and many contain some of the most harmful ingredients) and "Frequent face washing harmful?" Drs and skin specialists will confirm.

      SOURCE(S): 20+ years of research into natural treatments to enhance skin and cure skin problems and of anti aging and rejuvenation treatments.

  7. QUESTION:
    How to regenerate skin damaged by ecezma/dry skin and anorexia?
    so i got dry skin on the lower half of my body and the uper part of my harm which led to a lot of cuts and marks about five years ago i used cream to help it clear up a bit and now the amount i itch and damage them is limited however as i had an eating disorder last year which i battle with my skin has stopped repairing itself and now has marks from ages ago how do i rejuvinate it and will the damage ever go?

    • ANSWER:
      Bio oil could help as could taking a vitamin E product. Smooth baby oil over your skin when you are getting out of a bath or shower...don't dry yourself , It helps lock in moisture. Just wrap yourself in an old towel and let it absorb. Id only do this if its a last thing at night bath or you risk oiling up your clothes.
      Make sure your diet is healthy now as you have found out its essential for healthy repair.

      It might take a while but most damage will fade. I had severe eczema over my hand and arm for a number of years, my arm at 20 looked like a pensioners but after getting the right treatment my skin recovered (it took a couple of years).

      Hope this helps

  8. QUESTION:
    My girlfriends feet are dry and cracked, is there anything to use to help?
    my girl friend has really thick dry skin on here feet that somtimes cracks and bleeds. she washes her feet several times a day and lotions them puts creams on, vaseline, oil she has tried several things. Any one think of anything that will help. she is embaressed but its not her fault. any home remedies or walmart paharmacy cures? thanks.. shes even tried that ped egg thing, its just not strong enough, dont work for her.

    • ANSWER:
      Feet care is not a disorder one can be clueless about. This is also one of the reasons why people almost always neglect it. Primarily, feet care begins with some care. Home remedies have some of the best cost effective and result oriented solutions one can try and experiment with. But it is important to note that when home remedies do not cure cracked heels it is wise to take an appointment with your general physician.

      Here is a compilation of the best known remedies to treat cracked heels:

      -Apply any shortening or hydrogenated vegetable oil after washing the feet clean on dry and cracked areas of the feet. After applying a thick coat of shortening on the feet, wear a pair of thick socks. Leaving this application overnight can surely provide positive results in few days.

      -Apply the pulp of a ripe banana on the dry or cracked area of the heel. Leave it on for 10 minutes and rinse it clean.

      -Soak the feet in lemon juice for about 10minutes. Follow this therapy on a weekly basis until one finds a change.

      -A daily regime of cleaning and moisturizing is a good cure for dry or cracked heels. At the end of the day soak the feet in warm soapy water for about 15 minutes. Rinse feet and pat dry. Make a healing mixture comprising of: one teaspoon Vaseline and the juice of one lemon. Rub this mixture onto the cracked heels and other required areas of the feet till it is thoroughly absorbed. This can be done daily until visible results are obtained.

      -A regular application of a mixture of glycerin and rosewater is known to soothe and cure cracked heels.

      -Another result oriented solution is to melt paraffin wax and mix it well with little mustard oil. Apply on the dry or cracked area of the heels. Rinse it off in the morning. A continuous application for 10 to15 days can achieve desirable results.

      Cracked heels are caused by deficiency of vitamins, minerals, zinc and omega 3 fatty acids. Therefore it is essential to have a diet rich in vitamins, minerals and zinc. Omega-3 fatty acids are not naturally produced by the body, therefore it has to be ingested from food or supplements.

      Here is list of essential foods that one can include in a regular meal and help curb deficiencies that may cause cracked heels:

      -Vitamins (Vitamin E) rich foods include: vegetable oils, green vegetables, cereals, wheat germ, whole-grain products and nuts.
      -Minerals (Calcium and Iron) rich foods include :
      1) Calcium: milk, cheese, yogurt, goat’s milk, fortified soya milk, mineral water, ice cream, tinned fish, juices, cereals and broccoli are excellent sources of calcium. Dairy products such as milk and yogurt are also considered as one of the best sources of calcium.
      2) Iron: Meat, chicken and fish are good sources of iron. Iron is also available in cereals, eggs, vegetables and beans; however it is not as easily absorbed into the body as the iron from meat, chicken and fish.
      3) Zinc rich foods include: Oysters, chicken, crab, kidney beans, yogurt, brown rice, spaghetti.
      4) Omega-3 fatty acids are largely found in: Purslane herb, cold water fish, and flaxseed oil or flax seeds.

      Here are some simple suggestions towards caring for the feet effortlessly:

      -Keep feet clean and dirt free
      -Exercise the feet regularly
      -Alternate hot and cold water for a feet bath to soothe the feet
      -Moisturize and exfoliate the feet whenever possible
      -Avoid walking bare feet as much as possible

  9. QUESTION:
    My medicine is drying my skin out terribly?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris (a skin disorder), so I went to my dermatologist to see if he could help me. He gave me some cream for it, and it helps with the KP, but it dries my skin out terribly. Like imagine dry skin x100. Lotion is a bit harsh for my skin, because the skin on my face is extremely sensitive, and I don't know if using lotion will mess with the medicine. Will the dry skin get better, or what can I use that will help?

    • ANSWER:

  10. QUESTION:
    could sweet smelling urine, dry skin and mild thirst and fatigue be signs of diabetes?
    Could sweet smelling urine, dry skin and mild thirst and fatigue be signs of diabetes, what should i do?
    how do i know if theres something wrong with me or not?

    • ANSWER:
      Changes in urine odor are usually temporary. Such changes are not always a sign of disease. Certain foods and medicines, including vitamins, may affect your urine's odor. For example, asparagus causes a characteristic urine odor.

      However, foul smelling urine may be due to bacteria, such as that responsible for urinary tract infections. Sweet smelling urine may be a sign of uncontrolled diabetes or a rare disease of metabolism (diabetes insipidus (unrelated to diabetes mellitus). Liver disease and certain metabolic disorders may cause musty smelling urine. You do have symptoms that relate to diabetes, in fact, in the early years this is how doctors would diagnose diabetes by the sweetness of the urine before all the modern technology.

      Also, in pregnancy this is usually a symptom due to the high glucose levels filtered by the kidneys but this doesn't mean you are pregnant.

      See your doctor and get a simple blood test to determine your diagnosis.

      Hope this helps.

  11. QUESTION:
    What should I do to start a business selling my own health aid product?
    I have a product that is made from all natural ingredients that relieves the discomforts that are associated with skin disorders. I would like to find out what any legal issues are that I may need to know before I start marketing and selling the product. The product is made up of wet and dry ingredients (no cooking involved) that are blended together and used like a soap. It will be sold in amounts of less than 4 oz. per consumer.

    • ANSWER:
      I think you need to check with the Food and Drugs authority, there are lots and lots of laws relating to making and selling products like these, also a lot of regulations about what type of packaging you have to use. Have a look on the government website.

  12. QUESTION:
    Any suggestions for a dog with skin problems?
    I have a rottweiler/blood hound mix she is 3 years old and seems to have really dry skin. She constantly knaws away at her skin and she is losing her hair because of it. I give her a bath every week but she still seems to be having a problem. I have taken her to the vet and she was given antibiotics for an infection, it went away and now I do not know if it is coming back or if she just has dry skin.

    • ANSWER:
      Your vet needs to do a scraping. It certainly sound like mange. Is there a chance that this dog has any pit in it? They are notorious for having demodectic mange. Any dog can get it, but pits seem to have more immune disorders.

  13. QUESTION:
    What is thyroid disease in childen around one year to two years old?
    This one year old's soft spot has not healed over and he has some dry skin problems and a small loss of weight. This is some signs of thyroid disease. Hopefully it will turn out to be just a coincidence.

    • ANSWER:
      I would assume this child has been tested for thyroid disease. In the US, mandatory thyroid testing of infants has taken place since 1976. If this child has not been tested, then get him to a doctor as soon as possible. He may have congenital hypothyroidism. Even if he had been tested, it may be a good idea to test again. Hypothyroidism in a child can be devastating.

      Congenital hypothyroidism is a disorder that affects infants at birth, and occurs in about 1 in 4000 live-born babies. It is characterised by the loss of thyroid function, due to the thyroid gland failing to develop normally. In some cases, the gland is totally absent. About 10 per cent of cases are caused by an enzyme defect leading to deficient hormone production, iodine deficiency and a brain pituitary gland abnormality. If the diagnosis is delayed, and immediate treatment is not given, congenital hypothyroidism can lead to growth and developmental defects, and severe mental retardation (cretinism).

      Fortunately, routine testing for thyroid function in newborns has been mandatory since 1976. Within the first week of life, a heelprick blood sample is taken to assess an infant's thyroid hormone level. If any abnormality is found, a repeat blood sample is taken. If this confirms congenital hypothyroidism, the infant is immediately given thyroid hormone replacement therapy (T4 — thyroxine). Normal growth and development should then continue, with no adverse effects on the child's mental capacity.

      Before newborn thyroid screening began, this condition was easily missed. Even within a few days, subtle symptoms would emerge, such as poor feeding, constipation, low body temperature, cool skin, slow pulse, prolonged jaundice, increased sleepiness, and decreased crying. After a few weeks, other physical signs would become more noticeable, such as poor growth and development, dry skin and hair, poor muscle tone, slow tendon reflexes, hoarse crying, enlarged tongue, umbilical hernia, and puffiness or swelling. By this time, there would already have been some devastating consequences. Treatment with thyroid hormone replacement would have resolved most of the physical symptoms, but the child would more than likely have had permanent brain damage.

  14. QUESTION:
    How can I get a visibly clear skin?
    I have blemishes, acne, dark spots, dry skin and the list goes on and on so what methods do you suggest

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,

      For years i dreaded going out, meeting people or any event where i would have to show my face. My complexion was never even close to being clear. My doctor put me on a few prescriptions including the so-called best acne treatment, but i never found anything that worked without having side effects. Needless to say most of these so called cures either made our skin condition and our acne worse and filled us with heart breaking disappointment and frustration or they worked only short term, and acne came back with a vengeance. Some of these treatments simply didn't have any effect what so ever on my skin condition.

      Drugs, creams and typical acne treatments sometimes work in a partial way but the results are temporary and the side effects are nasty. The tiny handful acne sufferers who have learned how to clear their acne from within and without ever using drugs or over the counters are the only people in the world who keep their skin clear permanently. In 3 weeks, my face were acne free. I told my family and friends about it and they were amazed with the results.

      Your body sends you messages all the time. Most of us ignore the majority of them. Acne, blackheads and many other skin disorders and all its related symptoms are after all a desperate message from your body telling you something is wrong inside. Your acne and the infection, redness and irritation associated with it, are like an alarm signal warning you that your house (your body) is on fire. By ignoring those messages, your condition is bound to get worse. When your house is on fire, you cannot shut off the alarm, go to sleep and expect everything to return to normal.
      Article at http://www.powerful-remedies.tk/acne/128-1008

  15. QUESTION:
    How do I reduce the effects of scars from eczema?
    I'm 19 years old and have had eczema since I was roughly 15. It started just on my stomach cause of the belts I wore, and then on my arms, but that was nothing until this past year. I have it bad on my arms, stomach, half my back, upper thighs, chest, and neck. And I am also half hispanic, so I scar very easily. They aren't raised scars or anything, but just dark marks. And they stay, for years. Lotions for dry skin don't work, I know that. But even if I do control my eczema, the scars from it will last for a long time. Can anyone relate and possibly know any way to help me with my scars, or eczema? I'm running out of options! I feel like a leper here!

    • ANSWER:
      HI Amber

      Here are some ideas to start the healing process.

      Cause
      Eczema is often called Dermatitis, and may be a symptom of an omega-3 fatty acid deficiency. Eczema can be due to allergies, allergies secondary to digestive disorders such as hydrochloric acid deficiency, rashes secondary to immune diseases, genetic metabolic disorders, and/or nutritional deficiencies, especially of niacin (vitamin B3) and B6, as well as other B vitamins.

      To minimize your risk of developing eczema, avoid irritating substances, wear natural nonirritating materials, use soothing ointments, and check to see if dietary, nutritional, and/or and allergy-causing factors need to be considered.

      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Natural Cures

      Aromatherapy: Bergamot, chamomile, lavender, melissa, neroli, eucalyptus, geranium, and/or juniper can help speed healing and relief of symptoms when applied topically to the affected areas.

      Diet: Eat an organic, whole foods diet and avoid potentially allergy-causing foods, especially sugar, wheat, milk, and dairy products, including yogurt. Also avoid excess consumption of fruit, especially citrus and sour, as these foods may aggravate symptoms.

      Flower Essences: Rescue Remedy® for accompanying stress, and Rescue Remedy Cream® on the affected areas.

      Herbs: Herbal remedies such as cleavers, nettle, yellowdock, or red clover tea or tinctures may be very effective. They are often combined with relaxing herbs such as chamomile, linden flowers, or skullcap. One combination would be equal parts of cleavers, nettle, and chamomile drunk as an infusion three times a day. A stronger mixture combines the tinctures of figwort, burdock, and cleavers in equal parts; take one teaspoon of this mixture three times a day.

      To alleviate itching, bathe affected areas of your body with lukewarm or cold chickweed infusion. For cracked, dry, or painful skin, use a salve made from calendula flowers and St. John`s wort leaves.

      Goldenseal applied externally may also be helpful.

      Homeopathy:Dulcamara, Rhus tox., Sulfur, Arsen alb., and Graphites, taken alone or in combination with each other can help speed healing. Petroleum and Psorinum are also effective homeopathic remedies, but must be taken alone.

      Hydrotherapy: Hydrotherapy is the application of water, ice, steam and hot and cold temperatures to maintain and restore health. Treatments include full body immersion, steam baths, saunas, sitz baths, colonic irrigation and the application of hot and/or cold compresses. Hydrotherapy is effective for treating a wide range of conditions and can easily be used in the home as part of a self-care program. Many Naturopathic Physicians, Physical Therapists and Day Spas use Hydrotherapy as part of treatment. I suggest several at-home hydrotherapy treatments.

      Juice Therapy: The following juice combinations can help speed healing: black currant and red grapes; carrot, beet, spinach, cucumber, and parsley; and wheat grass juice.

      Nutritional Supplementation: Vitamin A and GLA (gamma-linolenic acid), an omega-6 essential fatty acid found in high quantities in evening primrose oil, have both been shown to improve the symptoms of eczema. Vitamin E. Other useful supplements for preventing and reversing eczema include vitamin B complex, vitamin B6, vitamin E, magnesium, and zinc.

      Topical Treatment: Apply evening primrose oil directly to cracked and sore areas of the skin. A topical paste made from ginkgo and licorice root extract has also been shown to improve eczema symptoms.

      Alternative Professional Care
      If your symptoms persist despite the above measures, seek the help of a qualified health professional. The following professional care therapies have all been shown to be useful for treating and relieving the symptoms of eczema: Acupuncture, Ayurveda, Biofeedback Training, Bodywork (Acupressure, Shiatsu, Reflexology), Detoxification Therapy, Energy Medicine (Light Beam Generator, Ondamed, Photon Stimulator), Environmental Medicine, Hypnotherapy, Magnetic Field Therapy (North Pole Magnetic Energy Application), Mind/Body Medicine, Naturopathic Medicine, Orthomolecular Medicine, Osteopathy, and Oxygen Therapy

      Best of health to you

  16. QUESTION:
    There are skin bumps and peeling skin on my sides, what is it?
    Lately, I've been having dry skin on the sides of my body and its peeling now. The dry skin is coming onto my chest and peeling there too and i have these small bumps in the middle of my chest. What might it be?

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like psoriasis. I was getting tiny bumps on my arms, chest, and the tops of my feet and after a few days, the skin would get very dry and peel off. This can be a very annoying skin disorder and can spread very fast. I advise you to go to your family doctor or a dermatologist soon so they can give you something to prevent it from getting worse. I have tried all of the OTC products but none of them helped. Once your doc gives you something, make sure to use lotion daily right after you shower. I prefer the Aveeno brand shower gel and body lotion.

  17. QUESTION:
    How can I get my cat to lose weight?
    He is a strict housecat, 10 years old, and weighs 30lbs. He did lose some weight after I got my second cat, but now that I've had her for a couple years, he has gained it all back. I feed him Iams Multi-cat formula dry food in the morning, and 1/2 can Friskies wet food in the evening. The vet told me I have to feed him wet food because of a dry-skin condition he tends to get. And he has a history of urinary-tract infections from bad dry food. I can't take him to the vet anymore cuz he gets mean. I can't get him to play to get excersize and there's no way he's walking on a leash. I'd appreciate any tips anyone can give!! Thanks!
    I do feed both cats at the same time, but I seperate the dishes. My younger cat's dish is on top of the refrigerator, where Joplin (my 10 year old) can't get to. Also, I do not leave a large bowl of dry food out during the day. I put about 3-4 tablespoons in each dish in the morning, and I'm pretty sure my younger cat (Mykah) is eating some of Joplin's during the day. Btw...thank you all so much for the info so far. I thought Iams was supposed to be good!

    • ANSWER:
      Hi there...Having both feline lower urinary tract disorders (FLUTD) and a cat that is overweight will require a delicate balance of diet so I'll do my best to explain the needs of both first then how you can achieve weight loss and management as well as avoid future recurrences of FLUTD symptoms.

      A little background about causes of FLUTD. It is caused by several factors, and combinations of these factors, which include obesity, stress, urinary pH, water and fibre intake in the animal's diet. Recurrence is common with FLUTD cats so preventive measures such a canned food diet to keep hydration levels high plus any other ways to encourage more water consumption is a must, easy access to multiple litter boxes in addition to regular check ups as well as supplementation with prescriptions depending on the severity of the condition.

      Cats who eat dry cat foods tend to suffer from recurring episodes and this seems to be a common denominator with cats diagnosed with various types of FLUTD. The idea is to acidify the urine because cats with FLUTD have low urine pH so your goal is to reverse this and canned foods have been known to achieve the results.

      Additionally, most commercial grade cat foods contain corn, corn meal which are fillers (carbohydrates) that bind the dry food together as a way of keeping foods lasting longer. Try finding cat food products which are devoid of these ingedients. The first ingredients should show chicken, chicken meal, etc. Most show the first ingredients as corn on the ingredient labels. IAMs, Science Diet, Purina, Whiskas, Friskies ...all have corn listed as the main ingredient. Cats who eat these tend to always feel hungry because the carbs don't metabolize fast enough and cats are obligate carnivores so they need a diet devoid of these types of carbs. Products such as Innova EVO, Nature's Variety Prairie, Felidae, Wellness, Chicken Soup for the Cat Lover's Soul, James Wellbeloved (for UK residents), are some examples of premium brands available. Most cats who eat these find that they do not eat to eat as much because their appetite is better satiated.

      Additionally, it's important to schedule feed a cat so you can monitor servings taken in during the day http://www.vet.cornell.edu/fhc/news/feed.htm . Each product lists the recommended servings based on a age and weight. For an overweight cat you would be reducing the intake gradually by 10% each week that the vet recommends is an appropriate caloric intake. Cats who are switched from a free-fed diet should be fed multiple times a day (if permittable) such as once in the morning, mid-day, and then evening before your bedtime.

      When switching to a new brand of cat food it is also important to note that sudden changes can cause sever bowel distress. Cats have very sensitive digestive systems so the quick change will cause bouts of diarrhoea and vomiting. Any vet can confirm this fact. Cat food should be changed gradually by mixing the current brand with the new brand over the course of several weeks. For example you would take 3/4 servings of the old cat food to 1/4 servings with the new for one week...then the next week 1/2 to 1/2...then following 1/4 of the old to 3/4 of the new in the third week before completing the switch in the final week. http://www.peteducation.com:80/article.cfm?cls=1&cat=1399&articleid=1155

      Furthermore, some cats can take off the weight faster by feeding a canned food diet, which is very helpful for cats who suffer from FLUTD. For some reason the hydration in the canned products helps metabolize food better and are also completely devoid of carbohydrates, which is more optimal for the feline's body and while at the same acidifies the urine pH which is perfect for cats who have FLUTD . When cats eat raw meat in the wild they get hydration from the fresh meat juices as well as some roughage from the animals who are natural herbivores. A mixture of canned and dry are always best for cats in the long-term, which many people are unaware of. We are have been exposed to so many commercial ads regarding dry food for cats, but in reality it's the manufacturer's who benefit rather than the cats. Cats are not naturally designed to eat dry--the products were designed for convenience for the owner.

      Here's an article about commercial cat food; dry vs. canned, proper nutritional needs, etc: http://www.consumersearch.com/www/family/cat-food/review.html

      Finally, most cats become bored with toys quickly. It's important to rotate them by hiding them and then bringing them back out again so the appear to be like new toys. Interactive toys are the best ones to use to get a cat moving such as a laser light. Most cats love chasing the light. The goal is to get the cat to move back and forth at least for 5 minutes to begin as some tire more easily than others especially if they are overweight. You can increase play time more if they enjoy it. Some cats love chasing feather teasers tied on a string too. Experiment to what gets your cat moving. Just please remember most overweight cats tire easily so keep the sessions short and fun. Interactive toys are the best ways to get your cat to exercise rather than leaving toys for them to play with. They only bat at those and really don't move enough. Not only does the interactive toys work better, but it's a bonding experience for both of you as well.

      Here are some websites that I've researched to help prepare for the long road ahead to minimize the repeat episodes:
      FLUTD (also formerly known as FUS):
      http://www.marvistavet.com/html/body_feline_lower_urinary_tract_dis.html
      http://www.hdw-inc.com/healthfus.htm
      http://www.thensome.com/flutd.htm
      http://www.vet.uga.edu/sams/courses/urology/lectures/Lecture06_FelineIdiopathicCystitis.pdf
      http://www.holisticat.com/fusfaq.htm

  18. QUESTION:
    How many calories a day should I eat to lose weight? How much should I lose?
    I am 5'7 and 141.6lbs. I've lost 43.4lbs since July. I've been eating 1,000 calories a day, most days lately less, I'm trying to make myself eat more. How many calories a day should I eat? 1,200? How much more weight do I need to lose? I want to get to 120lbs but people are getting mad at me for wanting to lose that much. I'm worried that I'm becoming malnourished, since I've never had a problem with dry skin until now. Also my hair is shedding badly and my nails are becoming brittle and chipping badly. I know I need to eat more but I'm so afraid of gaining that weight back. How much should I eat to atleast get to 130lbs?

    • ANSWER:
      5'7 135-140 is the absoulte perfect weight. You shouldn't be completely focused on losing numbers but trying to gain muscle. Youre developing bad eating habits and maybe even an eating disorder. You dont need to count calories, just eat clean and try to eat as natural and organic as possible. Workout a lot of strength to tone your body the weight you lose once you do you will be toned! Also, strength is great anyways since being fit is good for a lot of everyday life situations. Drink a lot of water, too..

  19. QUESTION:
    Why does my face always look clumpy and patchy when I use my foundation?
    It even looks like that in the morning but gets worse during the day. I've tried neutrogena healthy skin foundation, and now I switched to tinted mousteriser by aveeno but it still did he same thing. My mousterizer is Cetaphil and it has SPF in it. I even exfoliate my face, so it may not be dry skin. What am I doing wrong?!
    Btw, they are both brand new bottles so it's not expired.
    I have acne.

    • ANSWER:
      Don't put too much chemicals on your face because it may result adverse reactions. Resort to natural methods or use products containing natural ingredients. Nature has its own way of curing itself if you know how.
      Here are some tips for you:
      1. Use dry brush exfoliation every morning or before taking shower. It decreases puffiness and improve blood circulation.
      2. Improve your digestion. People having digestive problem may also have acne, psoriasis or other skin disorder.
      *Increase your water intake.
      *Eat meals with high fiber content.
      3. Do some regular exercises to improve your blood circulation also for good body metabolism.
      4. Avoid Excess sugar.
      5. Eat some good fats-- Essential fatty acids are needed for a healthy body.
      *Flaxseed and walnut oil
      *Cold water fish
      *Supplement--fish oil supplements

      Additional tips:
      Some beauty products are not working consistently well for different persons or skin types. Choose products best for your skin. Choose from wide range of products available and don't limit yourself from what you have accustomed to or recommended by your friends. Do some researches and know your skin type.

  20. QUESTION:
    How to make my dog smell better besides giving her baths?
    Shes an outside dog ALWAYS smells like shes rolled in something dead.Is there a way i could make her smell good without giving her a bath? Or could she have a skin disorder? Please Help!

    • ANSWER:
      my dog is an outdoor dog too, but i dont seem to have that problem...

      if it isnt a skin something-or-other, then maybe febreze will do the trick! or try rubbing a dryer cloth on her, then she'll smell like "fresh air" (if you use bounce dryer sheets)

  21. QUESTION:
    I have dry skin on my face, and I don't know how to get rid of it.?
    I have really bad dry skin on my face. I think it's from me taking these antibiotics the doctor prescribed for me. But it's on the right side of my face, going from my lip to my eye. I've tried everything there is to try. I've used night products that are supposed to moisturize your face, I've moisturizing creams, gentle face cleansers, and nothing seems to be working. Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      Most of those over the counter products don't work or are more harmful. Do a Search on Answers for facial dry skin and you will find that is the experience of many.
      Here is a safe, natural, low cost treatment that really works. If you apply to entire face you will find a remarkable curing of dry skin and also of most other skin conditions. Unfortunately we make skin unhealthy by use of soaps, skin cleaners and countless other products that have harsh chemicals and ingredients which harm skin. The way to make skin healthy again is to stop using and use a natural tea tree oil face wash or a very mild cleaner with no harsh ingredients and a regime of massaging face with a nourishing natural oil - coconut oil is excellent. It quickly absorbs and doesn't leave face looking oily. It's best to make the massage quite firm and vigorous. Do this everyday. It's best a night and to sleep without removing oil(use an old towel to protect pillow). You will find it very effective and in about a week you will see a much healthier, vibrant shin. Spots, dry skin, oily skin, large pores etc. will go away overtime if massage maintained. You can then keep up a less frequent massage for it to stay that way. I had countless skin problems incuding seriously dry skin and this treatment completely and permanently rid me of all of them. I have had a totally blemish free, radiantly healthy skin for many years. I found I don't need moisturizers or any other product as my skin naturally moisturizes. Only unhealthy skins need moisturizers and all the many other products that persons with unhealthy skins feel compelled to try and use.

      Experience: Over 20 years of research into natural treatments for skin, scalp and hair disorders

  22. QUESTION:
    My dog seems to sweat a lot and smells any one have any suggestions?
    She also has dry skin. I just recently changed her food and it has helped with her skin. She still smells bad only a couple of days after her bath. I need to bathe her 3 times a month (at least). I know it is not good for her but she makes my house smell (small dog 13lbs) please help.

    • ANSWER:
      Dogs sweat through their tongue. That is why you see them pant. If your dog's skin has an odor and it is that strong and that frequent, then it is most definitely time for you to see the vet.

      It is likely that your dog has some sort of skin infection, disease, or disorder. Bathing your dog excessively may only be exacerbating the situation. Does the dog scratch or chew at herself?

      You must call the vet to get her in.

  23. QUESTION:
    What skincare products work best for dry skin but also help with mild acne?
    I also have redness and some acne scars, but my skin is also sensitive. Yeah, that's a lot to keep in mind, but anything would help!!

    • ANSWER:
      Like every one with dry skin I recommend Moor Spa products try the rejuvenating mosturiser it has.
      Allantoin from the herb comfrey which is has been used traditional medicine to help with skin disorders and psoriasis.
      Anti oxidants which have soothing and anti inflammatory properties.
      It should clear up your dry skin and the Allantoin and Anti oxidants in vitamin E are said to be good for problem skin.
      Let me know if it helps if you get a chance :)

      http://www.moorbodycare.co.uk/product.php?id=17

  24. QUESTION:
    I have bumpy skin. What is the best solution?
    I just bought Eucerin Dry Skin Therapy Plus Intensive Repair Lotion which has Alpha Hydroxy Acid in it. Has anyone ever tried this to get rid of bumpy skin? Is there any other suggestions? I have bumps on my back, some around my hips, several on my legs, and a few around my elbows.

    • ANSWER:
      I have bumpy skin on the backs of my upper arms and my hips and the back of my thighs. Its actually a little skin disorder (NOTHING BIG) its some big word that I can't even think of right now, but I just recently went to the doctor for it. Its something hereditary, and most people in their teens and early 20s experience. I had to go to the docs and get special cream to get rid of it. Its a raised hair folicle. that makes a bump! No big deal. Just go to the doctor. the lotion from the pharmacy was only like .

  25. QUESTION:
    does anyone have a personal connection with someone who has morgellons disease?
    i need details that may help me diagnose this syndrome in myself. i have started noticing strange things, symptoms of this disease, in december 2006. as of today, i am not better, in fact, i can almost say i feel and look worse. the doctors just tell me i have dry skin and a psychiatric disorder. i need info. from real people with this very real and strange disease.

    • ANSWER:
      I had Morgellons, am now in 100% remission. Care to talk?

  26. QUESTION:
    How well does aloe vera gel work for dry skin?
    I have super dry 'lil spots on my face, and I was advised to get this product. Is it worth buying, or what?

    • ANSWER:
      Aloe vera pulp is the clear, thick substance inside of the Aloe vera leaf. (It is often called Aloe vera gel, but it is usually treated before it is used in cosmetics). Aloe vera juice is made by liquifying Aloe vera pulp. Aloe vera gel is made by adding a thickener such as irish moss to Aloe vera juice. Aloe vera oil is made by extracting oil-soluble portions of the Aloe vera plant into a light vegetable oil, such as safflower oil. Aloe vera juice, gel and oil can be used in cosmetics.

      Aloe is used in many skin care products because of its ability to stimulate healthy cell growth and repair damaged tissues. Most people think of using Aloe only on their skin because that is all they know about.

      Benefits of Aloe Vera to the Skin:

      Aloe vera is beneficial for cracked and dry skin.
      Aloe vera oil can be used on the dry skin to make the skin normal and shiny.
      Aloe Vera acts as a natural barrier and shields our skin from dangerous toxins.
      Aloe vera is helpful for frostbite, burns, insect bites, blisters and allergic reactions.
      All the Aloe vera products are used as a part of skin treatment regimen and keep the skin healthy.
      Aloe vera products contain the highest concentrations of healing agent which is beneficial for the skin.
      It makes the skin smooth and glowing.
      It relieves heat on the skin caused by sunburn.
      Aloe vera is used for treating various skin conditions such as eczema, burns, psoriasis, inflammations, wounds etc.
      It destroys bacteria that try to invade cuts or open wounds.
      It forms a protective barrier around achy and sore joints and muscles.
      It is an excellent skin moisturizer that keeps the skin flexible by giving oxygen to the cells which in turn increases the strength and synthesis of skin tissue.
      The products of Aloe vera are very popular among the customers due to the moisturizing properties which are best for the skin or skin disorders.
      Aloe vera improves the ability of the skin so that it can hydrate itself.
      It is helpful in removing dead skin cells and has the ability for effective penetration and transports healthy substances through the skin.
      It is beneficial for the cosmetic products such as make up, anti-wrinkle creams, facial masks, skin conditioners and lipsticks.
      Aloe vera is useful for preventing the aging of the skin. It nourishes the skin and tissues with body-loving nutrients such as vitamin E and C.
      Aloe vera gel is helpful in improving the lesions.
      It lightens dark spots on the face and reduces the intensity of pigmentation.
      It soothes itching and helps restore skin's natural beauty.
      Note: Herbal products and dietary supplements can have pharmacological effects, may produce adverse reactions in some people, and could interact with over-the-counter and prescription medications you may take. Discuss with your physician your decision to use any herbal product.

      Aloe Vera Skin Toner
      First of all, a cotton ball should be soaked in an aloe Vera gel and then apply it on the face to eliminate excess oil and provides freshness to the skin. One can apply this after moisturizer and can use it daily.
      It is perfect for normal and oily skin. If one is having sensitive skin, then the gel should be divided into 50 – 50 ratio along with spring water. One can also apply aloe Vera juice.
      Aloe Vera Face Mask for Soothing and Healing
      Ingredients

      One drop of Rose essential oil
      Three tablespoons pure and certified organic aloe Vera sap
      One drop of Helycrisum essential oil
      Method

      All the ingredients should be mixed well and then apply it on the face and neck. Then leave this mixture for few minutes and then wash off with lukewarm water. Let it dry and then apply healing and soothing aromatic blend, which is prepared in a bottle filled with vegetable oil and then mix with one drop of Neroli oil and three drops of lavender oil. It is very helpful for sensitive and dry skin and can be used after taking sunbath.
      Exfoliating Foot Mask
      Ingredients

      Half cup of oatmeal
      Half cup of cornmeal
      Four tablespoons of aloe Vera gel
      Half cup of unscented body lotion
      Method
      Put all the ingredients in a big bowl and then mix them properly. Apply this paste on the feet and rub, beginning from the toes to ankle and then cure it.

  27. QUESTION:
    Are these symptoms of an anxiety or compulsive disorder?
    Whenever I get acne I end up making a huge scab, and I pick the scab too. I peel my lips, bite my nails, pull eyelashes, pull dandruff, pick dry skin, crack fingers and back, etc. etc.
    I also self harm but I've mostly gotten over that.
    Are these symptoms of a disorder or just bad habit? Also what are ways to cope with it? I don't usually do it out of anxiety, just because I feel the need to, but I do it more when I'm anxious.

    • ANSWER:
      it was a habit then anxiety later on . it is aform of defensr mechanism to make yourself comfortable . it is unhygienic and bad habit but you could make other things to cope up with stress . ]tensions and anxiety attacks

  28. QUESTION:
    What are skin abnormalities after dieting (eating disorders)?
    Skin problems for example yellow skin, dry skin, stuffs like that but proves with sources, please!
    Answer only serious and if you know for sure please!
    SOURCES PLEASE

    • ANSWER:
      this is probably pretty obvious... but stretch marks. caused from extreme weight gain or loss.

  29. QUESTION:
    What is the best way to moisturize very dry spots of skin?
    I have dry patches around my nose and at the corners of my mouth. Is there anything I can use to help it?

    • ANSWER:
      Moisturizers probably won't help. This might be a mild medical problem, not a beauty problem,. This is going to sound weird, but it's possible you have a vitamin deficiency, specifically B vitamins. Take a one a day type vitamin and see if that helps. Also, try eating a little better with more fresh fruits, fruit juices and vegetables. Be sure to add at least one serving of lean meat once a day such as chicken, and drink milk. It could also be a mild skin infection such as eczema or a bacterial problem similar to a yeast infection. Try a mild hydrocortisone creme from the drug store or something like canestin, a mild sulpher-based creme that kills bacterial skin disorders.

  30. QUESTION:
    What is the best remedy for extremely dry skin? Legs and arms are ITCHY! I do not have any skin disorder...?
    I have extremely dry skin that itches really bad! My legs especially. I do not have any type of skin disease or disorder, what could this be and what is the best way to remedy this situation? I have tried the best (and most expensive) otc lotions and still no results. I switched my soap brand numerous times, rinse off extremely well in the shower, do not go into the sun, and cannot figure out why my legs itch so much. This is especially annoying before I go to bed! Please help me find a simple solution for these itchy legs! HELP!
    Wow! Thanks so much for all of the great answers! I definitely do not have scabies, change my sheets at least once a week and have tried several different laundry detergents. I am in the United states and wondering what the E45 is? Can I find it in the US? To answer the shaving legs response, it does seem to be worse when I shave my legs. I don't shave everyday, but is worse when I do. Thanks for all of your answers!

    • ANSWER:
      do you shave your legs and arms? I find if I shave my legs then I get really bad dry skin and itchyness swapping to waxing fixed the itchyness, mositurising loads with valeline intensive care/oils and E45 got rid of the driness (twice a day I'll use something, not as much work as it sounds)

  31. QUESTION:
    Why is exfoliating bad for psoriasis?
    I have psoriasis and I use the OTC Psoriasin Gel it works okay for my skin but I get better results if I first scrub my face with a wash cloth and remove the dry skin.

    So why is exfoliating said to be bad for psoriasis? I feel as though removing the dead skin cells and moisturizing the skin would be helpful.

    And yes I've seen doctors they all say I have a mild case and should treat it with otc creams/gels and diet but I do still get breakouts.

    • ANSWER:
      You'll have to learn what the "Koebner phenomenon" is, in order to understand why exfoliating is bad for psoriasis. In certain diseases, with psoriasis being one of them, if you aggravate the skin ( such as with exfoliation), the skin might heal back with the underlying skin disorder. That means that it's poossible for you to induce psoriasis in areas of the skin where the psoriasis doesn't exist at the moment.

  32. QUESTION:
    How can I tell if it is Skin Fungus or another skin disorder?
    I think I may have tinea versicolor on my chest but I am not sure. I have an area the size of a half dollar or so that has brownish colored spots on it. I am not sure if it is a skin fungus or another condition. I have only noticed it recently since the weather has become warmer. It is a little bumpy and dry. I tried scrubbing and exfoliating the area which irritated the skin and it became red (that's when I really noticed the bumps that almost looked like tiny pimples). I put Vicks Vaporub on after (as this can treat nail fungus) and the redness disappeared and the brown spots returned. I am not sure what this is.... Any ideas? I have heard Monistat can be used for skin fungus infections caused by yeast. Any thoughts?

    • ANSWER:
      Candida yeast fungi is often found topically. You can learn all that you need to know at the link below. Best of luck to you!

  33. QUESTION:
    my 2yr old has very dry and itchy skin, what cream can i use to clear it up fast?
    ok so since my baby was born she has had dry skin, you wouldnt think it to look at her skin though. Iv tried every cream i can think of but nothing seems to get rid of it. She is constantly scratching her neck, belly, back and arms. She is covered it scratch marks. Does anyone have any idea what i can use to get rid of this and fast?

    • ANSWER:
      The best treatment depends on the cause of the itchiness and dryness. This problem is commonly caused by allergies or eczema, and less often by a systemic disorder such as a hypothyroid condition. Lotions won't help much with these types of problems. It might be worthwhile to make an appointment with her pediatrician to look for the cause of this problem. Maybe the doc will suggest screening her for allergies or analyzing a blood sample to look for indicators or a variety of possible problems that might cause itchy skin. The pediatrician might also recommend a visit to a dermatologist.

      Soaps and shampoos are one of the more common allergies that cause chronic itching. Maybe you could try switching to a hypoallergenic soap.

  34. QUESTION:
    Cat is shedding alot and there are skin flakes all over the top of her head...what should I do?
    My cat is about 6 months old now. She is shedding like crazy and she has what I think is dry skin coming off of her ears and around her head. We gave her a bath a couple days ago and it didnt help at all. I have no idea what to do or if there is something more serious going on. I looked over the internet and I'm still not sure. It isnt clumping out, it seems like a pretty steady all over the body thing, except the head which seems a little worse. It also looks to be the underhairs since the hair I catch in the brush every night is white instead of the orange which the outer hairs are. Any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi there...at 6 months the kitten shouldn't really be shedding very much as they still have their kitten coat. It could be food allergy related or something medically related (see below). In all honesty, this is something to consider addressing with a vet over the phone to determine if a visit may be necessary.

      Feline Endocrine Alopecia: Thinning or balding of coat on insides of back legs, lower abdomen and genital area. Distribution is symmetrical (mirror image). Occurs most often in neutered males and spayed females.

      Hypothyroidism: Dry skin and thinning of hair/coat. Hair becomes dull and brittle which is rare.

      Food Allergies: The symptoms of food allergies are similar to those of most other allergies seen in cats. The primary symptom is itchy skin. Symptoms may also include hair loss, excessive scratching, and miliary dermatitis.

      More on feline skin disorders: http://www.manhattancats.com/Articles/Skin_Disorders_in_Cats.html
      Food allergies: http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?cls=1&cat=1402&articleid=142

  35. QUESTION:
    Why Do You Get Dry Skin On Your Face and How Do You Prevent Or Remove It?
    Just Wondering... happened to me last week for some random reason... skin went all sensitive and tight... looks really unhealthy!

    • ANSWER:
      Many soaps, face cleaners and other products have countless harsh, chemical ingredients that harm skin and are cause of dry skin and many skin disorders and premature skin aging. Do web searches "soaps, face cleaners harmful?". "Shampoos harmful?" You will see many doctors, skin specialist will confirm that. Shampoos come in contact with facial skin and contain some of the most harmful ingredients. Also washing too frequently and thoroughly can cause dry skin. Do a web search "frequent face washing harmful?" to confirm.

      This is this best ,safe, fast acting and low cost treatment and it´s using only natural products. Many people have benifited from it - research my Best Answers to see.
      I have a very sensitive skin prone to all kinds of skin problems and this not only permanently cured them but gave me a flawless, blemish free skin .
      Use a natural or organic oil - olive oils are excellent- and regularly massage with a quite strong, vigorous motion (at night as makes face flushed) It's the key to it working! Some skin clinics might tell you to massage gently - but vigorous massage has proven to be only beneficial to many who have used it. See results in about a week - some report results in a matter of days. Initially, skin has to adjust & if soreness, or reactions happen - stop & resume when you can. Find the pace that works for you - it's different for every person. Keep up a massage routine(not as vigorous) after that & and you will see continued improvements.

      SOURCE(S): 20+ years research of natural treatments and cures of skin, scalp and hair disorders

  36. QUESTION:
    How do i make flaking skin less visible?
    I am currently on a acne cream/antibitotics regimen according to my dermaitologist and my skin is really flaking badly on my face. I put moisturizer on religiously, but it only reappears a couple minutes later. Plus, when i apply the moisturizer, my skin slightly burns. What can I do to hide th flaking skin for more than a few minutes?

    • ANSWER:
      My son has dry skin on his face that flakes a lot to. Do not know if this will help you but he uses St. Ives Apricot Scrub (at Walmart) gently on his face it removes the flaky skin. Then he moisturizers. Sounds like the moisturizer you are using is only irritating your skin. Might try something else real gentle.He uses a cream called Eucerin. It is rather expensive but you can get it at Walmart. It is for Dry, scaling skin disorders. Might want to check with the doctor before trying this. Good luck.

  37. QUESTION:
    Is it dry skin or a chemical burn?
    Two weeks ago, I was in an accident and my airbags deployed. Ever since then my knuckles on my right hand have been red and flakey. Is it just dry skin or could it be a chemical burn from the airbag. I have been putting lotion on them twice a day but it doesnt seem like it is working.

    • ANSWER:
      Here is some information regarding that issue and question. The first part is for the chemicals inside BEFORE they EXPLODE. The second part is AFTER they EXPLODE. Some of it is scary, some not:

      -----------------------------------------------------------------
      Before a Deployment

      The air bag cartridges contain an explosive chemical, sodium azide. If the air bag has not been deployed, the material is dangerous to handle. It can explode, it can cause burns if it gets on unprotected skin, and it can severely irritate the lungs if inhaled.

      This danger is amplified if sodium azide comes in contact with heavy metals in the car, such as lead and copper, because these may react to form a volatile explosive.

      Here, another danger arises because if the NaN3 dissolves in water, it can form hydrazoic acid (HN3):
      NaN3 + H2O ---> HN3 + NaOH.
      HN3 is highly toxic, volatile (i.e., it becomes airborne easily), and explosive.

      Here's where it gets scarey!!!

      When Sodium Azide is mixed with water (or sweat or tears) the other byproduct is Sodium Hydroxide (NaOH) and this is the one that hurts!!!
      Potential Health Effects
      ----------------------------------

      Inhalation:
      Severe irritant. Effects from inhalation of dust or mist vary from mild irritation to serious damage of the upper respiratory tract, depending on severity of exposure. Symptoms may include sneezing, sore throat or runny nose. Severe pneumonitis may occur.
      Ingestion:
      Corrosive! Swallowing may cause severe burns of mouth, throat, and stomach. Severe scarring of tissue and death may result. Symptoms may include bleeding, vomiting, diarrhea, fall in blood pressure. Damage may appear days after exposure.
      Skin Contact:
      Corrosive! Contact with skin can cause irritation or severe burns and scarring with greater exposures.
      Eye Contact:
      Corrosive! Causes irritation of eyes, and with greater exposures it can cause burns that may result in permanent impairment of vision, even blindness.
      Chronic Exposure:
      Prolonged contact with dilute solutions or dust has a destructive effect upon tissue.
      Aggravation of Pre-existing Conditions:
      Persons with pre-existing skin disorders or eye problems or impaired respiratory function may be more susceptible to the effects of the substance.

      -----------------------------------------------------------------
      After a Deployment

      If the air bags have been deployed, the material is no longer dangerous, and you will not have to take special handling precautions.

      Airbags use cornstarch or some other powder to help lubricate them. The powder floats around in a cloud for a few minutes after the airbag is deployed, and that looks like smoke. Many drivers hurry to get out because they are concerned. The airbag cloud is usually harmless and is not a fire or fire hazard. The cloud may cause mild respiratory distress. If you have trouble breathing, step away from the cloud to get to fresh air.

      Check out this website for the EXACT answers to your questions including the blogs specific to many people’s concerns. This site tells you exactly what needs to happen for the airbags to deploy and what needs to be replaced (seat belts & all) on over 3500 cars after they do.
      http://www.airbagsolutions.com
      http://blog.airbagsolutions.com
      http://www.airbagsolutions.com/resources.aspx
      http://blog.airbagsolutions.com/archive/2007/08/15/why-didnt-my-airbag-deploy.aspx

  38. QUESTION:
    What is the best product from Eucerin for a dry, sensitive face?
    I have a dry(on a scale from one to ten a 5 or 6 for dryness) sensitive face. My cheeks are always red (not from acne) my face is slightly acne prone. What is the best product for my face from Eucerin? Reviews on it?

    • ANSWER:
      Exfoliate with a wash cloth, each time you take a shower. Too much soaking in the sun, tub or pool ARE skin's worst enemies. If you do that, your dry skin will never heal, no matter how many Eucerin bottle you use every month.

      And sometimes we feel entirely virtuous about our skin-care regimen because it's full of SPF-- all year round!-- and cleansers and such. But the truth is, we may not realize that we're overdoing (or underdoing) something that can lead to the very thing we're trying to avoid: dryness, breakouts, accelerated aging, New York dermatologist Dr. Jeannette Graf. (I've been giving this same advice for decades, but she's proof enough!).

      Eating the right types of food, heals the skin faster. Google: FIVE FOODS TO EAT FOR BEAUTIFUL SKIN

      Your skin is always red, it's not from acne, but too much exposure to the sun can permanently discolors the skin, and LOTIONS ain't going to fix that.
      I've been protecting myself from the sun since age 9, but no matter, I got Discoid Lupus. Google that one. It was like someone punched my chin and it gave a purplish mark. It took 12 years for that to fade, so now I'm using a wide brim hat or umbrella for protection. Gene Simmons & Shannon both have been seen hold an umbrella during an event. They were invented before beauty products, for a reason. Google also Bullous Pemphegoid, photos, another skin disorder.

      Take the Skin Picture Quiz - Identify These Common Skin Conditions on MedicineNet.

  39. QUESTION:
    I have a long haired cat who has excessive dandruff near the end of his back.?
    I have two other cats and neither one of them have it. It's to the pint where i cant even pet him there cause it's so gross. Do you think he has some kind of skin disorder or something.

    • ANSWER:
      the same thing happens to my long haired persian every summer. just go to the vet and he will perscibe some special dry food. its really good and rehydrates his skin. also, when brushing him...be sure to brush him/her with a soft brush instead of a metal brush.

      good luck xxxxx

  40. QUESTION:
    How do I stop chewing the skin off my fingers?
    I've recently been diagnosed with OCD. This because I do have some obsessive behavior like constant hand washing for example. I will be receiving treatment for this but I also find myself chewing as much skin off my fingers as I can but I do it without realising! I think I may have Dermatophagia but I haven't reported this to my doctor (yet).

    Does anyone have any tips to help stop this?
    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      This is the disease called "Dermatophagia" you referred to ^^^

      I have this problem too, and suffer from OCD. To try and break the habit, myself, Iv'e wrapped my fingers in medical tape, and walked around like that. At night, i put vaseline, neosporin mix on my fingers and put on cotton gloves, so the skin heals. if there is no dry skin and cuticle to bite, I wont do it. And the Medical tape in the daytime stops the habit. I have Anxiety Disorder as well as the OCD and this seems to be a "nervous habit" Check out the link below to learn more.

  41. QUESTION:
    Is this dry skin and how do you treat it?
    Hi i have red marks around the sides of my nose which becomes slightly lighter after a shower. It can be itchy occasionally, and sometimes has white flakes. It is also symmetrical around each side of my nose. Is this dry skin?

    If it is how do i treat it?

    Thanks in advance,

    • ANSWER:
      It could be the beginning of psoriasis, an auto-immune disorder that affects "creased" areas of your body. It's known by pinkish spots with flaking skin. Only a dermatologist could tell you for certain, though.

      The easiest way to treat it is using moisturizer, preferably one designed for sensitive skin. It'll keep the flaking down, but the sensitive skin moisturizer should keep the redness down. To really fight it, use a cream-based one before you go to bed at night.

      Hope that helps.

  42. QUESTION:
    How do i get rid permanently of red dry bumpy skin?
    ever since i was little i have had this type of skin on the sides of my face, all over my arms, and some parts of my chest and i want it gone. ive tried everything, can someone plz recommend something to make it go away

    • ANSWER:
      You might have Keratosis Pilaris.

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris:
      1. Keratosis pilaris rubra: red, inflamed bumps
      2. Keratosis pilaris Alba: rough, white, bumpy skin
      3. Keratosis pilaris rubra faceii: reddish rash over the cheeks

      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris. However, there are effective treatments available that make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Most of the available treatments are purely symptomatic; the one thing they all have in common is need for repetition and ongoing commitment. Some seeking treatment with the disorder may be prescribed Tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream, often by request.

      Triamcinolone, most commonly sold under the trade name Aristocort, is a synthetic corticosteroid medically approved as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of eczema, which also reduces the amount of keratin in pores. It may be of most help to those with keratosis pilaris by reducing red, inflamed bumps. Triamcinolone is typically applied three times a day.

      Tretinoin, most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by causing the outer layer of the skin to grow more rapidly, which decreases the amount of the protein keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. As keratosis pilaris is manifested through excess keratin in the skin, Tretinoin forms a more effective and core approach to treatment than Triamcinolone, which forms a largely symptomatic approach. Tretinoin is typically applied once a day before bed.

      An alternative treatment is Adapalene, a retinoid medication that is a more stable compound, is less sunlight-sensitive, has fewer general side-effects, and may be just as effective as Retin-A. Treatment of KP with Adapalene would be considered an "off-label" use of the medication.

      As with Triamcinolone, Tretinoin or any other treatment, once therapy is discontinued, the condition reverts to its original state. However, skin treated with Tretinoin may take several weeks or more to revert to its pre-treatment condition, but may, at the same time, take several weeks or more to show optimal results, with the condition commonly worsening initially, as underlying keratin is brought to the surface of the skin. Tretinoin is considerably more expensive and dispensed in smaller quantities than Triamcinolone and other treatments. Although it may be the most effective treatment for keratosis pilaris, it is not considered the first line of treatment.

      Keratosis pilaris has not been clinically researched for treatment in an unbiased manner, with all claims of success or improvement being purely marketed or anecdotal. The condition is often dismissed outright by practitioners as being presently untreatable, giving mere moisturizing suggestions or reassurance that the condition will improve or cease with age, typically after 30. General practitioners are often unable to identify the condition. Ignorance, accompanied with the price, availability, quantity dispensed, time taken for optimal results to be achieved, more serious side-effects, adverse reactions, and worsening of the condition in the initial treatment phase - coupled with the cheaper, safer, and easier availability of other treatments - has hindered Tretinoin from showing its potential in the treatment of this condition.

      exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, creams, and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Beta hydroxy acids may help improve the appearance and texture of the afflicted skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to their containing lactic acid, a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may be helpful in moderation. Coconut oil may also be helpful if applied to afflicted areas while in the shower. Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, and, in many cases, will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing, such as tight-fitting jeans, is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

  43. QUESTION:
    My chihuahua's hair is falling out on top of her head and she scratches constantly?
    I have taken her to the vet - she does not have ring worm. Her skin was scraped and they "think" she has a skin disorder and told us to buy medicated shampoo which we did but nothing seems to help. Is there anyone here who has had this happen to their pet and what did you do to stop it. Could she maybe be allergic to anything?
    Thank You All
    She eats purina puppy ch

    • ANSWER:
      Did the vet say anything about food allergies?

      I am fostering a chihuahua now who has food allergies.
      I have put her on a lamb-based dog food that does not have corn or wheat in it (common allergens), and I give her a fish oil capsule every day for the omega 3s. This has eliminated her dry skin.

      I gave her cod liver oil for the first two weeks, because Vitamin A is good both for the immune system, and the skin.

      None of these things would hurt your dog, and they might help, so I would start there.

      My foster dog is MUCH better, but still scratches sometimes, so I am going to try a homeopathic remedy with her next.

      Here is a good website on skin problems that I found:

      http://www.thepetcenter.com/gen/itch.html

  44. QUESTION:
    how do i get rid of these dry patches on my face?
    part of my face near my face near my nose under my cheek bone is really dry and the skin has peeled off my face a little. now the skin looks lighter right there. is there some kind of lotion or something i could use to fix it?

    • ANSWER:
      You should try organic shea, avocado, or cocoa butters these products works wonders on dry, peeling, cracked skin. If you like to try it, i will leave a link below to where i get them from. Hope this help, and good luck!

      1) Shea butter is extracted from the nut of West Africa's wild karite tree. Its high in content of essential fatty acids and natural anti-oxidant compounds provide extreme moisturizing capabilities as well as cellular restoration.

      Shea butter has proven successful in the treatment of various skin ailments including eczema and psoriasis and in some cases rosacia. Helps to restore elasticity to the skin. works wonderfully on razor bumps and rashes. It's an intensive general moisturizer, ideal for dry cracked skin, especially good for those extra dry spots: elbows, heels, knees and cuticle beds. Has natural sun protection qualities for your skin (though it should not be used in place of sunscreen).

      2) Cocoa butter is considered an occlusive emollients. This means that when applied to skin it leaves a thin layer of oil across the stratrum corneum. This layer of oils acts as a protective barrier, slowing the natural escape of moisture from the skin, resulting in less dry skin.The additional moisture also helps soften the skin, which may help prevent the irritation and inflammation of the skin disorders like eczema.

      Dry skin occurs when there is not enough moisture present in the outermost layer of the skin called the stratum corneum. Dry skin is commonly cause by dry winter air, wind evaporation, indoor heating or skin thinning due to natural aging. whatever the cause, you can treat and nourish your dry skin with cocoa butter.

      3) Avocado body butter add an excellent moisturizing attributes on dry, peeling, and cracked skin while exhibiting low comedogencity on the skin. Contains the antioxidants vitamins A, E, and D which help kill off free radicals that causes aging skin. Daily application of avocado butter will leave your skin moisturize and soft. Your skin will feel silky, smooth, and protected from the effects of aging and environmental pollution.

  45. QUESTION:
    What kind of tanning lotion should i use? if i have dry/sensitive skin?
    i wanna tan this year. i dont wanna get so dark. but i wanna tan in the sun and indoors. so what kind of tanning lotion should i use if i have dry sensitive skin?

    • ANSWER:
      Dry/sensitive skin is your clue, to avoid tanning, period. Take the Skin Picture Quiz - Identify These Common Skin Conditions on MedicineNet.
      I've been protecting myself from the sun since age 9, but no matter, I got Discoid Lupus. Google that one. It was like someone punched my chin and it gave a purplish mark. It took 12 years for that to fade, so now I'm using a wide brim hat or umbrella for protection. Gene Simmons & Shannon both have been seen hold an umbrella during an event. They were invented before beauty products, for a reason. Google also Bullous Pemphegoid another skin disorder. My husband's aunt recently got MELANOMA IN HER LUNGS, and in hospice now. When only last Christmas, she was behaving and very happy like she's 35 again! She's almost 84. She was a golfer and did stained glass.
      Tanning comes & go, unless you do them everyday 24/7 for the rest of your life. But in the end the only thing you'll benefit is either moles, freckles or discolorations from sunscreens, lotions, etc. and the more you do, the more they get larger, darker & bumpier. My nephew had a membership in a tanning bed salon for a year. After it expired, he stopped, now he's as white as before he began, UNLESS you've been tanning for 60 years, 24/7.

      EVEN IF A PRODUCT IS LABELED "HYPOALLERGENIC," IT MAY CONTAIN SUBSTANCES THAT CAN CAUSE ALLERGIC REACTIONS.
      Good thinking! Question 6b is True!
      After all, people are individuals. And there's no telling what any individual may be allergic to. According to the cosmetic industry, "hypoallergenic" means "less likely to cause an allergic reaction." But dermatologists - and consumers who have allergies - know that the word "hypoallergenic" on the label is no guarantee against an allergic reaction.

      CHOOSING PRODUCTS WITH THE CLAIM "DERMATOLOGIST TESTED" IS A WAY TO AVOID AN ALLERGIC REACTION OR OTHER SKIN IRRITATION.
      Nope! Question 6c is False!
      "Dermatologist tested" doesn't really tell you much, does it? It leaves you wondering about things like:

      •Did the dermatologist work for the manufacturer?
      •How many people was the product tested on?
      •How long did the testing last?
      •What were the results of the testing?

  46. QUESTION:
    Is there anything (injury/disc issue) that would cause my low back to itch constantly?
    I have been battling pain in my lower back and my whole back even went numb while I was walking the other day.

    The last few months, the area right in the center of my low back itches constantly. It is not dry skin or anything skin related. I would like to know if any disorders of the spine or back muscles would cause this?

    If anyone has experienced this or diagnosed this, I would appreciate the information.

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      this could very well be due to disc trouble as all your nerves go through the spinal cord, so any injury? could cause various sensations to be affected best to ask your doctor before it gets to badly

  47. QUESTION:
    I am so sick and tired of my weird skin problem?
    I have a freaky problem with excessively dry skin. I have been using a fingernail file to get rid of it but in a day or two it's right back. Naturally I can't file my entire body. It itches like you would not believe. There are no rashes, bumps or anything I can see. The flakes are white. I've looked at every skin condition there is and mine is not listed. I have no idea what is going on? (I used the file on my legs).

    • ANSWER:
      I had this for years, my mom told me it was eczema. Most people say eczema is a name used for tons of different dry skin conditions that doctors can’t diagnose. I used eczema creams all through Jr. High and High School, all that did was make me feel greasy and uncomfortable with zero results.

      You probably have what is called Keratosis pilaris, Keratosis pilaris is a common, genetic follicular condition that causes the appearance of flakes or rough bumps on the skin. It most often appears on arms, thighs, hands, legs, sides, buttocks, or face (which on the face are often mistaken for acne). Worldwide, Keratosis pilaris affects an estimated 40% of the adult population and approximately 50%-80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. There are several different types of Keratosis Pilaris, including Keratosis Pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), Keratosis Pilaris Alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), Keratosis Pilaris Rubra Faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.

      Keratosis Pilaris is caused by Hyperkeratosis: when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin, which is cream colored, surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore, resulting in rough clogged pores. The openings are often closed with a white plug of encrusted sebum, the oily, waxy substance produced by glands in the skin to keep it from drying out. Hyperkeratosis is most likely caused by your body having a vitamin A & E deficiency.

      I started taking vitamin A & E pills at dinner every night and 90% of my white bumps on my cheeks, arms, and legs cleared up. My boss also had white bumps on her arms and tried taking the vitamins too, it worked nicely for her. You could try taking the vitamins, but if you stop taking them, your body will go back to being deficient in them unless you start eating more foods naturally containing vitamins A & E:

      Vitamin A: Liver, Red Pepper, Cayenne, Sweet Potatoes, Carrots, Dried Apricots, Cantaloupe, Spinach, Squash, Dried Herbs, Papaya, Mangoes, Green Peas, Tomatoes.

      Vitamin E: Sunflower Seeds, Almonds, Pine Nuts, Peanuts, Dried Apricots, Pickled Green Olives, Cooked Taro Root, Wheat Germ/Flax Seed/Corn/Canola/Soybean Oils, Hazelnuts, Broccoli.

      Both A & E: Paprika, Red Chili Peppers or Powder, Spinach

      If the bumps (clogged dry rough crusty pores) have a red or pink ring around them, it could just be that they are inflamed, or it could be some sort of skin infection, such as yeast, which lives on the skin naturally but could become an infection, or bacterial. If they are a little pink or red I would try an antibacterial soap.

      Antibacterial soaps are full of chemicals and poisons, some are so harmful they cause muscle weakness, such as in the heart and tongue, and should not be in stores. A natural alternative is a soap or lotion containing Tea Tree oil. Tea Tree oil has natural antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and antiseptic qualities. It also has beneficial cosmetic properties. Tea Tree oil has a faint medicinal scent to it like eucalyptus, which is why I would suggest a soap instead of a lotion. Products containing Tea Tree oil can be found in abundance at health and natural and heath stores, but is also available in main stream store such as Wal-Mart for as low as around .

      So in short, vitamin A, vitamin E, soap, and you should be good (: I wish you luck

  48. QUESTION:
    What does it mean when dead skin scares you and disturbs you deeply?
    I've been this way since I was little ; I always have made sure my skin wasn't dry; and when I see dead skin on other people it disturbs me for some reason really bad.

    • ANSWER:
      Perhaps you had a negative experience that your mind corelates eith dry skin, perhaps a burn or something similar. We had to work hard to program my daughter after she had to stay in the hospital with a bad staph infection. I got an injury that required some gauze tape shortly after and the sight of it made her scream and cry and say noooo no no. It's a learned disorder/phobia that can be overcome with awareness and retraining to where you associate the dry skin no longer with fear but with non emotional understanding. Try looking up causes of dry skin or flaky skin. Learn about it in depth, look at the pictures(they can't hurt you obviously), and DESENSITIZE YOURSELF to the concept. Good luck and best wishes!

  49. QUESTION:
    What is a great product or way to prevent acne breakouts and heal the skin?
    Looking for over the counter product that is great for preventing acne, if it helps i am a 17 year old male. Also any suggestions on a product that is great for healing the scared skin would be great, thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      A skin disorder that is visibly apparent is a major source of embarrassment to the sufferer, and getting rid of it can be a very trying and expensive experience. People suffering from acne are always in pursuit of ways that they can help prevent acne because as they say, prevention is always better than cure. Here are a few viable ways to help prevent or reduce the chances of an acne breakout, thus avoid another embarrassing moment. There are also a few natural acne treatment options for you in the event that acne occurs when you least expect it.

      Acne Prevention Tips:

      Always apply a honey mask on a daily basis as honey is thought to be a great disinfectant and a great way to heal acne pimples. Honey is also known to be an effective antibacterial hence will help kill acne causing bacteria from your skin.

      If you have extremely long hair, why not cur it or better still, hold it in a style that it doesn't come in contact with your facial skin, This is because hair contains oil and may trap dust particles which may be transferred to your beautiful skin.

      Use a multi-vitamin twice daily to boost your nutritional value.

      Vitamins should also be taken on a daily basis, particularly Vitamins A as it helps reduce an overproduction of sebum and helps prevent an acne breakout.

      Avoid over-scrubbing or over-washing the skin.

      Avoid stressful situation as there is enough evidence to suggest that acne can actually be triggered by emotional instability.

      Take the recommended 8 glasses of water daily to keep the skin hydrated always.

      Avoid alcohol based cosmetic products.

      Consume foods rich in Zinc and a lot of veggies and fruits on a daily basis.

      Do regular exercises to boost blood circulation in the body and to help in toxin elimination.

      Be wise when selecting your cosmetic products as they can trigger acne.

      Acne Home Remedy Tips:

      Place a ripe tomato pulp on the acne affected areas and allow to stay for an hour before washing and patting dry with clean towels.

      Apply the raw papaya juice on the acne affected areas, particularly on swelled pimples.

      Apply fresh garlic on the pimples and watch them fade away.

      Make a paste using orange peel and water then apply it evenly on the acne affected areas of the skin.


dry skin disorder

Benign Seborrheic Keratosis

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How long does it take to remove skin tags?
    I'm trying to get rid of one by tying a string around it, (well about to) and i was wondering how long it would take to remove it. Thanks if you help any.

    • ANSWER:
      Skin Tag
      http://www.medicinenet.com/skin_tag/page2.htm How are skin tags treated?

      There are several effective medical ways to remove a skin tag, including removing with scissors, freezing (using liquid nitrogen), and burning (using medical electric cautery at the physician's office).

      Usually small tags may be removed easily without anesthesia while larger growths may require some local anesthesia (injected lidocaine) prior to removal. Application of a topical anesthesia cream prior to the procedure may be desirable in areas where there are a large number of tags.

      Dermatologists (skin doctors), family physicians, and internal medicine physicians are the doctors who treat tags most often. Occasionally, an eye specialist (ophthalmologist) is needed to remove tags very close to the eyelid margin.

      There are also home remedies and self-treatments, including tying off the small tag stalk with a piece of thread or dental floss and allowing the tag to fall off over several days.

      The advantage of scissor removal is that the growth is immediately removed and there are instant results. The potential disadvantage of any kind of scissor or minor surgical procedure to remove tags is minor bleeding.

      Possible risks with freezing or burning include temporary skin discoloration, need for repeat treatment(s), and failure for the tag to fall off.

      There is no evidence that removing tags causes more tags to grow. Rather, there are some people that may be more prone to developing skin tags and may have new growths periodically. Some patients even require periodic removal of tags at annual or quarterly intervals. Do skin tags need to be sent for pathology?

      Most typical small skin tags may be removed without sending tissue for microscopic examination. However, there are some larger or atypical growths that may be removed and sent to a pathologist for examination under a microscope to make sure that the tissue is really a tag and nothing more. Additionally, skin bumps that have bled or rapidly changed may also need pathologic examination. While extremely rare, there are a few reports of skin cancers found in skin tags.
      What else could it be?

      While classic skin tags are typically very characteristic in appearance and occur in specific locations such as the underarms, necks, under breasts, eyelids and groin folds, there are tags that may occur in less obvious locations.

      Other skin growths that may look similar to a skin tag but are not tags include moles (dermal nevus), nerve and fiber-type moles (neurofibromas), warts, and "barnacles" or "Rice Krispies" (seborrheic keratosis).

      Warts tend to be rougher, with a "warty" irregular surface whereas skin tags are usually smooth. Warts tend to be flat whereas tags are more like bumps hanging from thin stalk. While warts are almost entirely caused by human papilloma virus (HPV), tags are only sometimes associated with HPV.

      Groin and genital lesions resembling skin tags may actually be genital warts or condyloma. A biopsy would help diagnose which of these growths are not skin tags. Very rarely, a basal cell skin or squamous cancer or melanoma may mimic a skin tag, but this is very uncommon.

      Is there another medical name for a skin tag?

      Medical terms your physician or dermatologist may use to describe a skin tag include fibroepithelial polyp, acrochordon, cutaneous papilloma, and soft fibroma. All of these terms describe skin tags and are benign (noncancerous), painless skin growths. Some people refer to these as "skin tabs" or warts. However, a skin tag is best known as a skin tag.

      http://www.medicinenet.com/skin_tag/page2.htm

  2. QUESTION:
    What are seborrheic keratoses and how do you get rid of them at home?

    • ANSWER:
      Seborrheic keratosis is a benign form of skin tumor. The origin is unknown. It commonly appears after age 40. The tumors appear as wart-like growths in a variety of colors. They may appear in large numbers on the surface of the body. They are usually painless and benign, but may become irritated and itch. They may be cosmetically disfiguring and psychologically distressing as a result.

      Your treatment choices are:
      (1)Cryotherapy, the use of extreme cold to remove seborrheic keratoses. Cryotherapy is the preferred treatment for most seborrheic keratoses, especially flat or slightly raised growths.

      (2)Curettage, in which your health professional uses a spoon-shaped instrument (curette) to remove the growth. Regrowth is common after curettage alone.

      (3)Electrocautery (or electrodesiccation), which sends a low-voltage electrical charge through the tip of a needle to burn off a growth. This treatment is sometimes combined with curettage.

      (4)Excision, the removal of the growth with a scalpel after your doctor injects a local anesthetic. Excision may cause scarring.

      (5)Laser, an intense beam of light that burns and destroys the growth.

  3. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever heard of a skin disorder with two words, last one being Keratosis?
    I can't remember the first word but it looks and feels like small round rough patches on the surface of my skin, worse on my legs, ankles and top of my feet. I also have problems with skin tags on the underside of my upper arms, inside thighs and a few on my back. I am only a few lbs overweight so it's not due to that. My dermatologist told me what it was a couple of years ago and I cannot remember, he's not in practice now. If someone else has this or if you're a derm, I'd love to hear from you.
    I searched and now I'm pretty sure the name of this disorder is Seborrheic Keratosis. Anyone out there know anything about it?

    • ANSWER:
      I had a quick search and found this:
      SEBORRHEIC KERATOSIS
      A seborrheic keratosis is a benign skin growth that is very common among people over 40 years of age. The growths resemble flattened or raised warts, but have no viral origins and may exhibit a variety of colors, from pink or yellow through brown and black. Because only the top layers of the epidermis are involved, seborrheic keratoses are often described as having a "pasted-on" appearance.

      Because the tumors are rarely painful, treatment is not often necessary. There is a small risk of localized infection caused by picking at the lesion. If a growth becomes excessively itchy, or if it is irritated by clothing or jewelry, cryosurgery has been found to be highly effective in their removal. The main danger associated with seborrheic keratoses lies in their resemblance to malignant melanomas, which has sometimes led to a misdiagnosis of the cancerous lesions. If there is any doubt, a skin biopsy will allow a physician to make a correct diagnosis. A mutation of a gene coding for a growth factor receptor (FGFR3), has been found in 40% of seborrheic keratosis.

      I also found SOLAR KERATOSIS
      What is a solar keratosis?

      A solar keratosis is a small, rough, bump which develops on the skin. It is caused by a lot of exposure to the sun over many years. One or more may develop. It is sometimes called an actinic keratosis.

      What does a solar keratosis look like?

      Each one can range from the size of a pinhead to 2-3 cm across. Their colour can be light, dark, pink, red, the same colour as your skin, or a combination of these. The top of each one may have a yellow-white crust. They feel rough and dry, and are slightly raised from the surface of the skin. You can often feel them more easily than see them. Some redness may develop in the surrounding skin.

      Sometimes a finger-like growth of hard skin appears to come out of a solar keratosis (a 'cutaneous horn').

      Several solar keratoses may develop at about the same time, often in the same area of skin. Sometimes several join together and form a large flat-ish rough area of skin.

      Solar keratoses usually develop on areas of skin which have been exposed to the sun a lot. For example, on the face, neck, bald patches on the scalp, and the backs of the hands. They may appear in other areas in people who do a lot of sunbathing.

      There are usually no other symptoms. Rarely, you may get an itchy or pricking sensation from affected areas of skin.

      I hope that these help

  4. QUESTION:
    What are liver spots and what age can they develop?
    I was just curious.. :O and my moms 54. Why doesn't she have ANY.?

    • ANSWER:
      Liver spots" or "age spots" are the common names of the darker spots seen in adults, frequently on the back of the hands. The term "liver spot" is actually a misnomer since these spots are not caused by liver problems or liver disease. While freckles do tend to appear over time, they are not in themselves a sign of old age. Instead, they appear generally on sun-exposed areas, more so in people who have a genetic tendency to develop them. So, they are by no means purely a function of age.

      These spots are just the lentigo-type freckles that are commonly seen on the skin of older adults with a history of sun exposure.

      Sometimes, older people who have these lentigo-type freckles also have raised, brown, crusty lesions called seborrheic keratoses in or around the same areas. Seborrheic keratoses are also benign (not malignant) growths of the skin. Some patients call these growths "barnacles" or "Rice Krispies." Although they are most often medium brown, they can differ in color ranging anywhere from light tan to black. They occur in different sizes, too, ranging anywhere from a fraction of an inch (or centimeter) to an inch (2.5 cm) in diameter. Typically, these growths are around the size of a pencil eraser or slightly larger. Some keratoses begin as a flat lentigo and gradually raise and thicken to form a seborrheic keratosis.

      The telltale feature of seborrheic keratoses is their waxy, stuck-on, greasy look. They look like they have either been pasted on the skin or may look like a dab of melted brown candle wax that dropped on the skin. Seborrheic keratoses may occur in the same areas as freckles. Seborrheic keratoses are also more common in areas of sun exposure, but they may also occur in sun-protected areas. When they first appear, the growths usually begin one at a time as small rough bumps. Eventually, they may thicken and develop a rough, warty surface.

      Seborrheic keratoses are quite common especially after age 40. Almost everybody may eventually develop at least a few seborrheic keratoses during their lifetime. They are sometimes referred to as the "barnacles of old age.

  5. QUESTION:
    What help is available for Suberic Keratosis?

    • ANSWER:
      Seborrheic Keratoses are not harmful, but they are annoying - especially the large ones. Most insurance companies will not pay for removal treatments because they are benign and pose no threat to your health. If you don't mind paying out of pocket, your dermatologist can use liquid nitrogen to freeze them, or can numb the skin surrounding them and use electrocautery and a curette to scrape them off, or use a blade to cut them off.

  6. QUESTION:
    does someone help me with info ref to Seborrheic Keratosis ?

    • ANSWER:
      "Seborrheic keratosis is one of the most common types of noncancerous (benign) skin growths in older adults. In fact, most people develop at least one seborrheic keratosis at some point in their lives.

      A seborrheic keratosis usually appears as a brown, black or pale growth on the face, chest, shoulders and back. The growth has a waxy, scaly, slightly elevated appearance. Occasionally, it appears singly, but multiple growths are more common. Typically, seborrheic keratoses don't become cancerous, but they can look like skin cancer.

      These skin growths are normally painless and require no treatment. You may decide, however, to have them removed if they become irritated by clothing or for cosmetic reasons.

      A seborrheic keratosis usually has the appearance of a waxy or wart-like growth. It typically appears on the head, neck or trunk of the body. A seborrheic keratosis:

      * Ranges in color from light tan to black
      * Is round- to oval-shaped
      * Has a characteristic "pasted on" look
      * Is flat or slightly elevated with a scaly surface
      * Ranges in size from very small to more than 1 inch (2.5 centimeters) across
      * May itch

      You may develop a single growth or cluster of growths. Though not painful, seborrheic keratoses may prove bothersome depending on their size and location. Be careful not to rub, scratch or pick them. This can lead to inflammation, bleeding and infection.

      Causes

      The exact cause of seborrheic keratoses is unclear. They tend to run in some families, so genetics may play a role. Ultraviolet (UV) light may also play a role in their development since they are common on sun-exposed areas, such as the back, arms, face and neck.

      See your doctor if:

      * Many growths develop over a short time. Normally, seborrheic keratoses appear one or two at a time over many years.
      * The growths get irritated or bleed when your clothing rubs against them. You may want the growths removed.
      * You notice suspicious changes in your skin, such as sores or growths that grow rapidly, bleed and don't heal. These could be signs of skin cancer.

      Screening and diagnosis

      Your doctor can diagnose seborrheic keratosis by inspecting the growth. To confirm the diagnosis or to rule out other skin conditions, your doctor may recommend removal for examination under a microscope.

      Typically, seborrheic keratosis doesn't become cancerous, but it can resemble skin cancer. If your doctor suspects skin cancer, he or she will take a small sample of your skin (biopsy) for analysis in a lab. A biopsy can usually be done in a doctor's office using local anesthesia.

      Treatment of seborrheic keratoses usually isn't necessary. However, you may want them removed if they become irritated, if they bleed because your clothing rubs against them, or if you simply don't like how they look or feel.

      This type of growth is never deeply rooted, so removal is usually simple and not likely to leave scars. Your doctor can remove seborrheic keratoses using several methods, including:

      * Freezing with liquid nitrogen (cryosurgery). Cryosurgery can be an effective way to remove seborrheic keratosis. However, it may not work on large, thick growths, and it may lighten the treated skin (hypopigmentation).
      * Scraping the skin's surface with a special instrument (curettage). Sometimes curettage is used along with cryosurgery to treat thinner or flat growths. It may be used with electrocautery.
      * Burning with an electric current (electrocautery). Used alone or with curettage, electrocautery can be effective in removing seborrheic keratosis. This procedure can leave scars if it's not done properly, and it may take longer than other removal methods.

      Keep in mind that most insurance companies and Medicare won't pay for the removal of seborrheic keratoses if done only for cosmetic reasons. Medical reasons for seborrheic keratosis treatment include intense itching, pain, inflammation, bleeding and infection."

      "Characteristics of Seborrheic Keratosis
      The wicked witch with a wart on her nose probably had a Seb K not a wart. So how can you tell if that bump on your face or chest is actually a Seb K? They do have some defining characteristics.

      * Stuck on - They are classically described as looking like someone took clay or a blob of dirt and "stuck" it on the skin. The edge of the seborrheic keratosis is not attached to the underlying skin making it appear that it could be removed by picking it off with your fingernail. This is because seborrheic keratoses arise from the epidermis, or top layer of skin. They don't extend deep into the skin like warts. What you see is what you get.
      * Warty surface - Seborrheic keratoses may look like warts but they don't contain human papilloma viruses that cause warts. As they develop some can have a very rough surface with deep pits and fissures almost like cauliflower being pulled apart.
      * Smooth surface with horn pearls - Some seborrheic keratoses don't have a rough surface. If they are smooth, they contain tiny bumps that look like seeds that are lighter or darker than the surrounding tissue. These are called horn pearls and they are actually bits of keratin that develop in a whirling, circular pattern. Sometimes these horn pearls are best seen with a magnifying glass.
      * Itching - For some reason seborrheic keratoses tend to itch especially the older we get. Some people will unintentionally manipulate or "pick at" a seborrheic keratosis and cause it to be further irritated. If irritated enough, the skin around it can become red and the seborrheic keratosis itself can bleed. This can be alarming to savvy skin-watchers who know that a doctor should see any lesion that bleeds.

      What can be done about Seborrheic Keratosis?
      The first and usually the best choice is to leave them alone. They may get larger, but they are not precancerous so leaving them there for the life of your skin is not a problem. Seborrheic keratoses are usually removed because they itch, they interfere with clothing or jewelry, or they are cosmetically unacceptable. That last option is a judgment call. The warty thing on an 80-year-old man's nose may not be as big of a deal as the one on a 40-year-old woman's nose.

      Removing Seborrheic Keratosis
      If you decide to have a seborrheic keratosis removed, there are several ways to do this.

      * Liquid Nitrogen - A small seborrheic keratosis can be frozen with liquid nitrogen. Liquid nitrogen works by freezing and destroying the cells but leaving the connective tissue foundation intact. The lesion frozen forms a blister as the water is released from the now-dead cells then crusts over as that water dries. When the crust falls off after several days, the skin underneath has begun to repair itself. Liquid nitrogen can leave a scar as the repaired skin may have more or less pigment producing cells. The scar is usually flat though unless you have a tendency to form keloids.
      * Shave - Another way seborrheic keratoses can be removed is to shave them off. Because their attachment to the underlying skin covers less area than the lesion itself, shaving can be a viable option. Seborrheic Keratoses are shaved off with a flexible razor blade going just deep enough to get only the seborrheic keratosis cells and leave normal skin. Shaving too much normal skin off can leave a divot in the skin as a scar. After the lesion is shaved, a chemical agent such as aluminum chloride or silver nitrate is applied to the wound to stop any small surface bleeding. Silver nitrate is a dark brown color and the resulting wound after the shave is dark brown. This color will usually go away after the skin repairs but some of that pigment can remain. For this reason, silver nitrate is usually not used on the face.

      Unusual-Looking Growths
      Sometimes seborrheic keratoses can be very difficult to distinguish from melanoma. Especially when they first appear, they can have several of the characteristics of atypical growths. They can have an irregular border and color variation throughout the lesion. You should not hesitate to see your doctor about any skin rashes or bumps that concern you."

  7. QUESTION:
    Why is the doctor concerned about my wife's seborrheic keratosis?
    During her most recent annual exam my wife mentioned a couple spots near her vaginal area -- a mole and something resembling an age spot or wart -- to the doctor. She had had both for a few years and past doctors did not seem concerned, but since the "age spot" appeared to be growing and the mole was rather dark, the doctor referred her to a dermatologist. The dermatologist was also concerned about the mole, so she punch biopsied it and did a scrape biopsy on the age spot. The mole was ruled to be a common nevis, thus no concern, and the age spot was identified as a seborrheic keratosis. Despite the seborrheic keratosis almost certainly being benign, the dermatologist remains concerned about it and wants to remove the rest of it, stating that its location may make it HPV-related.

    Obviously there's no harm in removing it, but we are just trying to understand what the cause for concern is, or if she is just being abundantly cautious. Even if it is HPV, what more can be done after it is removed? Also, wouldn't the tests on the original specimen have identified the HPV virus? Any insight is appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like the doctor is being either overly cautious or just wants to continue in the lifestyle to which she has become accustomed and needs to have some additional cash flow to do that.

      Only 4% of all HPV viruses can cause cancer and those are very rare. In fact, the body's immune system usually deals with those viruses very well and it takes about 2 years for the body to clear them with no medical intervention at all. As always, any medical decision is your decision and the more educated you become on the subject, the better off you are to make a good one.

      good luck to you

  8. QUESTION:
    Do freckles eventually go away as you get older?

    • ANSWER:
      Some people like their freckles, while others may be more bothered by their appearance. The cosmetic improvement of the skin is a frequent request among people with freckles. On the other hand, freckles are desirable by some people who like the special character or uniqueness these give them.

      Freckles?

      True freckles pose essentially no health risk at all. They are all absolutely harmless. They are not cancerous and generally do not become cancerous.

      Rare concerns about freckles may arise when they are associated with other diseases like xeroderma pigmentosum and neurofibromatosis or when they are confused with the following, more serious conditions:

      Lentigo maligna ("malignant freckle"): This is an uncommon fairly superficial skin cancer that generally occurs on the faces of older adults who have a history of considerable sun exposure. Over the course of months to years, this condition may, if untreated, develop into a more aggressive malignant variety called lentigo maligna melanoma. There are, of course, many hundreds of ordinary facial freckles for every one that is potentially malignant. A simple in-office test called a skin biopsy can help diagnose lentigo maligna.

      Melanoma: This very dangerous form of skin cancer may appear even in young people and on parts of the body that are sun-exposed as well as those that are protected.. While the exact cause of melanoma is not entirely known, ultraviolet rays (particularly UVA) are known to play a part. Melanomas can arise from a previously normal mole or pigmented spot that has been present many years or lifelong. Melanomas can also arise from completely normal skin without an apparent preexisting mole. In comparison with benign (noncancerous) freckles, melanomas tend to be larger, darker, and have more irregular color and shape variations.. Most melanomas are actually flat and not raised as many people tend to incorrectly assume.

      Basal cell carcinoma: This is the most common type of skin cancer. These are usually pearly, pink or reddish in color and may bleed easily. Pigmented basal cell carcinoma is a type of basal cell that may be confused for a freckle or seborrheic keratosis because of its brown or dark color. A simple procedure called a skin biopsy can help diagnose this growth.

      So, no they don't go away as you get older. They may fade. You may even develop "liver spots" which some folks mistake as "freckles" ... but, this about covers it.

  9. QUESTION:
    Wuts the diesease called that cause spots on ur skin?
    not like freckles its like a black dot

    • ANSWER:
      Quincy Brown - There a couple of possibilities. Maybe the most common are the brown spots that increase with age. These are called seborrheic keratosis and are benign, tan-brown spots sometimes call "liver spots." Some infections cause pinpoint skin hemorrhages known as petechiae. A great drop in blood platelets can do the same (thrombocytopenia).

  10. QUESTION:
    need quick biology help!?
    I need help with these 10 questions:

    1. Baldness is:
    a. hyperhidrosis
    b. hypertrichosis
    c. albinism
    d. alopecia

    2. Inflammatory disease of the sebaceous glands characterized by papules, pustules, and inflamed nodules, and plugs of sebum that block pores is:
    a. seborrheic keratosis
    b. acne
    c. impetigo
    d. seborrheic keratosis

    3. A benign cavity lined with keratinizing epithelium and filled with sebum and epithelial debris is a:
    a. carbuncle
    b. keratinous cyst
    c. furuncle
    d. seborrheic dermatitis

    4. Radiographic imaging procedure of the spinal canal after injection of a contrast medium is:
    a. EMG
    b. myelography
    c. DEXA
    d. arthrography

    5. What is the lab test that looks for a substance present in the blood of those who have rheumatoid arthritis?
    a. Ca
    b. RA
    c. RF
    d. THR

    6. The bus driver and the administrative assistant were both diagnosed with a compression injury that manifests itself as fluctuating pain, numbness, and paresthesia of the hand caused by compression of the median nerve at the wrist. They both have:
    a. osteoarthritis
    b. rheumatoid arthritis
    c. carpal tunnel syndrome
    d. sciatica

    7. Drugs that are applied directly on the skin are:
    a. intradermal
    b. subcutaneous
    c. transdermal
    d. topical

    8. Route of administration in which drugs are injected within the skin is called:
    a. intradermal
    b. subcutaneous
    c. transdermal
    d. topical

    9. A fever blister is caused by:
    a. HPV
    b. HSV
    c. TB
    d. STSG

    10. A stretch mark is a(n):
    a. stratum
    b. stria
    c. excoriation
    d. erosion

    Thanks for the help. I did all of the other ones myself, except these.

    • ANSWER:
      4b 9b Herpes simplex virus 6c 7d 5c rheumatoid factor 3b 1d 10b 8a 2b

      wow that was some hard stuff. I'm lucky i don't take that course

  11. QUESTION:
    need quick biology help!?
    I need help with these 10 questions:

    1. Baldness is:
    a. hyperhidrosis
    b. hypertrichosis
    c. albinism
    d. alopecia

    2. Inflammatory disease of the sebaceous glands characterized by papules, pustules, and inflamed nodules, and plugs of sebum that block pores is:
    a. seborrheic keratosis
    b. acne
    c. impetigo
    d. seborrheic keratosis

    3. A benign cavity lined with keratinizing epithelium and filled with sebum and epithelial debris is a:
    a. carbuncle
    b. keratinous cyst
    c. furuncle
    d. seborrheic dermatitis

    4. Radiographic imaging procedure of the spinal canal after injection of a contrast medium is:
    a. EMG
    b. myelography
    c. DEXA
    d. arthrography

    5. What is the lab test that looks for a substance present in the blood of those who have rheumatoid arthritis?
    a. Ca
    b. RA
    c. RF
    d. THR

    6. The bus driver and the administrative assistant were both diagnosed with a compression injury that manifests itself as fluctuating pain, numbness, and paresthesia of the hand caused by compression of the median nerve at the wrist. They both have:
    a. osteoarthritis
    b. rheumatoid arthritis
    c. carpal tunnel syndrome
    d. sciatica

    7. Drugs that are applied directly on the skin are:
    a. intradermal
    b. subcutaneous
    c. transdermal
    d. topical

    8. Route of administration in which drugs are injected within the skin is called:
    a. intradermal
    b. subcutaneous
    c. transdermal
    d. topical

    9. A fever blister is caused by:
    a. HPV
    b. HSV
    c. TB
    d. STSG

    10. A stretch mark is a(n):
    a. stratum
    b. stria
    c. excoriation
    d. erosion

    Thanks for the help. I did all of the other ones myself, except these.
    well it's from a biology book:)

    • ANSWER:
      No way this is bio, this looks more like Health to me.

      The only one I think I know is 6, A possibly?

  12. QUESTION:
    mole removal..... is it possible?
    Hey guys,
    So, I have this mole on the side of my face. Its light brown in color, raised and a little bigger than the size of an eraser. I have been annoyed by this mole for too long. It's very noticeable and I catch people looking at it all the time. I always wear my hair down because of it ( since its far back enough that my hair mostly covers it). I'm turning 21 soon and I want to get it removed.
    I made an appointment at a dermatology place. Its this wednesday (appointments are very hard to get), I've been waiting for months now. ONLY thing is... I was looking through their website and they say they "provide evaluation and removal of warts, cysts, keloids, benign lesions (such as skin tags and seborrheic keratosis), pre-cancerous skin lesions (such as actinic keratosis), and skin cancer." The issue is... it dosent say they remove moles. Do you think that since they do other skin growths they do moles anyway? And can I get a removal on the same day as my appointment?

    • ANSWER:

  13. QUESTION:
    i had a keratin on my shoulder 2 year ago it was burnt off but it has come back under and around the scar and?
    my son was also 21 when he had a radical neck dissection from scamous cell will mine become the same

    • ANSWER:
      If your lesion was truly a keratosis, it will not trun into anything malignant, as a keratosis (seborrheic keratosis) is always a benign lesion. On the other hand, if you had an "actinic keratosis", this is a premalignant lesion, which can evolve into a squamous cell carcinoma. The fact that yours has come back after having been treated makes me think that you might have had an actinic keratosis, or possibly even a true squamous cell carcinoma at the time of the original surgery. Was a biopsy performed at the time of the original treatment?

  14. QUESTION:
    Had what the doctor said was a seborrhoic keratoss removed frm my neck?
    Hi
    Gp removed a suspected seborrhoic keratosis 3 to 4 weeks ago and he was sure that what it was in the way it came off etc. However the report came back saying in pathology speak. 'The segmented lesion does have characteristics of an irritated seborrhoic keratosis however elsewhere there is atypia in some areas which Arguably amounts to dysplasia. This should be bourne in mind if any of the lesion remains or if it re grows. complete excision is advised if there is any clinical concern.'
    My Gp said he thought it was fine and in his words he was not worried about it and said we should just watch the area and be aware of it. However I chose to have a re excision yesterday and when I went for it I got laid on the table and GP was about to numb me up when he looked and could not see any scar or any sign of the original lesion,to be fair to him it has healed up so well I cant see anything nor can my wife or the nurse in the GPs surgery. The GP then said look I was doing this for your peace of mind but I dont see any reason in giving you a scar for no reason. He said if he cant see the original lesion he could remove skin from the wrong area. Therefore the concensous was to leave it watch it carefully and if any sign at all of regrowth /change to wip it off immediately.
    ????

    • ANSWER:
      Spelled: seborrheic keratosis

      is a benign (noncancerous) wart like growth on the skin.

      But what's the question...this is just a chatty little note.

  15. QUESTION:
    whats this thing on my head?
    i have this little bump on my head. about the size of a spot. its not a spot because iv used spot creams and that.

    • ANSWER:
      need more info. Is it raised? Is it red? brown? purple? green? If it's red, there's a good chance that it's a benign growth called an angioma. If it's brown, it could be a simple mole. If it's red like a pimple but doesn't go away, you may want to see a dermatologist to make sure it isn't a basal cell carcinoma. If it's brown and flaky, and you are over 20 or so, consider seborrheic keratosis. You may want to consider a trip to the dermatologist just to check it out.

  16. QUESTION:
    how doctors remove moles?
    how do the doctors remove the moles dont tell me to do it at home because im not

    • ANSWER:
      Moles are pigmented macules, papules, or nodules composed of clusters of melanocytes or nevus cells. Their main significance (other than cosmetic) is their potential for being or becoming malignant. Lesions with characteristics of concern (changing or highly irregular borders, color changes, pain, bleeding, ulceration, or itching) are biopsied.(Merck)
      Moles may be removed surgically if they affect your appearance or have an increased cancer risk.(MedlinePlus)
      First, a diagnosis must be made. If the lesion is a seborrheic keratosis, shave excision, electrodessication or cryosurgery may be performed - usually leaving very little if any scarring. If the lesion is suspected to be a skin cancer, a skin biopsy must be done first, before considering removal. This is unless an excisional biopsy is warranted. If the lesion is a melanocytic nevus - one has to decide if it is medically indicated or not. Many insurance companies will not pay for cosmetic removal of benign moles.
      If a melanocytic nevus is suspected of being a melanoma, it needs to be removed and sent for microscopic evaluation by a pathologist by a method called skin biopsy. One can do a complete excisional skin biopsy or a punch skin biopsy, depending on the size and location of the original nevus. Other reasons for removal may be cosmetic, or because a raised mole interferes with daily life (e.g. shaving). Removal can be by excisional biopsy or by shaving. A shaved site leaves a red mark on the site which returns to the patient’s usual skin color in about two weeks. However, there might still be a risk of spread of the melanoma, so the methods of Melanoma diagnosis, including excisional biopsy, are still recommended even in these instances. Additionally, moles can be removed by laser, surgery or electrocautery.
      In properly trained hands, some medical lasers are used to remove flat moles level with the surface of the skin, as well as some raised moles. While laser treatment is commonly offered and may require several appointments, other dermatologists think lasers are not the best method for removing moles because the laser only cauterizes or, in certain cases, removes very superficial levels of skin. Moles tend to go deeper into the skin than non-invasive lasers can penetrate. After a laser treatment a scab is formed, which falls off about seven days later, in contrast to surgery, where the wound has to be sutured. A second concern about the laser treatment is that if the lesion is a melanoma, and was misdiagnosed as a benign mole, the procedure might delay diagnosis. If the mole is incompletely removed by the laser, and the pigmented lesion regrows, it might form a recurrent nevus.
      For surgery, many dermatologic and plastic surgeons first use a freezing solution, usually liquid nitrogen, on a raised mole and then shave it away with a scalpel. If the surgeon opts for the shaving method, he or she usually also cauterizes the stump. Because a circle is difficult to close with stitches, the incision is usually elliptical or eye-shaped.
      Electrocautery is also used for removing skin tags and only reaches the outermost level of skin so that scarring is not a problem.
      (Wikipedia)

  17. QUESTION:
    WHAT ARE SOME Skin Diseases?
    What are some skin diseases and illnesses
    ANSWER QUICK WITHIN 1HR

    • ANSWER:
      •Acne
      Acne is the most common skin disease treated by physicians. It is a chronic condition that affects over 85% of adolescents and young adults. There are different types of acne that respond to different types of treatment.
      •Seborrheic Keratosis
      Seborrheic keratoses are benign lesions that don't necessarily look benign. They can have various colors, grow quickly, itch, and sometimes bleed. Fortunately, they are fairly easy to distinguish from skin cancers
      •Dermatitis
      The term dermatitis describes many classifications of rashes. The most common dermatitis is atopic dermatitis or eczema.
      •Herpes
      Oral and genital herpes are caused by the herpes simplex virus. An infection with this virus is life-long, however the rash can be controlled with medication. Herpes infections in pregnant women can cause serious infections for the baby.
      •Hives
      Hives are caused by an allergic reaction in the skin releasing the chemical histamine. Acute hives can usually be treated with medications but chronic hives, lasting longer than 6 months, require an investigation into the cause.
      •Infections
      Infections are caused when an outside organism gets into the skin. They are classified by the type of organism causing the infection - bacterial, fungal, or viral.
      •Psoriasis
      Psoriasis is a lifelong skin condition caused by changes in the immune system. The rash of psoriasis is very distinctive. In the last couple of years there have been many strides in the use of biologic medications that make psoriasis less of a "heartbreak".
      •Rosacea
      Rosacea is a common skin condition characterized by redness of the face and acne. We don't know exactly what causes rosacea, but there are effective medications and treatments to keep it under control.
      •Warts
      Warts are a common skin condition caused by the human papillomavirus. There are many effective treatments, and yes, duct tape is one of them.
      •Seborrheic Dermatitis
      Seborrheic dermatitis causes a characteristic rash on the hair-bearing areas of the face. Sometimes it can be controlled with dandruff shampoo.
      •Skin Cancer
      There are several types of skin cancer from the slow-growing basal cell carcinoma to the potentially fatal melanoma.

      Hope this helps

  18. QUESTION:
    umm cancer? or my mind wondering too much?
    so i recently noticed a small black mark on my right outer/upper thigh.. this could most likely be me being stupid but is there any chance it could be anything bad like cancer? its small, black, and under my skin.. its kinda freaking me out, so could i please get a few answers asap? :/ thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Truman, the small black skin spot you mention would lead some to worry about a possible skin cancer known as melanoma. However, most of the time they are very common lesions often called "liver" spots or technically "seborrheic keratosis (SK)" Seborrheic keratoses (SKs) are common skin growths. These benign (non-cancerous) growths can occur almost anywhere on the skin. Some people get just one; others develop many. Having many SKs is more common.
      Usually beginning as small, rough bumps, SKs tend to eventually thicken and develop a warty surface. Most are brown, but these growths range in color from light tan to black. Some SKs measure a fraction of an inch; others are larger than a half-dollar. A SK can be flat or raised. Sometimes the surface feels smooth.
      What often distinguishes these growths from other lesions is a waxy, pasted-on-the-skin appearance. A SK can look like a dab of warm, brown candle wax on the skin. It also may resemble a barnacle attached to a ship. Either way, SKs tend to have that stuck-on-the-skin appearance.
      For absolute peace of mind, schedule a visit to a dermatologist MD.

  19. QUESTION:
    Sun affected Skin, Curiosity.?
    Tuesday i found a freckle like patch of skin. It has now grown to 2mm (W) x 5mm (L), looks like a scab, feels like a burn.

    Additional info:
    I spend alot of time outside toppless in the sun. No sun cream. Different colloured moles have appeared since, Shoulders are burnt.

    • ANSWER:
      James - What you describe is likely known as seborrheic keratosis (SK). SK are the most common benign tumor in older individuals. They have a variety of clinical appearances. Although no specific causes have been identified, they occur more frequently in sunlight-exposed areas. The frequency appears to increase with age. Seborrheic keratoses are benign but secondary tumors, and Bowen disease (squamous cell carcinoma in situ) or malignant melanoma may occasionally arise within the lesion. Seborrheic keratoses can also catch on clothing and become irritated. They can itch, grow, and bleed. Scratching seborrheic keratoses or trying to pick them off the skin can result in a secondary infection. People sometimes have many seborrheic keratoses, and they may obscure the detection of a dysplastic nevus or malignant melanoma. A variety of techniques may be used to treat SK. They include cryotherapy with carbon dioxide (dry ice) or liquid nitrogen, electrodesiccation, electrodesiccation and curettage, curettage alone, shave biopsy or excision using a scalpel, or a laser or dermabrasion surgery.
      Next, schedule a visit to a dermatologist MD for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment. My SKs have successfully been removed with carbon dioxide cryotherapy. Good luck!

  20. QUESTION:
    what is keratoses?

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a very common genetic follicular disease that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin and hence colloqually referred to as "chicken skin". Primarily, it appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms, but can also occur on thighs and buttocks or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet). Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40 to 50% of the adult population and approximately 50 to 80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. Varying in degree, cases of KP can range from minimal to severe.

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks) and related disorders.

      Most people with keratosis pilaris do not know they carry it. While KP resembles goose bumps, it is characterized by the appearance of small rough bumps on the skin. As a result, it is often confused with acne.

      Keratosis pilaris tends to occur as excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin, accumulates around hair follicles (process known as hyperkeratinization). Unattractive more than anything else, it most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy. Though people with keratosis pilaris experience this condition year round, it’s during the colder months when moisture levels in the air are lower that the problem can become exacerbated and the “goose bumps” are apt to look and feel more pronounced in color and texture.

      Although exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, and medicated lotions containing alpha-hydroxy acids or urea may improve the appearance and texture of affected skin, results are not permanent. There is no known cure for this condition

      ------------------
      Seborrheic keratosis (Seborrhoeic keratosis) a kind of benign skin growth that is very common among people over 40 years of age. The growths resemble flattened or raised warts, but have no viral origins and may exhibit a variety of colors, from pink or yellow through brown and black. Because only the top layers of the epidermis are involved, seborrheic keratoses are often described as having a "pasted-on" appearance.

      Because the tumors are rarely painful, treatment is not often necessary. There is a small risk of localized infection caused by picking at the lesion. If a growth becomes excessively itchy, or if it is irritated by clothing or jewelry, cryosurgery has been found to be highly effective in their removal. The main danger associated with seborrheic keratoses lies in their resemblance to malignant melanomas, which has sometimes led to a misdiagnosis of the cancerous lesions. If there is any doubt, a skin biopsy will allow a physician to make a correct diagnosis. A mutation of a gene codigng for a growth factor receptor (FGFR3), has been found in 40% of seborrheic keratosis.

  21. QUESTION:
    help sun burn!!!!?
    i went yesturday to school for my little sister it was hot outside the sun was so hot but before i went outside i put on sunscreen and i took an umbrella but today when i woke up i went to the mirror and i saw that i have this brown spots on my face douse any 1 know what i can do to get rid of this brown spots maybe itz a sunburn ??
    no people i am not on the uk

    • ANSWER:
      Small freckle-like spots (lentigines) often occur on sun-exposed areas of the skin during a person almost close to adults ages. These are commonly referred to as age spots or liver spots. These spots are more common in fair-skinned individuals, but may occur in many skin types. The tendency to develop lentigines is inherited. Another type of brown spot is a seborrheic keratosis. These rough, raised spots often flake off only to reappear. Seborrheic keratoses are often mistaken for moles because they can be quite dark or irregular in shape, even though they are benign. They typically occur after age 30 as an inherited trait. Sometimes it has nothing to do with sunscreens or other creams you may have used. Sometimes it can occur from the medications. The medications caused the skin reacts to the sun exposures.
      I suggest you to go to Dermatology doctor and treating your brown spots without you trying anything else on your own. Dermatologist will carefully screen them and check them to see if its moles even melanomas and will tell you how to have them disappeared and treat them properly. If you try anything else you don't know about on your face. It can might more problems on your face. Don't panic.. Just call and make an appointment. It will be worth it without second guessing of what your brown spots are or how they came on your face.

  22. QUESTION:
    Skin condition... very worried?
    I have a friend -- he is male, 61 years old -- and I'm very concerned that he may be in danger of skin cancer. He is bald on the top of his head (he started loosing hair early on in his life, in his 30's I would say) and he has many brown, irregularly-shaped spots/moles on the crown of his head. I would say they have been developing within the last 6-7 years. The more worrisome thing is that there is a some sort of growth on the side of his face, in the side-burn area, that has been growing for the past 2 1/2 - 3 years or so. It's hard to describe but I'll try: it's not a significantly different color than his skin, but it is very elevated, and seems to be very tiny sections of raised skin, almost like little spikes (but not very hard) and clumped together in a cluster. It's at least a centimeter in diameter and still slowly growing. I've tried to research it, looking at pictures of skin conditions online but nothing matches it.

    I, my mother, and his step-daughter have all expressed concern about it in the past year and said he should go to the doctor and have it checked out, but he hasn't. He had a doctor's check-up a few months ago, but he forgot to bring it up. I'm not sure if he's concerned about it much. He's very healthy otherwise, apart from being a bit overweight -- he takes lots of different vitamins and such every day.

    I know skin cancer can be very deadly and doesn't have any other symptoms. What can I do to help him? Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      The deadly form of skin cancer (melanoma) is best screened for with the ABCD rule:
      A - is the mole asymmetric? For a healthy mole you should be able to "cut it in half" and it still looks the same on either side
      B - Are the borders irregular? Healthy moles should have smooth regular and defined borders
      C - Are there multiple colours? Moles should be only one colour.
      D - Is the diameter large? Moles should be no larger than the eraser at the end of a pencil

      Having irregularities in any of the ABCD rules does not mean you have melanoma, but it raises the likelihood of that mole being cancerous. Probably the most important rule of all to follow is looking for moles or skin lesions that are new, or that have been changing in their appearance from how they used to look.

      There are other forms of skin cancer which can present in older individuals like basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. These can present as ulcerating lesions, sores that don't heal, crater-like lesions, and so forth. These are less dangerous but can on rare occasions become deadly if left untreated for a very long time.

      Another common condition in older individuals which is benign is called seborrheic keratosis. These are coin-like lesions on the skin that are elevated and look like they're "stuck to the skin". That sounds like it could be what your friend has.

      At any rate, there is NO way I could tell you for sure what your friend has based on a verbal description. It is really essential that he sees a doctor to ensure that none of his moles or skin lesions are cancerous. Even if he has gone for a checkup for something else, doctors are busy and may not have noticed anything on his skin if their attention wasn't drawn towards it.

      I'm sure everything is fine but please encourage your friend to see a doctor for a skin checkup as soon as possible.

  23. QUESTION:
    FLAT skin moles, is it safe to remove with a sharp needle?
    I've been growing skin moles that are flat rapidly now-a-days. I've removed some in my hands and one on my foot. it's like old skin. do you think it's safe and nothing wrong will happen? Some on my hands are sensitive other not. So give all the advise/facts you have. My moles are flat like a tattoo, so I think it's like peeling old skin. Also can you guys give me info about moles; how they produce, why and will it ever stop! lol help! thx.
    well. Tina D I find like safety pin easier. the thought of using tweezers feels like a red mark or something will result in pulling a mole w/ tweezers, but thx for the advise
    I saw pics on google, L R and they are HUGE! my are like small polka dots. I have one that is pretty dark, and i got some stuff out. They say (Wiki) that they are common in 40 year olds. I am no way near 40!

    • ANSWER:
      Of course without seeing them, it would be hard to diagnose and it's probably best that a dermatologist was seen to make sure, but I'm guessing that what you might have is seborrheic keratosis.

      keratosis, seborrheic (basal cell papilloma, verruca senilis)
      (seb´rē´ik pap´lōm vroo´k sē´nilis),
      n benign, pigmented, superficial epithelial tumors that clinically appear to be pasted on the skin of the trunk, arms, or face. Characterized histologically by marked hyperkeratosis, with keratin cyst formation, acanthosis of basal cells, and melanin pigmentation, all above the level of the adjacent epidermis.
      http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/keratosis

      If, this is indeed what you have, you're not going to do any harm. They will grow back in most cases, however, and you run the risk of scarring.

      These are the most common form of non-cancerous growths in adults and are not benign although they often look like they are. For that reason, an annual check should be done to make sure that any serious lesions are not overlooked.

      It is considered by some to be genetic as well as a possible result of exposure to UV rays.

      The following are all methods of removal:

      * Freezing with liquid nitrogen (cryosurgery). Cryosurgery can be an effective way to remove seborrheic keratosis. However, it may not work on large, thick growths, and it may lighten the treated skin (hypopigmentation).
      * Scraping the skin's surface with a special instrument (curettage). Sometimes curettage is used along with cryosurgery to treat thinner or flat growths. It may be used with electrocautery.
      * Burning with an electric current (electrocautery). Used alone or with curettage, electrocautery can be effective in removing seborrheic keratosis. This procedure can leave scars if it's not done properly, and it may take longer than other removal methods.

      As I mentioned at the top of my post, this is, by no means, a diagnosis - just the most common form of moles, why they pop up, their treatment, etc.

      I'm afraid it's fairly certain to say that IF you do, indeed, have seborrheic keratosis, they won't go away or stop. They just increase in number each year. Sorry! The good news is that they ARE removeable and that they are not cancerous.
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/seborrheic-keratosis/DS00846/DSECTION=1

      Hope you found this helpful,
      LR

      Figure Skater, SK starts out very small and it's very flat almost blending with the skin. As I mentioned above, it's difficult without seeing your skin, to diagnose but this is one of the most common benign skin growths that occur. It was just the best educated guess I could give based on the info I had. If you have any more symptoms or "characteristics" I might be able to narrow it down for you. My best advice would be to see a dermatologist to make sure none of them are of suspicious nature. Try using the following guidelines to help you decipher the benign spots from those that are more suspicious in nature:

      The majority of malignant melanomas are brown to black pigmented lesions.

      * Warning signs include change in size, shape, color, or elevation of a mole.

      * The appearance of a new mole during adulthood, or new pain, itching, ulceration, or bleeding of an existing mole should all be checked by a health-care provider.

      The following easy-to-remember guideline, "ABCD," is useful for identifying malignant melanoma:

      * Asymmetry—One side of the lesion does not look like the other.

      * Border irregularity—Margins may be notched or irregular.

      * Color—Melanomas are often a mixture of black, tan, brown, blue, red, or white.

      * Diameter—Cancerous lesions are usually larger than 6 mm across (about the size of a pencil eraser), but any change in size may be significant.
      http://www.emedicinehealth.com/skin_canc...

  24. QUESTION:
    Dad has chickpea-like growth on scalp, anyone else?
    My dad has had a chickpea-looking like growth on his scalp for about a year and a half.

    Its light yellowish and soft/mushy to the touch.

    I have BEGGED him to go to an oncologist to make sure it isn't some form of cancer but he refuses to make an appointment.

    He has a phobia about doctora taught to him by his parents (my grandparents.)

    They taught him to NEVER go to a doctor because if you ARE sick, you are WEAK and a FREAK OF NATURE.

    Real great parenting, huh? <---sarcasm

    So, since he won't go to a doctor, I asked an oncologist about the growth. As I expected, he said he could NOT rule out cancer unless he examines the actual growth and biopses it.

    I told my dad this, but it didn't make him want to go see an oncologist anymore than my previous warnings did.

    I am VERY worried since mt dad frequently goes out in the sun, which might have been the cause of the growth in the first place, WITHOUT any sunscreen on despite my and my mother's numerous warnings.

    So, has anyone had or know of someone who has had a growth on their scalp resembling a chickpea that is light yelowish and soft/mushy to the touch??

    Thanks to anyone who answers

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds more like a seborrheic keratosis which is common and benign, but obviously we can't tell that from here sight unseen.
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/seborrheic-keratosis/DS00846

      Skin cancers are the most common type of cancer, but they are not included in the American Cancer Society statistics since almost all are cured before the person ever sees a cancer specialist.

      You do not want him to see a medical oncologist. I am a medical oncologist. We usually do not do skin biopsies. We rarely see skin cancers even though there are more than one million of these each year in the U.S. These are cured by dermatologists and surgeons - not by chemotherapy specialists.

      A family practice doctor or a dermatologist could biopsy this. Maybe he would see a regular doctor. Absolutely no need to start with a specialist for this.

  25. QUESTION:
    Is a growing mole normal?
    My mom has a lot of moles as she inherited this from his father (who also had a lot of colorful moles but never had any sort of cancer and lived up to 92 years). I haven't seen her in 6 years because she moved to another country to work. But when I saw her again this year, I saw a 2 centimeter mole that grew on her neck. It's black. I've never seen it before and she said that it just grew over the period of 6 years. I also remember such large moles on my grandfather.

    Is it normal?

    • ANSWER:
      You can not be sure it is a mole until a dermatologist tells you that it is a mole. It might be a seborrhea keratosis which is a common benign skin lesion that looks similar to a mole and can range in size from a small brown bump to a 2-3cm dark brownish lesion. Here are a few images.

      http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://courses.washington.edu/hubio567/melanoma/large/mel13.jpg&imgrefurl=http://courses.washington.edu/hubio567/melanoma/dx1.htm&h=512&w=602&sz=55&hl=en&start=6&um=1&tbnid=C0Aas2JuEw5hkM:&tbnh=115&tbnw=135&prev=/images%3Fq%3DSeborrheic%2BKeratosis%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26safe%3Doff%26rls%3DGGLJ,GGLJ:2006-32,GGLJ:en%26sa%3DN

      http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.crutchfielddermatology.com/images/SeborrheicKeratosis/001.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.crutchfielddermatology.com/treatments/Seborrheickeratosis/&h=304&w=211&sz=14&hl=en&start=64&um=1&tbnid=rW89ppZAgRSGnM:&tbnh=116&tbnw=81&prev=/images%3Fq%3DSeborrheic%2BKeratosis%26start%3D60%26ndsp%3D20%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26safe%3Doff%26rls%3DGGLJ,GGLJ:2006-32,GGLJ:en%26sa%3DN

      A seborrheic keratosis is often caused by UV exposure and grows slowly over a period of years. You can often see huge ones on some elderly people. They can be removed by excision or treated with a laser.

      Unfortunately they also often look very similar to a basal cell carcinoma so your mom's best bet is to see a dermatologist and have him take a look at it. good luck

  26. QUESTION:
    I am 62 years old lady with hypertension for the last 35 years?
    I'm currently on Esidrex (Hydrochlorothiazide) 25 mg in the morning, Diovan (Valsartan) 180 mg in the morning, Diovan 80 mg at night and Tenormin (Atenolol) tablets 25mg at night. I have developed unexplained black skin lesions that are irregular in shape and not itchy. The periphery of the lesion is not raised.They are increasing in number. So far I have one on my back, one on the ear pinna and a new one is just starting on the tip of my nose. My doctor said Esidrex can cause skin rash, but have not seen it like this. Can any one tell me what this could be? Thank you.
    Yours,

    • ANSWER:
      Hydrochlorothiazide can rarely produce a rash that would make the skin red and potentially peel. It is not known to cause the type of rash you are describing. Diovan and Tenormin are also not known to lead to these type of skin lesions. It is really impossible to determine what your skin lesions are without seeing them. How long did they develop over? What is their approximate size?

      One possibility is Seborrheic keratosis, which are also known as age spots. These tend to develop as one ages and are completely benign. I will leave a link to pictures and you can see if this is similar to what you have. Skin cancer is also a possibility with any new skin lesions like you are describing. Dark irregular skin lesions are particularly concerning for melanoma. For this reason, I would suggest you have these lesions evaluated by a Dermatologist especially if your primary doctor is unsure of the diagnosis. Good luck.

      http://www.skinsight.com/adult/seborrheicKeratosis.htm
      http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/picture-of-seborrheic-keratosis


benign seborrheic keratosis

Keratosis On Scalp

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Can the use of aminolevulinic acid HCL for the use of keratosis on your scalp cause blood clots?
    I had a procedure called Levulan Kerastick by my dermatologist for the removal of keratosis on my scalp. The ointment is aminolevulinic acid HCL. 2 days later I had a small stroke. All the doctors including my dermatologist and cardiologist have said this procedure was not a result of the Levulan Kerastick and aminolevulinic acid HCL. They said it is a co-incidence that this has happened. I still have some doubts and am wondering if anyone has had problems with this procedure. Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      gail_92625 It's your news?
      http://www.osoq.com/funstuff/extra/extra04.asp?strName=gail_92625

  2. QUESTION:
    What are some otc body products that reduce redness and inflammation?
    I have Eczema around my knees and elbows, Keratosis Pilaris on my arms and legs, and Psoriasis on my scalp. My skin is soooo red, what could help me?

    My dermatologist gave me a steroid ointment, but it doesn't work very well and it's not healthy, so I'm looking for an alternative.

    Any help is appreciated!

    • ANSWER:

  3. QUESTION:
    what is the best hair removal treatment for keratosis pilaris? to get rid of it?
    my friend has been using wax and after she waxes it it improves her keratoisi slightly but after few days it cums back...isit better to use hair removal creames such as nair/ veet or shave her arms to improve her condition also she moistureses her arms with nivea after exfoliating wid dove soap...any1 can help her??

    • ANSWER:
      scalp head cream

  4. QUESTION:
    Will I ever be free of Psoriasis and Eczema?
    I've had Psoriasis since I was 13 in my ears and on my scalp, I am now 15. Around a year ago I had Eczema on the palm of my hands however it has returned around my knuckles and fingers.

    They say Psoriasis may one-day have a cure and the same goes for eczema I think. But is there a chance I will ever be rid of these two skin conditions. My brother has Eczema and Keratosis Pilaris but hes had it since he was born.

    Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      My eczema is controlled with diet alone. Its a jolly hard slog, but worth it. all the other advice is spot on, moisturise, moisturise and more moisturise!
      Dairy intolerances can be a major cause of allergic responses such as eczema (as in my case), and since living a totally dairy-free life since 1990 I can control it. This is not easy, but possible. I was a sufferer since the age of 7 and only found this cause/treatment when I was 25, so I know what it is like to suffer the hell of eczema.
      I know you are looking for quick fix miracle cure...but the problem is probably within you and not any amount of external preparations will 'cure' it.
      I would seriously seek medical advice, or dietetic advice on how to conduct a proper exclusion regime to try and eliminate certain food groups systematically. At your age you must do this under medical supervision, but I would certainly give it a go. You don't want to start using heavy steroids and harsh chemicals if you can help it.
      'moisturise and watch your food intake' - that's what I would suggest.
      good luck, we've been there too...
      BUT, remember your body is going through a hell of an hormonal rollercoster ride at the moment which could be upsetting everything much more than usual.

  5. QUESTION:
    Has anyone ever heard of a skin disorder with two words, last one being Keratosis?
    I can't remember the first word but it looks and feels like small round rough patches on the surface of my skin, worse on my legs, ankles and top of my feet. I also have problems with skin tags on the underside of my upper arms, inside thighs and a few on my back. I am only a few lbs overweight so it's not due to that. My dermatologist told me what it was a couple of years ago and I cannot remember, he's not in practice now. If someone else has this or if you're a derm, I'd love to hear from you.
    I searched and now I'm pretty sure the name of this disorder is Seborrheic Keratosis. Anyone out there know anything about it?

    • ANSWER:
      I had a quick search and found this:
      SEBORRHEIC KERATOSIS
      A seborrheic keratosis is a benign skin growth that is very common among people over 40 years of age. The growths resemble flattened or raised warts, but have no viral origins and may exhibit a variety of colors, from pink or yellow through brown and black. Because only the top layers of the epidermis are involved, seborrheic keratoses are often described as having a "pasted-on" appearance.

      Because the tumors are rarely painful, treatment is not often necessary. There is a small risk of localized infection caused by picking at the lesion. If a growth becomes excessively itchy, or if it is irritated by clothing or jewelry, cryosurgery has been found to be highly effective in their removal. The main danger associated with seborrheic keratoses lies in their resemblance to malignant melanomas, which has sometimes led to a misdiagnosis of the cancerous lesions. If there is any doubt, a skin biopsy will allow a physician to make a correct diagnosis. A mutation of a gene coding for a growth factor receptor (FGFR3), has been found in 40% of seborrheic keratosis.

      I also found SOLAR KERATOSIS
      What is a solar keratosis?

      A solar keratosis is a small, rough, bump which develops on the skin. It is caused by a lot of exposure to the sun over many years. One or more may develop. It is sometimes called an actinic keratosis.

      What does a solar keratosis look like?

      Each one can range from the size of a pinhead to 2-3 cm across. Their colour can be light, dark, pink, red, the same colour as your skin, or a combination of these. The top of each one may have a yellow-white crust. They feel rough and dry, and are slightly raised from the surface of the skin. You can often feel them more easily than see them. Some redness may develop in the surrounding skin.

      Sometimes a finger-like growth of hard skin appears to come out of a solar keratosis (a 'cutaneous horn').

      Several solar keratoses may develop at about the same time, often in the same area of skin. Sometimes several join together and form a large flat-ish rough area of skin.

      Solar keratoses usually develop on areas of skin which have been exposed to the sun a lot. For example, on the face, neck, bald patches on the scalp, and the backs of the hands. They may appear in other areas in people who do a lot of sunbathing.

      There are usually no other symptoms. Rarely, you may get an itchy or pricking sensation from affected areas of skin.

      I hope that these help

  6. QUESTION:
    My friend says she keeps fainting and her hair is falling out?
    I think it may be stress. I told her that she should go see a doctor. She says she will. But does anyone know what may be the problem. She is 17 by the way
    I dont think she has an eating disorder. she is definetly not anorexic or bulemic.

    • ANSWER:
      heat, heart problems, meds, stress, hypothyroidism,
      Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)
      does she have any mood swings?

      Early symptoms of PCOS include:

      * Few or no menstrualAbnormal menstrual periods
      Breast - premenstrual tenderness and swelling
      Depression and the menstrual cycle
      Menstrual cramp relief
      Menstrual periods - heavy, prolonged, or irregular
      Painful menstrual periods
      Premenstrual bloating
      Premenstrual dysphoric disorder
      Premenstrual syndrome
      Relief of menstrual cramps
      Vaginal bleeding between periods periods.

      * Heavy, irregular vaginalAnterior vaginal wall repair
      Causes of vaginal itching
      Culture - endocervix
      Hydrocele
      Hysterectomy
      Transvaginal ultrasound
      Vaginal bleeding between periods
      Vaginal cysts
      Vaginal discharge bleedingBleeding
      Bleeding between periods
      Bleeding disorders
      Bleeding gums
      Dysfunctional uterine bleeding (dub)
      Ear discharge
      Gastrointestinal bleeding
      Hemorrhagic stroke
      Nosebleed

      * HairHair loss
      Hair transplant
      Folliculitis, decalvans on the scalp
      Head louse infestation - scalp
      Ringworm of the scalp
      Tinea capitis
      Wood's lamp test - of the scalp and hairHair loss
      Hair transplant
      Male pattern baldness growth (hirsutism) on the faceFace pain, chestAcne, cystic on the chest
      Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray
      Bronchial cancer - chest x-ray
      Chest mri
      Chest pain
      Chest tomogram
      Chest tube insertion
      Chest tube insertion - series, backBack pain - low
      Back strain treatment, stomachAbdominal pain
      Abdominal pain diagnosis
      Esophagus and stomach anatomy
      Feeding tube insertion - gastrostomy
      Gastric cancer
      Gastric suction
      Gastric ulcer
      Ileus - x-ray of distended bowel and stomach
      Nausea and vomiting
      Roux-en-y stomach surgery for weight loss
      Stomach, thumbs, or toes. More than 70% of women with PCOS complain of these hairHair loss
      Hair transplant

      * AcneAcne
      Acne - close-up of pustular lesions
      Acne on the back
      Acne, cystic on the chest
      Acne, cystic on the face
      Multiple basal cell cancer due to x-ray therapy for acne and oily skinActinic keratosis
      Aging changes in skin
      Allergy skin prick or scratch test
      Allergy testing
      Basal cell carcinoma
      Birthmarks - red
      Cellulitis
      Circumcision
      Cutaneous skin tags
      Dry skin
      Fair skin cancer risks, caused by high androgen levels.

      * DepressionAdolescent depression
      Bipolar disorder
      Depression
      Depression - resources
      Depression among the elderly
      Depression and heart disease
      Depression and insomnia
      Depression and the menstrual cycle
      Depression in children or mood swings. Hormonal changes are a known cause of emotional symptoms.

      http://www.webmd.com/hw/womens_conditions/tw9106.asp

  7. QUESTION:
    Anyone know about keratosis on the neck?
    i got a keratosis breakout on my neck and theyre really red and swollen, is there anything that could either relieve the redness or get rid of the breakout?

    • ANSWER:
      What is it?
      An actinic keratosis (AK), also known as a solar keratosis, is a scaly or crusty bump that arises on the skin surface. The base may be light or dark, tan, pink, red, or a combination of these. . . or the same color as your skin. The scale or crust is horny, dry, and rough, and is often recognized by touch rather than sight. Occasionally it itches or produces a pricking or tender sensation. It can also become inflamed and surrounded by redness. In rare instances, actinic keratoses can even bleed.

      The skin abnormality or lesion develops slowly and generally reaches a size from an eighth to a quarter of an inch. Early on, it may disappear only to reappear later. You will often see several AKs at a time.

      An AK is most likely to appear on the face, ears, scalp, neck, backs of the hands and forearms, shoulders, and lips - the parts of the body most often exposed to sunshine. The growths may be flat and pink or raised and rough.

      Why is it dangerous?
      AK can be the first step in the development of skin cancer. It is thus a precursor of cancer or a precancer.

      The most common treatment for AK, it is especially effective when a limited number of lesions exist. No cutting or anesthesia are required. Liquid nitrogen is applied to the growths with a spray device or cotton-tipped applicator to freeze them. They subsequently shrink or become crusted and fall off. Some temporary swelling may occur after treatment, and in dark-skinned patients, some pigment may be lost.

  8. QUESTION:
    Do I have herpes or is it something else?
    i have these red bumps with little scabs on top on my arm legs and finger and face and in my scalp... i masturbate but i really haven't done it anywhere but my bathroom. I got the same thing like 5 - 6 months ago and it happened again... do i have herpes?
    bumps on my face are in my eye brows and my forehead. bumps on legs (thighs) are just bumpy and red. and arm ones too.
    DO I HAVE HERPES OR NOT?

    • ANSWER:
      first off calm down. from what you are describing it doesnt sound like herpes. plus you named practically every place on your body but you genitals!

      it could be a number of things. it could be a rash that your spreading or it could be Keratosis pilaris which is a common skin condition in which a protein in the skin called keratin forms hard plugs within hair follicles. it could be Eczema which a long-term (chronic) skin disorder that involves scaly and itchy rashes.

      if you are worried go to the doctor and get checked out

  9. QUESTION:
    A man in his late 50s came to the doctor with a hard spot under is breastbone.?
    An x-ray revels nothing abnormal, although the man insists the spot wasn't there until the past few years.

    What is the explanation?

    • ANSWER:
      There are a number skin conditions that cause lumps and bumps to appear on the surface of the skin or just below the skin. This article covers some of the most common ones, and includes the following:

      * Skin cysts
      * Cherry angioma
      * Dermatofibromas
      * Epidermoid cysts
      * Folliculitis
      * Keratoacanthoma
      * Keratosis pilaris
      * Lipomas
      * Neurofibromas

      Skin Cysts

      Cysts are noncancerous, closed pockets of tissue that can be filled with fluid, pus, or other material.

      Cysts are common on the skin and can appear anywhere. They feel like small peas under the surface of the skin. Cysts can develop as a result of infection, clogging of sebaceous glands (oil glands), or around foreign bodies, such as earrings.
      What Are the Symptoms of Skin Cysts?

      Skin cysts usually are:

      * Slow-growing
      * Painless
      * Smooth to the touch when they are rolled under the skin

      Cherry Angioma

      A cherry angioma is a smooth, cherry-red bump on the skin.

      Although cherry angiomas usually appear on the trunk of the body, they can occur nearly anywhere. The cause of cherry angiomas is not known and the growths usually appear on people over the age of 40.

      Dermatofibromas

      Dermatofibromas are harmless round, red-brownish skin growths that are most commonly found on the arms and legs. Dermatofibromas contains scar tissue and feel like hard lumps in the skin.

      The cause of dermatofibromas is not known.
      What Are the Symptoms of Dermatofibromas?

      The symptoms of dermatofibromas include:

      * A red, brown or purple growth that can change colors over time
      * A growth that is as small as a BB pellet
      * Tenderness, pain and itching; however, growths also can be painless
      * A dimple that appears when the growth is pinched

      Epidermoid Cysts

      Epidermoid cysts, also called sebaceous cysts, are benign (non-cancerous) skin cysts formed from blocked oil glands in the skin. Most commonly, epidermoid cysts are found on the genitals, trunk and back; but, they also can occur in other areas of the skin.
      What Are the Symptoms of Epidermoid Cysts?

      In general, epidermoid cysts have a round appearance. A dark portion of the cyst is visible on the skin. If the cysts become infected, they will become red and tender. When the cysts are squeezed, they can produce a cheesy white discharge.

      Folliculitis

      Folliculitis is an inflammation of the hair follicles. It can be caused by an infection in the hair follicles, by chemical irritation or by physical irritation (for example, shaving or friction from clothing). Typical body sites that are involved in folliculitis include the face, thighs and scalp.

      Folliculitis is more common in people who have diabetes mellitus. It also is more common in people who are obese or have compromised immune systems.
      What Are the Symptoms of Folliculitis?

      The main lesion in folliculitis is a papule or pustule with a central hair. The hair shaft in the middle of the lesion may not be seen.

      Other symptoms include:

      * Multiple red pimples and/or pustules on hair-bearing areas of the body
      * A rash
      * Itching skin

      Keratoacanthoma

      A keratoancanthoma occurs when cells in a hair follicle do not grow normally. The growth apparently is triggered by a minor skin injury in an area that previously had suffered sun damage. Ultraviolet radiation from sun exposure is the biggest risk factor in keratoacanthomas.

      A keratoacanthoma usually will appear on sun-damaged skin as a thick growth that has a central crusted plug.

      Keratoacanthomas appear most often in people who are over the age of 60.
      What Are the Symptoms of a Keratoacanthoma?

      Keratoacanthomas are rapidly growing, red, dome-shaped bumps with central craters. Some keratoacanthomas can grow to extremely large sizes, occasionally 3 to 6 inches in diameter.

      Keratosis Pilaris

      Keratosis pilaris (commonly called KP) appears as "chicken skin bumps" on the skin. These bumps usually appear on the upper arms and thighs. They also can appear on the cheeks, back and buttocks. Keratosis pilaris, while unattractive, is harmless.
      What Are the Symptoms of Keratosis Pilaris?

      This disorder appears as small, rough bumps. The bumps are usually white or red, but do not itch or hurt. Keratosis pilaris is usually worse during the winter months or other times of low humidity when skin becomes dry. It also may worsen during pregnancy or after childbirth.

      Lipomas

      Lipomas are subcutaneous soft tissue tumors or nodules that usually are slow-growing and are considered benign (not harmful). They have a firm, rubbery consistency. Lipomas tend to form on the trunk, shoulders, neck, but can appear elsewhere on the body.
      What Are the Symptoms of Lipomas?

      Lipomas can appear as solitary nodules or in groups. Most lipomas are less than 5 cm in diameter and are asymptomatic, but they can cause pain when they compress nerves.

      Neurofibromas

      Neurofibromas are soft, fleshy

  10. QUESTION:
    I have keratosis pilaris (kp) and need advice on treaments?
    I have started using AmLactin lotion for almost a week and I have seen no change except my skin is pretty smooth, but the bumps are still red and visible. I'm going to keep using the lotion but I would like to know of other things I can do to get rid of my kp. It is on my arms,thighs, and back. I am 19 and I have had it my whole life. Any advice helps.

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Have you been diagnosed by a dermatologist (or other doctor) with KP? It's not common and several other conditions can be mistaken for KP... most commonly, folliculitis is sometimes confused for KP.

      Folliculitis is tiny infected glands around the hair follicles. Can be on arms, legs, groin and even on scalp/eyebrows. Sometimes, proper hydration can be part of correcting this problem because dry skin will produce more sebum. With increased sebum production, we see blockage of the glands and the opportunity for infection.

      KP, however, is often related to insufficient vitamin A. Vitamin A (actually beta-carotene, which your body converts to vitamin A) can be found in brightly orange and yellow colored fruits and veg. I'm also including link that lists other food sources of vitamin A.
      http://www.hoptechno.com/bookfoodsourceA.htm

      Cod liver oil is also an excellent source of vitamin A (as well as vit D and omega-3.) A teaspoon of cod liver oil daily could also be included in your routine. The omega-3 fatty acids will also contribute toward healthy skin overall.

      If increasing dietary intake of these essential nutrients doesn't resolve your problem, consider talking with your local registered/licensed ND to guide you toward other treatment options.

  11. QUESTION:
    bumps everywhere - like ingrown hairs that cover the whole body?
    my boyfriend has these bumps everywhere and very dry skin - he cant shower often because he says it hurts his skin and scalp. He has had it for as long as he can remeber. Do you know what this could be?

    • ANSWER:
      My friend has somethinq like that - except she has it on her arms ;
      its called Keratosis Pilaris - but this miqht not be the same thinq .
      Try makinq him qo to a Dermatologists .

  12. QUESTION:
    I have these white bumps on my neck. What are they and what can I do?
    I have these small white bumps just above my adam's apple, just on the front of my neck. They are about the size of a tip of a ball-point pen (and look about like a whitehead) and I can pull them off. Some of them typically come off when I shave because they are on the outer layer of my skin, but they come back. When they come off they can bleed

    • ANSWER:
      They could be something called seborrheic keratosis. Do you have them on your scalp also?

      Or skin tags.

      You may be able to freeze them off.

  13. QUESTION:
    Can freckles turn into skin cancer?
    One time i got a second degree burn from the sun, ever since then i have had millions of freckles on my shoulders (where i got burnt). They get worse every year, and i was wondering if that could turn into skin cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      Wondering if that strange spot on your skin is a freckle, mole, or a form of skin cancer? There are ways to tell. Most people don't really pay much attention to their skin, especially those segments that we can't see easily. Those that are in a high risk group for skin cancer should consider full body photographs made at their dermatologist yearly so that they can keep track of changes in any freckle, mole, or suspicious spots. Take out your mirror and start inspecting because you'll now be able to tell if that little brown spot is a freckle, a mole, or a suspicious area that could indeed be skin cancer.
      Freckles are usually found on the face and the arms as small brown spots. They are more common in summer with sun exposure, after a sunburn, and in higher prevalence with people that are fair skinned and with light or red hair. Freckles are sometimes genetic and do not pose any type of health risk to the people that have them. Freckles don't have a real treatment other than using a sunscreen in the summer, but if you really want them removed there are laser treatments that can rid you of them, or you can cover them with makeup. There are those that believe that freckles add character and depth, especially to faces and shoulders. It is a personal opinion and they shouldn't be immediately thought to be rid of as "imperfections".

      Moles are brown or black growths on the skin. Moles can be in a single formation or in a group and appear anywhere on the body. They usually appear in childhood and cease around the mid-20s. Moles appearing after age 30 are usually suspicious and need to be monitored. The vast majority of moles are benign and don't pose a threat to those that have them

      If any mole bleeds, oozes, itches, or becomes tender and scaly then you will need to see a physician. Changes in any mole that you've had for a while, new moles that pop up, or a mole that becomes tender, should have special attention paid to. There is a simple moniker on when moles become suspicious: A, B, C, D, E.

      Asymmetry: When half of the mole does not match with the other half in size.
      Border: When the edges or borders of a mole are irregular, blurry, and jagged.
      Color: When the color of a mole is not the same, has shades of tan, brown, black, blue, white, or red.
      Diameter: When the diameter of the mole in question is over the size of a normal pencil eraser.
      Elevation: When part of the mole is raised or becomes elevated from the rest of the skin on the mole.

      Melanoma
      An asymmetrical mole that has uneven borders. It usually is scalloped. They have black, brown, red, white, or blue shades and will be larger than a pencil's eraser. This can be a new mole or manifest in an already existing mole. This is the most serious form of skin cancer and it can spread throughout the body.This is a curable cancer when it caught early.

      Basal Cell Carcinoma
      These are red patches that are pink, red, or white bumps that can bleed or ooze. This can only be a new mole, and doesn't manifest in already existing moles. It is easy to treat and usually isn't fatal.

      Acitinic Keratosis
      Scaly or Crusty bumps that are tan, pink, red, or skin colored. These can also be patches. They are rough and can itch on occasion. You may find that they are tender to the touch. These usually will appear in the lips, face, ears, scalp, neck, forearms, or backs of the hands. They are precancerous, but don't always turn into cancer. Still they should be removed when they are detected.

      Squamous Cell Carcinoma
      This looks like one of three different things: A rough, thick area that looks like a wart, A scaly patch that is red with irregular borders, or an open sore that will crust or bleed. They will not manifest in already existing moles. They are common on the lower lip, face, neck, arms, scalp, backs of hands, and the ears. Another curable cancer when it is detected early.

      If you do find a suspicious mole on you, don't panic and call and make an appointment with a dermatologist. They will be able to tell you if it is okay or if there is further looking needed and a biopsy may be ordered. There are times when they will just excise (cut out) the spot and put in a single stitch, or they may opt to freeze it off. Either way, they will have a better knowledge of what it is and the best method of taking care of it. One way or another, you will now have a better idea to the spots on your body and what they really are.

      Published by Tina Samuels - Featured Contributor in Lifestyle
      Author of three books, Tina Samuels is also the owner of Turtle Trax Hobbies. She s been a freelance writer for 20 years and a small business owner for three. Two of her three books are slated for a Spring 2... View profile
      How to Detect Skin Cancer
      An informative guide on how to detect symptoms of skin cancer before it gets into advanced stages.

  14. QUESTION:
    An idea to curing Keratosis Pilaris?
    KP is just extra protein buildup around the hair follicles, causing the red bumps... So what if a medicine was created to destroy all hair follicles (except for scalp)? Then the body would not need to send proteins to the hair follicles because there wouldn't be any. Besides, smooth skin without hair, or bumpy skin with hair? I choose the first one any day.

    • ANSWER:

  15. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of dandruff?!?! HELP?
    I`m 14 years old and I have had horrible dandruff ever since I was about 10, I have tried everything I can possibly think of ( salt water on scalp, dandruff shampoo) I dont know what to do!! HELP

    • ANSWER:
      Well, I think you should first try to figure out if it is dandruff that you are dealing with. I read online before that it can maybe be an infection or some sort of skin disease. If it is dandruff though, there are a lot of other things you should try. Dandruff is mainly your scalp being dry, so in order to deal with dandruff, you need to eliminate the dryness. Try wetting your hair, towel drying it a little bit, putting a deep conditioner all in your hair and scalp, and put it up in a towel for about 1/2 hour and let it dry in the towel. The towel on your head will lock in moisture and will work with the deep conditioner on your scalp. That's the first thing I recommend trying. Also, if you take Flax seeds, they are suppose to help with many problems the body can have, and they don't have any harmful side effects cause they're all natural. I take them cause I have a skin condition called Keratosis Pilaris, and it helps clear them up. It also helps for dry skin, and is suppose to make your hair grow faster and healthier. Look into that if your interested. I posted a few websites that talk about dandruff and some solutions. I hope I could help! Dandruff seems bad to have :(

  16. QUESTION:
    what causes scalp and arms to itch? any help to get rid of it?

    • ANSWER:
      Dandruff, Keratosis Pilaris. Selsun Blue to get rid of it.

  17. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know anything about "Atopy?"?
    After living in Asia for about 9 months, I started to develop a skin condition called, "atopy." I have never heard of it before I developed it. Your skin becomes very itchy and red, including your arms, legs, scalp, face, ears, etc. I have tried everything, including Prescription and Oriental medicines.

    Does anyone know anything about this illness, such as a web site or doctor who can help. Willing to travel anywhere to get some answers. Thank you

    • ANSWER:
      Atopy is an inherited predisposition which causes a tendency to suffer from one or more of the following “atopic diseases”: allergic asthma, allergic rhino-conjunctivitis and atopic dermatitis. The diagnosis of “atopy” is not based on one single distinctive clinical feature or laboratory test, but rather results from a combination of patient and family history and clinical findings. These features include:

      Family and patient history with regard to eczema, allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma

      Patient history with regard to milk crust, sweat-induced pruritus, intolerance of certain cloth fabrics or metals, photophobia

      Present or past clinical findings such as xerosis cutis, ear fissures/ eczema, dyshidrosis or dyshidrotic hand eczema, pityriasis alba, atopic winter feet, nipple eczema, angular cheilitis

      Atopic stigmata such as palmar hyperlinearity, Hertoghe’s sign, “dirty neck”, keratosis pilaris

      White dermographism, acrocyanosis

      Laboratory tests such as total IgE, phadiatop

      As mentioned above, atopy may lead to the eczematous disease “atopic dermatitis”. It may also facilitate the development of irritant contact dermatitis.

      TREATMENT: The treatment of atopic dermatitis targets underlying skin abnormalities such as xerosis, pruritus, superinfection and inflammation . Patients should also be educated about the chronic nature of the disease and the need for continued adherence to proper skin care.

      for the complete procedure, do visit the source below. think it has all you need. all the best!

  18. QUESTION:
    What is wrong with my scalp?
    It's really sore, and flakes always fall off of it. It sometimes bleeds a bit as well. I know I don't have a problem with lice, do you have any idea what this could be? Thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      You may have actinic keratosis of the scalp, sebbhoriec dermatitis or scalp psoriasis.

      You need to see you doctor for a referral to a specialist (dermatologist) or, if you're able to, see your dermatologist directly.

      Whichever of the above conditions you have, it should respond well to topical (cream/ointment) or light treatment (phototherapy), but it's important that you get an accurate diagnosis first.

  19. QUESTION:
    Do you have any secret beauty tips?

    • ANSWER:
      1. Drink 8 glasses of water a day (Great for skin)
      2. Herbs are EXTREMELY good for you, your health, and even your appearance (even though it's not really a secret)
      3. Brush your teeth for at least two minutes if you plan on kissing someone. (Brush after every meal/snack but wait 10 mins. before)
      4. ALWAYS be gentle to your hair, teeth, & skin when your brushing, combing, exfoliating and/or using beauty products.
      5. Body Brushes are great for exfoliating. (Yup, that's right...your whole entire body)
      6. Avocados, beans, nuts, and fruits like oranges and bananas help your skin looking youthful.
      7. Always use sunscreen daily even when there is snow on the ground. (even when your inside of a building in case your near or in front of a door or window that can expose you to the sun.
      8. When it comes to skin & skin care products you want have products that have Vitamin A, Vitamin C, and Glycol Acid. Glycolic Acid helps skin conditions like acne (as well as Vitamin A), blackheads, whiteheads, pustules, eczema, age spots, dry skin, pre-cancerous growths, psoriasis, hyperkeratosis, actinic keratosis, and seborrheic keratosis. As vitamin C allows for collagen synthesis and soaks up damaging free radicals, which are essential for healthy skin.
      9. Green tea is healthy for your skin and hair.
      10. Avoid putting hair products directly on your scalp, it'll clog up your pores.
      11. Avoid using styling products with alcohol, because the alcohol dries up your skin.
      12. When using fragrances such as perfumes or colognes only apply little cologne as possible and on the following areas of the body: inner ankles, upper thigh (in between thighs, near groin), behind ears, neck, armpits, and area between biceps and forearms.
      13. Oatmeal is good for your skin, even the Arabians and Egyptians used oatmeal back in like 2000 B.C. and great for rashes, bug bites, and itchy skin.
      14. finally, the best sunscreens have TiO2 or ZnO because they are great for protecting your skin, for example, use can reduce age spots.

  20. QUESTION:
    why do i keep losing hair on my arm & legs?...?
    once in a while i lose hair on my arms & legs...and when i shave my legs it seems like it duznt grow bak...i also lose alot on my scalp.....and on my arms i c red dots from the hair that fall..its like i plucked them out ...

    • ANSWER:
      Losing hair is natural. Hair naturally stops growing at some point, and then it resumes with a new hair follicle, which pushes the old follicle out of the skin. The red dots are likely keratosis pilaris, a natural and very very common condition that primarily is visible on the upper arms and thighs. It's just how about 50% of the population's skin looks, with small red dots at each follicle due to excess growth of keratin. If you are losing hair in patches, on the other hand, you might have alopecia areata, an autoimmune condition in which the body attacks hair follicles.

  21. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris AND Psoriasis...HELP?
    I have BOTH KP and Psoriasis.. KP on my upper arms and all over my legs..and psoriasis on elbows, knees, feet and in my scalp.
    Its super annoying but I've dealt with it for years.... but now I am going on my first vacation in 3 months to Florida and im very excited..except for my little problems... can anybody give me any suggestions how I can at least help this problem a little bit? i know it won't go away completely but even a little will be worth it..

    thank you so much!

    • ANSWER:
      Hello there. I have nothing to suggest for KP,,, but for my plaque psor. (elbows, knees and scalp) the herbal cream/spray combo by champori works the best: my patches cleared almost completely in just 2 weeks and I haven't had a flare up in more than a year now. Try it: it comes with money back guarantee, so if it doesn't work - it's free.
      Best,
      Bernadette

  22. QUESTION:
    Dad has chickpea-like growth on scalp, anyone else?
    My dad has had a chickpea-looking like growth on his scalp for about a year and a half.

    Its light yellowish and soft/mushy to the touch.

    I have BEGGED him to go to an oncologist to make sure it isn't some form of cancer but he refuses to make an appointment.

    He has a phobia about doctora taught to him by his parents (my grandparents.)

    They taught him to NEVER go to a doctor because if you ARE sick, you are WEAK and a FREAK OF NATURE.

    Real great parenting, huh? <---sarcasm

    So, since he won't go to a doctor, I asked an oncologist about the growth. As I expected, he said he could NOT rule out cancer unless he examines the actual growth and biopses it.

    I told my dad this, but it didn't make him want to go see an oncologist anymore than my previous warnings did.

    I am VERY worried since mt dad frequently goes out in the sun, which might have been the cause of the growth in the first place, WITHOUT any sunscreen on despite my and my mother's numerous warnings.

    So, has anyone had or know of someone who has had a growth on their scalp resembling a chickpea that is light yelowish and soft/mushy to the touch??

    Thanks to anyone who answers

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds more like a seborrheic keratosis which is common and benign, but obviously we can't tell that from here sight unseen.
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/seborrheic-keratosis/DS00846

      Skin cancers are the most common type of cancer, but they are not included in the American Cancer Society statistics since almost all are cured before the person ever sees a cancer specialist.

      You do not want him to see a medical oncologist. I am a medical oncologist. We usually do not do skin biopsies. We rarely see skin cancers even though there are more than one million of these each year in the U.S. These are cured by dermatologists and surgeons - not by chemotherapy specialists.

      A family practice doctor or a dermatologist could biopsy this. Maybe he would see a regular doctor. Absolutely no need to start with a specialist for this.

  23. QUESTION:
    What can I do to prevent balding?
    I'm 16 and I lose a lot of hair each day. I try not to wash my hair everyday, but if I don't, it gets very oily. Any tips?

    The top of my head looks like this right now:

    http://mylt.ltcdn.com/files/images/FergieHairLoss.jpg

    • ANSWER:
      What you may have is alopecia which is simply the medical term for hair loss on the head. First, you should question your diet. Are you eating enough protein and healthy fats? Are you getting enough iron in your diet or are you losing a lot of blood? There are biotin supplements you can take to help grow healthy strong hair but if you are losing it for an unknown reason you will constantly encounter a vicious cycle of new hair growth and great hair loss. According to Wikipedia, some of the following can be the cause of hair loss:

      Androgenic alopecia (male pattern baldness)
      Fungal infection such as "black dot" tinea or tinea capitis
      Chemical breakage such as over processing or frequent use of chemical relaxer
      Heat damage as from repeated hot comb use
      Chronic exposure to traction on hair shaft such as Traction alopecia
      Compulsive hair pulling such as trichotillomania
      Hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism[3]
      Iron deficiency
      Telogen effluvium resulting from physical or psychological stress
      Hereditary disorder of the hair shaft or genodermatoses
      Secondary syphilis can cause "moth-eaten" hairloss[4]
      Discoid lupus erythematosus or chronic cutanous lupus erythematosus
      Lichenplanopilaris
      Pseudopelade of Brocq
      Tufted folliculitis
      Dissecting cellulitis
      Alopecia mucinosa
      Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans
      Adverse effect from certain drugs such as chemotherapy
      Radiation therapy or other radiation exposure
      Hypervitaminosis A

      There are so many different possible causes. Because of this, you should see a doctor. Only a doctor can properly diagnose you. There are a few things you can do for healthy hair if there isn't a medical cause behind your hair loss. Don't brush your hair obsessively but do brush it, don't wear tight pony-tails or hair styles, or sleep in these hair styles, use a gentle, vitamin fortified shampoo and conditioner and massage your scalp on a daily basis, and don't vigorously towel dry your hair which can cause damage. Also, make sure you are eating healthy protein and fat sources in addition to foods rich in vitamin B. If I were you I would eat fish, nuts, cottage cheese, avocado, eggs, beans etc. and cut back on junk food.

  24. QUESTION:
    what type of cancer is Kertosis. My mother has been told this is what is on her legs?

    • ANSWER:
      i'm sure that they told her what kind of keratosis but here is some info for you the rest can be found on the website listed in sources. I wish the best for your mother.

      An actinic keratosis (AK), also known as a solar keratosis, is a small crusty, scaly, or crumbly bump or horn that arises on the skin surface. The base may be light or dark, tan, pink, red, or a combination of these... or the same color as your skin. The scale or crust is horny, dry, and rough, and is often recognized by touch rather than sight. Occasionally it itches or produces a pricking or tender sensation. It can also become inflamed and surrounded by redness. In rare instances, actinic keratoses can bleed.
      The skin abnormality or lesion develops slowly and usually reaches a size from an eighth to a quarter of an inch (2mm to 4mm) but can sometimes be as large as one inch. Early on, it may disappear only to reappear later. You will often see several AKs at a time. An AK is most likely to appear on the face, lips, ears, scalp, neck, backs of the hands and forearms, shoulders and back — the parts of the body most often exposed to sunshine. The growths may be flat and pink or raised and rough.
      Why is it dangerous?
      AK can be the first step in the development of skin cancer. It is thus a precursor of cancer or a precancer.
      If treated early, almost all AKs can be eliminated without becoming skin cancers. But untreated, about two to five percent may progress to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), the second most common form of skin cancer. In fact, some scientists now believe that AK is the earliest form of SCC. Although SCCs are usually not life-threatening when detected and treated in the early stages, they can grow large and invade the surrounding tissues. On rare occasions, they metastasize or spread to the internal organs.
      Another form of AK, actinic cheilitis, develops on the lips and may evolve into a type of SCC that can spread rapidly to other parts of the body.
      If you have AKs, it indicates that you have sustained sun damage and could develop any kind of skin cancer — not just squamous cell carcinoma. The more keratoses that you have, the greater the chance that one or more may turn into skin cancer. People may also have up to 10 times as many subclinical (invisible) lesions as visible, surface lesions...

  25. QUESTION:
    Aloe Vera on skin?
    I think i have this skin condition called keratosis pilaris on my upper arms. its red, bumpy, but it doesnt hurt. there are also some ingrown hair on the bumps. i have beem using the aloe vera gel, the one from the real plant, on then for sometime, and my skin started to get smoother. if i use more aloe gel on my skin, will the keratosis pilaris appear less?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes as a matter a fact it will, keep applying some everyday at night time preferable, in time it will look like it isn't there, every 21-28 days the skin replenishes itself when putting aloe gel on, aloe gel from the plant is good for acne, minor cuts, burns, poison ivy, rashes, diabeties, skin diseases, blemishes, muscle pain, dry skin, athletes foot, dry hands, germs, oily scalp etc... Aloe gel from the plant rejuvenates, rehydrates, nourrishes and retones the skin of your face it respects the skins natural beauty. I guarantee you your skin will look better in 21-28 days. I have used aloe gel from the plant for 10 years trust me i know! That's why people call me thealoeexpert!

  26. QUESTION:
    why do I have tiny bumps all over thighs, and how do I get rid of them?
    Alright guys. I would be overwhelmed with joy if somebody has the answer for me! Now, I do have some mild skin issues, including mild psoriasis on my scalp, very sensitive skin (to perfumes in soap only, really) and I have had these LITTLE TINY BUMPS ON MY BUTT and THIGHS and it drives me insane. They are not pimples, they kinda feel like perma-goosebumps with little tiny, tiny fine hairs like the rest of my body, but I don't shave up that high because my hair is so fine. I have tried scrubbing the Sh!t out of my skin on my thighs, applying lotion, and everything. They're not pimples, as I said, they do not form heads of puss or anything they're just these little stupid bumps. No where else on my body are these bumps found and I would like my skin to be as soft on my thighs and bum as everywhere else, I have very soft skin. I do kind of have a pear shaped body with more of my weight in my thighs and butt (but I am not overweight), does it have something to do with that? I don't know. Please help!! :)
    I use Dove on my entire body because it's the only one so far that doesn't mess with my skin. I will try a pumice stone! and It's not like excema, I don't think, they 1feel kinda permanent and never change! But thank you for your help:)
    I looked up folliculitis and it doesn't look like that, and I don't imagine it would look like a mild version unless there was absolutely no red pigmentation what so ever. they are not infected, I dont think, they're just hair bumps. Hmm :S thanks guys I would give you thumbs up and best answers but unfortunately I just joined!! :)

    • ANSWER:
      Your talking about keratosis pilaris there are 3 differnt versions of it. Its actually genetics and it can happen if you have allergy towards gluten. Scribing in some forms can make it spread. It goes away with age there are some lotions and scrubs made for that. Don't take hot showers and you need a moisturizer with aha something. It gets worse during winter. Try drinking apple cider vinegar 2 table spoons 3 times a day. Google it you will see pictures im sure that's what it is.

  27. QUESTION:
    I sometimes pick my skin, and i mostly pick my scalp?
    What is this called? I have keratosis polaris on my legs and the back of my arms and i sometimes pick those areas, but i pick my scalp the most. I look for scabs or anything that feels like a scab and pick those. i feel like it makes me less stressed out, and i do it usually while im thinking about something or doing home work. it's kind of a habit. i usually touch my scalp everyday and see if i can pick anything ( i know its gross, but its like i can't help it. i have like an urge to do it sometimes) i have gotten scabs on my scalp from it that people obviously cant see since i have a lot of hair. My scalp/skin picking doesnt interfere with my life at all, i'm just wondering what its called and if it has to do with anxiety. I dont do it around other people, or i do it when i know people arent looking at me.
    btw i have social anxiety and depression, if that makes any sort of a difference. thanks in advance :)

    • ANSWER:
      It has become a habit and its normal too,I know skin conditions make us feel gross but its a condition your dealing with it can social anxiety because people dont understand and can be mean,you are beautiful no matter what and you may look up coconut oil for skin conditions on you tube,its really great for your skin. huggs.

  28. QUESTION:
    Dry or combination skin?
    Hi-

    I am a teenager with thin, dry skin. After I wash it, it feels tight, and after I put a moisturizer on, it burns (I can feel its penetration), yet feels so wonderful. I assume I have dry skin, but the skin around my nose is slightly bumpy (maybe it is eczema?), my pores are big, and there are tiny blackheads, even though my nose is not oily. I have never had acne in my life. If I wash my nose, but do not moisturize, my nose feels tight and itchy; my forehead and chin are clear and dry. Which skin type do you think I have?

    Can you recommend any skincare products for me?

    Oh, and on my upper arms and buttocks, I have what you would call "chicken skin," or (scientifically known as) Keratosis Pilaris. They are like goosebumps. My whole body is extremely dry, and in the winter, I suffer from eczema on my hands and wrists. I also have dry (frizzy), curly hair.
    I don't need any skincare product recommendations for this, but I thought telling you this would aid you in determining my skin type.
    In the last detail I posted, I was referring to my "chicken skin."

    • ANSWER:
      if ur cheeks are dry n feel tight n itchy after a wash den u hav dry skin. else its the Tzone oily where only ur forehead, nose n chin are oily.. if ur moisturizer suits ur skin type,it shudnt burn. mayb u feel wonderful coz ur relieved of the tight sensation.. there can b combos of skin on the face n the body. Am 1 such specimen. my face is oily n my body, dry. my hair,normal... am not sure on wat kinda skin products uv to use on a day out but while indoors or before retirin to bed, there are a whole lot of thngs to sizzle ur skin for the next day.

      u can use the cream of milk/olive oil/coconut oil/gingelly oil or a combo off all 3 to massage ur face, hands n neck.. alternatly, u can use a mixture of gram flour,aloevera,cinnamom powder n a bit of honey to rub around the nose area as a pack n also to exfoliate n remove black heads.not only are they natural but also giv a nice glow. u can use these products on a weekly basis or evryday too.. put in about 3-4 drops of any oil in ur bath to prevent the dryin up of ur skin on the body.

      as far as the hair is concerned, apart from eatin well, again a whole lot of stuff.. coupla hours b4 the bath, warm up som coconut oil/olive oil/gingelly oil or a combo of all 3 n massage ur hair n scalp. for a hair pack,u can either, powder dried fenugreek n mix in milk / soak fenugreek in milk n grind it n apply this pack on the hair about half an hour prior to ur hairwash.. shampoo as usual. this is a sure shot fix to dry hair n dandruff too.. u may catch cold if left on the hair for too long, so plz b wary b4 usin fenugreek.

      but u know wat the best treatment wud b - drink a whole lotta water...

  29. QUESTION:
    Pop quiz: What is THAT?
    http://img116.imageshack.us/img116/3654/9482958375ra5.jpg

    on a scalp.
    Mmmmyeah clearly it's inflamed but what IS it
    Also to freak you all out a little more, this is the skin that came off of that spot before the first picture.

    http://img106.imageshack.us/img106/703/9482958462qz7.jpg
    It is DEFINITELY not a birthmark. =D
    Oh, believe me, the scabs gave up ages ago. That's just really thick skin plus some random blood.
    Perhaps hyperkeratinization?

    • ANSWER:
      You should have left that scab on it!
      It will take ages to heal now.
      It looks like solar keratosis.

  30. QUESTION:
    is this keratosis pilarsis?
    i have bumpy uneven tetured skin on the front of my forearms and the top of my arm. they are reds bumps, and there's also dry white bumps that shed, but the other side feels smooth and even.

    • ANSWER:
      Most people with keratosis pilaris don't know they have it. While KP resembles goosebumps, it is characterized by the appearance of small, rough bumps on the skin. Primarily, it appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms, but can also occur on thighs and buttocks or any body part except palms or soles. (Often confused with acne.)

      Keratosis pilaris is unsightly but completely harmless. KP tends to be worse during the winter months or other times of low humidity when the skin dries out. It may also occur and/or worsen among pregnant women or show up after childbirth.

      There is no cure for keratosis pilaris, since KP is a chronic, genetic follicular disease, however treatments are available. Results from treatments vary and can often be disappointing. With persistence, most people will see satisfactory improvement. It is recommended that treatment not be discontinued because the buildup of keratin (the hard protein in the skin, nails, and hair) will continue to reform around the hair follicles.

      There are several types of keratosis pilaris; variants and related disorders include:
      Keratosis pilaris alba : rough, dry, bumpy skin with no irritation
      Keratosis pilaris rubra : reddened lesions; red, inflamed bumps
      Keratosis pilaris rubra faceii (KPRF) : reddish rash on the cheeks (blushed look)
      Keratosis pilaris atrophicans faciei: facial follicular atrophy (small scar-like depressions)
      Keratosis follicularis (Darier Disease) aka lichen pilaris, or follicular xeroderma:
      conditions in which abnormal keratinization (failure of skin to desquamate properly) is
      limited to the hair follicles, manifesting itself as discrete, tiny follicular papules (solid,
      usually conical elevations)
      Ulerythema ophryogenes : involvement of the outer eyebrows
      Atrophoderma vermiculata : severe worm-eaten appearance of the cheeks
      Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans: a rare familial variant which results in bald
      areas on the scalp and eyebrows
      Lichen spinulosus : solitary or multiple patches of follicular papules topped with scaly
      spines on any part of the body

  31. QUESTION:
    reoccurring scab on the scalp..?
    Hi,
    For years I have had recurring scabs in one spot on my scalp on the back of my head- almost near-well about one inch above my hair line. I pick and pick and after 2 months or so it goes away. Since I am a picker anyway- it is very hard for me to resist. I have neevr showed this to a derm but my rheumatologist said a few years ago that it is acnitin keratosis. Does anyone have any better knowlegde of what this might be>is this maybe also a form of cancer that I should have checked out? I can't find any info on it. any inout would be great (:
    thanks

    • ANSWER:
      My first stop would be wikipedia or google for a quick reference. I actually had a similar question not even 5 days ago, but I couldn't find the answer. If it's possible, try getting help from someone with more knowledge/experience/expertise, like a professional if it's possible. This can be pretty important.

      I saw a forum with this online, but I didn't have time to read it all. Try checking it out. I want to help out more, but I'm not 100% sure about the answer. Sorry I'm not much help. I hope you found your answer! Good luck!

  32. QUESTION:
    HIV/AIDS related question. I will give 10 pts and answer as many of your Q as you want, please just answer.?
    I know this is quite the read, but realize you are seriously helping someone on the verge of a real nervous breakdown. I really need someone to listen and not just skim through this. 10 points and I will answer as many questions of yours as you want.

    I have ALWAYS been afraid of this disease? I started becoming promiscuis mid-17. I am now 24 and have had sex with 9 men, 4 with condoms, remaining pulled out or just did not finish cause of interruption (dont give me a lecture, cant change the past) I had sex with one guy at 19 who had sex with like 20 women or so he 'says' but he was into gothic lonely girls ya know ? Anyway, NOW that SCARES me, 20 women? What are the chances HE had HIV? Or I do after two times having partial sex? When I turned 21, I finally met the love of my life. He was very skiddish and nervous about sex, he was a virgin. We did not have sex till Dec 6th 2008, it was like in out literally and he went flacid cause of nerves after 3 seconds. We got condoms from the store and he was still having problems getting hard for at least a week. He couldnt be in me more than 2 min without going flacid. We eventually had sex and had it once a day with a condom. I can't remember if he got sick mid Dec or beg of January, but he had a night sweat and some serious sore throat and felt miserable. He just curled in a blanket by a heater for a few days with throat lozenges. Now thinking back, knowing about symptoms, I am FLIPPIN. I know there is a typical initial HIV infection that has flu symptoms about 2-4 weeks after contracted and includes thrush, rash, sore throat, swollen glands, cough, night sweats, fever. I am sorting through all my OLD myspace messages going nuts thinking I did this and have it and gave it to him, he said he always feels like crap at my sisters (where we were when he got sick) just that time it was real bad, but always gets a sore throat there and reading up, it is really difficult to GIVE the disease to a man unless he has a open cut on penis. It is pretty rare apparently. Fast foreward to 2011, last 3 months I went from 113 to 104 lbs (im 5'3) but haven't found opportunity to eat or desire cause I have been busy and we never have enough $$ for food. About 700 cal a day. When I really started worrying about cancer and disease just by happenstance was late oct, I practically fasted for 2 weeks cause I was so worry ridden I felt naseous. I had no where to go but my parents and they gave me nutrition drinks and food, I have a slight more appetite and look better apparently. Still being here since oct, I have went from 103-104 to 109-110 lbs. (might be fecal weight too but who knows) so I went to the doctor for a full physical to put some mind to rest. Other than a fat encrusted normal sized lymph node (that feels big to me) ultrasound, everything is normal. My Thyroid, White blood cell, Red blood, Blood sugar, etc was all normal as well as pap. Though they prescribed me anxiety pills. So, I am starting to still worry about AIDS cause of that sick incident my fiancee had, it scares me to the point of shaking. Then I look up symptoms and add it up past and present. Like I "had" chronic headaches for a while, I have these stupid 1 mm bumps on my wrists that have come and gone for longer than I have been stressed (4 months), that weight loss, bumps which I assume is folliculitis and then I look up folliculitis and it is a friggen symptom of AIDS! (well so is appendicitis herpes psoriasis and pretty much anything else you think of) but the symptoms are painful whitehead like bumps, 99.9% of mine dont hurt at all and don't look like white heads. so now dandruff, which I might have? My hair dresser noticed. But lately I have neglected showering cause or worry and carelessness. And in AIDS patients, it tends to be severe. My scalp is nice and healthy looking. Not peeling or crusing over.. just flecking little. I had 3 night sweats 2 weeks ago but that is done, I have been sneezing more since I came back here and have occasional congestion, and sinistus is a symptom but from what I read everywhere, sneezing is not a symptom of sinistus. Had a cough 2 weeks ago, gone now. Now I just have those bumps that are scaring me, some jerk on YA said ALL zits/bumps/sores are immune system related.. now I am flipping cause of that! I need reasurement. I know HIV is dormant in blood test and symptoms until the WBC starts to deteriorate into AIDS, then you get these symptoms I talked about. My doctor told me of this to 'try' and assure me I am overreacting and if I had full blown AIDS (not HIV), most likely my WBC would be low or abnormal and likely not normal like it was when I had a full CBC. Sorry about the read, but I need thurough answers so I can sleep.

    These are pics of my bumps
    (can anyone relate or fill me in here?)

    http://postimage.org/image/s4bu4gme7/

    http://www.freeimagehosting.net/9849c
    (I have these some on my forearms

    • ANSWER:
      The bumps look like Keratosis pilaris; which has nothing to do with HIV. An over the counter Allegra will take care of them.

      That said, your post does not mention if they did an HIV test during your physical. ?

  33. QUESTION:
    I believe i have Keratosis Pilaris...i have a few questions?
    I've had goose-bumpy skin on my chest, (boobs) for a few years now, I thought it was body acne for a while since the bumps look like miny, tiny pimples, but most of them aren't red, just white, skin colored.
    I read up on Keratosis pilaris after my friend said she had it on the back of her thigh and got cream to treat it.

    I feel like my condition matches this pretty well. I will go to a dermatologist soon to confirm though.

    I've been having a little bit or a red rash on my cheeks lately as well...no zits with puss though. Can this be something different?

    The bumps on my arms aren't that bad, its only the top and if I don't scratch they're not noticable.

    The bumps on my chest get a little red if I scrub, but mostly look like goose bumps. They're only on the front of my boobs, were my cleavage is. The sides are soft and smooth.
    Its not too noticable but I feel self-concious when my boyfriend and I are having sex and he touches me.

    What also is weird is that I get a couple of zits on my chest once in a while too...like regular zits...is this normal with Keratosis pilaris? And sometimes when I scratch I get a hard little yellow-clear bead under my nail...I also find similar looking yellowish beads on my scalp if I scratch sometimes...what is that?
    Also...will I be able to wear makeup ever again? Or will it worsen everything?

    • ANSWER:
      exfoliate gently after a soak in a warm shower or bath & moisturize well. follow up with your dermatologist.

  34. QUESTION:
    i cant stop touching my hair or picking my skin and scalp!! why?
    whenever im by myself, and im sitting down or laying down, i always touch my hair and my scalp. when i do my homework, i touch my hair. when i read, i touch my hair, when i watch movies, i touch my hair. i dont do it infront of other people because i think its embarrassing. when i'm by myself i try to not touch my hair by touching something else like the edge of a pillow. it usually doesnt work. i do have anxiety, but i'm not sure if this relieves any of my anxiety and would this be considered a compulsion like in OCD? also when i touch my hair i usually pick my scalp, and its a bad habit that causes scabs, that i then pick. its like a cycle, but i wouldnt say its severe like some of the cases i read about, but it's like i cant stop.

    when im around other people i just rub my fingers over my bumpy arms instead of picking. (i have Keratosis pilaris)

    ALSO if im not touching my hair/scalp i'm picking my skin on my legs or the back of my arms. how do i stop???
    no, i've never been a nail biter.

    • ANSWER:
      i do something similar...i mess with my eyebrows by forcing the hairs one way and then smoothing them out i mostly do this when im tired or bored. my bf notices me doing it before i do and just asks if i want some sleep (i work nights). i used to pull out my eyelashes too when i was younger (like 8 or so). i have been told it is a compulsion but not necessarily ocd, more like a strange habit. if you couldnt control yourself and just had to do it (even in front of your friends etc) that would be more indicitive of ocd.

      how to stop? you need to carry something else to fiddle with, idk what would be best for you, i break up sticks or leaves (if outside), tear paper etc.

      btw, do you or have you ever bitten your fingernails?

  35. QUESTION:
    I have solar keratosis... what does that mean?

    • ANSWER:
      Solar Keratosis or Actinic keratosis is a skin condition characterized by rough, scaly patches on the skin of your face, lips, ears, back of your hands, forearms, scalp and neck. The cause is frequent or intense exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays, typically from the sun. Many doctors consider actinic keratosis to be precancerous because it can develop into skin cancer.

      Actinic keratoses, also known as solar keratoses, grow slowly and usually cause no signs or symptoms other than patches or small spots on your skin. These lesions take years to develop, usually first appearing in older adults. Left untreated, about 2 percent to 5 percent of actinic keratoses develop into a serious form of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma.

      You can reduce your risk of actinic keratosis by minimizing your sun exposure and protecting your skin from UV rays.

      If treated early, almost all actinic keratoses can be eliminated before developing into skin cancer. However, if left untreated these spots or patches may progress to squamous cell carcinoma, a serious form of skin cancer, in a small percentage of people with normally functioning immune systems.

      An actinic keratosis may be the earliest form of squamous cell carcinoma. This type of cancer usually isn't life-threatening if detected and treated early. However, actinic keratoses can grow to be large and invade surrounding tissues, some spreading (metastasizing) to other parts of your body. The more keratoses you have, the greater your chance of developing skin cancer.

      Treatment
      It's impossible to tell exactly which patches or lesions will develop into skin cancer. Your doctor or a dermatologist can discuss with you which treatment is appropriate for you.

      Actinic keratosis treatment options may include:

      Freezing (cryotherapy). An extremely cold substance, such as liquid nitrogen, is applied to skin lesions. The substance freezes the skin surface, causing blistering or peeling. As your skin heals, the lesions slough off, allowing new skin to appear. This is the most common treatment, takes only a few minutes, and can be performed in your doctor's office.

      Creams or ointments. Some topical medications contain fluorouracil, a chemotherapy drug. The medication destroys actinic keratosis cells by blocking essential cellular functions within them. Another treatment option is imiquimod (Aldara), a topical cream that modifies the skin's immune system to stimulate your body's own rejection of precancerous cells.

      Chemical peeling. This involves applying one or more chemical solutions — trichloroacetic acid (TCA), for example — to the lesions. The chemicals cause your skin to blister and eventually peel, allowing new skin to form. This procedure may not be covered by insurance, because it's considered cosmetic.

      Scraping (curettage). In this procedure, your surgeon uses a device called a curet to scrape off damaged cells. Scraping may be followed by electrosurgery, in which a pencil-shaped instrument is used to cut and destroy the affected tissue with an electric current.

      Photodynamic therapy. With this procedure, an agent that makes your damaged skin cells sensitive to light (photosensitizing agent) is either injected or applied topically. Your skin is then exposed to intense laser light to destroy the damaged skin cells.

      Laser therapy. A special laser is used to precisely remove the actinic keratoses and the affected skin underneath. Local anesthesia is often used to make the procedure more comfortable. Some pigment loss and scarring may result from laser therapy
      .
      Retinoids. Drugs in this class include orally administered isotretinoin (Accutane), and topically applied adapalene (Differin) and tretinoin (Vesanoid). These medications may be effective at both treating and preventing actinic keratosis. However, isotretinoin is recommended only in high-risk cases because it may cause serious side effects, such as inflammation, bone spurs and hair loss, and birth defects if taken during pregnancy.

      Dermabrasion. In this procedure, the affected skin is removed using a rapidly moving brush. Local anesthetic is used to make the procedure more tolerable.

      Talk to your doctor about your treatment options. The procedures have various advantages and disadvantages, including side effects, risk of scarring, and the number of treatment sessions required. Actinic keratoses are usually very responsive to treatment. Afterward you'll likely have regular follow-up visits to check for new patches or lesions.

      In the future, limit time you in the sun, especially between the hours of 10am & 4pm when it is most dangerous. Always wera sunscreen. Never use tanning beds or use tanning accelerator products.Be aware of sun-sensitizing medications. Some common prescription and over-the-counter drugs can make your skin more sensitive to sunlight like:

      some antibiotics
      certain cholesterol, high blood pressure meds
      diabetes medications
      birth control pills
      nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others)
      acne medicine isotretinoin (Accutane)

      Always ask your Dr. or Pharmacist if any medication prescribed causes any sun-sensitivity.

      My husband was diagnosed with this 2 years ago & he used a topical cream, had some minor redness and skin peeling & has never had anymore problems. He used Solaraze Gel, you can get this by prescription from your Dr. If you have insurance this helps, as it is a bit expensive, but it really works! Hope this info helps, Good luck!

  36. QUESTION:
    How can I get rid of my dermatillomania (skin picking disorder)?
    I basically have mostly all the symptoms of dermatillomania. I bite my nails (which I recently quit), I pick at my scalp for hours, until it bleeds and hurts. I pop the pimples on my face, or I'll go crazy if I don't. The worst part is my arms. I have keratosis pilaris, and I pop and scratch and pick at my arms. Right now, it looks like I have a disease. By the way, I'm 15, and I have had this since I was 4.

    So, what can I do to stop? WHat helps in the healing process? Is it time to see a therapist?
    Stop taking ice? WTF, I'm sorry, but is that supposed to mean like crystal meth or something? I have never been near it, seen it, or touched it in my life. Same with alcohol and any otehr drug.

    • ANSWER:
      I have dermatillomania and i like pick the fuck out of my scalp and cuticles around my nails. and squeeze the shit out of blackheads or pimples on my face. the scalp picking led to pulling out my hair. I was terrified.

      I went to a psychiatrist and he put me on zoloft and I have no urge to do anything anymore. Just talk to your mom. She'll bring you to a doctor. They see hundreds of people with the same thing. don't even be scared.

  37. QUESTION:
    Variety of skin problems, redness, dryness spottiness?
    okay so here's the case, within two years max i have developed a variety of skin problems and i am 17 and male. for starters i have always had dry skin since i was young mostly on the back of my arms which is now more predominant on my back, buttocks and thigh's. The problems i have developed are keratosis pilaris which occurs in most places of my body and combined with the dry skin its a effing nightmare; this started first. I then started getting dandruff or dry scalp about 5 months ago which shows no signs of improvement. and now more recently i get this itchy redness on my thighs in the form of smallish red bumps. this comes and goes and most of these problems are really not severe just combined its starting to frustrate me. i think a lot of this is linked in some way; whether its my skin type or whatever. can someone maybe add some input into why and what i can do.

    • ANSWER:
      A deficiency in the essential fatty acids causes skin problems and dandruff!... there are some other nutrients that effect our skin. just google for more info. I think vitamin A, vitamin B5, zinc, and biotin also help our skin. make sure you are eating healthy, including uncooked fish oil and coconut oil in your diet. (you can get fish oil in a bottle to pour a little over your salads or whatever... just don't cook your oil).. healthy oils are: olive oil, sesame oil, fish oil, coconut oil, flaxseed oil, and hemp oil. Always make sure you are eating very healthy: greens, vegetables, berries, healthy oils, etc... carbs (bread, pasta, rice, cereal) is NOT healthy nor great for the skin!

      PS: use coconut oil as a moisturizer.

      you might want to get your nutrient levels for vitamin A, vitamin B5, zinc, biotin, and the essential fatty acids checked up; the nurse will take a blood test to see if you are low in any of them. vitamin A deficiency causes keratosis pilaris!! (google for more info).

  38. QUESTION:
    how can i remove my dark spots..?
    i am a boy my scene color is mid dark..

    • ANSWER:
      Try out MeritVCO virgin coconut oil extracted from coconut milk

      Virgin coconut oil extracted from coconut milk, due its high saturated fat content was branded as unhealthy and artery-clogging which could cause heart diseases. This claim has been widely disproved by the scientific community and it is now being hailed as one of world’s healthiest cooking oils. Though it may take time, perceptions are slowly changing as people are beginning to realize its tremendous benefits. Coconuts and Virgin coconut oil have always been a part of the cuisine in tropical countries like India (South) and Sri Lanka and even today coconut is indispensable in their diet. For now, let’s leave aside the health benefits and focus our attention on the beauty uses of this wonderful oil. South Indian women swear by it. They attribute their dense, long, raven black hair and a flawless, clear complexion to good genes and the liberal use of Virgin coconut oil in their diet and beauty regimen.

      Technically what makes it a good oil to use for cosmetic purposes and skin care is its chemical formulation. Its small molecular structure allows for easy absorption through the skin, giving it a soft, smooth texture and hence is an ideal treatment for dry, rough and wrinkled skin. Unrefined Pure Virgin coconut oil is extremely high in antioxidants that can penetrate deep into the underlying tissues of the skin to prevent and protect against the formation of free radicals that make the skin lose its elasticity. Regular application protects the skin from developing ugly spots and blemishes caused by aging and overexposure to sunlight. That’s why this oil is regarded as the best natural ingredient lotion for the skin. It’s also very inexpensive and is easily available. The lovely smell and feel of virgin coconut oil is so enticing that you will fall in love with it.

      Virgin coconut oil pre-bath massage

      One of the previous posts The luxury called ‘oil bath’, had elucidated how a pre-bath whole body massage with oils, better known as ‘Abhyanga Snana’ in Ayurvedic terminology keeps the skin soft, young and supple for years. After bath, just pat yourself dry; do not rub your skin vigorously with the towel so that your skin retains a bit of oiliness. This oil-massage is also highly recommended for people with extremely dry skins, persons of all age-groups and for all skin-types in winter. And if you do not have the time to indulge in an oil-massage everyday do remember to add a few drops of Virgin coconut oil to your bath water.

      Virgin coconut oil as an after-bath moisturizer

      Virgin coconut oil can work as an excellent skin moisturizer if applied immediately after a shower. Oils such as olive, jojoba or Virgin coconut oil, and Vaseline (petroleum jelly) sit on top of the skin and lock in moisture, thus acting as a water sealant. That's why they work best when applied to damp skin. Keratosis pilaris, a skin problem can be alleviated with the regular use of Virgin coconut oil on body after a bath while the skin is damp. People suffering from mild to moderate Xerosis due to some defect in their skin’s barrier have a dry, rough, scaly, and itchy skin. They should regularly moisturize their skin with pure Virgin coconut oil after bath to deal with this condition effectively.

      Virgin coconut oil for other skin problems

      An external application of Virgin coconut oil also relieves eczema symptoms. It can also help in conditions like fungal infections in toes, athletes foot. As an under-arm deodorant it helps to prevent body odour.

      Virgin coconut oil to protect your skin and hair from sun damage

      If you can’t help venturing out in the hot sun often, then apply Virgin coconut oil to your scalp as a protection from the harmful and drying effects of the UV rays and also do not forget to soothe your skin afterwards with a liberal application of aloe vera gel to which a few tsps of Virgin coconut oil is added.

      Virgin coconut oil in face packs

      Do not forget to add a few drops of Virgin coconut oil in your face-packs in winter, if you are above thirty and if you have dry to normal skins.

      Virgin coconut oil to cure cracked heels

      For cracked heels, combine Virgin coconut oil with petroleum jelly (Vaseline) and apply over those areas before going to bed.

      Virgin coconut oil for dry, flaky lips

      Dry, flaky lips can also be rejuvenated with a liberal application of pure Virgin coconut oil on them.

      Virgin coconut oil for dark elbows and knees

      Take half of squeezed lemon and pour half a teaspoon of Virgin coconut oil in lemon skin, rub on dry and dark elbows and knees to help with spots.

      Virgin coconut oil to remove eye makeup

      Use it to remove eye makeup by gently applying it on damp cotton wool and delicately remove it with gentle inward motion.

      Virgin coconut oil for hair

      Virgin coconut oil can be used as a pre-shampoo hair conditioner. Warm the bottle of Virgin coconut oil by placing it in a container of hot wat

  39. QUESTION:
    Human infected with Demodex Canis Mites ?
    I have been infected with some form of mites for years.My brother went to a Doctor that told him it is Scabies.However there are NO burrows,the mite creme does NOT get rid of them.They bite on the scalp,forehead and especially on the upper and middle back and actually the entire body from scalp to the soles of my feet.If I sit at a table at a restaraunt from anyone they begin within seconds swatting at their own face so i think these things can fly.My wife was diagnosed with wrongly Keratosis Pilaris.
    I know it is some form of microscopic bug!!!
    But it is not a "clinically known problem",there are salt like granules or like eggs or seeds that come out of the bites.Salicylic acid products help some as does baby oil and talc powder ,but does not eradicate them.Permethrin has No effect on them.Anyone have any idea first hand how to get rid of these or what it is?It is NOT parasychosis as it is carried from state to state with just someone coming into a few minutes conact because they jump or fly like 6 feet onto people.
    Please do not provide links to stupid rip off websites of "alternative treatments" garbage.Thanx.Even tea tree oil does not get rid of them.

    • ANSWER:
      I had a suggestion until I read 'even tea tree oil does not get rid of them'. Tea tree oil is a repellent for many species of insects and parasites. I always thought if used correctly on a daily basis it would get rid of just about anything. Sooo, I know this may sound bizarre, but many morticians have solutions for bug problems because sometimes a body isn't found right away and they have to clean the body and rid it of any parasites that invade it to make it safe for burial. So call your local funeral home and see if they have any suggestions or call a dermatologist.

  40. QUESTION:
    Human infected with Demodex Canis Mites ?
    I have been infected with some form of mites for years.My brother went to a Doctor that told him it is Scabies.However there are NO burrows,the mite creme does NOT get rid of them.They bite on the scalp,forehead and especially on the upper and middle back and actually the entire body from scalp to the soles of my feet.If I sit at a table at a restaraunt from anyone they begin within seconds swatting at their own face so i think these things can fly.My wife was diagnosed with wrongly Keratosis Pilaris.
    I know it is some form of microscopic bug!!!
    But it is not a "clinically known problem",there are salt like granules or like eggs or seeds that come out of the bites.Salicylic acid products help some as does baby oil and talc powder ,but does not eradicate them.Permethrin has No effect on them.Anyone have any idea first hand how to get rid of these or what it is?It is NOT parasychosis as it is carried from state to state with just someone coming into a few minutes conact because they jump or fly like 6 feet onto people.
    Please do not provide links to stupid rip off websites of "alternative treatments" garbage.Thanx.Even tea tree oil does not get rid of them.
    uh,gee,nice answer "impossible" ... I'll go out to dinner with you and see if you aren't infested in 5 minutes,or even a car irde in your car

    • ANSWER:
      Demodex mites live on humans. Don't know if it is the same species that lives on dogs. I don't see how they could jump on other people. Maybe you could cover yourself with petrolatum at night to trap them.

  41. QUESTION:
    Peculiar symptoms..? What's wrong with me?
    If you are not in the medical field or studying medicine or have not experienced these symptoms as well, then please don't give your input. If you know someone that has had these symptoms, that is acceptable, I am willing to hear anyones opinion except from those that have no idea what they are talking about or have something nasty to say.
    I have a long list of symptoms; I am not a hypochondriac; I don't have insurance so I can't see a doctor about it right now.
    I have nearly all the symptoms of Lupus and Cushings Disease, but my previous doctor last year dismissed my concerns and diagnosed me with Poly cystic Ovarian Disease, Fibromyalgia, and Hepatitis B. My PCOS diagnoses was just him saying he's sure I have that because of some symptoms. I had blood work and my ovaries came back just fine, yet I was still diagnosed with PCOS anyway.
    Ok, symptoms: Daily fatigue, awful back and shoulder pain, upper body obesity, a rounded face, increased fat around the neck, and relatively slender arms and legs,bruises easily, and heals poorly., never developed breasts, no period for over a year (I'm 25), thinning hair on scalp, but hirotism (excessive body hair), stomach discomfort, urine smells very strong of ammonia without signs that it's a UTI. Dark circles under my eyes, excessive thirst, bright red cheeks, diagnosed with osteoperosis I'm 25!!! skin problems including frequent acne around my chin (I never had acne as a teen), Depression & Anxiety, Keratosis Pilaris on my upper arms (the excess production of keratin, creates a goose-bump appearance), boils and bumps on butt, now a rash on my butt! I know I sound disgusting, but please don't make me feel worse than I already do about myself. Please help me out if you are familiar with these problems... I'm sure I have other problems that I'm not contributing to the list, so if you want to ask if I have other symptoms, please ask and I will answer asap.
    Thank you both for your responses, however - I have already been tested numerous times for thyroid problems and they function very well. As for diabeties, my fasting glycemia level is 79-80, so I'm nowhere near diabeties, I'm closer to hypoglycemia, but not that either. As for meningitus, I was also tested for that a while ago and that was negative. I have Hep B. so that could explain a liver problem, since Hep B eats at your liver when in flare. I was told to keep an eye on a stomach rash or soreness around the liver, which I don't have. So I'm not concerned about a liver problem right now. Anyone else have any ideas?
    My BMI is high, it's 27. I am just below obesity, which really sucks. I used to be very thin and active - age 20/21 I was 80lbs lighter and much more active. Over 5 years I have gained 80lbs and pain has overwhelmed me to the point where I am not as active. I play with my son and I am a postal worker - so I get mild/moderate exercise, but at the end of the day, I'm wiped out and in pain. For osteo - I consume a lot of Vit D and normally take supplements. Lupus, I was unaware of the plastics! I am constantly drinking from plastic bottles and cans without washing. I only run my fruits & veggies under a cold tap for maybe 30 seconds before consuming... so I guess that's bad. Steroids, I can't recall ever taking any - but it's possible.

    • ANSWER:

      Hi,

      Firstly - from my own experiences I feel I need to ask, what is your BMI? By staying focused on eliminating grains and starches and fruit-sugar/deserts I was able to more easily finally drop to 25 and my goal is now 22. My viewpoint has become that our bodies will repair the best when one would eat much healthier and would then fast maybe one or two days a week - in order to burn old muscle and organ cells so one’s DNA would replace them with brand new muscle and organ cells. Sooo I am learning how to eliminate my gut fat and will then fast occasionally so that I can move from my daily calories being from daily foods and also body fat >>==> to my calories being from daily foods and my own body’s muscle and body’s organ 'meat,' and then 'I_think' my bad fatty cholesterol loaded liver will finally begin to be 'consumed' by my own body processes and will be replaced by a healthy one in a natural way without surgery. [(-:]

      "Most Cushing's syndrome cases are caused by steroid medications." FROM: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cushing's_syndrome Have you had any steroid meds in the last few? My view is that our bodies will make its own hormones or insulin the best that it can be done, and when one uses synthetics or inject horsey pea it cripples our own body’s willingness/ability to make its own hormones as it was designed/built to do.

      My previous investigations into Lupus showed me that it was from an overload of plastic/vinyl consumption during my friend's life. Coke-cans and any other plastic lined cans for vegetables soups etc or plastic water bottles and especially indoor vinyl painting. Probably the greatest source of plastic consumption is from pharmaceuticals and supplements that use plastics to contain them. Definitely eliminate these from your consumption with little efforts. Also, FYI pizzas and bread/muffins/cakes that use aluminum based rising powder are the greatest source of toxic aluminum consumption within our culture. Eliminate these and Alzheimer’s will become much much less of a future possibility.

      I now rinse all my canned vegetables three times and then re-cook 31+ to 90+ mins and throw out the water. What elements are lost is the carb-acids that are in super-excess, while the most important nutrition that your body needs are in the solids that have not been digested yet, but the boiling helped to also make this digestion much much easier for me. I have also eliminated all nightshades i.e. tomatoes.

      I would recommend everyone to first thoroughly boil their vegetables and this is why. Eating boiled vegetables, like spinach, is the only way I have found I can eat 200 calories a day of leafy greens without loose stools - because boiling reduces the hundreds of percent of acid carbs, like oxalic acid, that oftentimes cause loose stools. Boiling spinach also reduces the pesticides from 80 to 95%+ as per canning studies done in the 70's, by boiling the pesticides off with the steam - after extracting it from the broken cells in the raw plant. Boiling for thirty minutes also kills any salmonella bacteria or e-coli and even anthracs spores that may have somehow been introduced into the raw or commercially canned produce. Again, thirty minutes will kill e-coli AND anthracs spores, which is common sense to me, since my immune system is already weakened and could not handle more than a few spores from a raw salad before I would likely be killed off before I reach my goal of better health. [(-:]

      Boiling also breaks vegetables down a first step so it is then easier to digest in the gut, which would then minimize GI-digestion cancer problems from continually ‘overworking’ your GI-digestion system. Boiling also IMPROVES the micro-nutritional density, i.e. RDA%_nutrition per calorie, by about 10% as per the USDA’s data for boiled spinach versus raw spinach.

      For Osteoporosis - are you taking supplements or eating/drinking any dairy products? I am very ‘strongly’ allergic to the Vitamin A&D Palmitate Preformed Retinol enrichments that are added to non-organic milk. I also learned that one carrot a day has 100% of what is needed but my daily greens have a-lot more than this. Also, consider that the anecdotal shpeal about how these prevent Osteoporosis is the opposite of what really works and then consider eliminating these as well. Eat much more super-boiled spinach, broccoli - after rinsing and boiling out the antifreeze if bought it frozen, asparagus, Pok-Choy, and/or Nappa cabbage. Eliminate all grains/pasta and other starches and fruits/deserts. See my food list from the link below.

      See: >>==> VITAMIN A AND BIRTH DEFECTS from:
      http://www.scienceblog.com/community/older/archives/M/1/fda0309.htm
      OR:
      http://www.windsorpeak.com/vbulletin/showpost.php?p=1427639&postcount=7
      ORIGINALLY FROM:
      http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/ANSWERS/ANS00689.html

      I had almost poisoned my liver to death with nutritional supplements before I realized what I was doing, and I then learned that the entire industry has been an un-researched snake oil scam since Geritol in the 1920’s, and now likely additional snake oils like B12 since the fifties. Synthetics are ALL toxic to the liver, and someone like myself with a sickly liver could definitely tell you the results from a flare up when one would ‘try’ to consume a new snake oil that is really a toxin.

      Check out my own story from the links to understand what I have learned over the years and what I have proposed will likely make more sense and you will likely come to the same conclusions I am choosing.

      http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20091025223942AAni6lC
      http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20091113104039AAbnGet

      Although I think the problem is 'most-likely' long and or short term allergic reactions to 'something' COMBINED WITH a weakened lymph liver kidney and immune systems - IF the following symptoms would ever occur - I think the worst it might possibly be is deadly bacterial meningitis.

      For further details see http://www.cdc.gov/meningitis/about/faq.html

      Even so these are my thoughts of what ‘might’ be happening in almost any rash or itch situation >>=> I have not been educated to be an M.D. - just a lifelong learner.

      My own view from my own experiences is that rashes and/or itches break out in the weaker parts of one's skin, usually because of allergic reactions; OR perhaps due to fungus problems that may also occur simultaneously, and both of these more easily occur when one has too many carbs and fats in one's daily calorie allotments, and therefore one has inadequate micro-nutrition absorption in the gut which has contributed to a compromised immune system – due to a lack of adequate micro-nutrition to adequately rebuild one’s body on a continual basis.

      What I have learned is that my past naïveté to the consequences had allowed my occasional stresses to sometimes cause me to do things or to eat things or to inhale things that have more toxins in them and that have then weakened my immune system, like drinking and eating caffeine chocolate or high carb foods and sweets.

      It sounds like the malady may be a result of an allergic reaction to something that is toxic to the liver/kidneys. IF it is due to a toxin overload of the lymph system, you might then notice that when one gets hot - then a rash or itching will sometimes occur since the toxins are sweating out of one’s system ONTO an area of the skin that may be weaker and more easily irritated and inflamed.

      ALSO whenever one’s immune system has become weakened the other problem can easily become a bacteria-fungus i.e. ringworm and/or yeast infection thrush, but it is hard to tell what the root causes may be without seeing and learning the details about what one has been eating breathing and applying to the skin. SEE https://health.google.com/health/ref/Ringworm Monistat 7 will likely kill any fungus in a few days and better micro-nutrition will keep it killed and will also strengthen one’s liver lymph and kidney systems to be able to better handle both an allergic reaction AND/OR bacteria-fungus outbreaks with less suffering in the future.

      IF you think it may be an allergic reaction - although it may be a difficult process - try to identify the triggers from cosmetics meds nuts milk grains other-foods chlorine-water-in-showers smoke perfume moldy-smells laundry-cleaners etcetera by discontinuing them until the symptoms stop and then beginning them again to see how the body reacts. If one is like me one may start to see allergies to many things because the root problem for me was a severely weakened liver from too many nutritional supplements that were toxic and I never knew it until it was almost too late.

      After several months of pruritus Urticaria with blisters and skin fevers primarily at the back of my knees and thighs sometimes when I got warmer, that had begun during the colder months of November inside a gas heated low humidity home, I have identified enough of my own triggers to allow my legs to heal with only a super-minimal amount of coconut cream cut with de-chlorinated water rubbed over my skin and a minimal number of full body showers.

      After several applications my lymph glands have become severely allergic to petrolatum products that are similar to Vaseline Petroleum Jelly, and common sense has now taught me that any petroleum products should always become toxic to anyone’s kidney and liver with repeated applications. I had flare-ups immediately after I had applied organic olive oil so I eventually changed to minimal amounts of coconut oil after I had used a minimal amount of a p

  42. QUESTION:
    Do I Have HIV? Or Is It Just Anxiety? Can Anxiety Cause HIV Symptoms?
    Please no rude or stupid comments.

    well about 2 months ago i made out with this guy and later i gave him oral and he ejaculated in my mouth, i didnt know if he had HIV or not. i had brushed my teeth like 1 hour before and i dont know if my gums bled or not. and about a month ago my testicles started hurting like if they were super cold. then i got scared and looked up symptoms of HIV, and i read them and everytime i read one i later got that symptom. i had a fever, loss of appetite and alot of bumps on my back. then i got a lot of bumps all over my penis but they might be Fordye Spots. now i have a head ache that wont go away and i get diahriaeah only when i think about the hiv. i started getting bumps all over my arms and pubic area and she said it was Keratosis Pilaris but i dont know. my tempurate was fine and everything. i also have really bad anxiety and ive been stressing alot about this. i m just asking, do you guys think this is caused by stress and anxiety? i also have a really itchy scalp. and the bumps on my back kinda go away but when they itch they spread all over my back but when i dont scratch they go away. please help me? anxiety? HIV? im really scared :(
    and i get nausea, loss of appetite, and feel sick only when i think about the HIV when i think about other things or am having fun i dont feel that way. and im 16 by the way.

    • ANSWER:
      It could be stress, but you still need to get tested. It's been two months, so you should get an accurate result from the test. be safe from now on. I have been where you are recently. :)

  43. QUESTION:
    what can i do for very dry skin on my face i never had dry skin i always had oily skin?
    i started getting dry itchy patches on my eyebrows and when i scratch them off it just gets red and comes back and sometimes they ooze a bit. Also my skin has been very tight dry red and itchy and just uncomfortable. I have sebborhic dermatits in my scalp and a bad case of keratosis pilaris on my arms and legs, so i figure it may have something to do with all of those condition. I have tried all kinds of lotion which break me out i have tried natural stuff which doenst help either.
    Can someone reccomend a cheap prefferably homemade thing that can help me. I can't go to the dr i just lost my health insurance and i can not afford expenive things.
    Thanks so much !!!!

    • ANSWER:

  44. QUESTION:
    what beauty tricks do you have?

    • ANSWER:
      For that plump up look try brushing lips gently with a mixture of olive oil and cayenne pepper(fine ground) but beware, this is XXXHOT! Wash off and pat dry..wow plump lips!!

      To remove darkened acne scars, use a mixture of turmeric in coconut oil on the affected parts. Effect of this can be seen within a week or two.

      Before you shower, wet your legs, take salt and just rub the salt up and down your legs gently for about 3-5 minutes. Then just jump into the shower and wash it off, and all the dead skin will be gone.

      For an exfoliant on hands and feet.... rub honey all over hands and then dip in a bowl of sugar or Salt...unless you have open cuts ...salt will burn. Then rub together for a minute and let sit for five or six minutes... I do this while I sit in my bath of oatmeal and honey..... its a mess at times....but I am soft as a babies butt when I get out...and my hands aren't dry anymore...flaky skin gone.

      As soon as you get out of the shower, right away go to the fridge, get an ice cube and use it like mascara on your eye lashes. That way, you'll get that luscious look in your eye lashes but it'll look natural (well, it is!).

      * 1 tablespoon of gram flour
      * 1 tablespoon of corn flour

      Mix the both, and take to your bath, use to wash face & body. This is an excellent scrub and will remove your dead skin cells, leaves you feeling clean and glowing. Makes your skin so smoot

      For great hair try a tbsp of honey mixed with your favorite conditioner this will make highlights shimmer tremendously.

      For people who suffer from ingrown hairs or similar skin problems, such as Keratosis Pilaris, I have found a remedy that may help. Simply simmer (in water) the chopped rind of two to three citrus fruits, I prefer to use grapefruit but any citrus is OK, on high for 5 - 10 minutes or until the rind appears translucent. Discard the rind and pour the liquid (which will now be a yellowish colour) into an airtight jar and store in the fridge. After shaving, dab the liquid using a cottonball onto any problem areas to prevent ingrown hairs and shaving rash. There is no need to rinse off, feel free to apply your moisturizer as usual.

      To get rid of those pesky zits that just won't go away I add a few aspirin to a tablespoon of water and mash it up and leave it on my face over night...it really works, if you have sensitive skin leave on for a half hour or your skin will be irritated.

      Absorb Perspiration - BY GBROWN233
      Cornstarch has always been a very good "beauty helper." Dust this product on the arm pits and other perspire prone areas. The cornstarch absorbs the perspiration leaving drier skin. Also dust on your face, neck, and chest to reduce oils. Less oils means less breakouts. You can also take a pinch and use accordingly throughout your scalp to remove the oils and add volume and lift. It works great!!

      White Teeth - BY HANNAH
      If you want whiter teeth then mash up some strawberries and use like toothpaste. The seeds and acids help remove plaque.

      Homemade Sunless Tanning Lotion - NEVER ORANGE!!! - BY ASHLEY M.
      We all want that sun-kissed glow, but it's hard on our skin to be in the sun, or even worse, we only burn or can never tan. When you go to buy a sunless tanning lotion in the store, they always seem to be orange, streaky and messy. And the ones that work are so expensive it never seems worth it. I have the most cost-effective and satisfactory solution to this problem. I've tried all types of tanning and sunless tanning, and this is BY FAR the best solution: pure cocoa. Take some of your favorite white lotion and add pure cocoa powder until your desired color (color will appear much darker in the lotion than it does on your skin). Always looks purely natural, and it can be used over your entire body because there are no harsh or irritating chemicals that are sometimes in other sunless tanning products. Works every time for that sun-kissed, just-got-off-the-beach summer look. All year long!

      Shaving - BY BRITTANY
      Hi! ok before shaving, wash legs with a exfoliating scrub then rinse and shave. Your shave will last longer and it will feel better!

      Lipstick Lasts Longer - BY HEATHER EDWARDS
      Try putting on lip liner than lipstick and blot, put powder on top of lipstick and add another coat of lipstick. Works really well and is cheaper than buying long lasting lip colors. It does work!!

      Soft Silky Feet - BY MANDY MICHAEL
      At night massage your feet with olive oil and wear your socks until the morning for soft, silky feet.

      Eye Makeup Remover - BY MONNIE
      I put small amount of baby oil on the cotton. Then I wipe it on my eyes. All the make up will come out easily.
      Make-Up Remover - BY SHANE S
      Using baby oil to remove make-up is great but wash your face well with soap and water afterward or also your pores will get clogged.

      Yogurt Drink Good for Complexion - BY TRACY W

      Ingredients:

      1/2 cup of natural non-fat yogurt
      1/3 cup of Grape Juice
      1/2 teaspoon of Green Tea powder

      Mix everything together and mix in cube to drink.

      Lip Gloss BY J.D.
      Instead of using lip gloss that doesn't last long enough, rub a thick layer of petroleom jelly (e.g. Vaseline) onto your lips and around them. This is great for winter as well because it prevents chapping and cold sores.

      Long Lasting Eyeshadow - BY STEPHANY 154
      If you want your eyeshadow to last all day long simply apply a thin layer of concealer ( Maybelline works good for me ) before applying your eyeshadow. It will usually last you for 24hrs.

      Beautiful Pouty Lips - BY DESSTENI

      To achieve, beautiful pouty lips, if you were not born with them...try this trick:

      Wipe your lips very very dry...apply a drop or to of rubbing alcohol to a cotton ball and gently rub across your lips..DO NOT LICK, and don't try if you may have a allergic reaction. Next, take a neutral lip liner and line your lips, conceal and then powder with a light or transparent powder..apply lipstick, then line with a matching lipliner above your natural lipline...apply vaseline in the center of the top and bottom of your lip..and prepare to be amazed....i have written a book on ancient egyptian beauty secrets...for more info e-mail me @ dessteni14@aol.com

      Beauty Tip - BY TRECIE

      Dear all,

      Here's a great tip for extending the life of your best friend - the eyeliner pencil. Before you sharpen it again, put it in the freezer for a few minutes to harden it. Take it out (don't forget it!) then sharpen with ease and you won't lose any of that valuable pencil with soft-pencil-breakage!

      Kissable Lips - BY BP
      Here's a secret my model sister shared with me. For healthy, kissable looking lips simply do this: using a soft bristle toothbrush lightly brush your lips. This helps rub off any dead skin or/and lipstick residue (especially in corners of the mouth). Then apply a thin layer of vaseline to your lips to moisterize. Do this once a day at bedtime for wonderful, sexy looking lips.

      Perfect Shade Of Lipsticks - BY TINA M
      Can't find the perfect shade of lipstick? I take several colours of lipsticks and blend them until I get the perfect shade. You can mix them then place into a small container...an old lip gloss container works perfectly for this.

      Yummy Lip Treatment - BY JESS
      A good way to get nice soft lips is to add honey and sugar together (just enough to cover your lips) and rub it on your lips the honey will allow for softness and the sugar will act as a good exfoliator (lips need exfoliation too). Wipe the honey and sugar off after about 5 min.

      Quick Mascara - BY BUFFALOBILSBABE5
      If you don't have mascara handy, just lick or wet your finger and stroke over your eyelashes. This gives eyelashes the same deep full look. Using a clear lipgloss works just as well

      I find that using aloe vera as a moisturizer works great. It also helps with acne. I put it on before I go to bed every night and wake up with a clean, smooth face.

      One tip I would like to share is for clear, clean, glowing and brighter skin use equal parts of milk and lemon juice and put it all over your face. Leave it for 15 minutes and rinse it well! Voila!

      For all those people with a pale complexion avoid spending lots of money on tanning salons. Instead use bronzer or blusher... believe me it works!

      For Beautiful Eyelashes - BY PRASUNA C

      Hello friends..

      Want to have a beautiful lashes like Barbie doll? Then stop worrying about your lashes..you will have beautiful and thick lashes in no time.

      Here is the tip, cut your lashes very lightly..then apply castor oil daily to your lashes before going to bed, and then within no time, you'll get your desired lashes very thick and lustrious.
      Apart from that, you can also, apply castor oil mixed with Vitamin-E oil to your face, as this will reduce wrinkles gradually and give you a smooth, supple and shiny skin. Try it out.

      This is really sticky but it smells good and gets fast results!

      1 cup maple syrup
      1/2 cup of sugar

      Mix together in a container and then rub it on your face in a circular motion. After about 2-3 minutes wipe it off with warm water and dab your face with a towel. This makes your skin beautifully soft and gets rid of dirt on your face.

      Soft Skin - BY K. RAINA

      If you apply olive oil right after taking a bath and then rinse it off. You'll be touching your skin all day.

      Amazing Lips!! - BY DAN G.
      When you wake up in the morning and have nasty dry lips, rub Vaseline onto them and leave on for about 3-5 minutes. When the time is up rub a piece of warm, wet flannel across your lips. It takes the Vaseline and dry skin off! Works great!

      Beauty Tips - BY KIM C
      To prevent razor bumps at the bikini area. After shaving apply any kind of astringent. Then apply lotion, unscented is best.

      Hello, my beauty secret is this:
      Take a second

  45. QUESTION:
    Skin Question... Acne on my arms?
    I have these small bumps on my arms; they look like small pimples. They're only above the elbow though. Is this something that needs attention or am I fussing over nothing? Is there something that will help make it go away? : /

    • ANSWER:
      http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1070651-overview

      Keratosis Pilaris. Really super common, and while annoying (and maybe itchy), definitely not worth worrying too much over.
      There are lots of things you can try to help get rid of it, but what works is different for many people.
      You can try mild soaps and heavy moisturizers (like cocoa butter). Works for some people, makes it worse for others.
      You can try treating it as you do acne. Exfoliate and use a medicated facial or body wash.
      What works for me, personally, is head and shoulders shampoo (the dry scalp formula).
      You could also talk to your doc about trying a steroid cream. It might work for you, but you can't/shouldn't use it as frequently as you can all the other things you can use for it.

  46. QUESTION:
    What is on my lip?
    I have this small rough patch of skin on my upper lip. It feels weird, so I dug the dry skin off and now it HURTS. I have no idea what this is, but I really would like to know. It doesn't seem a cold sore or anything like that though, even though I've never had one. Any ideas?
    P.s. It is NOT herpes kids, if you don't have a REAL idea, don't answer. If I had herpes, I'd know, i'm pregnant too. They test you for EVERYTHING when your pregnant.

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like it might be actinic keratosis.You're most likely to develop actinic keratosis if you have one or more of these risk factors:

      A history of frequent or intense sun exposure or sunburn
      Pale skin
      Blond or red hair, especially when coupled with blue, hazel or green eyes
      A tendency to freckle or burn when exposed to sunlight
      ____________________

      The signs of actinic keratosis include:

      Flat to slightly raised, scaly patches on the top layer of your skin
      Lesions on your skin ranging in color from pink to red to brown, or flesh-colored

      Patches or lesions caused by actinic keratosis usually are 1 inch or less in diameter and primarily are found on areas exposed to the sun, including your face, lips, ears, back of your hands, forearms, scalp and neck. There may be a single lesion or several lesions.

      This condition also known as solar keratoses, grows slowly and usually cause no signs or symptoms other than patches or small spots on your skin. These lesions take years to develop, usually first appearing in older adults. Left untreated, about 2 percent to 5 percent of actinic keratoses develop into a serious form of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma.

      I would suggest making an appointment Monday with a Dermatologist & getting a diagnosis confirmation. If it is actinic keratosis, the doctor will most likely prescribe a cream or gel like Solaraze for easiest treatment. If you would like to read more about this condition: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/actinic-keratosis/DS00568/DSECTION=1

  47. QUESTION:
    Skin Cancer Symptoms?
    What are the symptoms of skin cancer?

    Ive got this mole-like spot near my wrist area, i first noticed it three years ago. I have scratched/picked it off countless times (I have a habit of scratching off scabs, etc.) Its kind of a mishaped oval, and the same color as my skin. My mother doesnt think anything about it, but im getting a little scared because skin cancer runs in the family.

    • ANSWER:
      Skin cancer — the abnormal growth of skin cells — most often develops on skin exposed to the sun. But this common form of cancer can also occur on areas of your skin not ordinarily exposed to sunlight.

      Skin cancer develops primarily on areas of sun-exposed skin, including the scalp, face, lips, ears, neck, chest, arms and hands, and on the legs in women. But it can also form on areas that rarely see the light of day — your palms, beneath your fingernails, the spaces between your toes or under your toenails, and your genital area.

      Skin cancer affects people of all skin tones, including those with darker complexions. When melanoma occurs in those with dark skin tones, it's more likely to occur in areas not normally considered to be sun-exposed.

      A cancerous skin lesion can appear suddenly or develop slowly. Its appearance depends on the type of cancer.

      Basal cell carcinoma
      This is the most common skin cancer. It's also the most easily treated and the least likely to spread. Basal cell carcinoma usually appears as one of the following:

      * A pearly or waxy bump on your face, ears or neck
      * A flat, flesh-colored or brown scar-like lesion on your chest or back

      Squamous cell carcinoma
      Squamous cell carcinoma is easily treated if detected early, but it's slightly more apt to spread than is basal cell carcinoma. Most often, squamous cell carcinoma appears as one of the following:

      * A firm, red nodule on your face, lips, ears, neck, hands or arms
      * A flat lesion with a scaly, crusted surface on your face, ears, neck, hands or arms

      Melanoma
      This is the most serious form of skin cancer and the one responsible for most skin cancer deaths. Melanoma can develop anywhere on your body, in otherwise normal skin or in an existing mole that turns malignant. Melanoma most often appears on the trunk, head or neck of affected men. In women, this type of cancer most often develops on the arms or legs.

      Warning signs of melanoma include:

      * A large brownish spot with darker speckles located anywhere on your body
      * A simple mole located anywhere on your body that changes in color, size or feel or that bleeds
      * A small lesion with an irregular border and red, white, blue or blue-black spots on your trunk or limbs
      * Shiny, firm, dome-shaped bumps located anywhere on your body
      * Dark lesions on your palms, soles, fingertips and toes, or on mucous membranes lining your mouth, nose, vagina and anus

      Less common skin cancers
      Other, less common types of skin cancer include:

      * Kaposi sarcoma. This rare form of skin cancer develops in the skin's blood vessels and causes red or purple patches on the skin or mucous membranes. Like melanoma, it's a serious form of skin cancer. It's mainly seen in people with weakened immune systems, such as people with AIDS, and in people taking medications that suppress their natural immunity, such as people who've undergone organ transplants.
      * Merkel cell carcinoma. In this rare cancer, firm, shiny nodules occur on or just beneath the skin and in hair follicles. The nodules may be red, pink or blue and can vary in size from a quarter of an inch (about 6 millimeters) to more than 2 inches (about 50 millimeters). Merkel cell carcinoma is usually found on sun-exposed areas on the head, neck, arms and legs. Unlike basal and squamous cell carcinomas, Merkel cell carcinoma grows rapidly and often spreads to other parts of the body.
      * Sebaceous gland carcinoma. This uncommon and aggressive cancer originates in the oil glands in the skin. Sebaceous gland carcinomas — which usually appear as hard, painless nodules — can develop anywhere, but most occur on the eyelid, where they're frequently mistaken for benign conditions.

      Precancerous skin lesions, such as an actinic keratosis, also can develop into squamous cell skin cancer. Actinic keratoses appear as rough, scaly, brown or dark-pink patches. They're most commonly found on the face, ears, lower arms and hands of fair-skinned people whose skin has been damaged by the sun.

      Not all skin changes are cancerous. The only way to know for sure is to have your skin examined by your doctor or dermatologist. -

  48. QUESTION:
    dose any1 no the side affects for...............?
    dose any1 no the side affects that aldara cream causes or if you have used it did you have any problems thanks for your help

    • ANSWER:
      Aldara
      Side Effects & Drug Interactionsfont sizeAAAAldara™
      (imiquimod) Cream

      For topical use only

      DRUG DESCRIPTION
      Aldara™ (imiquimod 5%) Cream is an immune response modifier for topical administration. Each gram contains 50 mg of imiquimod in an off-white oil-in-water vanishing cream base consisting of isostearic acid, cetyl alcohol, stearyl alcohol, white petrolatum, polysorbate 60, sorbitan monostearate, glycerin, xanthan gum, purified water, benzyl alcohol, methylparaben, and propylparaben.

      Chemically, imiquimod is 1-(2-methylpropyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-c]quinolin-4-amine. Imiquimod has a molecular formula of C14H16N4 and a molecular weight of 240.3. Its structural formula is:

      INDICATIONS
      Actinic Keratosis
      Aldara Cream is indicated for the topical treatment of clinically typical, nonhyperkeratotic, nonhypertrophic actinic keratoses on the face or scalp in immunocompetent adults.

      Superficial Basal Cell Carcinoma
      Aldara Cream is indicated for the topical treatment of biopsy-confirmed, primary superficial basal cell carcinoma (sBCC) in immunocompetent adults, with a maximum tumor diameter of 2.0 cm, located on the trunk (excluding anogenital skin), neck, or extremities (excluding hands and feet), only when surgical methods are medically less appropriate and patient follow-up can be reasonably assured.

      The histological diagnosis of superficial basal cell carcinoma should be established prior to treatment, since safety and efficacy of Aldara Cream have not been established for other types of basal cell carcinomas, including nodular and morpheaform (fibrosing or sclerosing) types.

      External Genital Warts
      Aldara Cream is indicated for the treatment of external genital and perianal warts/condyloma acuminata in patients 12 years or older.

      Limitations of Use
      Aldara Cream has been evaluated in children ages 2 to 12 years with molluscum contagiosum and these studies failed to demonstrate efficacy. [see Use in Specific Populations].

      Unevaluated Populations
      The safety and efficacy of Aldara Cream in immunosuppressed patients have not been established.

      Aldara Cream should be used with caution in patients with pre-existing autoimmune conditions.

      The efficacy and safety of Aldara Cream have not been established for patients with Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome or Xeroderma Pigmentosum.

      DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION
      The application frequency for Aldara Cream is different for each indication.

      Aldara is not for oral, ophthalmic, or intravaginal use.

      Actinic Keratosis
      Aldara Cream should be applied 2 times per week for a full 16 weeks to a defined treatment area on the face or scalp (but not both concurrently). The treatment area is defined as one contiguous area of approximately 25 cm2 (e.g., 5 cm x 5 cm) on the face (e.g. forehead or one cheek) or on the scalp. Examples of 2 times per week application schedules are Monday and Thursday, or Tuesday and Friday. Aldara Cream should be applied to the entire treatment area and rubbed in until the cream is no longer visible. No more than one packet of Aldara Cream should be applied to the contiguous treatment area at each application. Aldara Cream should be applied prior to normal sleeping hours and left on the skin for approximately 8 hours, after which time the cream should be removed by washing the area with mild soap and water. The prescriber should demonstrate the proper application technique to maximize the benefit of Aldara Cream therapy.

      It is recommended that patients wash their hands before and after applying Aldara Cream. Before applying the cream, the patient should wash the treatment area with mild soap and water and allow the area to dry thoroughly (at least 10 minutes).

      Contact with the eyes, lips and nostrils should be avoided.

      Local skin reactions in the treatment area are common. [see ADVERSE REACTIONS] A rest period of several days may be taken if required by the patient's discomfort or severity of the local skin reaction. However, the treatment period should not be extended beyond 16 weeks due to missed doses or rest periods. Response to treatment cannot be adequately assessed until resolution of local skin reactions. Lesions that do not respond to treatment should be carefully re-evaluated and management reconsidered.

      Aldara Cream is packaged in single-use packets, with 12 packets supplied per box. Patients should be prescribed no more than 3 boxes (36 packets) for the 16-week treatment period.

      Unused packets should be discarded. Partially-used packets should be discarded and not reused.

      Superficial Basal Cell Carcinoma
      Aldara Cream should be applied 5 times per week for a full 6 weeks to a biopsy-confirmed superficial basal cell carcinoma. An example of a 5 times per week application schedule is to apply Aldara Cream, once per day, Monday through Friday. Aldara Cream should be applied prior to normal sleeping hours and left on the skin for approximately 8 hours, after which time the cream sh

  49. QUESTION:
    Rough Spot on Ankle?
    on one of my ankles for years regardless of whether it is summer or winter I have this small patch of skin that looks darker than the rest of my skin but when I scratch at it it turns really white n flaky... For a while I was really devoted to getting rid of it so I scrubbed at it and used lotion everyday but it didn't go away so I gave up... what is it? and what's causing it?

    • ANSWER:
      When skin is exposed to the sun constantly, thick, scaly, or crusty bumps appear. The scaly or crusty part of the bump is dry and rough. The growths start out as flat scaly areas, and later grow into a tough, wart-like area.

      You could possibly have keratosis which is described in wikipedia as follows:
      "An actinic keratosis site commonly ranges between 2 and 6 millimeters in size, and can be dark or light, tan, pink, red, a combination of all these, or have the same pigment as the surrounding skin. It may appear on any sun-exposed area, such as the face, ears, neck, scalp, chest, backs of hands, forearms, or lips."

      I have several of these patches which I've had treated croyosurgery, e.g. with liquid nitrogen, by "freezing off" the scaly patches. It's best if you see a dermatologist to confirm a diagnosis.


keratosis on scalp

Kp Skin Disorder

To answer this question one has to understand what the term "natural" implies. Natural implies that the skin care product contains ingredients extracted from plants, earth, sea or animals. Examples would be essential oils extracted from botanicals, minerals such as mica, and zinc oxide which are found in mineral makeup, marine ingredients such as seaweed, or sea salt, or oils and other animal byproducts such as Emu oil which is made from the fat of an Emu bird.

Unfortunately, the term" natural" is not regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) and thus the term "natural" is often used very loosely in labeling and extensively in marketing ploys by the skin care industry. Additionally, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not define the term natural or organic. In fact the USFDA does not approve cosmetics before going to the market. The responsibility of the safety of the cosmetic lies with the manufacturer. Except for color additives and those ingredients which are prohibited or restricted by regulation, the manufacturer may use any ingredient in a cosmetic provided that they are safe and properly labeled and can coin numerous terms when marketing the cosmetic that may or may not be true. You can read more about the regulation of cosmetics at the Food and Drug Administration website.

If you are considering purchasing natural skin care products consider these tips:

Read the label - many skin care companies use the term "Natural" when in reality many products contain less than 1% of a natural ingredient such as aloe Vera, or other essential oils as an example. The most prevalent ingredient will be listed at the top of the ingredient list and the least amount of an ingredient will be listed at the bottom. Therefore if you are buying an aloe Vera gel and aloe Vera is not listed at the top of the ingredient list, you are more than likely buying a gel containing an enormous amount of synthetic ingredients versus the natural ingredient of aloe Vera.

Question the product - Is there scientific proof or clinical testing that can substantiate the product claims? Are you paying more because the product is labeled natural skin care? Is it really natural?

For those with sensitive skin it is best to avoid skin care product with fragrances, alcohol, FD and C colors, mineral oil and formaldehyde, however, mineral oil is in almost all skin care products and the more you use it the drier your skin becomes. Unfortunately many women continue to have irritated, dry, scaly, itchy or blotchy skin and jump from one chemical cosmetic to another trying to find the cure.

In short, always read the label on your skin care products and do a skin patch test to avoid topical dermatitis or an allergic reaction. Of all the chemicals used in cosmetics, the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health has reported that nearly 900 are toxic - although other groups attack that figure as being far too conservative. Again, understanding the ingredients in your skin care products will provide a great advantage when shopping for a new lotion or cream.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Is there a way to get rid of Keratosis Pilaris?
    So i know its a is a common skin disorder, typified by “chicken skin” bumps on upper arms, thighs, torso, buttocks and occasionally the cheeks. Excess skin forms around individual hair follicles, creating the characteristic minute, rough, grater-like bumps, but is there something you can do about it? Its really nasty and embarrassing!

    • ANSWER:
      get a product called KP Duty by DermaDoctor
      http://www.dermadoctor.com/

  2. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of Chicken Skin on arms and legs?
    I'm 15 years old, a girl, and I've had chicken skin for all of my life. It's only on my legs and arms, and it's really unattractive. I don't wear shorts or short sleeves because it's so embarrassing for me. I can't afford to go to a dermatologist, so what can I do at home? I've tried many lotions, and they never work. Any creams or anything that I can try?

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      What is sometimes referred to as Chicken Skin is actually a condition known as Keratosis Pilaris. (KP) It is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      Although KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured, it can be made less noticeable. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.
      - http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pil…
      - http://www.helpforkp.com/

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre…
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co…

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin.
      Check out this site for some great, inexpensive, homemade exfoliants you can try;
      - http://www.skinway.com/skincare_articles…

      The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers (Hot water tends to dry out the skin) and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when low humidity dries out the skin.

      Make sure to be drinking more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc… And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3’s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3’s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 – 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-…

      Hope this helps!

  3. QUESTION:
    Any anti-depressants that help with psoriasis and other skin conditions such as KP?
    I have seen in some reports that some anti-depressant medication helps with skin disorders.
    Does anyone know which specific medication?

    Thanks in advance

    • ANSWER:
      ive never heard of that before. try citalopram

  4. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of keratosis pelariis!?!?
    I've had KP my whole life I'm 14 And I have these bumps and acne on my upper arms and I'm afraid to wear tank tops outside. I know it's a hereditary skin disorder but I'm wondering if there's a treAtment, cure, ect. Pleazzzzzz help

    • ANSWER:
      I've tried lots of things personally, and none of them really work. I've tried prescription lotion even, per bottle with insurance did nothing. The best thing I have found (with doctors advise) is bathing in a hot bath at night and getting some sun on my arms. When it's summer time and I have a little tan the bumps go away pretty well. One last thing that works ok for me is Miracle II soap and lotion. You have to find that at a health food store or on the web. I used it for the first time this winter, and my bumps have been a lot less than past years. I hope you find a combo that works for you, and don't dispare cause my doctor said sometimes it goes away as we get older! Good luck!

  5. QUESTION:
    How do you treat Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have the condition KP (chicken skin) on my legs, upper arms and on the sides of my face. It's a condition where you get bumpy skin but is not itchy or irritated. Also wondering if I got it from the sun because it stops at my ankles and upper thigh. How do I get rid of it? Is there a type of cream or something? Please suggest products! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:

      1. How to prevent Sunburn* & scope for consequential skin cancer, Melanoma, etc: Expose Ur body and or the affected parts within 90 minutes from sunrise & within 60 minutes before sunset. Timely exposure of body ensures safe and sufficient production of Vitamin D by Ur body. During strong winds, no exposure to sunlight, please. Any extra exposure shall be @ Ur own risk for skin cancer/melanoma

      2. The symptoms cited---------an offshoot of blocked energy + accumulated toxins liver, lungs, Thyroid & Parathyroid, lymphatic system, Spleen, hormonal imbalance with a displaced solar plexus.

      ‘Target Therapy’ [Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies] proved to be effective for all types of cancer [including brain tumors, leukemia, melanoma, Crohn’s Disease, bone marrow cancer, breast cancer, etc., ] & all the most dreaded and incurable diseases.

      TARGET THERAPY* It is the God-given therapy communicated to the mankind through THE RIGVEDA, one of the Hindu scriptures.
      Target Therapy---Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies, [comprising Ayurveda, Homeopathy, Bio-chemic salts, Herbal Remedies, Yoga/Meditation, Magneto-therapy, Sidha, etc.,] U can have sizable & perceivable relief in 45-90 days. @ no/affordable costs, No side effects, and No Hospitalization.

      Dr.Vora designed it in such a way that the costs are the least for the survival/rescue of common man and the poor in villages, towns and metropolis on the globe; with NO insurance cover & NO money to bear the costs of chemo. It is most suitable to all the youngsters on this entire globe.
      U may study it, discuss with Ur family members/friends/acquaintances and slowly and steadily implement it for the best results.

      •No side effects and no risk. If it clicks, mostly possible, U shall have a cure. Lest, the therapy keeps mum. No extra risk. It is the most suitable line of treatment even for the terminally ill patients. Cancer cure/prevention is quite possible. U may try it for any incurable disease including cancer of any organ[s], post-surgical recurrence of tumors, Leukemia, HIV/AIDS, Crohn’s Syndrome, Gilbert’s Syndrome, colon cancer, Thalassemia, Alzheimer’s Syndrome, Muscular Dystrophy, Autism, bone TB., Tinnitus, all brain & spinal cord disorders, CLL, Crohn’s Syndrome, endometriosis, etc., ---it should aim @ [3] steps.
      1. Removal of toxins from all internal organs & purging through Normal Drainage systems, feces, urine, skin, lungs, menses [females].
      2. Activating all the internal organs to make each & every organ to function up to optimum levels, by purging out toxins.
      3. Supplying vitamins, nutrients, micro-nutrients, minerals, trace elements for invigorating the entire Immune system to produce antibodies.
      All items for a cure—available in Ur vicinity all over the globe.

      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse 'Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.

  6. QUESTION:
    How do you make the skin on your arms smoother?
    My upper arms seem normal, but they feel as though little itte-bitte pimples are covering the surface. How do you clear the skin and make it smoother?

    • ANSWER:
      i think i know what you're talking about. i have the same thing. it's little bumps, and they don't hurt, but they're sometimes dry and almost always annoying.

      Keratosis pilaris (KP, also follicular keratosis) is a very common genetic follicular condition that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin, hence referred to as chicken skin. It most often appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms (though the lower arms can also be affected), and can also occur on the thighs and tops of legs, flanks, buttocks, or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet). Less commonly, lesions appear on the face, which may be mistaken for acne.

      Classification
      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40% of the adult population and approximately 50%-80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men.

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faciei (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.

      Symptoms and signs
      Keratosis pilaris occurs when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore. This causes the formation of hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). The painless bumps are skin-colored, although they can become red and inflamed at times. Usually many plugs form in an area, causing patches of rough, bumpy skin. This gives the skin a sandpaper or goose flesh appearance. This may be more severe in the winter or times of low humidity, which causes the skin to become dry. It will eventually resolve on its own.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin's "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. The hair, then, grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated. The hair can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though removal can lead to scarring.

      Keratosis pilaris may be hereditary. It is present in babies and continues into adulthood, but is uncommon in elderly people. It is most obvious during the teenage years. KP is prevalent in those who are overweight, or have atopic dermatitis, ichthyosis, or descend from Celtic backgrounds. Keratosis pilaris occurs in otherwise healthy people.

      Treatment
      There is no cure for Keratosis pilaris, but treatment is available. One option is to use a loofa to remove the dead, dry skin. Another option is to use a dermotologist-prescribed cream or lotion that should be applied daily. The best lotions for this condition would have urea, 15% alphahydroxy acids, or Retin A in them. Over-the-counter lotions work as well and should be applied after showering, as well as several times a day. The lotions are often soothing and can help improve the appearance of the skin. Dermotologists also recommend mild peeling agents, or alpha hydroxy acids, that may open up the plugged follicles. Antibiotics may also help in some cases where the bumps are red and badly inflamed. To temporarily reduce redness but not roughness, pulse dye laser treatment or intense pulsed light (IPL) can be done.

      Although it may clear up with treatment, reccurance of KP is very likely. Therefore, treatment should be continued regularly. It may take several months to years for the condition to completely clear up.

      A dermotologist or physician can usually diagnose a patient for Keratosis pilaris by visually inspecting the patient's skin.

  7. QUESTION:
    How do i get rid permanently of red dry bumpy skin?
    ever since i was little i have had this type of skin on the sides of my face, all over my arms, and some parts of my chest and i want it gone. ive tried everything, can someone plz recommend something to make it go away

    • ANSWER:
      You might have Keratosis Pilaris.

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris:
      1. Keratosis pilaris rubra: red, inflamed bumps
      2. Keratosis pilaris Alba: rough, white, bumpy skin
      3. Keratosis pilaris rubra faceii: reddish rash over the cheeks

      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris. However, there are effective treatments available that make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Most of the available treatments are purely symptomatic; the one thing they all have in common is need for repetition and ongoing commitment. Some seeking treatment with the disorder may be prescribed Tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream, often by request.

      Triamcinolone, most commonly sold under the trade name Aristocort, is a synthetic corticosteroid medically approved as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of eczema, which also reduces the amount of keratin in pores. It may be of most help to those with keratosis pilaris by reducing red, inflamed bumps. Triamcinolone is typically applied three times a day.

      Tretinoin, most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by causing the outer layer of the skin to grow more rapidly, which decreases the amount of the protein keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. As keratosis pilaris is manifested through excess keratin in the skin, Tretinoin forms a more effective and core approach to treatment than Triamcinolone, which forms a largely symptomatic approach. Tretinoin is typically applied once a day before bed.

      An alternative treatment is Adapalene, a retinoid medication that is a more stable compound, is less sunlight-sensitive, has fewer general side-effects, and may be just as effective as Retin-A. Treatment of KP with Adapalene would be considered an "off-label" use of the medication.

      As with Triamcinolone, Tretinoin or any other treatment, once therapy is discontinued, the condition reverts to its original state. However, skin treated with Tretinoin may take several weeks or more to revert to its pre-treatment condition, but may, at the same time, take several weeks or more to show optimal results, with the condition commonly worsening initially, as underlying keratin is brought to the surface of the skin. Tretinoin is considerably more expensive and dispensed in smaller quantities than Triamcinolone and other treatments. Although it may be the most effective treatment for keratosis pilaris, it is not considered the first line of treatment.

      Keratosis pilaris has not been clinically researched for treatment in an unbiased manner, with all claims of success or improvement being purely marketed or anecdotal. The condition is often dismissed outright by practitioners as being presently untreatable, giving mere moisturizing suggestions or reassurance that the condition will improve or cease with age, typically after 30. General practitioners are often unable to identify the condition. Ignorance, accompanied with the price, availability, quantity dispensed, time taken for optimal results to be achieved, more serious side-effects, adverse reactions, and worsening of the condition in the initial treatment phase - coupled with the cheaper, safer, and easier availability of other treatments - has hindered Tretinoin from showing its potential in the treatment of this condition.

      exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, creams, and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Beta hydroxy acids may help improve the appearance and texture of the afflicted skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to their containing lactic acid, a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may be helpful in moderation. Coconut oil may also be helpful if applied to afflicted areas while in the shower. Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, and, in many cases, will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing, such as tight-fitting jeans, is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

  8. QUESTION:
    My medicine is drying my skin out terribly?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris (a skin disorder), so I went to my dermatologist to see if he could help me. He gave me some cream for it, and it helps with the KP, but it dries my skin out terribly. Like imagine dry skin x100. Lotion is a bit harsh for my skin, because the skin on my face is extremely sensitive, and I don't know if using lotion will mess with the medicine. Will the dry skin get better, or what can I use that will help?

    • ANSWER:

  9. QUESTION:
    What are the bumps on my skin that look like goose bumps?
    they're on my arms and tummy and they look like little white bumps (not red) and they wont go away. they're not spread out they are in groups and are small. i want to get rid of them but idk how. does anybody know what they are and how to get rid of them?plz help.

    • ANSWER:
      ?Keratosis pilaris...
      Keratosis pilaris (KP) describes a group of disorders.1 It is a very common condition in which there is hyperkeratosis around hair follicles. KP is often described in association with other dry skin conditions. the bumps can be white, pinkish brown or red.
      Treatment
      * Avoid excessive dryness of the skin but emollients and moisturisers are of limited value. That is not to say that they have no value.
      * Creams with salicylic acid, lactic acid or urea may be of value.
      * Expensive cosmetic or vitamin creams are not helpful.
      * An abrasive pad may be helpful.
      * Take tepid showers rather than hot baths.

  10. QUESTION:
    I have red dots on my arms and legs. Do I have a skin disease?
    I have these little red dots on my arms and legs all over. It isn't chicken pox or anything, it doesn't itch. Sometimes it isn't that bad, but when i get uncomfortable or nervous it gets really bad. I've had it most of my life, but these past couple of years it has gotten worse. So do I have some kind of a skin disease, and if I do, can I treat it or get rid of it somehow?

    • ANSWER:
      It could be Keratosis Pilaris, it's a hereditary skin disorder that a lot of people have. I have it, and it sucks because there is no cure. Fortunately for some, though, it can improve with age. It is the most prominent during adolescence and during the teen years, but for some it starts to clear up a little later on.(some have said that when they entered their mid twenties they noticed that it was less noticeable) There is some really useful information about it on this site that can help you determine whether or not that is the problem:
      http://www.helpforkp.com/

      You can find some info and the symptoms here:
      http://www.helpforkp.com/keratosis_pilaris_about_kp.html

      And pictures in case you want to compare:
      http://www.helpforkp.com/keratosis_pilaris_pictures.html

      If you do have it one thing you can do is try to moisturize it with lotion (it helps) One really good moisturizer is Eucerin Plus Intensive Repair Cream. Don't try to physically exfoliate the skin with things like lofa sponges. Those can be too abrasive and can make it worse. The Eucerin lotion I mentioned has things in it that exfoliates the skin for you, which will give you good results.

      If it's not Keratosis Pilaris, thank your lucky stars and be sure to see a dermatologist to see what the problem is and what you can do about it. I had a doctor tell me I was ZINC deficient, but even after taking Zinc for 6 months there was very little improvement. It's actually better in the summer time. In the winter there is less moisture in the air and dryness can make Keratosis Pilaris look worse (which is why moisturizing the skin is a good idea, it’s better to put lotions and creams on right after a shower)

      Good luck!

  11. QUESTION:
    What is the name of injection to prevent chilblains?
    Hello
    I am suffering from chilblains. My fingers are getting red , swollen. And it is itched too much at night. I tried to put my legs into hot water with some salt and another items but its still the same. Even at that time itched are not bearable. I heard so many people that there is some injection to prevent this, but don't know the name, If anybody knows please let me know.

    • ANSWER:
      Safer than injections. You can, not only prevent, but also have permanent cure.

      1.Chilblain— Inflammation of the skin over the toes or some portion of the feet, the hand or ears, caused by sudden alternations of temperature. The skin becomes red in patches, slightly swollen and there is much irritation and itching, specially in the evening. NS 3x alone, failing which mixture of CP 3x or 12x, FP 12x, KM 3x, KP 3x, NM 3x, NS 3x and S 12x both internally and locally mixed with vaseline, failing which mixture of CS 3x, KS 3x and NP 3x.

      •Dosage*: 2 grains t.d.s.
      •All these biochemic salts/homeo medicines available @ local Homoeo shops, are safe and with side benefits. Don’t swallow medicine. The medicine to be dissolved on/under the tongue. Don’t take any thing 10 minutes before and 10 minutes after medication. You can take water.

      2.CAUSE; The endocrine glands produce hormones to regulate human traits, namely, Kama [desire], Krodha[anger], Lobha[Selfishness and greed]Moha[[love], Mada[lust] and matsaryas[affections]. Hormonal Imbalance is the root cause of all the chronic and dreaded diseases/syndromes.
      Prevention* & Cure* of any Disease/Syndrome/Disorder/Hormonal Imbalance:---
      In any ailment [acute as well as chronic] and emergencies, Acupressure techniques come to Ur rescue, not only for instant diagnosis, but also for giving some prevention of any disease[s] and perceivable relief/cure. No medication/hospitalization/side effects. Most suitable to the poor masses who can’t afford insurance, nor ability to pay the bills.
      1. Acupressure techniques--- Utility—Blocked energy + toxins shall be moved from all Ur internal organs to purge in the normal drainage system, i.e., urine, feces, sweat, cough, menses[ladies], vomitting and all the organs shall function up to optimal levels
      Acupressure Techniques—NO MEDICATION. NO SIDE EFFECTS. NO HOSPITALIZATION. NO COSTS. IT IS SAFE ALSO.
      With Ur thumb, press ur/his/her palms and soles, wrists and ankles on both sides. Suppose pain is felt while pressing a particular point in the palm/sole, u have to press the surrounding area—just like u r pumping out air from that painful point. The blocked energy in any internal organ, be it lungs, heart, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, liver, etc., shall be released along with toxins if any. As a last point u must press middle part of each palm/sole; so that toxins, if any, shall be excreted/purged through urine without affecting the kidneys.
      It should be done in an empty stomach or 2 hours after meals. With this, all the endocrine glands and their hormonal secretions shall be regulated. All internal organs shall function up to optimal levels. Ur entire immune system gets invigorated to produce antibodies.

      PS:If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse ‘Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.

  12. QUESTION:
    Why do I have little bumps on my arm, between my elbow and my shoulder and how do I get rid of them?
    They are small un-noticeable (except to touch) bumps on my arm where the biceps are. They usually feel softer when I put moisturiser on them, except this does not get rid of them. How do I get rid of them completely?

    • ANSWER:
      I believe that you are talking about Keratosis pilaris and as far as I know its genetic. Here's what I found on the internet. Hope it answers your question:

      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a very common genetic follicular condition that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin and hence colloquially referred to as "chicken skin". It most often appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms (though the lower arms can also be affected), and can also occur on the thighs and tops of legs, flanks, buttocks or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet). Less commonly, lesions appear on the face and may be mistaken for acne.

      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40 to 50% of the adult population and approximately 50 to 80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. Varying in degree, cases of KP can range from minimal to severe.[citation needed]

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks) and related disorders.

      Many people with keratosis pilaris do not know they have it (if the condition is mild). While KP resembles goose bumps, it is characterized by the appearance of small rough bumps on the skin. As a result, it is often confused with acne.

      Keratosis pilaris occurs as excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin, accumulates within the hair follicles forming hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). Bearing only cosmetic consequence, the condition most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy. Though people with keratosis pilaris experience this condition year round, it’s during the colder months when moisture levels in the air are lower that the problem can become exacerbated and the “goose bumps” are apt to look and feel more pronounced in color and texture.

      [edit] Treatment

      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris, however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, Retin A and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to the lactic acid — a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may also be helpful but increases risk of skin cancer. Small amounts of vitamin A can be used orally but only with exteme caution due to potential for liver damage. Check with a Dermatologist or Family Doctor before taking extra vitamin A due to the vitamins' potential toxic effects.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden (if they do not already appear red), and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. Instead, the hair grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated, and can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though can lead to scarring.

      Food allergies may also exacerbate the condition, causing hyper-keratosis pilaris, gluten being a common culprit (source: physician's (MD) oral presentation).

  13. QUESTION:
    There should be a cure for Keratosis Pilaris by now?
    You would think that if 40% of the WORLD population, about 2.4 BILLION people, have KP, that's a good enough reason to research a cure for it am I right? Come on, it's not like we're trying to cure cancer here, KP is just a skin disorder...

    • ANSWER:
      I have found a cure that works for me!! Other people need to try it to see if it works for other people too... I've been applying pure coconut oil for a few days (the stuff you eat) and my arms are completely smooth for the first time EVER!!! So excited

  14. QUESTION:
    How to treat my keratosis pilaris?
    I've had this condition for a very long time. It is located on my arms, above the elbows. I never really cared about them, but I'm just so sick of them and want to treat it. I know it's not curable but I just need some kind of home treatment to lessen it. It is so unflattering when I wear strappy dresses or tank tops, and with spring coming up and all. Plus I always scratch them when I'm stressed and pick at them, which isn't good, because now there is scarring to go along with the bumps.

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      You're right that KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured, although it can be made less noticeable. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre…
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co…

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture in, such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin.
      Check out this site for some great, inexpensive, homemade exfoliants you can try anywhere on your body;
      - http://www.skinway.com/

      Do not scrub the affected areas too harshly. It's not the amount of pressure you apply to the area that matters, as much as it's the consistency of gently exfoliating those affected areas daily. Also, you would not want to bruise your sensitive skin.

      The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers (Hot water tends to dry out the skin) and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when the lower humidity tends to dry out the skin.

      Vaseline and other such petroleum-based products are NOT generally recommended as a moisturizer, because petroleum-based products actually suffocate the skin. Skin needs to breathe to heal. As well, if there's any bacteria on your skin when the Vaseline is applied, it makes a perfect breeding ground for the bacteria to grow.

      The moisturizers you've mentioned are good. You could also add olive oil to that list. Olive oil is a natural oil that will help moisturze but will not clog your pores.

      Make sure to be drinking more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc… And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3’s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3’s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 – 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-…

      Check out the sites below for more information....

  15. QUESTION:
    How do I fix these appearance downfalls?
    I have all these little random bumps on my thighs are the top of my arms and I need to make them go away but I have no idea what they are! I've had them for years. You can't really see them but you can feel them. Does anyone know what they could be? Theyre really little. And they NEED to go away soon! Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      Here you go...

      Keratosis Pilaris
      Keratosis pilaris (commonly called KP) appears as "chicken skin bumps" on the skin. These bumps usually appear on the upper arms and thighs. They also can appear on the cheeks, back and buttocks. Keratosis pilaris, while unattractive, is harmless.

      What Are the Symptoms of Keratosis Pilaris?
      This disorder appears as small, rough bumps. The bumps are usually white or red, but do not itch or hurt. Keratosis pilaris is usually worse during the winter months or other times of low humidity when skin becomes dry. It also may worsen during pregnancy or after childbirth.

      How Is Keratosis Pilaris Treated?
      Although the condition may remain for years, it gradually disappears before age 30 in most cases. Treatment of keratosis pilaris is not medically necessary; but, individuals with this condition may want to seek treatment for cosmetic reasons.

      The initial treatment of keratosis pilaris should be intensive moisturizing. A cream such as Acid Mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 can be applied after bathing, and then re-applied several times a day. Other treatments may include:

      Medicated creams containing urea (Carmol-20) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily
      Efforts to unplug pores by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth or stiff brush.

  16. QUESTION:
    Why do I have these small bumps all over my upper arms?
    Ever since I can remember I have had small bumps on my arms. Mostly light in color and only on the upper part of the arm. If I go to the tanning bed a lot, it seems like a lot of them go away, but there are always some there. What does this mean???? Do I have a vitamin deficiency? Do I need to use a certain type of cleanser?

    • ANSWER:
      That could be keratosis pilaris.

      According to one website it is described as this: Keratosis Pilaris (KP) is a common skin disorder, typified by "chicken skin" bumps on upper arms, thighs, torso, buttocks and occasionally the cheeks. Excess skin forms around individual hair follicles, creating the characteristic minute, rough, grater-like bumps.

      To me they look like a bunch of ingrown hair bumps.

  17. QUESTION:
    shower gel that will help keratosis pilaris?
    I'm using coconut oil as a moisturiser and a generic moisturising shower gel which I'm not all impressed with. Any suggestion?

    Also is there any other advice people have for my skin? Worst area is my bum, thighs and just under my shoulder blades.

    • ANSWER:
      HELP HAS ARRIVED!!!!!!!!!!!

      I had this for years, my mom told me it was eczema. Most people say eczema is a name used for tons of different dry skin conditions that doctors can’t diagnose. I used eczema creams all through Jr. High and High School, all that did was make me feel greasy and uncomfortable with zero results.

      Keratosis pilaris is a common, genetic follicular condition that causes the appearance of rough bumps on the skin. It most often appears on arms, thighs, hands, legs, sides, buttocks, or face (which on the face are often mistaken for acne). Worldwide, Keratosis pilaris affects an estimated 40% of the adult population and approximately 50%-80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. There are several different types of Keratosis Pilaris, including Keratosis Pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), Keratosis Pilaris Alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), Keratosis Pilaris Rubra Faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.

      Keratosis Pilaris is caused by Hyperkeratosis: when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin, which is cream colored, surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore, resulting in rough clogged pores. The openings are often closed with a white plug of encrusted sebum, the oily, waxy substance produced by glands in the skin to keep it from drying out. Hyperkeratosis is most likely caused by your body having a vitamin A & E deficiency.

      I started taking vitamin A & E pills at dinner every night and 90% of my white bumps on my cheeks, arms, and legs cleared up. My boss also had white bumps on her arms and tried taking the vitamins too, it worked nicely for her. You could try taking the vitamins, but if you stop taking them, your body will go back to being deficient in them unless you start eating more foods naturally containing vitamins A & E:

      Vitamin A: Liver, Red Pepper, Cayenne, Sweet Potatoes, Carrots, Dried Apricots, Cantaloupe, Spinach, Squash, Dried Herbs, Papaya, Mangoes, Green Peas, Tomatoes.

      Vitamin E: Sunflower Seeds, Almonds, Pine Nuts, Peanuts, Dried Apricots, Pickled Green Olives, Cooked Taro Root, Wheat Germ/Flax Seed/Corn/Canola/Soybean Oils, Hazelnuts, Broccoli.

      Both A & E: Paprika, Red Chili Peppers or Powder, Spinach

      If the bumps (clogged dry rough crusty pores) have a red or pink ring around them, it could just be that they are inflamed, or it could be some sort of skin infection, such as yeast, which lives on the skin naturally but could become an infection, or bacterial. If they are a little pink or red I would try an antibacterial soap.

      Antibacterial soaps are full of chemicals and poisons, some are so harmful they cause muscle weakness, such as in the heart and tongue, and should not be in stores. A natural alternative is a soap or lotion containing Tea Tree oil. Tea Tree oil has natural antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and antiseptic qualities. It also has beneficial cosmetic properties. Tea Tree oil has a faint medicinal scent to it like eucalyptus, which is why I would suggest a soap instead of a lotion. Products containing Tea Tree oil can be found in abundance at health and natural and heath stores, but is also available in main stream store such as Wal-Mart for as low as around .

      So in short, vitamin A, vitamin E, soap, and you should be good (: I wish you luck

      Also, ontop of everything listed above, oils like (yes coconut) sunflower, extra virgin olive, jojoba, almond, and argan oil wont clog pores, I would try moisturizing for a few days with lotions containing some of those to soften the KP, then one day of thorough exfoliating to scrape the KP build up on your skin away

  18. QUESTION:
    How do i get rid of these red dots on my arms?
    they are not freckles!!
    ive had them since i was little.
    my brother and sisters have them too.
    i forgot what its called but theyre not freckles.
    theyre red, sometimes they stick out like pimples. but they cover my arms. what is it and how do i get rid of it? (i use uncented lotion)

    • ANSWER:
      It may be keratosis pilaris.
      For an accurate, professional diagnosis you would need to consult your doctor or a certified dermatologist.

      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.
      - http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pil…
      - http://www.helpforkp.com/

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre…
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co…

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin.
      Check out this site for some great, inexpensive, homemade exfoliants you can try;
      - http://www.skinway.com/skincare_articles…

      The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers (Hot water tends to dry out the skin) and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when low humidity dries out the skin.

      You should drink more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc… And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3’s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3’s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 – 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-…

      Hope this helps!

  19. QUESTION:
    My feet feel so cold even under a blanket?
    When it's cold, my feet just do as mentioned and feel so damp and sweaty and I'm starting to get chillblains. I'm 18 I get enough activity in my day. Would this just be because of poor circulation?

    • ANSWER:
      1. Chilblain— Inflammation of the skin over the toes or some portion of the feet, the hand or ears, caused by sudden alternations of temperature. The skin becomes red in patches, slightly swollen and there is much irritation and itching, specially in the evening. NS 3x alone, failing which mixture of CP 3x or 12x, FP 12x, KM 3x, KP 3x, NM 3x, NS 3x and S 12x both internally and locally mixed with vaseline, failing which mixture of CS 3x, KS 3x and NP 3x.

      •Dosage*: 2 grains t.d.s.
      •All these biochemic salts/homeo medicines available @ local Homoeo shops, are safe and with side benefits. Don’t swallow medicine. The medicine to be dissolved on/under the tongue. Don’t take any thing 10 minutes before and 10 minutes after medication. You can take water.

      2. Prevention * & Cure* of any Disease/Syndrome/Disorder:---
      In any ailment [acute as well as chronic] and emergencies, Acupressure techniques come to Ur rescue, not only for instant diagnosis, but also for giving some prevention of any disease[s] and perceivable relief/cure.
      Acupressure techniques--- Utility—Blocked energy + toxins shall be moved from all Ur internal organs to purge in the normal drainage system, i.e., urine, feces, sweat, cough, menses[ladies], vomiting and all the organs shall function up to optimal levels.
      Utility—Blocked energy + toxins shall be moved from all Ur internal organs to purge in the normal drainage system, i.e., urine, feces, sweat, cough, menses[ladies], vomitting and all the organs shall function up to optimal levels
      Acupressure Techniques—NO MEDICATION. NO SIDE EFFECTS. NO HOSPITALIZATION. NO COSTS. IT IS SAFE ALSO.
      With Ur thumb, press ur/his/her palms and soles, wrists and ankles on both sides. Suppose pain is felt while pressing a particular point in the palm/sole, u have to press the surrounding area—just like u r pumping out air from that painful point. The blocked energy in any internal organ, be it lungs, heart, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, liver, etc., shall be released along with toxins if any. As a last point u must press middle part of each palm/sole; so that toxins, if any, shall be excreted/purged through urine without affecting the kidneys.
      It should be done in an empty stomach or 2 hours after meals. With this, all the endocrine glands and their hormonal secretions shall be regulated. All internal organs shall function up to optimal levels. Ur entire immune system gets invigorated to produce antibodies.

      Remote control Acupressure points given by the God. For Treatment, hard-pressure is to be applied on & around these points with Ur thumb and middle finger.
      Palms/soles:
      Point Nos.1-10 -----1 [brain], 2 [Mental Nerves], 3 [Pituitarygland], 4 [Pineal gland], 5 [Head Nerves], 6 [Throat], 7 [Neck], 8 [Thyroid & Parathyroid], 9 [Spine], 10 [piles-constipation], , Point Nos.11-16, No.11 [Prostrate gland], 12 [Penis], 13 [Vagina], 14. Testes & Ovaries], 15 [Uterus], 16 [Lymph], 17 [Hip], 18 [Urinary Bladder], 19 [intestines], 21 [appendix-front side], and 21 [allergy-back side]; 22[gall bladder], 23 [liver], 24[Shoulder], 25[Pancreas], 26[kidney], 27[Stomach], 28[Adrena gland], 29[Solar Plexus-Nabhi Chakra-Umbelicus], 30[Lungs], 31[Ear], 32[Energy], 33[Nerves of ear], 34[Cold], 35[Eye], 36[Heart], 37 [spleen]. 38[Thymus].

      If the particular point is tender on pressure by Ur thumb, U can note that that particular organ[s] is/are affected. U can indulge in instant diagnosis of any disease and or the affected organ[s].
      http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.2304961665160.2103840.1282822997&type=1&l=0a6bb63dd0

      Dorsal side of Palms & soles to diagnose & treat ailments of eyes, spine, breast cancer, etc., :

      http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.2306802071169.2103895.1282822997&type=1&l=38eadce9df

      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse 'Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.

      Source: ‘HEALTH IN UR HANDS’ Vol.I & II available in all Indian Languages all over the globe---by Dr.Devendra Vora, DSc.,MD.,FRCP.,---an octogenarian & the pioneer in Acupressure in India.

  20. QUESTION:
    I have kp scars on my arms, what type of cream is best at getting rid of scars, a bleaching cream perhaps?
    my upper arms are covered with scars from when i had bad keratosis pilaris and i would scratch and pick at the bumps, i have the kp under control but the scars are still there. i exfoliate and moisturize but what can i use to get rid of these brown spots?
    i recently tried a skin fade cream which had hydroquinone as the main ingredient along with vitamin c and spf 15, it was working great but after 2 weeks or so it started making me itch and my arms began to turn red so i stopped.
    is there a good well known bleaching cream out there that i should try?
    AFRICAN BEAUTY WHERE CAN I FIND FAIR&WHITE PRODUCTS??????
    IVE ACTUALLY HEARD A LOT ABOUT THEM BUT CANNOT FIND THEM, I HEAR SOME PEOPLE SELL FAKES WHICH ARE DANGEROUS.

    • ANSWER:
      please use fair and whote. this is by far the best product i have ever ever used. i had a skin disorder called Pityriasis rosea it left my skin a messed uo. I had dark veins all over my legs. I also pick at my skin at times and i had scars from mosiquito bites on my arms and legs. i was running out of options. i dreaded the summer months because i knew it would be too hot for me to cover up with long sleeve clothes. i began using this product a year ago. it works so well. i saw reults within the first 2-3 weeks. everyday i thouroughly wash my face then apply sunscreen regardless of the weather. the fair and white product line includes lotions,creams, sprays. and soaps. i had some minor acne scarring on my face after washing my face i apply palmers ambi cream then fair and white lotion. i simpathize for you and i know exactly what you are going though. please use this product if you want an improved appearance in your skin.

  21. QUESTION:
    What genetic diseases/skin conditions occur in association with keratosis pilaris?

    Please... anyone with a REAL answer?

    • ANSWER:
      KP is a genetic skin disorder and it is hereditary. There have been suggestions made that KP might be linked with a deficiency in Vitamin A.
      "Follicular keratosis refers to orthokeratosis involving the follicular ostium and infundibulum. It may be isolated [as in standard keratosis pilaris (KP)] or associated with other pathologic processes, including follicular inflammation, atrophy, scarring, and alopecia [keratosis pilaris atrophicans (KPA)]. These are reaction patterns that occur alone or as part of a wide variety of syndromes"
      The disorder may be associated with eczema (dermatitis).

  22. QUESTION:
    How can i get rid of Keratosis pilaris?

    • ANSWER:
      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris, however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Most of the available treatments are purely symptomatic, the one thing they all have in common is need for repetition and ongoing commitment. Some who seek treatment with the disorder may be prescribed Tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream, often by request.

      Triamcinolone, most commonly sold under the trade name Aristocort, is a synthetic corticosteroid medically approved as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of eczema and also reduces the amount of keratin in pores. It may be of most help to those with keratosis pilaris by reducing red, inflamed bumps. Triamcinolone is typically applied three times a day.

      Tretinoin, most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by causing the outer layer of the skin to grow more rapidly, which decreases the amount of the protein keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. As keratosis pilaris is manifested through excess keratin in the skin, Tretinoin forms a more effective and core approach to treatment than Triamcinolone which forms a largely symptomatic approach. Tretinoin is typically applied once a day before bed.

      An alternative treatment is Adapalene, a retinoid medication which is a more stable compound, less sunlight sensitive and has less general side effects and may be just as effective as Retin-A. Treatment of KP with Adapalene would be considered an "off-label" use of the medication.

      As with Triamcinolone, Tretinoin or any other treatment, once therapy is discontinued, the condition reverts back to its original state. However, skin treated with Tretinoin may take several weeks or more to revert back to its pre-treatment condition, but may at the same time take several weeks or more to show optimal results with the condition commonly worsening initially as underlying keratin is brought to the surface of the skin. Tretinoin is considerably more expensive and dispensed in smaller quantities than Triamcinolone and other treatments. Although it may be the most effective treatment for keratosis pilaris, it is not considered the first line of treatment.[citation needed]

      Unfortunately keratosis pilaris has not been clinically researched for treatment in an unbiased manner, with all claims of success or improvement being purely marketed or anecdotal. The condition is often dismissed outright by practitioners as being presently untreatable,[citation needed] giving mere moisturizing suggestions or reassurance that the condition will improve or cease with age, typically after 30. General practitioners are often unable to identify the condition.[citation needed] Ignorance accompanied with the price, availability, quantity dispensed, time taken for optimal results to be achieved, more serious side effects, adverse reactions and worsening of the condition in the initial treatment phase, coupled with the cheaper, safer and easier availability of other treatments has hindered Tretinoin from showing its potential in the treatment of this condition.[citation needed]

      Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, creams and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Beta hydroxy acids may help improve the appearance and texture of the afflicted skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to the lactic acid, a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may be helpful but increases risk of skin cancer. Coconut oil may also be helpful if applied to afflicted areas while in the shower. Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing, such as tight fitting jeans, is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

  23. QUESTION:
    what are these little bumps on the back of my legs?!?
    I have little pimple like bumps on the back of my thighs, ive considered heat rash but im not sure, when you try to squeeze them all you get it blood, they're really embarrassing as they're bright red. DO you ahve any idea. What can i do to get rid of them??

    • ANSWER:
      That is actually an extremely common skin disorder called Keratosis Pilaris (normally found on the tops of arms & the back of thighs.) Never pick at these bumps as it will only make things worse, however good measures to take would be to use a wash with glycolic acid such as MD Formulations, but the greatest product which is literally a wonder cream is Karin Herzog Oxygen body cream.It is great for all kinds of lumps & bumps, such as KP & Milia,spots, wounds,burns & lines/wrinkles as well as for scar tissue.
      Put Keratosis pilaris into Google & you will find plenty of information.
      The Karin Herzog website is: www.karinherzog.com

      Good luck & take care

  24. QUESTION:
    How can I get rid of kp?
    I hate having kp.
    I have it on my arms, legs, butt, and stomach. I never wear short sleeve shirts or show my legs because of this. I am a teenager and I never show skin due to my kp. I hate it! I don't even let people touch me. I never go to beater or swimming either.
    What can I do to get rid of it?? :(
    When I do wear short sleeves I always see people staring at my arms.

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured, although it can be made less noticeable. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.
      - http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pil…
      - http://www.helpforkp.com/

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre…
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co…

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin.
      Check out this site for some great, inexpensive, homemade exfoliants you can try;
      - http://www.skinway.com/skincare_articles…

      The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers (Hot water tends to dry out the skin) and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when low humidity dries out the skin.

      Make sure to be drinking more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc… And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3’s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3’s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 – 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-…

      Hope this helps!

  25. QUESTION:
    How can I remove these bumps on my arm?
    I have had these small bumps on my upper arm for almost all of my life and I just recently found out that what I have is called Keratosis Pilaris. Is there any way I can remove these bumps on my arms? thanks

    • ANSWER:
      I also have them, and suffer from the same thing.

      the cure i have found is very simple.
      a little sunlight on the arms.
      less dairy & mainly less milk.
      more fresh produce
      more water.

      mine have faded dramatically, and are almost gone!
      when i have a tran, they are hardly there at all!
      good luck!

      Classification

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faciei (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.[3]

      [edit] Symptoms and signs

      Keratosis pilaris occurs when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore. This causes the formation of hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). The painless bumps are skin-colored, although they can become red and inflamed at times. Usually many plugs form in an area, causing patches of rough, bumpy skin. This gives the skin a sandpaper or goose flesh appearance.[4] This may be more severe in the winter or times of low humidity, which causes the skin to become dry. It will eventually resolve on its own.[5]

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin's "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. The hair, then, grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated. The hair can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though removal can lead to scarring.[6]

      Keratosis pilaris may be hereditary. It is present in babies and continues into adulthood, but is uncommon in elderly people. It is most obvious during the teenage years. KP is prevalent in those who have atopic dermatitis, ichthyosis, or descend from Celtic backgrounds. Keratosis pilaris occurs in otherwise healthy people.[7]

      [edit] Treatment

      There is no cure for Keratosis pilaris, but treatment is available. One option is to use a loofa to remove the dead, dry skin. Another option is to use a dermotologist-prescribed cream or lotion that should be applied daily. The best lotions for this condition would have urea, 15% alphahydroxy acids, or Retin A in them. Over-the-counter lotions work as well and should be applied after showering, as well as several times a day.[8] The lotions are often soothing and can help improve the appearance of the skin. [9] Dermotologists also recommend mild peeling agents, or alpha hydroxy acids, that may open up the plugged follicles. Antibiotics may also help in some cases where the bumps are red and badly inflamed.[10] To temporarily reduce redness but not roughness, pulse dye laser treatment or intense pulsed light (IPL) can be done.[11]

      Although it may clear up with treatment, reccurance of KP is very likely. Therefore, treatment should be continued regularly. It may take several months to years for the condition to completely clear up.

      A dermatologist or physician can usually diagnose a patient for Keratosis pilaris by visually inspecting the patient's skin.[12]

  26. QUESTION:
    Dry skin brushing and keritosis pilaris?
    i think i may have kp on my upper thigh area and i always seem to get ingrown hair on the back of my elbow forearm area, can dry brushing only these areas of my body help? with my problem anyone else suffer from this unsightly skin disorder i don't like wearing shorts or swimsuit cus of it its been awful for me. any tips thanks

    • ANSWER:
      I have that on the back of my upper arms.

      They sorta look like red goose bumps right?

      Try this stuff..it works wonders!! This is what I use.

      It's sorta expensive..but it last a really long time because all you use is a pea sized amount.

      So here's the link:
      http://www.sephora.com/browse/product.jhtml?id=P73509&categoryId=B70

      Good luck and hope this helps!

  27. QUESTION:
    How do i get rid of these things?
    So ive had like pimples or something on my butt for like a year now and i cant seem to get rid of them i dont even know if there pimples just assuming. and its super embarrassing and i need to know how to get rid of it. do i use baby oil or lotion or whaat? and i wash and loofah it everynight

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis Pilaris is a very common genetic follicular disorder manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin. Primarily, it appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms, but can also occur on thighs and buttocks or any body part except palms or soles.

      An excess of the protein known as Keratin, accumulates within the hair follicles forming numerous tiny rough bumps on the skin. Sometimes, these bumps can become irritated causing the follicles to redden excessively. KPR

      KP is often misdiagnosed and treated as acne. Most types are more evident during teen years.

      Some products that have worked for others:
      # Neostrata lotion AHA 15
      # Amlactin 12% Moisturizing Cream
      # Lac-Hydrin 5 Lotion, With Alpha Hydroxy Acid for relief of Dry Skin
      # AVON MOISTURE THERAPY Skin Bump Minimizer
      # Glytone Keratosis Pilaris 3 Piece Kit
      # Hydro Foam 40 (Urea)
      # KP DUTY

      Over exfoliating can aggravate it and make it worse, so be careful.

  28. QUESTION:
    I have little redish bumps on my arms. What are they?
    i am a female, and ever since 4th grade i have had these little red bumps above my elbow on my arms. they don't hurt but the just look odd. Does anyone else have these?, know what they are? or know how to get rid of them?

    • ANSWER:
      I have little redish bumps on my upper arms as well. My dermatologist said they are called "keratosis pilaris rubra". Here is a picture of it http://keratosispilaris.org/images/kp/arm_01.jpg

      This is from their website
      "Why KP occurs?

      The bumps of KP result from the way in which scales are shed from the outer skin around KP affected hair follicles. In these follicles, the outer skin scales are excessively adherent and do not shed easily. This phenomenon is known as abnormal keratinization or hyperkeratinization. The fact that it is localized to the individual follicles and occurs in each and every one in a certain area, explains its characteristic "millions of bumps" appearance.

      Sometimes, this hyperkeratotic buildup entraps the hair within the follicle. The trapped hair gets bunched up and may lead to a red irritated bump that may fill with pus. These pus filled red bumps are often confused with bacterial folliculitis or acne.

      People with a history of skin allergies are most susceptible to this condition. The papules tend to occur in association with allergic dermatitis and several types of xerotic (dry) skin disorders. Both of these conditions have a strong hereditary link.

      Keratosis pilaris tends to be more severe during the winter months or other times of low humidity when skin dries out. Areas where relative humidity is low have a higher incidence of Keratosis Pilaris."

  29. QUESTION:
    AmLactin for kp gives me a rash?
    I have a very annoying case of kp and am currently using the lotion "AmLactin". I use it every night as i was directed and it works! But as soon as it begins to work and show a difference, i start breaking out in more, smaller bumps, over small areas of where i applied the AmLactin. Then if I stop applying the lotion, the rash goes away, but the kp returns. I'm not sure what to do. If i should just continue using the AmLactin, hoping that the new rash will just go away, or is there is another solution?

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured, although it can be made less noticeable. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre…
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co…

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture in, such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin.
      Check out this site for some great, inexpensive, homemade exfoliants you can try anywhere on your body;
      - http://www.skinway.com/

      Do not scrub the affected areas too harshly. It's not the amount of pressure you apply to the area that matters, as much as it's the consistency of gently exfoliating those affected areas daily. Also, you would not want to bruise your sensitive skin.

      The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers (Hot water tends to dry out the skin) and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when the lower humidity tends to dry out the skin.

      Vaseline and other such petroleum-based products are NOT generally recommended as a moisturizer, because petroleum-based products actually suffocate the skin. Skin needs to breathe to heal. As well, if there's any bacteria on your skin when the Vaseline is applied, it makes a perfect breeding ground for the bacteria to grow.

      Olive oil is a natural oil that will help moisturze but will not clog your pores.

      Make sure to be drinking more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc… And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3’s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3’s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 – 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-…

      Check out the sites below for more information....

  30. QUESTION:
    I have small bumps on my legs. sort of like rashes. theyre not red. their just bumps. what do i do?
    I have small bumps on my legs. i dont really know how to explain it. I have more on my right leg than my left leg.
    Its not noticeable to the eye. but once you stroke your hand on my leg.. you can definately feel the bumps.
    I recently just shaved and im not sure if its a razor burn? or if its something that has to do with that.
    When i didnt shave, it never had bumps.
    what should i do to take them away?

    • ANSWER:
      You might have developed KP (skin disorder, doesn't harm you juss makes your skin bumpy and not red) on your legs. I recommend moisturizing them a couple times a day for a little while and see if they go away. If they do, keep using the lotion or aloe Vera, it's good for you to moisturize your whole body after showering or swimming!! (:

  31. QUESTION:
    how can i get rid of chicken skin? (KP)?
    Ok so I have chicken skin on my CHEEKS which really sucks and I have it on my thighs and arms so is there any way to get rid of it? Please help

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.
      - http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pil…
      - http://www.helpforkp.com/

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre…
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co…

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin. The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when low humidity dries out the skin.

      You could make sure to be drinking more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc… And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3’s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3’s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 – 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-…

      For the redness on your cheeks, there are products you can buy that are specifically made to help reduce redness:
      - LaTherapie Paris has a fortifying skin cream that is supposed to help soften high colour (reduce redness)
      - There is a cream called ROSACURE which is an anti-redness cream formulated to reduce redness for rosacea-prone skin types. (even if it's not rosacea)
      - Guinot has a cream called RED LOGIC which claims to neutralize the appearance of red blood vessels.

  32. QUESTION:
    raised red and itchy bumps on my arms only?
    last month I started having raised red itchy bumps on both of my upper arms only, I thought maybe insect bites but no they come and go, I'm taking metatoprol for high blood, I do have a app with my doctor next week I do have allergies can anyone help?

    • ANSWER:
      I have that too Its called Keratosis Pilaris.
      All you have to do to get Rid of It Is Exfoliate with a Loofah Brush.
      If you have a Walgreens near you there is also Vanicream Soap that Helps Me When Im using the Loofah.You can also buy Lubriderm i heard which I will have to do.Heres a little about KP:

      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40% of the adult population and approximately 50%-80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men.

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.

      While KP resembles goose bumps, it is characterized by the appearance of small rough bumps on the skin. As a result, many people with keratosis pilaris do not know they have it, and it is often confused with acne.

      Keratosis pilaris occurs when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin, which is cream color, surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore. This causes the formation of hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). Bearing only cosmetic consequence, the condition most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy. Though people with keratosis pilaris experience this condition year-'round, it is during the colder months, when moisture levels in the air are lower, that the problem can become exacerbated and the goose bumps are apt to look and feel more pronounced in color and texture.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin's "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. The hair, then, grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated. The hair can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though removal can lead to scarring.

  33. QUESTION:
    Does exfoliation really help with KP?
    Well, for my KP, I exfoliate with Apricot Scrub and then I pat my legs dry. Next, I rub Clindamycin lotion on them, and every other night I use Tretinoin cream. My legs are SMOOTH right now, and the bumps seem to be going away somewhat, but do you really think this will help my KP?

    • ANSWER:
      Physical exfoliation is not helpful for KP, rather chemical exfoliation. Yikes, you use apricot scrub?! That stuff can cause micro tears on your skin.

      The CAUSE(S):
      The exact cause is unknown, but keratosis pilaris (KP) is developed because of hyperkeratinization (disorder of inner lining of hair follicle). Excessive keratin (tough protein) blocks the opening of hair follicles, thus, leads to hyperkeratosis (thickening of the stratum corneum of epidermis). KP is observed as benign bumps that are usually white, sometimes red, and generally do not hurt or itch. KP affects 50-80% adolescent and 40% adults.

      To CORRECT KP:
      1)Wash the affected area with a gentle cleanser
      2)Use an over-the-counter topical exfoliant/keratolytic product with one or a combination of the following ingredients: glycolic acid, lactic acid, malic acid, mandelic acid, resorcinol, salicylic acid, sulfur, and urea.
      3)Use an over-the-counter topical corticosteroid like 1% hydrocortisone cream. This should only be used short-term because it can thin the skin if you use it too frequently.
      4)Moisturizer with a well-formulated lotion or cream.

      To PREVENT KP:
      Since the exact cause is still unknown, there is no way to prevent that particular cause from occurring in the future. You can control the conditions of KP, however:
      1)Avoid harsh soaps like bar soaps
      2)Avoid scrubs
      3)Take a warm shower, pat dry, and then apply topical products.

      Improvement can take a few weeks to a one month with diligence, compliance, and patience depending on the severity of KP. If the over-the counter therapies are ineffective, then you should visit a board-certified dermatologist and request a prescription-strength retinoid, keratolytic agent(s), or immunomodulators. Or, you can pay for a series of chemical peels or microdermabrasion. Chemical peels are better than microdermabrasion unless your skin is too sensitive with the acids. Microdermabrasion is a waste of money in my opinion, but it is still an option.

  34. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know anything about Keratosis Pilaris?
    What can i do to make it go away? I am using AmLactin Cream and it is not working!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a very common genetic follicular condition that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin and hence colloquially referred to as "chicken skin". It most often appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms (though the lower arms can also be affected), and can also occur on the thighs and tops of legs, flanks, buttocks or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet). Less commonly, lesions appear on the face and may be mistaken for acne.

      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40 to 50% of the adult population and approximately 50 to 80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. Varying in degree, cases of KP can range from minimal to severe.[citation needed]

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks) and related disorders.

      Many people with keratosis pilaris do not know they have it (if the condition is mild). While KP resembles goose bumps, it is characterized by the appearance of small rough bumps on the skin. As a result, it is often confused with acne.

      Keratosis pilaris occurs as excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin, accumulates within the hair follicles forming hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). Bearing only cosmetic consequence, the condition most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy. Though people with keratosis pilaris experience this condition year round, it’s during the colder months when moisture levels in the air are lower that the problem can become exacerbated and the “goose bumps” are apt to look and feel more pronounced in color and texture.

      Treatment

      There is no known cure for Keratosis pilaris, though it may improve with age and even disappear completely in adulthood; however, some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life.

      Treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden (if they do not already appear red), and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring.

      Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. Instead, the hair grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated, and can be removed if the bump is picked or squeezed (which can lead to scarring.)

  35. QUESTION:
    Help: I have been diagnosed with keratosis pliaris?
    I was recently diagnosed with keratosis pilaris on the back of my arms by a family doctor. They prescribed some cream for it and it has helped a bit, but with summer coming up I am embarrassed to show my arms. It is minimal but there :( and the doctor said it could be worse. Is there any cure for it? Can a peel help? Help please.

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis Pilaris (KP) is a common skin disorder, typified by “chicken skin” bumps on upper arms, thighs, torso, buttocks and occasionally the cheeks. Excess skin forms around individual hair follicles, creating the characteristic minute, rough, grater-like bumps.
      As seen in
      Health Magazine

      Keratosis Pilaris affects almost 50% of the world’s population and is particularly likely to affect anyone prone to eczema, asthma or hayfever.

      It’s never a chore to attain flawless, smooth skin. KP Duty™ effectively eliminates crustiness, flaking, and dry, rough chicken skin – no prep work or scrubbing required.

      KP Duty™ is a concentrated treatment with potent antioxidant Green Tea, moisture replenishing Hyaluronic Acid and texturizing Dimethicone.

      Contains:
      Glycolic Acid - Powerful AHA
      Sodium Glycolate – Glycolic Acid salt with buffering action
      Green Tea – Botanical antioxidant with soothing anti-redness action
      Urea - Humectant
      Algae – Soothing botanical
      Sodium Hyaluronate –Potent hydrating agent
      Dimethicone – Barrier agent – reduces moisture evaporation

      • Dermatologist Tested & Approved
      • Non Comedogenic
      • Non Irritating
      • Allergy Tested
      • Fragrance Free
      • Dye Free
      • pH Balanced
      • No Animal Testing

  36. QUESTION:
    DERMAdoctor KP Duty Dermatologist Moisturizing Therapy For Dry Skin ?
    i have this skin disorder calle Keratosis Pilaris.. and i found this product called DERMAdoctor KP Duty Dermatologist Moisturizing Therapy For Dry Skin and i would like to know if this product really works for keratosis pilaris

    • ANSWER:
      i have the same skin problem and i use the kp duty. but it doesn't work like really fast. you have to use it for a while like a few months before results really show. also, don't stop using it until your skin is all better or else you won't get the best results.

      hope this helps. :]

  37. QUESTION:
    I am a thirteen year old girl and i suffer from keratosis pilaris please help?
    I am a thirteen year old girl and i suffer from keratosis pilaris please help?
    ok for those of you who don't know, kp is a skin disorder that causes your upper arms to get dry itchy bumps. i am 13 and i just cant take it anymore everyday i go to school with a sweater on and i hate it even when its hot like 90 degrees hot i keep my sweater on ashamed of my kp.sometimes i wanna cry because i hate this it makes me feel ugly. so i just wanted to know if there was any one else out there like me

    • ANSWER:
      ive never heard of KP, but i must say my heart goes out to you darlin :) I hope you find something to help you with this. I know that there are other people out there that do have skin disorders. Just keep your head up my dear, i know its hard but it can only get better :)
      XO

  38. QUESTION:
    Do you REALLY CARE if you LOVE HER?
    Girls are welcome to answer this one too.

    I was just wondering would you guys even care if the girl you really like/love has a certain skin condition such as keratosis pilaris (kp)?
    Or would you just accept her and still love her the way she is?

    This question includes the rest of the imperfections we girls are insecure about out there. Thanks. =)

    • ANSWER:
      Ofcourse! There are people with MUCH more extreme skin disorders out there, and they find/keep love. If someone doesn't want to accept you for who and how you are, you DON'T need him in your life. Period. He is not mature enough to be in a relationship anyway, if he is so concerned about shallow things like that. Seriously. =)

  39. QUESTION:
    Does birth control reduce "chicken skin" ?
    I'm gettin on birth control and I know that some pills help and reduce acne immensely, can it reduce my "chicken skin" as well? If not, what's a way to get rid of it

    • ANSWER:
      Birth control pills are hormones and help to balance the hormones in your body. "Chicken Skin" (Keratosis Pilaris) is not due to hormones, so "No"... Sorry, but it is highly unlikely you'll notice any difference with your "chicken skin" when taking the birth control pill..

      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured, although it can be made less noticeable. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.
      - http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pil…
      - http://www.helpforkp.com/

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre…
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co…

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin.
      Check out this site for some great, inexpensive, homemade exfoliants you can try;
      - http://www.skinway.com/

      The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers (Hot water tends to dry out the skin) and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when low humidity dries out the skin.

      Make sure to be drinking more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc… And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3’s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3’s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 – 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-…

      Hope this helps!

  40. QUESTION:
    i am a thirteen year old girl and i suffer from keratosis pilaris please help?
    ok for those of you who don't know, kp is a skin disorder that causes your upper arms to get dry itchy bumps. i am 13 and i just cant take it anymore everyday i go to school with a sweater on and i hate it even when its hot like 90 degrees hot i keep my sweater on ashamed of my kp.sometimes i wanna cry because i hate this it makes me feel ugly. so i just wanted to know if there was any one else out there like me

    • ANSWER:
      I had the same problem.
      So I told my mom and then we got an appoitment with our doctor and he gaves us perscription cream and it went away in like a couple days or a week

  41. QUESTION:
    how do i treat Keratosis Pilaris?
    i'm 14 and i just found out that the little white bumps on my arms, cheeks, and, embarisingly, butt, are a condition called keratosis pilaris. i don't have a lot of money to spend on treatments, probably at most. is there anything i can do on my own to get rid of the bumps?

    • ANSWER:
      Okay i know basically everything about Keratosis Pilaris. KP (chicken skin) is a skin disorder passed down from genetics which disappears at the age of +30. half of the worlds population suffers and had suffered from KP. unfortunately KP can NOT be cure but CAN be treated. 1. never pick, itch, squeese, or touch KP because it will bleed. 2. let your affected skin breathe air so dont cover your skin. 3. cleanse ur skin with a loofah sponge. 4. apply lotion such as amlactin or try the dermadocter KP duty cream () or use the dermadocter scrub wash () 5. let ur skin see sunlight. 6.be proud of it because ur not alone. i also (14) have KP and .....acne =,= crap.....and they are everywhere..butt.cheek.arms.legs.back. but dont worry :D people who are good people would never mind these little flaws and wont really care.

  42. QUESTION:
    Starting swimming late?
    ok im 15 and i wanna learn to swim :( i dont know that well lol i cant even go in the deep and im kinda chubby like 150 pounds lool i was wondereing if i could still make it to like swim meets and stuff? and also lose weight and getting that perfect body lol ( big chest small waist kinda like micheal phelps ) but im starting in beginners thats what worries me which is probably like 1 day a week of swimming ! and also what disturbs me is i have KP which is a skin disorder and im afraid ppl will laugh the hell outa me and be like wtf is that shit ! and the girls will see it and wont like me :( i have kp on my chest and arms grrrrrrrrr anyways ppl plz comment back thx i appreciate it :)
    TY:) yes i have a friend who swims professionally and he said i have a long way to go till i reach his level :) but im hopin to get tonedup by the time this year is finished :D thx for the answer
    also my kp just looks like goosebumps but permenant and it gets red sometimes :(

    • ANSWER:
      okay, well its never too late. but before joining a team you need to be in a clinic. this is how i did it, i went every friday to learn the technique and a trainer taught me. look for one in your community. swimming will stretch you out but you will not lose all of that fat. but its alright it will become muscle when you join the team. Listen, kp, or any other skin disorder is normal, it happens and whoever laughs at it, so what? are you really gonna not swim and get in shape and get stronger because of what other people think? its not like you have bleeding puss and crazy bumps on your skin. and never swim with a shirt on, and if you swim get TIGHT jammers, its the only way you can swim good, trust me. if i were you 1. i'd join a clinic, then 2.join a team... its really hard to swim for a team, they push you non-stop you wont be able to handle it, and you need to be in shape for a long time... so im telling you experience wise dont join a team yet. you have to learn at your own pace.

  43. QUESTION:
    KP issues... Socially and mentally.?
    I have had KP since I was born and everybody made fun of me at school and it really lowered my self esteem, and I don't have any. I constantly agree with all the bad things people say about me and it helps me, in a way, feel safer. I haven't felt good about myself in a positive manner since before I entered school. I've been constantly picked on and put down and felt like shit because of my skin disorder and it really has taken a toll on me. I began experimenting in drugs and alcohol; I fear it'll only get worse. I don't see myself living because it is of course a very shallow world, and if you don't look good, you're not... Liked. And all my life, that's all I wanted. Now, I met a guy outside of school and I really, really like him. He's the first person I've ever really liked and he likes me too, but I hide my skin, so if he sees it, it might scare him away. And I know no one will ever want me because of my skin, but I really like him, like I said. He really makes me happier and optimistic and without him, I'd be a pessimistic b/itch, to be honest. He invited me to a party and it's a swimming pool one. I feel so bad about it. I don't know how to hide my skin and I don't want to feel ugly like I usually do. I really want to have clear skin. How do I make it go away so that it isn't noticeable?

    • ANSWER:
      I know how you feel. The first step to a better self is too realise that you have these issues and you can't change them. As soon as you realize to forget about what you can't change and focus onwhat you can and life will be so much better. Also you got to take a chance and just be your self. Don't hide it, because it is best to be yourself.

  44. QUESTION:
    Small, painless, flesh-colored bumps on backs of upper arms?
    Anyone know what that is? I can't really give much more info than what I put in the 'question.' Sometimes I can scratch a part of a bump off, and there are about, I dunno, forty VERY small bumps on each arm? It's only on the upper arms, mainly the backs.

    I remember seeing three or four of these five years ago, and since then, they've multiplied. My oldest brother had this, and I know quite a few friends have it, too. Does anyone know the name of this and/or treatments for it?

    • ANSWER:
      This might be Keratosis Pilaris (KP).

      Here is a quote from www.medicinenet.com

      "Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a very common skin disorder seen in many people of all ages. It is a benign condition that presents as numerous small, rough, red, or tan bumps primarily around hair follicles on the upper arms, legs, buttocks, and sometimes cheeks. KP creates a "goose bumps," "gooseflesh," or "chicken skin" appearance on the skin. A majority of people with KP may be unaware that the skin condition has a designated medical term or that it is treatable. In general, KP is often cosmetically displeasing but medically completely harmless. KP is frequently noted in otherwise healthy people."

      Check out the info here: http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pilaris/article.htm

  45. QUESTION:
    How can I reduce redness in my skin?
    I have something that my friends call "chicken skin." The scientific term is KP or Keratosis Pilaris. Both my mom and dad have it. It's apparently a skin disorder that makes the upper half your arms and legs really bumpy and red. I'm fine with my bumps but I want to reduce the redness caused by it. Another effect from KP is that I get red really easily throughout my whole body when I get fatigued or emotional. I would really like to stop all this reddening. I would really appreciate any remedies or products you recommend. Thank you! :)

    • ANSWER:
      Heal yourself from within either by opting for homeopathy or ayurvedic treatment.
      Homeopathy is cheap and Ayurveda is costly.
      The first and foremost organ that actually causes redness and other skin related problems is none other than "LIVER"

      Drink Milk thistle.
      Drink body cooling agents like Butter Milk, Coconut water, Cucumber juice.
      Avoid alcohol and heat inducing food like beef and pork.
      Do not smoke or do drugs.
      Drink 20-25 glasses of water daily.
      Eat green leafy vegetables more often.
      Eat chicken and fish in real moderation.
      Always take shower with cool water (not cold). Never use hot or warm water.
      Sleep well at night and do YOGA, breath exercises especially.
      Whenever you feel stressed out, just take deep breathes and relax.
      Avoid sun and Avoid doing strenous tasks.
      Sleep in cool rooms and always try to be in cool rooms.

  46. QUESTION:
    how do you get rid of keratosis pilaris???
    i get em on my face, and arms...ughhhhh

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Roostew

      Here is an unusual but effective method to draw toxins from the body/skin.

      INTRODUCTION TO OIL PULLING ("OP")
      REPORTED CURES WITH OIL PULLING:

      Mouth & Gum Disease; Stiff Joints; Allergies; Asthma; Acne, High Blood Sugar; Constipation; Migraines; Bronchitis; Eczema; Heart, Kidney, Lung Diseases; Leukemia; Arthritis; Meningitis; Insomnia; Menopause (hormonal issues); Cancer; AIDS; Chronic Infections; Varicose Veins; High Blood Pressure; Diabetes; Polio; Cracked Heels,.

      Here's are a few paragraphs from Bharat Savur's article on The Hindu Business Online

      ..."When Dr Karsch examined the gargled milk-white oil under a microscope with 600 magnification, he saw live organisms swimming in it. It's poisonous, so never swallow it, he warns. These poisons are bacteria-embryos, which, if not eliminated, cause diseases. Apparently, Dr Karsch cured his own chronic blood disease and 15-year-old arthritis.

      The first sign of improvement is in the teeth-they become firm and white, he says. Other healing indications: fresh, relaxed feeling on waking up, disappearing dark pouches below the eyes, anew appetite and energy, better memory and deep sleep.

      Dr Karsch swears by the mouth oil-wash for anything from organ-disorders, skin-diseases, menstrual problems, paralysis to every ache and it is in the human anatomy. You can gargle even when you have fever, he says, adding, it takes anything from two days to a year to cure a disease.

      And if these claims sound exaggerated, he told a conference of Ukrainian cancer specialists, try out the process yourself.

      Interestingly, Ayurveda advises oil gargling "to purify the taste-buds and the entire system", as explained by Dr Deepak Chopra in Perfect Health.

      According to this life science, the tongue is mapped by organ-locations — that is, each section of the tongue is connected to the kidneys, lungs, spleen, liver, heart, pancreas, small intestines, stomach, colon, and spine.
      Thus, an oil-mouth-massage soothes and stimulates the key meridians where taste meets organ. Simultaneously, as in any skin-massage, the inner skin and lining of the mouth, palate and tongue become warm and supple and the lubrication prevents dryness (the vatic effect).
      In modern dietetics too, dryness is discussed.

      For example, lack of Vitamin A (retinal) causes the outer lining of the eyeball to dry and wrinkle, and affects vision.
      And as any dietician would tell you, all oils contain 960 micrograms of vitamin A per 10 gm (the recommended daily allowance of vitamin A per adult is 600 micrograms). So, it's possible that oil gargling helps in reaching the required retinal to the eyeballs and keeps them elastic and smooth.
      Likewise, the Ayurvedic `purification of taste-buds' also has its equivalent in dietetics as `antioxidants'. Oxidation literally means `the putrefaction of body-tissues'.

      And oil-soluble vitamins, A, C, D, and E are antioxidants that protect and prevent the decaying process and help maintain the integral functioning of cell membranes. That's why, many people are ingesting vitamin E pills to stem `aging' (oxidation). "

      Here is the link to learn more about OP

      http://www.earthclinic.com/Remedies/oil_pulling.html

      testimony on KP

      http://curezone.com/forums/fm.asp?i=1030891#i

      Best of health to you

  47. QUESTION:
    home remedies for Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris and I hate it. If anyone has (or preferably had) then please tell me how on earth you can get rid of this. I don't want anything that's really expensive but I'd really appretiate any and every suggestion you have. PLX HLP!!!
    it's on my arms and thighs not face.

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured, although it can be made less noticeable. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.
      - http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pil…
      - http://www.helpforkp.com/

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre…
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co…

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin.
      Check out this site for some great, inexpensive, homemade exfoliants you can try;
      - http://www.skinway.com/

      The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers (Hot water tends to dry out the skin) and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when low humidity dries out the skin.

      Make sure to be drinking more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc… And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3’s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3’s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 – 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-…

      Hope this helps!

  48. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of kp?
    on arms and face??
    its kerosis pilaris

    • ANSWER:
      angie, I believe you mean "keratosis pilaris" LOTS of info can be found on the web site KeratosisPilaris.org and Mayo Clinic +keratosis pilaris (search)

      KP is a very common genetic follicular disorder manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin. Primarily, it appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms, but can also occur on thighs and buttocks or any body part except palms or soles. An excess of the protein known as Keratin, accumulates within the hair follicles forming numerous tiny rough bumps on the skin. Sometimes, these bumps can become irritated causing the follicles to redden excessively.
      KP is often misdiagnosed and treated as acne. Most types are more evident during teen years.

      The Mayo Clinic advises that no single treatment universally improves keratosis pilaris. Most options, including self-care measures and medicated creams, focus on softening the keratin deposits in the skin. Treatment of keratosis pilaris can include the following medications:

      Topical exfoliants. Medicated creams containing alpha-hydroxy, lactic or salicylic acid or urea moisturize and soften dry skin while helping to loosen and remove dead skin cells. Depending on their strength, certain creams are available over-the-counter and others require a prescription. Your doctor can advise you on the best option for your skin. The acids in these creams may cause redness, stinging or skin irritation, and therefore they aren't recommended for young children.
      Topical corticosteroids. These anti-inflammatory drugs help decrease cell turnover by suppressing the immune system. Low-potency corticosteroid ointments, such as hydrocortisone or derivatives, are usually recommended for sensitive areas such as your face and for treating widespread patches. Doctors usually prescribe corticosteroids for short-term treatment or for temporary relief of symptoms. They aren't used as long-term treatment due to potential side effects from absorbing stronger corticosteroid creams or thinning of the skin. Topical corticosteroids may also cause local burning, itching or irritation.
      Topical retinoids. Derived from vitamin A, retinoids work by promoting cell turnover and preventing the plugging of the hair follicle. Retinoids may be an effective treatment, but they can cause bothersome skin irritations, such as severe dryness, redness and peeling. Tretinoin (Retin-A Micro, Avita) and tazarotene (Tazorac) are examples of topical retinoids.
      Using a medication regularly may improve the appearance of your skin. But if you stop, the condition returns. And even with medical treatment, keratosis pilaris tends to persist for years.
      Best wishes for satisfactory improvement.

  49. QUESTION:
    How to know if I have Celiac disease - without insurance?
    I no longer have insurance which is terrible timing. Please if you know anything about Celiac's PLEASE read!!! Sorry this is so long but any resources or directions other than a simple "symptoms list" would be great!

    I recently had a gallbladder attack and docs thought it was non-functioning and diseased, but it was tested and my gallbladder is actually OVER-active and the doctor saw no alarm for this other than stress (finishing my Master's degree and car broke down in same week). However, this also occurs in people with Celiac's, finding this out after doing my own research. I also have a huge tendency to form calcium kidney stones (2 surgeries and over 10 stones, I'm in my early 20s), and I also have KP, keratosis pilaris, which is a skin disorder thought to be caused by a vitamin A deficiency. I have been eating healthier and it has helped but only somewhat... I can't hardly drink beer anymore, even 2 of them cause pain and I used to be able to drink quite a few! Sometimes after I eat I can feel my gallbladder twitching. My CBC blood tests were normal, liver function good, white blood cell count slightly high, slightly low bilirubin (whatever that is) but overall everything looked good.

    Then why do I feel like crap!!?!? I feel as though I have a malabsorption problem, or could it be a simple food intolerance? Its hard for me to tell if I have a food intolerance because I feel really full after not eating much, and then feeling really hungry a few moments later... because of my gallbladder :( . Are there any "over the counter" or at home tests that can test for Celiac?

    Add'l info: I eliminated most of my kidney stones by cutting down on fast food, soda, and meat. I have always drank a lot of milk, and was actually told to drink more but I'd get sick if I did!

    I have been to 4 doctors all who raise their eyebrows, poke and prod, and then just tell me I'm "just stressed". I am already being treated for anxiety...

    • ANSWER:
      The simple no cost method to figure it out is to go on a gluten free diet for 3 months and see how you feel as the diet goes along. This won't be definitive for celiac disease but if you feel better then you are either allergic to wheat or gluten or intolerant of them.

      An easy way to start a gluten free diet is to eat fresh fruits, vegetables, non processed fresh beef, pork, chicken, fish, egg and cheese. Add in rice and potatoes for starches. Don't try to learn how to read labels and find substitutes for pastas and breads although they are available until the three months are up. Also avoid commercially prepared sauces, gravies and anything with a long list of ingredients that you don't know what they are.

      After the three months are up, figure out if the gluten free diet has helped you or not and if it has, then learn all the ingredients that contain gluten and start finding gluten free substitutes for the things you miss the most.


kp skin disorder

Genetic Skin Disorder

"Health is wealth" this is a very common saying and it is so true. If we do not have health then there is no use in possessing wealth. Knowledge about anything is never a waste and especially about health and the various health diseases. This health information knowledge will let help you in protect yourself as well your friends and neighbors. It is important to know the common types of health diseases and their basic cure. Today, everyday we hear about a new disease attacking the city through epidemics. Millions of people all around the world die because of certain disease even before its medicine is invented or discovered.

Before knowing about the common types of health diseases, we must know about disease. 'Disease' has been defined in many ways but the most commonly accepted one is that "disease is a condition in which the body's normal functioning is affected". It is also said that when a person is affected to any disease then he or she is not just physically disturbed but also mentally and socially.

There are many types of diseases. You can classify them either according to the ways they are spread or according to the cause of their spreading.

Some of the common types of health diseases are:

* Infectious disease: These types of disease are caused due to microorganisms. These organisms can enter into your body via many different ways. Unhygienic food, water, polluted air are some of the ways through which they can enter your body. Infectious diseases can further be divide into the following ways:

o Parasitic disease

o Bacterial disease

o Viral disease

o Fungal disease

* Contagious disease: These diseases are transferred from one person to another through food, water or physical contact. An unhealthy person can pass his or her disease to a healthy person. If a person is coughing and you happen to touch even a drop of the fluid or his hands then you are susceptible to be infected to this disease. That is the reason why doctors suggest relatives and friends to stay away from the patient. One example of contagious disease is swine flu.

* Genetic disease: Genetic diseases are caused due to the faults or disarrangement in our genes. There is no cure for genetic disease, as these diseases are inborn. You can find out whether the child will have any genetic disease when he or she is in the womb.

* Hypo or hyper disease: Some diseases are caused due to the deficiency or over intake of certain foods in the body. If you eat excess of vitamin c then your face will turn pale or if you do not take enough of vitamin A then you might fall prey to night blindness.

* Sexual disease: Some diseases are transferred due to sexual intercourse with multiple partners. Body fluids, which are passed into one another's body during sex, cause these diseases. Through mechanical barriers, you can avoid these diseases. Some are curable while some are not. AIDS is an example of this type of disease.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Can someone give me a rare genetic disorder to write a paper on?
    I need to write a paper on a genetic disorder. It has to be something not in my biology book so that's why I want a rare one. Can anyone list some? Perhaps some interesting ones? Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      MY TOP 3 FAVORITE GENETIC DISORDERS I LEARNED ABOUT IN MED SCHOOL:
      1. Alkaptonuria- when your pee turns black when exposed to air
      2. Huntington's- when people have abnormal jerky body movements
      3. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum- when a 20 year old person has the lose skin of an 80 year old

      Good Luck!

  2. QUESTION:
    What are these white patches on my arm?
    I have eczema, which is a genetic skin disorder that I got from my dad and have since I was born. I usually break out on my arms. But never like this. It usually just itchs, gets red, then peels. Normal reaction. I don't want to go to the dermatologist because I'm broke. Should I use elidel on it? Which is the cream that "treats" it. Does anyone else have eczema? If so, have you ever gotten these?

    • ANSWER:
      if it is a patch of skin that is a little dry and has less pigmentation that the rest of your skin it could be caused by a bacteria that grows on your skin. My boyfriend gets it and it has to be treated with a special soap and a special cream. It sort of looks like white spots, but he says it doesn't itch, not sure if that is what you have, but if so...you can't treat it over the counter and the soap and meds are pretty expensive. one tube of the cream costs him and that is after insurance pays their portion.

  3. QUESTION:
    how to start a report about a genetic disorder?
    my genetic disorder im doing my studies on is Neurofibromatosis 1 and i don't really know how to start my report...
    thanks if you help me(:

    • ANSWER:
      Start by describing the disorder. NF1 is a disorder characterized by the growth of noncancerous tumors called neurofibromas. They usually form on or just underneath the skin, as well as in the brain and peripheral nervous system. But they can also develop in other parts of the body, such as the eye.

      The severity and physical signs of Neurofibromatosis 1 can vary widely from patient to patient. Most people with this disorder have very distinctive spots the color of coffee with milk, as well as freckles. The number of spots and freckles increases with age. People with Neurofibromatosis 1also have many noncancerous tumors called neurofibromas throughout their body. Rarely, these tumors can progress into a malignant tumor.

      Others may also have high blood pressure, bone defects, scoliosis (curvature of the spine), learning disabilities, benign growths on the iris of the eye, and optic gliomas (benign tumors on the optic nerve that connects the eye to the brain).

      Then explain the genetic aspect. The disorder is caused by a mutation in a gene on chromosome 17. The gene codes for a protein called neurofibromin.

      Next explain how it is diagnosed. Most of the time, the Neurofibromatosis 1 is diagnosed by its physical symptoms tumors or spots, or by a family history of the disorder. The spots usually appear within the first two years of a child's life.

  4. QUESTION:
    Where can I find photos of genetic skin disorders in infants on the internet?
    Skin birth defect appears as pinkish with rough surface like a wort but much much larger. Covers large part of hand. MD says there is no cure.

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds as if you're dealing with a hemangioma. You might want to search that. In addition, Susan Bayliss just wrote an excellent pediatric dermatology book; perhaps you can find that online. It would be best to have a pediatric dermatologist evaluate the mark for you, as they are the experts in this field. The expert in pediatric vascular lesions, in the U.S., is Elaine Siegfried, MD., if that is the type of lesion that it turns out to be.

  5. QUESTION:
    What is the name of the condition where skin grows in your pores?
    I went to the dermatologist a couple months ago to see what these bumps/red dots on my arms were. He told me the name of what the condition was (though I can't remember it) and said its harmless genetic disorder where your skin grows in your pores. Does anyone know what the name of this is? Oh, and if it ever goes away?

    • ANSWER:
      http://www.ebody-specialist.com/skin_care/glossary_of_skin_conditions.html

  6. QUESTION:
    Can someone show me how many cancer related deaths can be 100% attributed to indoor tanning?
    I see so many positive results from indoor tanning, from personally being partial interest in a salon, that the negative press that we receive is unreal. Alcohol, tobacco, lifestyles-all still legal, and possibly deadly, but yet no one keeps harping on them. We know it, accept it, and make our own personal choices. I personally tan doctors, nurses, politicians, people referred by these same doctors to treat skin disorders, depression, etc etc, it just comes down to the same old game: money.
    Dermatologists can't state the benefits, because their interests would be somewhat compromised if their clients didn't need to visit them as often. Please someone give me the number of cancer related deaths directly attributed to indoor tanning, so that we may be able to compare it to, say, getting trampled by a herd of kittens, or dying from an exploding bowling factory whose balls knocked you down from the sky. FACTS-not guesses.

    • ANSWER:
      No cancer can be 100% attributed to one thing. We live in a World full of carcinogens. Anyone of them can cause cancer.

      Indoor tanning, tobacco use, abestos and, many other things have proven to be potent mutagens but, this does not gurantee cancer. However, these carcinogens increase the risk of cancer because every cancer is a specific set of genetic mutations. If you get the right combination, you get cancer. Therefore, to lower your risk, lower your exposure to carcinogens.

      You make a good point. People should educate themselves about the risks in anything and, live to their comfort level of risk. Not just with cancer but in all aspects in life (the way you drive, financial opportunities, career opportunities, etc.).

  7. QUESTION:
    What are these red dry skin patches on my sons cheecks?
    My son is 1 year 8 months old.

    He is very healthy and active.

    He has a small/medium patch on each side of his cheecks that are circluar, red, and hardish dry skin. It looks as if he is blushing, however, it is dry skin.

    Does anyone know what this could be? The cold? Hormones? Dry skin.

    Any remedies?

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      With that age group and that description, you are most likely dealing with atopic eczema. Why not point it out to your pediatrician the next office visit. If that's what it is, it's a genetic disorder, and he may have to deal with it on and off for quite a long time. In addition, it might be a marker of asthma or hay fever in him or the family tree.

  8. QUESTION:
    How do genes in genetic diseases become triggered?
    There are some genetic diseases that are apparent once a baby is born, particularly those affecting the metabolic system. But why do some disease like cancer or hypertension only develop much later in life? What causes this dormancy?

    • ANSWER:
      What is a genetic disease?

      A genetic disease or disorder is any disease that is caused by an abnormality in an individual's genome. The abnormality can range from minuscule to major -- from a discrete mutation in a single base in the DNA of a single gene to a gross chromosome abnormality involving the addition or subtraction of an entire chromosome or set of chromosomes.

      What are the different types of inheritance?

      There are a number of different types of genetic inheritance, including the following four modes:

      1. Single gene inheritance -- Also called Mendelian or monogenic inheritance. This type of inheritance is caused by changes or mutations that occur in the DNA sequence of a single gene. There are more than 6,000 known single-gene disorders, which occur in about 1 out of every 200 births.

      Some examples of single gene inheritance are cystic fibrosis, sickle cell anemia, Marfan syndrome, Huntington's disease, and hemochromatosis. Single-gene disorders are inherited in recognizable patterns: autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and X-linked.
      2. Multifactorial inheritance -- Also called complex or polygenic inheritance. This type of inheritance is caused by a combination of environmental factors and mutations in multiple genes. For example, different genes that influence breast cancer susceptibility have been found on chromosomes 6, 11, 13, 14, 15, 17, and 22. Some common chronic diseases are multifactorial disorders.

      Examples of multifactorial inheritance include heart disease, high blood pressure, Alzheimer's disease, arthritis, diabetes, cancer, and obesity. Multifactorial inheritance also is associated with heritable traits such as fingerprint patterns, height, eye color, and skin color.
      3. Chromosome abnormalities -- Chromosomes, distinct structures made up of DNA and protein, are located in the nucleus of each cell. Because chromosomes are the carriers of the genetic material, abnormalities in chromosome number or structure can result in disease.

      For example, Down syndrome or trisomy 21 is a common disorder that occurs when a person has three copies of chromosome 21. There are many other chromosome abnormalities including Turner syndrome (45,X), Klinefelter syndrome (47, XXY), the cat cry syndrome (46, XX or XY, 5p-), and so on.
      4. Mitochondrial inheritance -- This type of genetic disorder is caused by mutations in the nonchromosomal DNA of mitochondria. Mitochondria are small round or rod-like organelles that are involved in cellular respiration and found in the cytoplasm of plant and animal cells. Each mitochondrion may contain 5 to 10 circular pieces of DNA.

      Examples of mitochondrial disease include an eye disease called Leber's hereditary optic atrophy; a type of epilepsy called MERRF which stands for Myoclonus Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers; and a form of dementia called MELAS for Mitochondrial Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-like episodes.

  9. QUESTION:
    What disease/disorder causes a person to have multiple cysts on there body?
    The cysts grow in different areas. Is there a genetic disease that would cause this?

    • ANSWER:
      The main one that comes to my mind is polycystic kidney disease. Although it's named for kidney cysts, it also causes cysts in the liver, pancreas, and even sometimes testes. Polycystic disease is actually a group of genetic diseases, and the way it shows up in a person depends both on which type of PKD the person has and on environment factors.

      If by different areas you meant different areas on the skin, then some infections like tapeworm will do that, and cystic acne (which is partly genetic) will do that.

  10. QUESTION:
    How do you make the skin on your arms smoother?
    My upper arms seem normal, but they feel as though little itte-bitte pimples are covering the surface. How do you clear the skin and make it smoother?

    • ANSWER:
      i think i know what you're talking about. i have the same thing. it's little bumps, and they don't hurt, but they're sometimes dry and almost always annoying.

      Keratosis pilaris (KP, also follicular keratosis) is a very common genetic follicular condition that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin, hence referred to as chicken skin. It most often appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms (though the lower arms can also be affected), and can also occur on the thighs and tops of legs, flanks, buttocks, or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet). Less commonly, lesions appear on the face, which may be mistaken for acne.

      Classification
      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40% of the adult population and approximately 50%-80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men.

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faciei (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.

      Symptoms and signs
      Keratosis pilaris occurs when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore. This causes the formation of hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). The painless bumps are skin-colored, although they can become red and inflamed at times. Usually many plugs form in an area, causing patches of rough, bumpy skin. This gives the skin a sandpaper or goose flesh appearance. This may be more severe in the winter or times of low humidity, which causes the skin to become dry. It will eventually resolve on its own.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin's "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. The hair, then, grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated. The hair can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though removal can lead to scarring.

      Keratosis pilaris may be hereditary. It is present in babies and continues into adulthood, but is uncommon in elderly people. It is most obvious during the teenage years. KP is prevalent in those who are overweight, or have atopic dermatitis, ichthyosis, or descend from Celtic backgrounds. Keratosis pilaris occurs in otherwise healthy people.

      Treatment
      There is no cure for Keratosis pilaris, but treatment is available. One option is to use a loofa to remove the dead, dry skin. Another option is to use a dermotologist-prescribed cream or lotion that should be applied daily. The best lotions for this condition would have urea, 15% alphahydroxy acids, or Retin A in them. Over-the-counter lotions work as well and should be applied after showering, as well as several times a day. The lotions are often soothing and can help improve the appearance of the skin. Dermotologists also recommend mild peeling agents, or alpha hydroxy acids, that may open up the plugged follicles. Antibiotics may also help in some cases where the bumps are red and badly inflamed. To temporarily reduce redness but not roughness, pulse dye laser treatment or intense pulsed light (IPL) can be done.

      Although it may clear up with treatment, reccurance of KP is very likely. Therefore, treatment should be continued regularly. It may take several months to years for the condition to completely clear up.

      A dermotologist or physician can usually diagnose a patient for Keratosis pilaris by visually inspecting the patient's skin.

  11. QUESTION:
    What is the cause of the dark and light patches on my kids skin?
    My son has a few patches of whiter skin on his torso. My daughter has a few patches of darker skin on her torso and arms. Is this a coincidence, or is it some kind of related genetic pigment disorder? In both children, the patches were not present at birth, but showed up several months later. The texture of the discolored patches on both skin is fine, it's just the skin color that's different.

    • ANSWER:
      They are most likely caused by a fungal condition called tinea versicolor, or pityriasis versicolor. Patches are generally on the chest, back, upper arms, and occasionally on the neck and face.

      The patches can range from white to pink and from tan to dark depending on the babies skin tone. They will generally become more noticeable if the baby is hot/sweaty or their skin gets tanned.

      Patches may look odd, but they're probably nothing to worry about. It poses no health problems for your baby. It tends to flare up in the summer and prefers oily skin.

      If the spots are small and mild and your baby doesn't seem uncomfortable - ask the doctor whether it's okay to treat them with an over-the-counter dandruff shampoo that contains selenium sulfide (Selsun Blue).

      Put a thin layer of the shampoo on all the affected spots and spread it a couple of inches beyond their borders. Leave the shampoo on for ten to 15 minutes before rinsing it off. If you do this every night for a few weeks, the fungus should disappear. It can take a few months for the skin color to return to normal, though.

      If this home remedy doesn't work, take them to the doctor.

  12. QUESTION:
    I have tiny skin colored bumps on my face and arms?
    I have tiny little skin colored bumps on my cheeks and upper arms. I'm in 7th grade and its really embarrassing when people point them out. I've had them for about two years now and they're not acne. When I scratch them just white hard stuff comes out, but its not puss. I clean my face regurally but they don't go away. Do I need to moisturizer? I don't even know what they're called. Please help. I'm tired of these stupid things. 10 points to the best answer.

    • ANSWER:
      HELP HAS ARRIVED!!!!!!!!!!!

      I had this for years, my mom told me it was eczema. Most people say eczema is a name used for tons of different dry skin conditions that doctors can’t diagnose. I used eczema creams all through Jr. High and High School, all that did was make me feel greasy and uncomfortable with zero results.

      You probably have what is called Keratosis pilaris, Keratosis pilaris is a common, genetic follicular condition that causes the appearance of rough bumps on the skin. It most often appears on arms, thighs, hands, legs, sides, buttocks, or face (which on the face are often mistaken for acne). Worldwide, Keratosis pilaris affects an estimated 40% of the adult population and approximately 50%-80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. There are several different types of Keratosis Pilaris, including Keratosis Pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), Keratosis Pilaris Alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), Keratosis Pilaris Rubra Faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.

      Keratosis Pilaris is caused by Hyperkeratosis: when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin, which is cream colored, surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore, resulting in rough clogged pores. The openings are often closed with a white plug of encrusted sebum, the oily, waxy substance produced by glands in the skin to keep it from drying out. Hyperkeratosis is most likely caused by your body having a vitamin A & E deficiency.

      I started taking vitamin A & E pills at dinner every night and 90% of my white bumps on my cheeks, arms, and legs cleared up. My boss also had white bumps on her arms and tried taking the vitamins too, it worked nicely for her. You could try taking the vitamins, but if you stop taking them, your body will go back to being deficient in them unless you start eating more foods naturally containing vitamins A & E:

      Vitamin A: Liver, Red Pepper, Cayenne, Sweet Potatoes, Carrots, Dried Apricots, Cantaloupe, Spinach, Squash, Dried Herbs, Papaya, Mangoes, Green Peas, Tomatoes.

      Vitamin E: Sunflower Seeds, Almonds, Pine Nuts, Peanuts, Dried Apricots, Pickled Green Olives, Cooked Taro Root, Wheat Germ/Flax Seed/Corn/Canola/Soybean Oils, Hazelnuts, Broccoli.

      Both A & E: Paprika, Red Chili Peppers or Powder, Spinach

      If the bumps (clogged dry rough crusty pores) have a red or pink ring around them, it could just be that they are inflamed, or it could be some sort of skin infection, such as yeast, which lives on the skin naturally but could become an infection, or bacterial. If they are a little pink or red I would try an antibacterial soap.

      Antibacterial soaps are full of chemicals and poisons, some are so harmful they cause muscle weakness, such as in the heart and tongue, and should not be in stores. A natural alternative is a soap or lotion containing Tea Tree oil. Tea Tree oil has natural antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and antiseptic qualities. It also has beneficial cosmetic properties. Tea Tree oil has a faint medicinal scent to it like eucalyptus, which is why I would suggest a soap instead of a lotion. Products containing Tea Tree oil can be found in abundance at health and natural and heath stores, but is also available in main stream store such as Wal-Mart for as low as around .

      So in short, vitamin A, vitamin E, soap, and you should be good (: I wish you luck

  13. QUESTION:
    How common is it to get the skin disease vitiligo?
    I have a very distant cousin who has it, and I'm wondering if it's genetic. Also, is this a rare disease, or is it actually very common and just not talked about? I'm African American and proud of my color, so naturally, I don't want to lose it. Not to mention the cost of treatments, and the possible need to bleach my skin to even everything out. I know it's silly, but I'm nervous about it. Does anyone have any information?

    • ANSWER:
      1% of the world's population gets this disease so I think it is rarer than other auto immune diseases.but here is a link that may help you understand.
      http://www.ask.com/bar?q=vitiligo+skin+disorder&page=1&qsrc=178&ab=2&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.aocd.org%2Fskin%2Fdermatologic_diseases%2Fvitiligo.html

  14. QUESTION:
    What do you call this thick skin disease?
    Like, it is a genetic disorder...

    They are born with extra skin. They look like aliens when they are born. When they grow up, their skin is so thick they have barely any hair.

    • ANSWER:

  15. QUESTION:
    What health testing do you do on your dogs before you breed?
    What genetic health testing do you do? What is it called and what is it testing for? What breed do you have and why do you test for it?

    Thanks!
    Yes I know of them, just interested to know what breeders test for and what breeds and why.
    Do you do the tests on just the dogs you breed or the pups before also before they go to new homes? (not the OFA ones because I know they have to be 2 years old at least)

    • ANSWER:
      APBT and Rottweiler Health Testing:

      I do not breed but I do have some knowledge to assist me when buying outside of a rescue. It also helps me keep breeders reputable. The following health testing is not specific to just APBT's or Rottweilers as most diseases are not exclusive to just one specific breed.

      True health-testing is in depth and seeks to identify carriers of crippling and increasingly common genetic diseases that are affecting our purebred dogs. Health-testing is a tool to help breed away diseases from the dogs that are carrying them.

      The Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) offers tests for hips, elbows, patellas (kneecaps), cardiac, thyroid, eyes, hearing, shoulders, some skin diseases, and a hip disorder commonly affecting small dogs. They also offer DNA testing. PennHip is another organization that offers hip testing, utilizing different methods than the OFA.

      Hips are probably the top concern then cardiac, elbows and patellas are also important to a working breed and the remaining as above noted above.

      The working drive and pain threshold is so high in this breed that afflicted dogs may work their hearts out without ever giving any indicator that they are unsound.

      The APBT ranks 27th out of 142 breeds for hip dysplasia. 22.2% of our breed is dysplastic, versus only 4.8% excellent. That number is up more than 7% since 1990. (The AmStaff's percentage of hip dysplasia dropped 9% during that same period.)

      The APBT ranks 15th out of 82 breeds for elbow dysplasia. 14% of tested dogs are dysplastic.

      Rottweiler Health Testing: (Same as above with the following)

      A reputable breeder will have the hips and elbows of all breeding stock x-rayed and read by a recognized specialist. They will have paperwork to prove it.

      They will also have certificates that their breeding animals do not have Entropian or Ectropian and that they have full and complete dentition with a scissor bite.

      As with any species, hereditary conditions do occur in some lines. Potential purchasers should question breeders about any history of hereditary disease in their lines.

      If over fed and /or under exercised Rottweiler’s are one of the breeds most prone to obesity. Some of the consequences of obesity can be very serious: arthritis, breathing difficulties, diabetes, heart failure, reproductive problems, skin disease, reduce resistance to disease and overheating caused by the thick jacket of fat under the skin

      Ego, reputable breeders do health testing to “Better the Breed”!

  16. QUESTION:
    What are some of the weirdest genetic disorders?
    I'm doing a project for school and I wanted to know if you know any really wierd and rare genetic disorders

    • ANSWER:
      I love reading about this stuff. My favorite I came across so far is the genetic disorder of blue skinned people: http://abcnews.go.com/Health/blue-skinned-people-kentucky-reveal-todays-genetic-lesson/story?id=15759819

  17. QUESTION:
    Where are immune definciency disorders located in the body?
    Like where is the chromosome (or maybe gene) generally located in the body for immune definciency disorders?

    • ANSWER:
      In your blood. Specifically your white blood cells, the ones that are called lymphocytes.

      More information:
      Congenital immunodeficiency disorders
      Congenital immunodeficiency is present at the time of birth, and is the result of genetic defects. These immunodeficiency disorders are also called primary immunodeficiencies. Even though more than 70 different types of congenital immunodeficiency disorders have been identified, they rarely occur. About 50,000 new cases are diagnosed in the United States each year. Congenital immunodeficiencies may occur as a result of defects in B lymphocytes, T lymphocytes, or both. They also can occur in the innate immune system.
      HUMORAL IMMUNITY DISORDERS. Bruton's agammaglobulinemia, also known as X-linked agammaglobulinemia, a congenital immunodeficiency disorder. The defect results in a decrease or absence of B lymphocytes, and therefore a decreased ability to make antibodies. People with this disorder are particularly susceptible to infections of the throat, skin, middle ear, and lungs. It is seen only in males because it is caused by a genetic defect on the X chromosome. Since males have only one X chromosome, they always have the defect if the gene is present. Females can have the defective gene, but since they have two X chromosomes, there will be a normal gene on the other X chromosome to counter it. Women may pass the defective gene on to their male children.
      B LYMPHOCYTE DEFICIENCIES. If there is an abnormality in either the development or function of B lymphocytes, the ability to make antibodies will be impaired. This allows the body to be susceptible to recurrent infections.
      A type of B lymphocyte deficiency involves a group of disorders called selective immunoglobulin deficiency syndomes. Immunoglobulin is another name for antibody, and there are five different types of immunoglobulins (called IgA, IgG, IgM, IgD, and IgE). The most common type of immunoglobulin deficiency is selective IgA deficiency, occurring in about one in every 500 white persons. The amounts of the other antibody types are normal. Some patients with selective IgA deficiency experience no symptoms, while others have occasional lung infections and diarrhea. In another immunoglobulin disorder, IgG and IgA antibodies are deficient and there is increased IgM. People with this disorder tend to get severe bacterial infections.
      Common variable immunodeficiency is another type of B lymphocyte deficiency. In this disorder, the production of one or more of the immunoglobulin types is decreased and the antibody response to infections is impaired. It generally develops around the age of 10-20. The symptoms vary among affected people. Most people with this disorder have frequent infections, and some also will experience anemia and rheumatoid arthritis. Many people with common variable immunodeficiency develop cancer.
      T LYMPHOCYTE DEFICIENCIES. Severe defects in the ability of T lymphocytes to mature results in impaired immune responses to infections with viruses, fungi, and certain types of bacteria. These infections are usually severe and can be fatal.
      DiGeorge syndrome is a T lymphocyte deficiency that starts during fetal development and is the result of a deletion in a particular chromosome. Children with DiGeorge syndrome either do not have a thymus or have an underdeveloped thymus. Since the thymus is a major organ that directs the production of T-lymphocytes, these patients have very low numbers of T-lymphocytes. They are susceptible to recurrent infections, and usually have physical abnormalities as well. For example, they may have low-set ears, a small receding jawbone, and wide-spaced eyes. People with DiGeorge syndrome are particularly susceptible to viral and fungal infections.
      In some cases, no treatment is required for DiGeorge syndrome because T lymphocyte production improves. Either an underdeveloped thymus begins to produce more T lymphocytes or organ sites other than the thymus compensate by producing more T lymphocytes.
      COMBINED IMMUNODEFICIENCIES. Some types of immunodeficiency disorders affect both B lymphocytes and T lymphocytes. For example, severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) is caused by the defective development or function of these two types of lymphocytes. It results in impaired humoral and cellular immune responses. SCID usually is recognized during the first year of life. It tends to cause a fungal infection of the mouth (thrush), diarrhea, failure to thrive, and serious infections. If not treated with a bone marrow transplant, a person with SCID will generally die from infections before age two. In 2003, a report showed a new form of severe SCID with severe mutation of T receptor cells.
      DISORDERS OF INNATE IMMUNITY. Disorders of innate immunity affect phagocytes or the complement system. These disorders also result in recurrent infections.

  18. QUESTION:
    Could an african american look like a white guy?
    My cousin has a white mom and african dad (blood related) and he has olive skin color and his hair has bigger curls (Not tight small ones that most blacks have). What type of skin disease, genetic disorder, etc. would this be called?

    • ANSWER:
      It's not a disease or a disorder, it's just called genetics. Not kidding, it's more common than you think. I saw twins once, one dark like her father and the other light like his mother.

  19. QUESTION:
    What happens when an hermaphrodite has a son of himself?
    I was in science class and talking about genetic manipulation and my teacher said that clones happen because they have the same genetic material, so my thoughts went to something like this:
    'clones need to have identical genetic information to occur, if a hermaphrodite had a son of himself the genetic material would be the same because the chromosome X and Y have the same information, (due to belonging to the same person) therefore his son would be a clone of him'.
    Am I right? I didn't ask my teacher because i has afraid of her lowering my note.... Do you share the same idea or not really?

    • ANSWER:
      "Hermaphrodite" is not a term that is used anymore for humans.

      However, there are several disorders of sexual development that lead to ambiguous genitalia.
      Some of these are mutations in certain sexual development genes, which cause genetic males to develop genitalia that looks more like a female (there is a whole spectrum).

      In the RARE case where it appears both are present, this is usually a result of a chimera. That means that 2 separate zygotes (fertilized eggs) fuse before they start to develop, so the resulting embryo has 2 different distinct cell lines. This is different form identical twins, where 1 embryo splits in 2 and develops separately. This is like 2 "fraternal" twins that fuse before embryonic development goes very far. If the 2 cell lines are a male and a female, it's possible for both types of genitalia to develop (there are also other findings, like patches of different colored skin from the different cell lines). Even in these cases, it is normal that the FULL reproductive organs may not be present for both sexes.

      They cannot reproduce with themselves.

  20. QUESTION:
    are there any families in the united states whose children have noonan syndrome?
    noonan syndrome is a genetic disorder which has in the last 10 years just started being diagnosed...there are many families in the UK and abroad w/this disorder but haven't been able to find many in the US

    • ANSWER:
      People with Noonan syndrome have distinctive facial features such as a deep groove in the area between the nose and mouth (philtrum), widely spaced eyes that are usually pale blue or blue-green in color, and low-set ears that are rotated backward. Affected individuals may have a high arch in the roof of the mouth (high-arched palate), poor alignment of the teeth, and a small lower jaw (micrognathia). Many children with Noonan syndrome have a short neck and both children and adults may have excess neck skin (also called webbing) and a low hairline at the back of the neck.

  21. QUESTION:
    Which genetic disorders can be treated in their early stages?
    It's a question from my biology assignment and I can't find any bloody sites with the proper answers.

    • ANSWER:
      high blood pressure , breast cancer , also other cancers such as skin , hart problems can be treated early monitored regular ecg mi, thyroid glands blood tests treated with statins and diet . Knowing you have sickness early is half the battle your odds in beating it are better lots of sickness comes from diet no active lifestyle others are passed down but knowing is great you can prepare and be on lookout for syptoms life sucks if adopted like me as i have no history medically but im healthy touch wood . Enjoy your summer we got a hot one coming , excuse spelling grammar on tube ppl knocking everyone arghhh city life beem me up et lol have a good one mate

  22. QUESTION:
    What's the genetic disorder called where a person grows too much skin?
    Where they grow the amount of skin in 1 day that normal people grow in 2 weeks?
    calc kid, you are completely wrong, it was harlequin type ichthyosis

    • ANSWER:
      hmmm i've never heard of it. interesting though...

  23. QUESTION:
    What's the genetic disorder called where a person grows too much skin?
    Where they grow the amount of skin in 1 day that normal people grow in 2 weeks?
    Nope, boogeywo

    • ANSWER:
      Harlequin ichthyosis :-). Supposed to be very painful...

  24. QUESTION:
    How do I reduce the effects of scars from eczema?
    I'm 19 years old and have had eczema since I was roughly 15. It started just on my stomach cause of the belts I wore, and then on my arms, but that was nothing until this past year. I have it bad on my arms, stomach, half my back, upper thighs, chest, and neck. And I am also half hispanic, so I scar very easily. They aren't raised scars or anything, but just dark marks. And they stay, for years. Lotions for dry skin don't work, I know that. But even if I do control my eczema, the scars from it will last for a long time. Can anyone relate and possibly know any way to help me with my scars, or eczema? I'm running out of options! I feel like a leper here!

    • ANSWER:
      HI Amber

      Here are some ideas to start the healing process.

      Cause
      Eczema is often called Dermatitis, and may be a symptom of an omega-3 fatty acid deficiency. Eczema can be due to allergies, allergies secondary to digestive disorders such as hydrochloric acid deficiency, rashes secondary to immune diseases, genetic metabolic disorders, and/or nutritional deficiencies, especially of niacin (vitamin B3) and B6, as well as other B vitamins.

      To minimize your risk of developing eczema, avoid irritating substances, wear natural nonirritating materials, use soothing ointments, and check to see if dietary, nutritional, and/or and allergy-causing factors need to be considered.

      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      Natural Cures

      Aromatherapy: Bergamot, chamomile, lavender, melissa, neroli, eucalyptus, geranium, and/or juniper can help speed healing and relief of symptoms when applied topically to the affected areas.

      Diet: Eat an organic, whole foods diet and avoid potentially allergy-causing foods, especially sugar, wheat, milk, and dairy products, including yogurt. Also avoid excess consumption of fruit, especially citrus and sour, as these foods may aggravate symptoms.

      Flower Essences: Rescue Remedy® for accompanying stress, and Rescue Remedy Cream® on the affected areas.

      Herbs: Herbal remedies such as cleavers, nettle, yellowdock, or red clover tea or tinctures may be very effective. They are often combined with relaxing herbs such as chamomile, linden flowers, or skullcap. One combination would be equal parts of cleavers, nettle, and chamomile drunk as an infusion three times a day. A stronger mixture combines the tinctures of figwort, burdock, and cleavers in equal parts; take one teaspoon of this mixture three times a day.

      To alleviate itching, bathe affected areas of your body with lukewarm or cold chickweed infusion. For cracked, dry, or painful skin, use a salve made from calendula flowers and St. John`s wort leaves.

      Goldenseal applied externally may also be helpful.

      Homeopathy:Dulcamara, Rhus tox., Sulfur, Arsen alb., and Graphites, taken alone or in combination with each other can help speed healing. Petroleum and Psorinum are also effective homeopathic remedies, but must be taken alone.

      Hydrotherapy: Hydrotherapy is the application of water, ice, steam and hot and cold temperatures to maintain and restore health. Treatments include full body immersion, steam baths, saunas, sitz baths, colonic irrigation and the application of hot and/or cold compresses. Hydrotherapy is effective for treating a wide range of conditions and can easily be used in the home as part of a self-care program. Many Naturopathic Physicians, Physical Therapists and Day Spas use Hydrotherapy as part of treatment. I suggest several at-home hydrotherapy treatments.

      Juice Therapy: The following juice combinations can help speed healing: black currant and red grapes; carrot, beet, spinach, cucumber, and parsley; and wheat grass juice.

      Nutritional Supplementation: Vitamin A and GLA (gamma-linolenic acid), an omega-6 essential fatty acid found in high quantities in evening primrose oil, have both been shown to improve the symptoms of eczema. Vitamin E. Other useful supplements for preventing and reversing eczema include vitamin B complex, vitamin B6, vitamin E, magnesium, and zinc.

      Topical Treatment: Apply evening primrose oil directly to cracked and sore areas of the skin. A topical paste made from ginkgo and licorice root extract has also been shown to improve eczema symptoms.

      Alternative Professional Care
      If your symptoms persist despite the above measures, seek the help of a qualified health professional. The following professional care therapies have all been shown to be useful for treating and relieving the symptoms of eczema: Acupuncture, Ayurveda, Biofeedback Training, Bodywork (Acupressure, Shiatsu, Reflexology), Detoxification Therapy, Energy Medicine (Light Beam Generator, Ondamed, Photon Stimulator), Environmental Medicine, Hypnotherapy, Magnetic Field Therapy (North Pole Magnetic Energy Application), Mind/Body Medicine, Naturopathic Medicine, Orthomolecular Medicine, Osteopathy, and Oxygen Therapy

      Best of health to you

  25. QUESTION:
    What are the main health problems and need to watch out for in siberian huskies?
    What are common health problems and how can I prevent them in siberian huskies? Is skin problems one of them?

    and is it really necessary for my 4 month old siberian huskies to get shots? They have already gotten 1 or 2 shots after they were born when they were with the breeder...

    • ANSWER:
      You really need to get the pup wormed and it needs at least two more shots to protect it from the deadly virus's that will kill your pup within hours.

      No breed of dog is totally free from inheritable genetic defects, but few breeds have had the good fortune of the Siberian Husky. Not only is the individual dog generally healthy and of good temperament, but throughout the years there has not been an abundance of genetic issues. Additionally, the national breed club, the Siberian Husky Club of America, Inc. (SHCA), has maintained a watchful eye for potential genetic problems and has taken positive action in those instances when the general health and well-being of the breed has been challenged. two areas of greatest concern are canine hip dysplasia and inheritable eye disease.

      Hip dysplasia is an abnormality of the hip joint in which the head of the thighbone (femur) does not fit properly into its pelvic joint socket (acetabulum). This condition, while not present at birth, develops during the first two years of the dog's life. It is often progressive, causing inflammation, pain, and arthritis of the affected hip. It is aggravated by strenuous exercise and, sitting up, lying down, or climbing stairs.

      Genetic Defects of the Eye

      Although there are many possible eye defects, only three are of current concern in the Siberian. These are hereditary or juvenile cataracts, corneal dystrophy, and progressive retinal atrophy. Each disorder is present in a different portion of the eye, and will occur in any eye color. Eye defects in the Siberian Husky are serious and should not be understated or overlooked.

      Hereditary or juvenile cataracts are manifested by opacity in the lens of a young dog as early as 3 months of age. These cataracts are different from the non-hereditary cataracts affecting aged or senior dogs. The function of the lens of the eye is to focus the rays of light so that they form an image on the retina.
      corneal dystrophy
      Corneal dystrophy affects the cornea or the outer transparent portion of the eyeball. In most cases, Siberian Huskies with this disorder have an abnormal collection of lipids in the clear cornea of the eye which results in a hazy or crystalline opacity.

      progressive retinal atrophy
      Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) affects the retina, the light-sensitive inner lining of the posterior part of the eyeball. The retina contains two types of specialized cells called rods and cones. The rods are necessary for sight in dim light or night light, and the cones are utilized in in bright light vision. The Siberian Husky has a unique type of PRA that is only found in Siberians and man.
      The disease in males can be devastating with loss of vision as early as 5 months of age.
      Since eye abnormalities can appear over a period of several years, annual eye examinations are imperative. It is possible for a dog to have a normal eye examination at one year of age and be severely afflicted with an eye disorder one or two years later.

  26. QUESTION:
    Did Michael Jackson bleach his skin or did he have a type of disease?
    I don't know if MJ bleached his skin or if he has a disease 'cause he lies so much to the people and the news. So please help me. If you actually know, please answer. If you don't know, don't answer. OK?

    • ANSWER:
      Well I'm not sure if this directly answers your question, but I have no doubt that he did, in fact, bleach his skin. There is no disease that causes the skin all over the body to progressively lighten over time. There is a genetic disorder in which some skin cells do not produce melanin and presents itself as patches of very white skin in various parts of the body--it's called Vitiligo--and some fans believe his bleaching was to mask the appearance of this condition. I call BS on this, because even if he had this condition, it did not appear on any of the parts of the skin we saw of him from his childhood as part of the Jackson 5 (that is, his face, neck, and arms), so it seems like that excuse is weak. What would be the reason to go to such lengths to bleach skin to mask the appearance of vitiligo if it were only on a part of the body hidden by clothing? And given his addiction to plastic surgery, I wouldn't be the least bit surprised if he did it only to look less African American.

  27. QUESTION:
    Which acne/skin products do you think work best?
    I have oily skin and I just wanted to know which one would you think would work best?

    Choices are:

    Proactiv
    Murad
    Clean and Clear
    Clearasil
    Neutragena
    Other (please tell me)

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      The acne kit from Skin Actives Scientific may not be enough for a male with a huge acne problem, but it is likely to be perfect for you. I would also try the salicylic wash.

      This is from a guide I have written on acne, I hope it helps. I think the more you know about how your skin works, the better you will be able to control it and keep it healthy.

      Good luck and best wishes

      Hannah

      "Acne is a very common skin disorder in the USA. It affects about 85% of adolescents, and comedos, an early stage of acne that may or may not develop into acne, affects practically all teenagers. Getting older is not a guarantee either: the number of older people suffering from acne is increasing, affecting 8% of 25-34 year-olds and 3% of 35-44 year-old. This means that acne is normal, at least at some stage in our lives, but this does not make it any less painful and it is important to know that acne can be controlled and how.

      What is acne?
      Acne is a disease of the follicles, the pore where the hair is formed and sebum is secreted. Keratinocytes, which would normally be "shed", accumulate and plug the pore with the sebum acting as glue, and the result is a a microcomedo. Continued accumulation of materials will distend the pore, forming an open comedo, a blackhead. Oxidized lipids and melanin give blackheads their color.

      Inside the comedo there is little oxygen and lots of sebum, an ideal medium for the acne bacterium, Propionibacterium acnes, to grow and multiply. The activity of the bacteria leads in turn to inflammation and irritation.

      Cysts can develop when the contents of the sick follicle (keratinocytes, sebum and bacteria) spills into the surrounding dermis, producing a pustule (superficial), or, deeper papule or nodule.

      What can we do?
      First, remember that acne is not a trivial matter. Besides the psychological suffering, acne can leave scars, keloids andchanges in pigmentation, so it is important to control acne before it leads to permanent changes in the skin. Second, serious acne should be taken seriously and this means visiting your M.D. Some genetic problems show themselves as acne, and only tests ordered by your doctor can tell you whether your acne is “normal”, i.e. caused by the hormonal turmoil of adolescence or the menstrual cycle, or whether it is a symptom of polycystic ovarian syndrome or other health problems that cause an excess in the production of male hormones by the young woman.

      To control acne:
      1) Keep sebum secretion under control using sea kelp bioferment, niacinamide and EGCG from green tea.
      2) Normalize keratinization and prevent the exfoliated keratinocytes from sticking together, closing the pore. Go for white willow bark extract, which will also reduce inflammation. Other helpful actives are sulfur, retinyl acetate (or other retinoids). Chemical peels will also help but make sure that the glycolic and other acids are not neutralized using bases like sodium hydroxide, a common ploy used to impress consumers with high concentrations of acid that will do nothing because they have been converted into (useless) salts.
      3) Decrease inflammation with actives like white liquorice extract. Avoid steroids, anti-inflammatories that everybody likes because they are so fast. With prolonged use they may cause skin atrophy and steroid acne.
      4) Kill acne bacteria: tea tree oil, Coleus essential oil. Propolis should also work but many of our clients do not like the smell. Avoid benzoyl peroxide, which will kill bacteria but will also age your skin and increase the probability of skin cancer.
      5) For men and women: inhibit the activity of the enzyme 5-alpha reductase using saw palmetto and wild yam extracts, this active will reduce skin androgens, reducing the frequency of acne lesions.

      What NOT to do
      Don't use benzoyl peroxide. This chemical is a strong oxidant, and the idea is to use it to kill the acne bacteria. The problem is, you are killing your own cells too. There must have been a time when benzoyl peroxide seemed like a good idea, but with what we have learnt about the effect of oxidant on cells, and how the are a major cause of skin aging, it is time to forget about it and go for more sophisticated tools. Sophisticated does not mean more expensive. Skin Actives Scientific is now selling a kit for under that will help control sebum production (and sebum is the bacteria's favorite food!), skin renewal (so that pores are kept open and do not turn into comedos) plus anti-inflammatory actives.

      So, before you go for benzoyl peroxide, think long-term and give your skin a chance."

  28. QUESTION:
    Can this sickle cell disease be transmitted through intercourse with someone who has it?
    Ok, can this be transmitted through intercourse? I am just wondering, I know it is genetic but if someone has intercourse and does not know that have it, can it passed through semen, or any other bodily fluids?

    • ANSWER:
      No, sickle cell anemia is a recessive genetic disorder; not an STD. To decrease your chances of getting an STD, you can abstain, lessen the number of partners you have, or use a condom (which is not 100% reliable and doesn't protect against such things as HPV, HPV is transmitted by skin cells on genital areas and 80% of women will contract it at some point in their lives).

  29. QUESTION:
    What are anorexia and bulimia? Who are most likely to suffer from these eating disorders?
    and Why do you think this is the case?

    so basically can someone give me a nice detailed answer to this:
    What are anorexia and bulimia? Who are most likely to suffer from these eating disorders? Why do you think this is the case?

    THANKS IN ADVANCE!
    MUCH APPRECIATED!
    10 POINTS!
    xxxx

    • ANSWER:
      Anorexia nervosa is an eating disorder that affects the mind and the body. Most people don't know the harsh and long term side affects of it; they think its just getting too skinny. That's not true though; they include but not limited to: depression, suicide, yellowing skin, hair falling out, low blood pressure, slow heart beat, and much much more. It can affect almost every part of your body, but it's different for everyone.
      Experts don't know the actual reason why its caused; this is also different for everyone. It can be anything from media, job or sport (dance, model, gymnastics, ect), stress, and more.
      Anorexia affects less than 1 percent of the population and out of those only less then 10% are male. It mostly affects female teens. Research also shows that many people with Anorexia come from a white rich family; it can still happen and does happen to anyone though.
      It is a treatable disorder; the earlier it is diagnosed- the better. There are no meds that help cure it, but there is therapy which gradually transform one to their own and healthy state again.

      Bulimia nervosa is another eating disorder. It often starts with binge eating (overeating) and then vomiting it all out. It appears mostly among female teens as well. The person with it is aware of their eating habits and often feel guilty afterwords. The exact cause for this is also unknown. Genetic, trauma, media, and more can all play a factor. The side affects for Bulimia are also threatening. For one, the stomach acid going through the esophagus from vomiting can cause permanent damage by burning it. Other complication include: constipation, dental damage, pancreatitis, and more.

      If you need any more information then feel free to contact me! xkhushali@yahoo.com or tigergirlx3@yahoo.com (;

  30. QUESTION:
    What causes a certain patch of hair on my head to turn white and I'm in my early 20s?
    I have a patch of white hair and I'm in my early 20's. No stress. It's not genetic because no one in my family has gotten white hair this early. Is it a medical condition of some sort? Autoimmune?

    • ANSWER:
      "Hair color comes from cells in the hair follicle called melanocytes, which make pigment. Melanocytes don't live forever, and how well they give color to hair decreases over time. We see gray hair when the amount of pigment becomes less and white hair when all pigment has "run out" and is no longer made by the melanocytes. This usually happens later in life, with the average age between 35 and 50 years.

      Poliosis is the name given when someone has a small patch of white hair. While this patch occurs most often along the forehead (so-called white forelock), it can involve hair anywhere on the body and can happen anytime in life. When healthy people have it, this simply means there is no pigment in the hair and skin of that involved area. Poliosis can also occur with medical conditions such as piebaldism, a genetic disease with single or multiple white patches of hair. In this case there usually are other family members with similar white patches of hair. Marfan's syndrome and Waardenburg's syndrome are other genetic disorders where this condition is noticed. Vitiligo is a skin condition that destroys melanocytes. This can affect the hair, but usually involves the skin as well. If your child also has white patches of skin, this may be vitiligo."

      Don't worry, there are many people with this and usually it's on older males, but considered very sexy!

  31. QUESTION:
    What are some shocking genetic disorders?
    I've heard of a vampire disease that is supposedly where vampires and werewolves originated... Is there anything out there as intriguing as that? Just the name and a quick description, please. Or if you want, just leave a link for where I can find more info. on it. Thx!

    • ANSWER:
      The disease you're thinking of is porphyria...some types affected the skin so that there was increased sensitivity to light... other symptoms included shrinking gums (making canines look like fangs) and hair growth... it was thought that drinking blood could be a way to make up for the lost heme that resulted as lack of the diseae. However, it is ACQUIRED and not GENETIC

      Some other weird diseases or disorders...
      Alice In Woderland Syndrome or Micropsia- the brain interprets things as much smaller than the actually are... the object seems both far away and really close at the same time.
      Pica- people with Pica have an urge to eat non-food substances, like paper or dirt
      Human Werewolf Syndrome or hypertrichosis- dark patches of fur like hair grow on a person's face.
      Progeria- symptoms similar to those of an aging individual appear at a very early age.
      Xeroderma Pigmentosum- the skin can't repair any damage caused by UV light, which means that in extreme cases, patients can't go out into the sun at all.
      Cotard Syndrome- patient thinks they are dead or don't exist.
      Capgra Delusion- person thinks that somebody they love has been replaced with an imposter.

  32. QUESTION:
    What does it mean if a small cut causes a lot of bleeding?
    or the reverse: a deep cut (to the skin) causes little to no bleeding. What does this indicate in terms of the person's health, particularly heart health?

    • ANSWER:
      Quite a lot can be said from this actually. A small cut that causes a large amount of bleeding could be due to some sort of disorder such as hemophilia, a genetically based disorder. In terms of a persons health it's never great to have some sort of disorder. There's worse disorders out there though, this one is manageable although without a complete cure yet, being a genetic disorder and all. Often people take clotting factors for this disorder. Normally when you get a cut your blood vessels will constrict and platelets will close the cut over time. With a disorder such as hemophilia you get incomplete coverage of platelets around the area and thus more bleeding occurs. In terms of heart health for this it's hard to say just by examining the disorder alone. A person can have either a completely healthy heart of a weak one and still have this disorder. There was a rumor that hemophilia can help prevent cardiovascular disease but over 90% of the time that's been falsified.

      A large cut with no bleeding isn't necessarily any sort of disorder although it would still be good to get checked out if it happened. These typically occur if the skin is under stress for a long time rather than some sort of puncture. This leads to blood vessels not being ruptured with the intrusion of skin still being present. It's really not common to see this. In term of a persons health, not great because there has to be a large amount of stress on the skin for this to occur. Can't really say much about heart health on this one.

  33. QUESTION:
    I am very interested in trying Mineral Makeup? How does bare essentials rate next to sheer cover and others?
    and others. It seems awfully expensive as well. But I just saw Avon as advertising it for really cheap, but I've never really liked that stuff. Please answer if you use it or have tried it.
    Thanks. And could it possibly be good for your skin?

    • ANSWER:
      If you knew the chemicals and the dangers that go along with makeup that's not of a mineral content you would definately reconcider.
      If you use a makeup base from Origins this would keep your mineral makeup to keep from running, becoming oily or wear off during the day. A Makeup base keeps mineral makeup looking fresh all day.
      Stick with make makeup that's organic, and of a natural ingredient content.

      The 35 billion-dollar cosmetic industry is one of the nation's largest and most profitable enterprises, spending more money on television advertising than any other business. Contrary to what most consumers believe, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) neither tests nor determines the safety of cosmetics and toiletries. The cosmetic industry is self-regulating through an independent panel of experts whom it appoints.1,2

      "Skin Deep" is the title of an investigative report prepared in 2004 by the Environmental Working Group (EWG), an advocacy organization based in Washington, DC. The EWG examined 711 lipstick products and found that 28% contained ingredients associated with cancer risk from chemicals like butylated hydroxytoluene, Nylon 6, ferric oxide, polyethylene, and titanium dioxide.2

      Toxins in Makeup
      All cosmetic products contain a certain amount of bacteria, prompting manufacturers to add preservatives. Parabens are toxic and allergenic synthetic chemicals used extensively as preservatives in cosmetic products. Aubrey Hampton, of Aubrey Organic Cosmetics, informs us that preservatives are not added to protect the consumer from bacteria, however, but to extend the shelf life of the product.3

      Toxic metals can be found in moisturizer, lotion, sun block, sunscreen, mascara, eye shadow, rouge, face powder, lipstick, and theatrical and clown makeup. Health effects may include nausea, cramps, vomiting, skin rash, joint and bone pain, mouth sores, cancer, stillbirths, genetic damage, immune dysfunction, brain and learning disorders, and impulsive and violent behavior.4 These toxins in makeup are numerous and include the following:

      Mercury compounds are permitted by the FDA for use in eye makeup at concentrations up to 65 parts per million (p/p/m). Awareness of mercury contamination in fish, vaccines, and dental amalgams is increasing. Old mercury-filled thermometers are being phased out and substituted with new mercury-free thermometers to avoid environmental and health risks. (Several schools have even been forced to close down because of mercury spills from broken thermometers.) Yet with all the evidence about mercury's toxicity, how many women and teenagers have been warned about toxic mercury in eye makeup?5

      Mercury is both a deadly poison and a heavy metal. The skin easily absorbs mercury, and it accumulates in the body.3

      Mercury exposure also may cause allergic reactions, skin irritation, or neurotoxicity problems. Phenyl mercuric acetate is a highly toxic chemical used as a preservative in eye makeup, even though it does not protect the consumer from bacteria in products that have become contaminated by use.

      Bronopol is used in mascara and other cosmetics. A skin irritant, bronopol has caused blindness and death in laboratory animals at concentrations much higher than used in cosmetic products.3

      Formaldehyde-releasing ingredients are found in nearly all brands of skin, body, and hair care products, antiperspirants, and nail polishes. Imidazolidinyl urea and DMDM Hydantoin are just two of many preservatives that release formaldehyde, which can
      irritate the respiratory system, cause asthma, allergies, or skin reactions, even
      trigger heart palpitations. Formaldehyde exposure can cause joint or chest pain, depression, headaches, fatigue, dizziness, immune dysfunction, and cancer.6

      Hexamethylenetetramine is a carcinogenic formaldehyde-compound used in lotions and creams, and must carry a warning label if used in concentrations greater than 0.05%. Trade names: Aminoform, Formid, Uritone, and Cystamin.3

      Lanolin, a fatty secretion from sheep's wool, is found in many cosmetics. Although lanolin is a natural product, it may be contaminated with DDT and other pesticides used on the animals.1

      Mineral oil is used as an emollient to prevent water loss from skin, but can be toxic and actually dries out skin.3

      1-Naphthol and 2-Naphthol are coal tar derivatives used as dye intermediates. They can be absorbed through skin and are skin irritants. Oral doses larger than one teaspoon can be fatal.3

      Nitrosamines are a class of carcinogenic compounds that can be absorbed through skin. Nitrosamines are by-products created by the chemical reactions of many cosmetic ingredients including 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-l,3-diol, cocoyl sarcosine, Diethandamine (DEA), Imidazolidinyl urea, formaldehyde, hydrolyzed animal protein, Lauryl sarcosine, Monethanolamine (MEA), Quaternium-7,15,31,60, etc., Sodium Lauryl (or Laureth Sulfate), Sodium methyl cocoyl taurate, Triethanolamine (TEA). However, vitamins C and E act as blocking agents, inhibiting the toxic effects of nitrosamines, and some manufacturers add vitamins C and E to their products for this purpose.3,7

      p-Hydroxybenzoic Acid Benzyl Ester (PHB Esters), are widely used preservatives more commonly known as methyl paraben, propyl paraben, ethyl paraben, and butyl paraben. They are highly toxic, causing skin rashes and can behave as xenoestrogens, raising the risk of breast cancer in women and low sperm count in men.3,7

      Petrolatum (petroleum and paraffin jelly) is a type of mineral oil used in baby oil, creams, lipstick, makeup remover, and lip-gloss. This type of waxy mineral oil sits on top of the skin, clogging the pores which leads to blackheads, whiteheads, and eventually, enlarged pores.7

      Propylene Glycol is a petroleum derivative found in most forms of makeup and other cosmetics as a humectant (moisture retainer), surfactant (oil emulsifier), and solvent. Its industrial uses include hydraulic brake fluid and antifreeze. This additive causes allergic and toxic reactions in some individuals. Surprisingly, it is an ingredient in many products claiming to be "natural." Because of Propylene Glycol's ability to quickly penetrate skin, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires workers to wear protective clothing, gloves, and goggles when working with this toxic chemical. The Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) warn against skin contact because of possible brain, liver, and kidney abnormalities. Unfortunately, consumers are neither protected, nor warned against health risks. Stick deodorants have concentrations higher than most industrial applications.3,6

      Quaternium-15 is a toxic agent used in cosmetic creams. Quaternium-15 can cause skin rashes and allergic reactions. Trade names: Dowicil 200, Dowicide Q, and Preventol.3

      Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS) is a surfactant, detergent, and emulsifier used in thousands of cosmetic products and industrial chemicals as a cleansing agent. It has a degenerative action on cell membranes and is damaging to hair and skin. High levels of skin penetration may occur at even low-use concentrations. Because it is derived from coconuts, SLS is implied to be "natural," but it is mixed with sulfur trioxide or chlorosulforic acid and then neutralized with aqueous sodium hydroxide (lye). SLS is often combined with triethanolamine (TEA) which may be contaminated with the potent carcinogen, nitrosamines.8,3

      SLS is used in labs around the world as a skin irritant to evaluate the healing potential of ingredients used on the SLS-irritated skin. Permanent eye damage has been observed, as well as residual levels of SLS in the heart, liver, lungs, and brain from skin contact. It may be damaging to the immune system. SLS's protein-denaturing properties can inflame and separate skin layers.8 SLS is used in nearly every shampoo, cleanser, and toothpaste, including many products sold in health food stores.

      Sodium Laureth Sulfate (shortened from Sodium Lauryl Ether Sulfate or SLES) is a yellow liquid detergent similar to Sodium Lauryl Sulfate, with higher foaming ability. SLES is considered slightly less irritating than SLS.3,8

      Talc – used in face powders and baby powders – can cause lung problems. Talc may be contaminated with asbestos.3

      Triethanolamine (TEA) is widely used throughout the cosmetic industry and is frequently found in so-called "natural" products as an emulsifier, pH adjuster, and preservative. TEA is a synthetic chemical that can be contaminated with potent carcinogens called nitrosamines.3

      Color Additives date back as far as 5000 years. The desire to improve one's
      appearance is not a modern concept. Artificial colors and dyes are now included in
      nearly every cosmetic product. The FDA lists two categories of color additives: coal-tar dyes derived from petroleum, and colors exempt from certification – primarily obtained from mineral, plant, or animal sources.9

      Many coal tar derivatives are suspected carcinogens, and most artificial colorants have not yet been tested for cancer risk. About 76 D&C (approved for use in Drugs and Cosmetics) color pigments, and approximately 19 FD&C colors are used in food and toiletries. Ext. D&C approved colors are approved only for use in externally applied drugs and cosmetics. Six FDA "certified" colors are suspected carcinogens. Others may cause hives, eye irritation and permanent blindness, behavior problems, emotional outbreaks, attention deficit disorder (ADD), chromosome damage, and reproductive mutations. Absorption of certain colors can cause oxygen depletion of the body resulting in death.1,4,6,9

      Certification in regard to coal tar pigments only regulates the amount of metallic impurities from lead and arsenic, and is not intended to protect the public from toxic synthetic chemicals. Dyes may also be contaminated with aluminum and other toxic metals to give a shine to makeup.1,4,9

      Exposure to color additives and dyes is a 24-hour experience in modern society, including multiple uses of soap, skin cream, shampoo, conditioners, shaving cream, toothpaste, body lotions, and makeup (including lipstick, mascara, eyeliner, face powders and more). The FDA assures consumers that color additives are safe for their intended purposes, despite removal of some questionable colors in the past.9 FD&C yellow No. 5 (listed as tartazine on medicine labels) is used in beverages, desserts, drugs, makeup, and many other product, and has caused itching and hives in some sensitive individuals. Since 1980 (for drugs), 1981 (for foods), the FDA has required all products containing No. 5 to be listed on labels.9

      Fragrance chemicals are added to cosmetics and toiletries. Fragrance on a label can indicate any of 4,000 individual ingredients, nearly all synthetic. Fragrance exposure can affect the central nervous system, causing depression, hyperactivity, irritability, inability to cope, and other behavioral problems. "Fragrance-free" and "unscented" products may still contain fragrance chemicals without listing them on the label. Eight to 90% of fragrance chemicals are petroleum derivatives that can enter the body through inhalation, skin, or ingestion, and go directly to the brain. The EPA considers fragrance, second-hand smoke, and formaldehydes as triggers for asthma, while the FDA lists fragrance as the primary cause of allergic skin reactions to cosmetics.1,9

      Skin
      Rodney Dangerfield, the comedian, might have said, "Skin gets no respect." And that would be no joke. We expose our skin to harsh weather conditions and products containing toxic petroleum derivatives that are drying, irritating, and pore-clogging. Alcohols and solvents destroy the skin's pH balance, stripping away the skin's defense barrier to infection while contributing to wrinkles, fine lines, spots, red veins, or other discolorations. Dr. Susan Lark reminds readers of her Health Letter that skin is a "living, breathing, blood-circulating organism" that must be treated with the same care we'd give our heart, liver, and lungs. In fact, Chinese medicine considers skin to be the "third lung." 7,10

      Contrary to previous beliefs that skin was impermeable, we now know that skin easily absorbs chemicals, hence the nicotine patch, nitroglycerine patch, and birth control patch. Toxic chemicals in makeup, personal care products, commercial, industrial, hobby, and household products are also absorbed into the bloodstream through dermal contact. Skin is a two-way membrane, and the body's largest organ of elimination via perspiration, which is why saunas are so healthful in ridding the body of unwanted toxins.11

      Skin is composed of three layers: the epidermis, the dermis (cutis), and the subdermis (subcutaneous). The epidermis has no blood vessels, but contains many small nerve endings, and its outermost layer is constantly shedding and being replaced. The middle layer, dermis or cutis, is highly sensitive with a vascular layer of connective tissue containing blood vessels, lymph vessels, nerve endings, sweat and oil glands, hair follicles, arrector pili muscles, and papillae. The subcutaneous tissue makes up the third layer of skin. It is adipose (fatty) tissue, necessary for energy. The subcutaneous tissue acts as a protective cushion for the outer skin, hair, and nails.3

      Sebum is a complex oil released onto skin to slow down water evaporation while preventing excess moisture from penetrating into the skin. Exposure to wind and cold have a drying effect on skin. Mineral-oil based creams appear to be helpful, but eventually inhibit the skin's natural moisturizing process, which is also adversely affected by solvents, detergents, and chemicals in makeup including sodium lactate, sodium pyrolidone, carboxylic acid (NaCPA), and collagen amino acids.3

      Exposures to toxic chemicals add up. According to a survey by the EWG and a coalition of health advocacy organizations, the average American adult uses nine personal care products daily containing a total of 126 unique chemical ingredients. The survey also revealed the following:

      12.2 million adults are exposed to known or probable human carcinogens through daily use of personal care products.
      4.3 million women are exposed daily to toxic ingredients linked to fertility impairment and fetal development problems.
      20% of all adults are exposed daily to the top seven carcinogens commonly found in personal care products: hydroquinone, ethylene, dioxide, 1,4-dioxane, formaldehyde, nitrosamines, PAHs, and acrylamide.
      Women use more cosmetics and personal care products than men and are exposed to more unique ingredients daily.12
      Labels
      The cosmetics law requires that product labels list ingredients in descending order of predominance in a manner easily read and easily understood under normal conditions of purchase. In reality, labels are not easy to read or understand. Labels include complicated scientific terms for myriad synthetic ingredients, terms intelligible only to a chemist.13

      The EWG found 13,900 unique ingredient names listed on the labels of 14,200 products. Misspellings and synonyms reduced the actual number of ingredients to just over 9,800 unique chemicals. Approximately half of all ingredients were mislabeled. The EWG found 22 different spellings of the botanical ingredient, "witch hazel." The EWG also revealed that several cosmetic companies failed to disclose ingredients for products sold online via their web sites.13

      Drugs are heavily regulated; cosmetics are not. Both share common intentions and, often, common ingredients as well. Many cosmetic ingredients are designed to penetrate skin, and many drugs and cosmetics contain the same biologically active ingredients. Indeed, many cosmetics fall into a gray area FDA calls "cosmeceuticals," products that are half drug, half cosmetic.13

      The cosmetic industry spends billions advertising what ingredients have intentionally been added to their products, but does not provide consumers with accurate information alerting them to carcinogenic contaminants or preservatives that release formaldehyde. The FDA acknowledges that many cosmetic companies lack adequate data on safety tests and that some companies have even refused to disclose test results. Out of approximately 5,000 cosmetic distributors a miniscule three percent have filed reports with the government of injuries to consumers.14

      The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health claims 884 chemicals available for use in cosmetics are toxic substances. The FDA has no resources for assessing the safety of these chemicals, which cause genetic damage, biological mutation, and cancer. Mainstream brands of personal care products and makeup contain a wide range of undisclosed carcinogenic ingredients and contaminants.14

      Despite the FDA's failure to adequately regulate the safety of personal care products, the industry assures the public that its voluntary self-regulation ensures the safety of products available in the marketplace. A major provision of the cosmetics law claims the following: "Each ingredient used in a cosmetic product and each finished cosmetic product shall be adequately substantiated for safety prior to marketing. Any such ingredients or product whose safety is not adequately substantiated prior to marketing is misbranded unless it contains the following conspicuous statement on the principle display panel: Warning – The safety of this product has not been determined."13

      When asked by EWG volunteers if any product labels carry this warning, industry spokespeople replied in the negative, indicating companies are not allowed to sell products with unsafe ingredients and would not risk violating the law. However, the FDA admits it has little to no authority to enforce provisions of the law requiring manufacturers to substantiate the safety of products being sold. Safety testing is optional, and companies can operate for the most part without fear of retribution.13

      The EWG spent two years reviewing more than 20,000 product labels and did not find even one product that carried a warning.13 Considering the FDA's repeated failure to protect consumers from the side effects of patented drugs, including death, how can the public possibly retain confidence in the agency's ability to protect against harmful ingredients in personal care products and makeup?

      FDA Admits Failure in Cosmetic Safety
      The EWG filed a cosmetic safety petition in June 2004. In September 2005, the FDA issued its written response revealing serious deficiencies in its power to protect public health, admitting its inability to require warning labels on products with safety concerns. The FDA even lacks the ability to recall harmful products, relying solely on voluntary company actions.15

      Consumers are generally shocked to learn that cosmetic ingredients have not been tested or proven safe. To say the American public has been misled in this regard is an understatement. A coalition of grassroots organizations is finally spearheading a movement to protect American consumers from toxic ingredients in personal care products and makeup.

  34. QUESTION:
    How many of you have heard of Neurofibromatosis?
    Neurofibromatosis (NF) is a neurological disorder that although fairly common, is hardly heard of. What it does is cause tumors to grow along the nerves, randomly, in the body or on the skin. It can also cause a lot of other things, ranging from scoliosis and learning disabilities to cancer. It is a genetic disorder, progressive, and has no cure.

    As a mom of two kids with NF, I have been working towards bringing awareness to my community. I am just curious as to how many people reading this might actually have heard of NF, or possibly either have NF or know someone who does.

    • ANSWER:
      i have NF
      did you know your kids have a 50/50 chance of passing it on.. to their kids..
      ?

  35. QUESTION:
    The head of my penis has a darker skin pigment then the rest of the head?
    My penis head is kinda pink but the right side of the head is kinda blackish. It doesn't hurt or anything it's like the skin is darker in the certain spot. I am still virgin :( and I don't have any STD. I have had for a while now maybe a few years ago I noticed I had it. I do masturbate with no lotion maybe that's why? I am not circumcised. I'm 18 btw.

    • ANSWER:
      Pigmentation means coloring. Skin pigmentation disorders affect the color of your skin. Skin cells give your skin color by making a substance called melanin. When these cells become damaged or unhealthy, it affects melanin production. Some pigmentation disorders affect just patches of skin. Others affect your entire body.
      http://shopcraze.com/
      If your body makes too much melanin, your skin gets darker. Pregnancy, Addison's disease and sun exposure all can make your skin darker. If your body makes too little melanin, your skin gets lighter. Vitiligo is a condition that causes patches of light skin. Albinism is a genetic condition affecting all of a person's skin. Infections, blisters and burns can cause lighter skin.

  36. QUESTION:
    Quick way to get rid of acne by next saturday?
    I'm going to a concert saturday, and I can feel this big pimple coming up. I really want to pop it, but so far I'm resisting, haha. I've been using the oxy maximum acne-fighting pads for a while, but they don't seem to be helping that much. Most of the creams I tried just dry out my skin and don't really help on a long-term basis. Ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      PIMPLES
      Pimples is a unique skin disorder.Pimples are lesions that occur when the skin’s pores are obstructed or infected.They can form for a variety of reasons.However,the mechanism involved in causing some pores to collapse and block drainage of natural oils is not really understood. Pimples may also crop up for genetic reasons. It is not clear how it can be inherited from one’s parents, but studies do indicate a high occurrence of pimples in children whose parents had it,too.
      The pimples associated with adolescence almost certainly occur because of hormonal changes that take place during puberty. Both males and females get an overdose of the male hormone testosterone during this period,causing excessive generation of sebaceous fluids that invariably cause pimples.

      GIVEN BELOW ARE A FEW SIMPLE HOME REMEDIES TO FIGHT PIMPLES.

      1.The most basic form of pimple prevention is hygiene and preventive skin care. Regular washing of the affected areas with mild soap is a must.The soap need not necessarily contain any chemicals designed to prevent pimples .However, face washing should not be overdone or the skin will become dehydrated .

      2.Care should be taken on makeup,moisturizers and other skin care products.If these products are oil based,it would just make the problem worse. Use water based products instead.

      3.Generally we rub, press or squeeze our pimples.Don’t when we do this,we risk spreading the bacteria to other areas.

      4.Lemon juice diluted in water can be applied externally because of its antiseptic
      quality.

      5.Tea Tree oil can also be applied directly to infected pores.

      6.Vitamin A tablets are also a natural and effective cure. Vitamin A promotes healthy skin.

      7.Before bathing, apply a mixture of fresh tomato pulp, honey and rose-water to your face and keep for twenty minutes before washing off.

      8.Juice of raw papaya is the best treatment for pimples.Apply fresh juice of raw papaya on pimples and get a good result.

      9.Directly rub potato slices all over the face, helps to get rid of blemishes and
      pimple scar.

      10.Drink plenty of water and vegetable or fruit juices.

      11.Use cucumber or other fruit and vegetable packs to cure pimple scars.

      12.Maintain a diet that is rich in cottage cheese, salads, fresh juices, fish and
      yogurt.These help to cleanse your system and ward off pimples.

      13.Another overnight home remedy for pimples is to put a dab of toothpaste on it to help dry it out. Calamine lotion also will have the same drying effect.

      14.Pound orange peel with water and apply to affected areas.

      15.Another useful remedy for pimples is zinc. Which can be taken in a dose of 50 mg daily for a month and then reduce the dose.

      16.You can clean your skin with apple cider vinegar as an overnight home pimple remedy.

      17.Aspirin contains Beta hydroxy acid which is a powerful defoliant ,so you can crush 1to 2 Aspirin tablets mix with a little water and apply on pimples for 15 minutes and wash.

      Finally,certain medications may temporarily alter the hormonal changes prevalent during adolescence and cause pimple outbreaks. If this is the case, a simple adjustment in medication may be all that is required.

  37. QUESTION:
    Why did Michael Jackson really have white skin?
    Is it really a skin condition?

    • ANSWER:
      He had a genetic skin disorder called Vitiligo. He did NOT have his skin bleached just to look white. Vitiligo is a disorder that cause your skin pigment to leave and turn white, but it comes off in patches. I'm sure Michael Jackson got his skin to be turned white so that his skin would be even instead of being blotchy, which is equally humiliating as what he turned out to be.

      R.I.P. Michael Jackson.

  38. QUESTION:
    Best way to get rid of Dark Circles around my eyes?
    Ok, well, i have REALLY bad dark circles around my eyes. The thing is, theyre not genetic. I dont get hwy im getting them though! I dont stay awake till 11, i normally go to sleep at about 9:45. But form now on ill go to bed at 9:00. But im not sure if thatll help. At like, 9:00 at night they are hardly noticeable, but thats when i go to sleep! Help me, how can i stop this!

    • ANSWER:
      The following medical conditions are some of the possible causes of Dark circles under eyes. There are likely to be other possible causes, so ask your doctor about your symptoms.

      Persistent eye rubbing
      Sleep difficulty - see the many causes of sleep difficulty symptoms (e.g. stress, depression, sleep disorders, etc.).
      Allergies
      Hay fever
      Allergic shiners
      Dust allergy
      Mold allergy
      Eczema - i.e. eczema in the skin under the eyes.
      Pallor - the paleness of the skin may accentuate the dark rings.
      Inherited eye blood vessel condition - dark circles under the eyes run in families.
      Aging
      Dehydration

  39. QUESTION:
    Would you consider Heterochromia a genetic disorder or disease?
    Or would Hirschsprung's disease or Waardenburg syndrome be one?

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      In anatomy, heterochromia refers to a difference in coloration, usually of the iris but also of hair or skin. Heterochromia is a result of the relative excess or lack of melanin (a pigment). It may be inherited, due to genetic mosaicism, or due to disease or injury.

      Hirschsprung’s disease is a congenital disorder of the colon in which certain nerve cells, known as ganglion cells, are absent, causing chronic constipation . A barium enema is the mainstay of diagnosis of Hirschsprung’s, though a rectal biopsy showing the lack of ganglion cells is the only certain method of diagnosis.

      Waardenburg syndrome or Waardenburg-Klein syndrome is a rare genetic disorder most often characterized by varying degrees of deafness, minor defects in structures arising from the neural crest, and pigmentation anomalies.

  40. QUESTION:
    Would you risk skin cancer to avoid breast cancer?
    Studies have shown that utilizing a tanning salon lowers the risk of breast cancer. It also states that the chance of breast cancer in a person is great than the possible risk of getting skin cancer by going to a tanning salon.
    Jojo- Thanks for your answer. I thought it sounded a little odd.

    I do have a family history of breast cancer, and I have already had several lumbs removed when I was 19 that thankfully were not cancer, but even now at 29, I still have check ups every 6 months and a mamo once a year.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, it is not true that tanning salons reduce the risk of breat cancer.

      breast cancer is commonly due to genetic disorders or oestrogen disorders, and UV light would not have an effect on these levels.

      However UV light does greatly increase the risk of skin cancer, by producing radicals that damage DNA.

      In short one should avoid tanning salons to reduce risk of skin cancer.

      If worried about obtaining breast cancer i would advise regular check ups that your GP can organise, especially if you have a family history. Every 6 months may be appropriate.

      thats great! breast cancer occurence increases with age also, so make sure you continue to go to your mammogram appointments all the best!

  41. QUESTION:
    what is the genetic disorder for albinism?
    i really need some help in biology.
    the question is albinism is a recessive autosomal genetic disorder that causes the complete or partial absence of pigments in the skin hair and eyes. i have to fill in the punnett square and determine the expected genotypic ratios form crossing homozygous recessive and heterozygous dominant parents.

    • ANSWER:

  42. QUESTION:
    What does it mean when you have really stretchy skin?
    I have really, really stretchy skin, i haven't seen anyone else with skin like that. I am 15 and really skinny for my hight, 5'8, 48 kg but, everyone else my hight and weight still have normal skin. It's also really soft. It is stretchy everywhere but especially on my legs (thighs mainly) arms, and face, but also on my stomach. When you stretch it it still springs back, but it stretches VERY far. is it bad?
    I am not trying to loose weight..

    • ANSWER:
      yo i kinda have the same thing so ive been checking it out. theres a disorder called EDS, its a genetic thing, and soft stretchy skin is a symptom. idk if i have it, but i guess get it checked out.

  43. QUESTION:
    Will my child inherit my genetic skin disorder?
    I have had Vitiligo since I was 10 years old. It is only on my father's side of the family.

    My grandma has it, 1 out of 2 aunts have it, and one of her daughters (out of 3) have it (my cousin).

    My grandma's Vit didn't show up until she was in her sixties. My aunts until she was in her late thirties, and my cousin's around the same time as me.

    What are the chances I will pass it on to my children?

    • ANSWER:
      I cant give you an exact percentage....but you could see a genetasis (sp?)...Yes, chances are they will inherit this. they may not ever get it but they will be a carrier of it always meaning their children have a chance of getting it.

  44. QUESTION:
      Which of the following skin colors may be due to a liver disorder?
    Which of the following skin colors may be due to a liver disorder?

      A. erythemia
      B. pallor
      C. jaundice
      D. bronzing
      E. bruises

    • ANSWER:
      Actually, all of them.
      A) Erythema- may be seen in end stage liver disease (cirrhosis), specially in the hands (palmar erythema).
      B) Pallor- may also be seen in cirrhosis, when there is massive bleeding from esophageal varices.
      C) Jaundice- classically seen in Cirrhosis
      D) Bronzing- Hemochromatosis (disease of iron overload, can be either genetic or acquired).
      E) Bruises- again, Cirrhosis, due decrease in clotting factors (which are made by the liver)

  45. QUESTION:
    How long do vitamins take to work?
    I'm 18 years old, female, and i have very bad acne and hair thinning ( & hair loss). I also suffer from depression. I started taking more vitamins today to help my hair and skin. What are the best vitamins and how long do they take to show results??

    • ANSWER:
      Give it a few months to see a difference. That said, if you have an underlying medical condition, your symptoms will persist. Some supplements are not very good with absorption however so check the label (if you live in the US) that is states Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP). GMP certification ensures that supplements and vitamins are manufactured safely, with quality and with efficacy. Supplements that absorb more effectively than supplements are sublingual (under the tongue), effervescence tablets or liquids.

      Aside from stress and pollution, one of the leading causes of hair loss is vitamin deficiency. Hair loss can also be a symptom of an underlying disease such as thyroid disease or lupus.

      Vitamins for hair loss: Biotin (Vitamin-H), Iron, B vitamins, Zinc, Anti-Oxidants - Vitamin A, C and E, Protein, Pantothenic Acid.

      The 8 vitamins for hair loss >>>
      http://www.hairlosstreatment-s.com/vitamin-and-hair-loss.html

      "How To Prevent and Treat Acne:

      Eight simple steps will help most overcome their acne problems.

      1. Stay away from milk. It is nature’s perfect food–but only if you are a calf.

      2. Eat a low glycemic load, low sugar diet. Sugar, liquid calories, and flour products all drive up insulin and cause pimples.

      3. Eat more fruits and vegetables. People who eat more veggies (containing more antioxidants and anti-inflammatory compounds) have less acne. Make sure you get your 5-9 servings of colorful fruits and vegetables every day.

      4. Get more healthy anti-inflammatory fats. Make sure to get omega-3 fats (fish oil) and anti-inflammatory omega-6 fats (evening primrose oil). You will need supplements to get adequate amounts (more on that in a moment).

      5. Include foods that correct acne problems. Certain foods have been linked to improvements in many of the underlying causes of acne and can help correct it. These include fish oil, turmeric, ginger, green tea, nuts, dark purple and red foods such as berries, green foods like dark green leafy vegetables, and omega 3-eggs.

      6. Take acne-fighting supplements. Some supplements are critical for skin health. Antioxidant levels have been shown to be low in acne sufferers. And healthy fats can make a big difference. Here are the supplements I recommend:

      Evening primrose oil: Take 1000 to 1500mg twice a day.
      Zinc citrate: Take 30 mg a day.
      Vitamin A: Take 25000 IU a day. Only do this for three months. Do not do this if you are pregnant.
      Vitamin E (mixed tocopherols, not alpha tocopherol): Take 400 IU a day.

      7. Try probiotics. Probiotics also help reduce inflammation in the gut that may be linked to acne. Taking probiotics (lactobacillus, etc.) can improve acne.

      8. Avoid foods you are sensitive to. Delayed food allergies are among the most common causes of acne–foods like gluten, dairy, yeast, and eggs are common culprits and can be a problem if you have a leaky gut.Diet is a big factor for causing acne. Studies now confirm dairy and sugar both can cause acne."

      It’s Proven: Sugar and Dairy Cause Acne >>>
      http://freshandagelessblog.com/2011/02/16/its-proven-sugar-and-diary-cause-acne/

      Depression is from low serotonin levels.

      The following factors can cause low serotonin levels:

      * Alcohol
      * Artificial sweeteners (aspartame)
      * Caffeine
      * Cigarette smoking
      * Diabetes
      * Dietary deficiencies of nutrient co-factors
      * Ecstasy, diet pills, and certain medications
      * Genetic predisposition
      * Hormone imbalances (thyroid, adrenal, estrogen)
      * Hypoglycemia
      * Insulin Resistance
      * Inflammation
      * Infections (eg: lyme's disease)
      * Poor diet (also eating disorders)
      * Lack of exercise
      * Lack of sunlight (lack of vitamin D)
      * Problems converting tryptophan to serotonin
      * Problems with digestion (low stomach acid is a major issue)
      * Stress and anger
      * High cortisol levels (stress hormone)

      5-htp needs Zinc, Magnesium, Vitamin B6, and Vitamin C to form Serotonin >>>
      http://www.understand-andcure-anxietyattacks-panicattacks-depression.com/5-htp.html

  46. QUESTION:
    How do i get rid of acne marks?
    I dont have a big problem with acne but about 5 weeks ago i got a HUGE pimple that was gone in about 2 weeks buit it left a big dark mark on my skin and it looks ugly. Any suggestions of how to get rid of it?
    THNX!!:-)

    • ANSWER:
      PIMPLES
      Pimples is a unique skin disorder.Pimples are lesions that occur when the skin’s pores are obstructed or infected.They can form for a variety of reasons.However,the mechanism involved in causing some pores to collapse and block drainage of natural oils is not really understood. Pimples may also crop up for genetic reasons. It is not clear how it can be inherited from one’s parents, but studies do indicate a high occurrence of pimples in children whose parents had it,too.
      The pimples associated with adolescence almost certainly occur because of hormonal changes that take place during puberty. Both males and females get an overdose of the male hormone testosterone during this period,causing excessive generation of sebaceous fluids that invariably cause pimples.

      GIVEN BELOW ARE A FEW SIMPLE HOME REMEDIES TO FIGHT PIMPLES.

      1.The most basic form of pimple prevention is hygiene and preventive skin care. Regular washing of the affected areas with mild soap is a must.The soap need not necessarily contain any chemicals designed to prevent pimples .However, face washing should not be overdone or the skin will become dehydrated .

      2.Care should be taken on makeup,moisturizers and other skin care products.If these products are oil based,it would just make the problem worse. Use water based products instead.

      3.Generally we rub, press or squeeze our pimples.Don’t when we do this,we risk spreading the bacteria to other areas.

      4.Lemon juice diluted in water can be applied externally because of its antiseptic
      quality.

      5.Tea Tree oil can also be applied directly to infected pores.

      6.Vitamin A tablets are also a natural and effective cure. Vitamin A promotes healthy skin.

      7.Before bathing, apply a mixture of fresh tomato pulp, honey and rose-water to your face and keep for twenty minutes before washing off.

      8.Juice of raw papaya is the best treatment for pimples.Apply fresh juice of raw papaya on pimples and get a good result.

      9.Directly rub potato slices all over the face, helps to get rid of blemishes and
      pimple scar.

      10.Drink plenty of water and vegetable or fruit juices.

      11.Use cucumber or other fruit and vegetable packs to cure pimple scars.

      12.Maintain a diet that is rich in cottage cheese, salads, fresh juices, fish and
      yogurt.These help to cleanse your system and ward off pimples.

      13.Another overnight home remedy for pimples is to put a dab of toothpaste on it to help dry it out. Calamine lotion also will have the same drying effect.

      14.Pound orange peel with water and apply to affected areas.

      15.Another useful remedy for pimples is zinc. Which can be taken in a dose of 50 mg daily for a month and then reduce the dose.

      16.You can clean your skin with apple cider vinegar as an overnight home pimple remedy.

      17.Aspirin contains Beta hydroxy acid which is a powerful defoliant ,so you can crush 1to 2 Aspirin tablets mix with a little water and apply on pimples for 15 minutes and wash.

      Finally,certain medications may temporarily alter the hormonal changes prevalent during adolescence and cause pimple outbreaks. If this is the case, a simple adjustment in medication may be all that is required.

  47. QUESTION:
    Colour blind means You only see black and white?
    If white people is a term which usually refers to human beings characterized, at least in part, by the light pigmentation of their skin.

    That means You see all people?

    • ANSWER:
      There are many types of color blindness. The most common are red-green hereditary (genetic) photoreceptor disorders, but it is also possible to acquire color blindness through damage to the retina, optic nerve, or higher brain areas. Higher brain areas implicated in color processing include the parvocellular pathway of the lateral geniculate nucleus of the thalamus, and visual area V4 of the visual cortex. Acquired color blindness is generally unlike the more typical genetic disorders. For example, it is possible to acquire color blindness only in a portion of the visual field but maintain normal color vision elsewhere. Some forms of acquired color blindness are reversible. Transient color blindness also occurs (very rarely) in the aura of some migraine sufferers.

      The different kinds of inherited color blindness result from partial or complete loss of function of one or more of the different cone systems. When one cone system is compromised, dichromacy results. The most frequent forms of human color blindness result from problems with either the middle or long wavelength sensitive cone systems, and involve difficulties in discriminating reds, yellows, and greens from one another. They are collectively referred to as "red-green color blindness", though the term is an over-simplification and is somewhat misleading. Other forms of color blindness are much more rare. They include problems in discriminating blues from yellows, and the rarest forms of all, complete color blindness or monochromacy, where one cannot distinguish any color from grey, as in a black-and-white movie or photograph.

  48. QUESTION:
    can someone find me a pedigree of the genetic disorder OSETEOGENESIS IMPERFECTA?
    i cannot find a good pedigree, i looked everyone. can somone please help me?

    • ANSWER:
      Disorder: Osteogenesis Imperfecta, Type 1
      Also known as: OI, TYPE I, OI1, OSTEOGENESIS IMPERFECTA TARDA, OSTEOGENESIS IMPERFECTA WITH BLUE SCLERAE

      Clinical
      Phenotype: multiple bone fractures caused by minor trauma, blue sclerae, normal teeth, hearing impairment, thin skin, other bleeding tendency, kyphoscoliosis, hernias
      Seen In: Amish
      Old Order Mennonite
      Old Colony Mennonite
      Unknown/Other Mennonite
      Hutterite

  49. QUESTION:
    What layers of skin and tissue does Seborrhea affect?
    What layers of skin and tissue does Seborrhea affect?
    I need to know this please for a Biology paper, Thanks :)

    • ANSWER:
      Seborrhoeic dermatitis is a skin disorder affecting the scalp, face and trunk causing scaly, flaky, itchy, red skin. It particularly affects the sebum-gland rich areas of skin. It shows up where and when the sebaceous glands in the skin are most active.

      Primary seborrhea is an inherited disorder of the skin in which the outer layer of the skin (the epidermis), the sebaceous glands, and part of the hair follicles are hyperproductive. The rate of cell turnover in these tissues is significantly increased, causing excessive production of scale (dry flakes of skin) and sebum (fatty lubricating substance). Seborrhea oleosa is the more greasy form while seborrhea sicca is a dryer form. Chronic waxy ear infections (otitis externa) also occur commonly as part of this disorder.

      In seborrhea, the sebaceous glands (found in or near hair follicles, whose normal function is to enrich the skin with oil secretions) increase the amount and quantity of their secretions.

      An abnormal turnover of the skin cells (keratinocytes) into dead scale (keratin) also occurs. Normally the cells in the skin are constantly dying and being worn off; new cells to replace them from deeper in the skin. So there is a constant migration of deeper cells moving to the surface, undergoing keratinization (making keratin and dying), and being sloughed off. This migration usually takes 3 weeks. This cycle is changed in animals with seborrhea. The migration is greatly accelerated and only takes several days. Thus there is a buildup of this keratin on the surface of the skin. This is why seborrhea is commonly termed a "keratinization disorder".

      Seborrhea can be broken down into two groups, based upon the cause. Primary seborrhea can be either genetic-based or caused by a keratinization disorder. Secondary seborrhea is a result of other disease processes such as allergies, parasites, nutritional disorders, and endocrine (hormonal) disorders such as hypothyroidism. To determine the best treatment, it is important to differentiate whether a dog has primary or secondary seborrhea


genetic skin disorder

Kp On Cheeks

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How to find discontinued beauty products and cosmetics?
    I have been curious about a certain Almay skin product that I used over ten years ago. It helped clear up KP on my cheeks and I want to know what active ingredient this moisturizer contained. Is there any way to find this out?

    • ANSWER:
      My guess is that the active ingredient was retinol as this is the only anti-acne ingredient that i have found in moisturizers. Other anti-acne ingredients are Benzoyl Peroxide, salicylic acid,and sulfur but I doubt these were the active ingredients in that moisturizer.Since this product was discontinued, you most likely wont be able to find it anywhere as most products last for 2 years.

  2. QUESTION:
    Is there a way to get rid of Keratosis Pilaris?
    So i know its a is a common skin disorder, typified by “chicken skin” bumps on upper arms, thighs, torso, buttocks and occasionally the cheeks. Excess skin forms around individual hair follicles, creating the characteristic minute, rough, grater-like bumps, but is there something you can do about it? Its really nasty and embarrassing!

    • ANSWER:
      get a product called KP Duty by DermaDoctor
      http://www.dermadoctor.com/

  3. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of small flesh colored bumps on face?10 points to best answer?
    im in 8th grade and i just want to graduate with a clear face. i have alot of these tiny flesh colored bumps on my face they dont hurt or anything when i touch them. when i pick at them this white hard stuff comes out and its not pus. i dont have pimples just these bumps please help. its on my forehead cheeks and chin mostly on my forehead

    • ANSWER:
      I have the same bumps on my face, and I'm in eighth grade too! They're called Keratosis pilaris, and pretty much 50-80% of teens/young adults have them. Most people have them on their arms or legs, but some people (like you and me) also get them on their face. Mine are mostly centered on my cheeks, though.

      What I use to get rid of them, well, it calms them down so they're barely visible, is the Nuetrogena Naturals Purifying Pore Scrub in the morning, and then when I take a shower at night, I use the St. Ives Apricot Scrub Blemish & Blackhead Control, which is a pretty rough exfoliating scrub, so its better to use it every 2-3 days. Even though is says blackhead control it works great for KP. You can find both scrubs at Walmart or a convenience store.

      Then for moisturizer, I used to use a pretty expensive one called KP Duty (specifically for KP) but then I lost it... oops. I now use a body lotion, which isn't a great idea, so if you can afford the KP Duty, buy it. You can find it at Ulta. I definitely recommend it.

      Basically, just be sure to wash your face in the morning and at night to keep it clear, and DO NOT sleep with makeup on.

      Hope I helped!

  4. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of KP on back arms and face?
    After years and years and one year of high school I noticed how much I HATE my kp right now its bugging me. I see people with silky arms and idt about hair or anything but this kp is driving my head up the walll.... I hate that all these girls can wear tank tops to school and i cant cause of it.. and i want a nice smooth face too... PLEASE HELP ME. Im gettting desperate

    • ANSWER:
      I have it too. There is no cure :( When I was in high school I had a little on my cheeks and on my upper arms. They say it is supposed to get better as you get older. Unfortunately, I am 31 and I still won't wear tank tops, but the bumps on my cheeks went away. I also feel so jealous of people with nice smooth arms. One thing I can tell you is DON'T scrub it. Throw away your loofah sponges if you have them. They make it worse. I got rid of mine a couple of months ago and it has gotten a little less red (still there though). Don't treat it with acne cleanser and use lots of lotion. They sell some creams on the internet. I haven't tried them though. I am so sorry for you - I know how you feel. There are so many people out there with it, more than you realize. I think the stats say one out of three!

  5. QUESTION:
    What (makeup) primer would you recommend for me?
    I have KP on my cheeks, and oily in areas. I want a primer so my foundation doesn't sweat off in gym class. I've never had any type of face primer, so I don't really know what's the best one. Any ideas? :) thanks

    p.s. DRUGSTORE please!

    • ANSWER:
      loreals primer!
      so worth it.
      it keeps my makeup in place all day and makes my pores look invisible
      http://www.target.com/LOreal-Studio-Secrets-Face-Primer/dp/B002PBLH3Q

  6. QUESTION:
    How can i get rid of them?
    i have these little tiny bumps on my forehead and cheeks. They're not pimples or spots or belemishes or whatever you call them, they're little bumps. It's really wierd.. If i tilt my head in the light they become visible, but from straight on you cant see them..

    They're rather noticeable though, unless everybody stands directly infront of me, they can see them.

    What are they and how can i get rid of them?

    I wash my face twice daily with a gentle clenser, and exfoliate every other day.

    • ANSWER:
      It could be keratosis piliris.. I have it too... THis is a minor case i guess you could say...
      http://www.google.com/imgres?q=keratosis+pilaris+face&hl=en&biw=1280&bih=594&gbv=2&tbm=isch&tbnid=Qk0o9QzpGI1_3M:&imgrefurl=http://www.laser-derm.com/Microdermabrasion.htm&docid=mh87bYvOTiNlnM&w=329&h=268&ei=kFVdTpjyN9TF0AHYy9iSAw&zoom=1

      There are some face washes like kP duty... Heres a link

      http://www.sephora.com/browse/product.jhtml;jsessionid=05OBRHVU1EXYUCV0KRTQ5UQ?id=P122302&shouldPaginate=true&categoryId=5762

  7. QUESTION:
    Is there any good treatment for Keratosis pilaris rubra faceii?
    Which is keratosis pilaris with red cheeks.. i've had it forever and its just plain ugly. i've heard somehere of a laser treatment for the skin of the cheeks but to me anything with a laser and skin sounds like it can go terribly wrong.

    • ANSWER:
      Chris. I'm sorry but there is no cure for Keratosis pilaris.

      Though it may improve with age and even disappear completely in adulthood; however, some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life.

      Treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden (if they do not already appear red), and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring.

      Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the ketanized skin "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. Instead, the hair grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated, and can be removed if the bump is picked or squeezed (which can lead to scarring).

  8. QUESTION:
    how do i get an evenly colored face?
    besides having KP on my cheeks, my face is generally the same tone, but in florescent light it kind of looks blotchy and a little red, it's not a big deal, but how can i get it to be an even tone w/out tanning.... i'm a guy but is there a lotion or do i exfoliate it.... what do i do?

    • ANSWER:
      make-up...but everyone looks like crap in florescent lights

  9. QUESTION:
    How do you make the skin on your arms smoother?
    My upper arms seem normal, but they feel as though little itte-bitte pimples are covering the surface. How do you clear the skin and make it smoother?

    • ANSWER:
      i think i know what you're talking about. i have the same thing. it's little bumps, and they don't hurt, but they're sometimes dry and almost always annoying.

      Keratosis pilaris (KP, also follicular keratosis) is a very common genetic follicular condition that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin, hence referred to as chicken skin. It most often appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms (though the lower arms can also be affected), and can also occur on the thighs and tops of legs, flanks, buttocks, or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet). Less commonly, lesions appear on the face, which may be mistaken for acne.

      Classification
      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40% of the adult population and approximately 50%-80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men.

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faciei (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.

      Symptoms and signs
      Keratosis pilaris occurs when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore. This causes the formation of hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). The painless bumps are skin-colored, although they can become red and inflamed at times. Usually many plugs form in an area, causing patches of rough, bumpy skin. This gives the skin a sandpaper or goose flesh appearance. This may be more severe in the winter or times of low humidity, which causes the skin to become dry. It will eventually resolve on its own.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin's "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. The hair, then, grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated. The hair can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though removal can lead to scarring.

      Keratosis pilaris may be hereditary. It is present in babies and continues into adulthood, but is uncommon in elderly people. It is most obvious during the teenage years. KP is prevalent in those who are overweight, or have atopic dermatitis, ichthyosis, or descend from Celtic backgrounds. Keratosis pilaris occurs in otherwise healthy people.

      Treatment
      There is no cure for Keratosis pilaris, but treatment is available. One option is to use a loofa to remove the dead, dry skin. Another option is to use a dermotologist-prescribed cream or lotion that should be applied daily. The best lotions for this condition would have urea, 15% alphahydroxy acids, or Retin A in them. Over-the-counter lotions work as well and should be applied after showering, as well as several times a day. The lotions are often soothing and can help improve the appearance of the skin. Dermotologists also recommend mild peeling agents, or alpha hydroxy acids, that may open up the plugged follicles. Antibiotics may also help in some cases where the bumps are red and badly inflamed. To temporarily reduce redness but not roughness, pulse dye laser treatment or intense pulsed light (IPL) can be done.

      Although it may clear up with treatment, reccurance of KP is very likely. Therefore, treatment should be continued regularly. It may take several months to years for the condition to completely clear up.

      A dermotologist or physician can usually diagnose a patient for Keratosis pilaris by visually inspecting the patient's skin.

  10. QUESTION:
    Why do I have little bumps on my arm, between my elbow and my shoulder and how do I get rid of them?
    They are small un-noticeable (except to touch) bumps on my arm where the biceps are. They usually feel softer when I put moisturiser on them, except this does not get rid of them. How do I get rid of them completely?

    • ANSWER:
      I believe that you are talking about Keratosis pilaris and as far as I know its genetic. Here's what I found on the internet. Hope it answers your question:

      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a very common genetic follicular condition that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin and hence colloquially referred to as "chicken skin". It most often appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms (though the lower arms can also be affected), and can also occur on the thighs and tops of legs, flanks, buttocks or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet). Less commonly, lesions appear on the face and may be mistaken for acne.

      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40 to 50% of the adult population and approximately 50 to 80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. Varying in degree, cases of KP can range from minimal to severe.[citation needed]

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks) and related disorders.

      Many people with keratosis pilaris do not know they have it (if the condition is mild). While KP resembles goose bumps, it is characterized by the appearance of small rough bumps on the skin. As a result, it is often confused with acne.

      Keratosis pilaris occurs as excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin, accumulates within the hair follicles forming hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). Bearing only cosmetic consequence, the condition most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy. Though people with keratosis pilaris experience this condition year round, it’s during the colder months when moisture levels in the air are lower that the problem can become exacerbated and the “goose bumps” are apt to look and feel more pronounced in color and texture.

      [edit] Treatment

      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris, however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, Retin A and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to the lactic acid — a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may also be helpful but increases risk of skin cancer. Small amounts of vitamin A can be used orally but only with exteme caution due to potential for liver damage. Check with a Dermatologist or Family Doctor before taking extra vitamin A due to the vitamins' potential toxic effects.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden (if they do not already appear red), and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. Instead, the hair grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated, and can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though can lead to scarring.

      Food allergies may also exacerbate the condition, causing hyper-keratosis pilaris, gluten being a common culprit (source: physician's (MD) oral presentation).

  11. QUESTION:
    How do I fix these appearance downfalls?
    I have all these little random bumps on my thighs are the top of my arms and I need to make them go away but I have no idea what they are! I've had them for years. You can't really see them but you can feel them. Does anyone know what they could be? Theyre really little. And they NEED to go away soon! Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      Here you go...

      Keratosis Pilaris
      Keratosis pilaris (commonly called KP) appears as "chicken skin bumps" on the skin. These bumps usually appear on the upper arms and thighs. They also can appear on the cheeks, back and buttocks. Keratosis pilaris, while unattractive, is harmless.

      What Are the Symptoms of Keratosis Pilaris?
      This disorder appears as small, rough bumps. The bumps are usually white or red, but do not itch or hurt. Keratosis pilaris is usually worse during the winter months or other times of low humidity when skin becomes dry. It also may worsen during pregnancy or after childbirth.

      How Is Keratosis Pilaris Treated?
      Although the condition may remain for years, it gradually disappears before age 30 in most cases. Treatment of keratosis pilaris is not medically necessary; but, individuals with this condition may want to seek treatment for cosmetic reasons.

      The initial treatment of keratosis pilaris should be intensive moisturizing. A cream such as Acid Mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 can be applied after bathing, and then re-applied several times a day. Other treatments may include:

      Medicated creams containing urea (Carmol-20) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily
      Efforts to unplug pores by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth or stiff brush.

  12. QUESTION:
    How do i get rid permanently of red dry bumpy skin?
    ever since i was little i have had this type of skin on the sides of my face, all over my arms, and some parts of my chest and i want it gone. ive tried everything, can someone plz recommend something to make it go away

    • ANSWER:
      You might have Keratosis Pilaris.

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris:
      1. Keratosis pilaris rubra: red, inflamed bumps
      2. Keratosis pilaris Alba: rough, white, bumpy skin
      3. Keratosis pilaris rubra faceii: reddish rash over the cheeks

      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris. However, there are effective treatments available that make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Most of the available treatments are purely symptomatic; the one thing they all have in common is need for repetition and ongoing commitment. Some seeking treatment with the disorder may be prescribed Tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream, often by request.

      Triamcinolone, most commonly sold under the trade name Aristocort, is a synthetic corticosteroid medically approved as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of eczema, which also reduces the amount of keratin in pores. It may be of most help to those with keratosis pilaris by reducing red, inflamed bumps. Triamcinolone is typically applied three times a day.

      Tretinoin, most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by causing the outer layer of the skin to grow more rapidly, which decreases the amount of the protein keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. As keratosis pilaris is manifested through excess keratin in the skin, Tretinoin forms a more effective and core approach to treatment than Triamcinolone, which forms a largely symptomatic approach. Tretinoin is typically applied once a day before bed.

      An alternative treatment is Adapalene, a retinoid medication that is a more stable compound, is less sunlight-sensitive, has fewer general side-effects, and may be just as effective as Retin-A. Treatment of KP with Adapalene would be considered an "off-label" use of the medication.

      As with Triamcinolone, Tretinoin or any other treatment, once therapy is discontinued, the condition reverts to its original state. However, skin treated with Tretinoin may take several weeks or more to revert to its pre-treatment condition, but may, at the same time, take several weeks or more to show optimal results, with the condition commonly worsening initially, as underlying keratin is brought to the surface of the skin. Tretinoin is considerably more expensive and dispensed in smaller quantities than Triamcinolone and other treatments. Although it may be the most effective treatment for keratosis pilaris, it is not considered the first line of treatment.

      Keratosis pilaris has not been clinically researched for treatment in an unbiased manner, with all claims of success or improvement being purely marketed or anecdotal. The condition is often dismissed outright by practitioners as being presently untreatable, giving mere moisturizing suggestions or reassurance that the condition will improve or cease with age, typically after 30. General practitioners are often unable to identify the condition. Ignorance, accompanied with the price, availability, quantity dispensed, time taken for optimal results to be achieved, more serious side-effects, adverse reactions, and worsening of the condition in the initial treatment phase - coupled with the cheaper, safer, and easier availability of other treatments - has hindered Tretinoin from showing its potential in the treatment of this condition.

      exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, creams, and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Beta hydroxy acids may help improve the appearance and texture of the afflicted skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to their containing lactic acid, a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may be helpful in moderation. Coconut oil may also be helpful if applied to afflicted areas while in the shower. Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, and, in many cases, will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing, such as tight-fitting jeans, is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

  13. QUESTION:
    methods to get rid of Karatosis Pilaris?
    I have karatosis pilaris on my upper arms and my face's cheeks. I am using Eucerin on my face and another brand on my arms. My cheek bumps have seemed to go away but not my arms really. Does anyone have any methods to get rid of KP? Any help is appreciated!

    • ANSWER:
      Wow, I have the same thing in the same place. I also use the same cream as you. Sadly, they are spreading to my back.

      I was told that there's no way of getting rid of it. *shrugs*

  14. QUESTION:
    Why do I have these small bumps all over my upper arms?
    Ever since I can remember I have had small bumps on my arms. Mostly light in color and only on the upper part of the arm. If I go to the tanning bed a lot, it seems like a lot of them go away, but there are always some there. What does this mean???? Do I have a vitamin deficiency? Do I need to use a certain type of cleanser?

    • ANSWER:
      That could be keratosis pilaris.

      According to one website it is described as this: Keratosis Pilaris (KP) is a common skin disorder, typified by "chicken skin" bumps on upper arms, thighs, torso, buttocks and occasionally the cheeks. Excess skin forms around individual hair follicles, creating the characteristic minute, rough, grater-like bumps.

      To me they look like a bunch of ingrown hair bumps.

  15. QUESTION:
    Pimples how do i get rid of them without using proactive?
    i don't want to spend 80$ on a product to clear my face i've tried to use several products but it hasn't helped so far. i have pimples on my face, neck, back, and upper arms.

    • ANSWER:
      I have been using L'oreal Acne Response for the last two weeks and am amazed how my skin looks. I am 30 and for some reason have always had blemishes somewhere at all times. The set is at drug stores I believe but you can find coupons in the Sunday paper for to off. Use a body scub on your back and you can also use the clay face masks on other parts of your body. You back skin is tougher than your face but use a good deep pore mask on your back. Most likely the pimples on your back is caused by sweat or clothes that don't allow your skin to breathe. Make sure you take a shower after activites and try and wear looser cotton clothing. Treat the ones on your back as you would with your face. A good cleansing with an acne cleanser (probably have to have someone help you) , followed by a toner and then a very light layer of drying cream ( all contained in the L'oreal Acne Response kit). As for the ones on your arms, I think it may be Keratosis Pilaric. Also called "Chicken Skin Condition" or "KP" It is when skin builds up around the hair follicles on your upper arms, torso, legs, buttocks and sometimes cheeks. It can create bumps that are red and itchy or that can be like little white heads with a little puss in them. I had this as well. I used Dermadoctors KP Duty. Which you can get a Sephora for for a good sized tube. I noticed a HUGE difference in a few days. If you can't afford that look for a cream that contains Glycolic Acid or other chemical exfoliators. Using a loofah or semi-course body scrub on a daily basis on your amrs will help as well. Feel free to contact me if you have any questions about anything!!

  16. QUESTION:
    What are these white bumps on the backs of my arms and thighs?

    • ANSWER:
      If they are very small (ie 1mm) and numerous, they are likely KP-keratosis pilaris. they occur on upper arms, thighs, cheeks mainly. they're very common. you can smooth them with products containing lactic acid, gylcolic acid, or salicylic acid. I am a physician in dermatology, so I know what I'm talking about :)
      but, sometimes it's hard to know what something is unless you see it. there are other possibilities, see your doctor if they bother you.

  17. QUESTION:
    I have Keratosis Pilaris, (chicken skin), which is dry bumpy skin on the upper arms, can anyone help?
    For as long as i can remember, I have had dry, bumpy skin on my upper arms and thighs, I have found out this is called Keratosis Pilaris. Its ment to be really common, with around 50% of people effected by this 'chicken skin' as it is commonly known as. Does anyone have any tips on how to deal with it, or at least make it a lot less noticeable. I would love to be able to wear a tank top!

    • ANSWER:
      You also will need to gently exfoliate those areas regularly (daily?) with this condition. A strong wash cloth and some elbow grease will do it. Make sure you don't use something too rough or harsh as that will tear the top "tissue paper" layer of skin you have and will cause irritation, which will just make your problem worse. Go easy, and do it regularly.

      Then use something to soften the skin and seal in its natural moisture. I see a post suggesting flax seed oil, which is a nice, natural product that surely would do the trick. An oil really cannot "moisturize," but it can lock in any moisture in your skin, so it doesn't dry out so quickly. Dryness could be part of your problem. Flax seed oil may also provide some oil-soluable vitamins that will help.

      I also have a shower filter for chlorine, which I think is an big irritant to many people. I pretty much eliminated my dry and irritated skin problems with the chlorine filter. If you can't install one, try getting one of those counter-top pitchers that filter the water, and use it as a final rise after your bath or show, to see if that also helps. If it's too cold to pour that pitcher on you, use a fresh wash cloth and pour the filtered water on that, then run it over your upper arms. Then pat dry, and seal in the chlorine free moisture on your skin's surface with the flax seed oil. I bet following this regiman will clear you up completely. If you still have some lingering issues with the KP, then after the rinse, add a toner with AlphaHydroxy Acids in it. Let it soak in/dry, and then put on the flax seed oil. You will have the most gorgeous upper arms ever. Girl, get your summer clothes READY!!

      PS I also noticed my complexion was less irritated and dry and felt less "tight" on my cheeks in winter when I managed my skin's exposure to chlorine.

  18. QUESTION:
    How to become more beautiful if...?
    I have keratosis pilaris on my cheeks and it bugs me. I want to be more prettier and I would without this kp. Can anyone tell me stuff to do to become prettier? And maybe how to minimize the kp?

    • ANSWER:
      just see what beautiful features you have and enhance them :)
      and most of all, be yourself.

  19. QUESTION:
    Creams/moisturisers for redness of the face (keratosis pilaris rubra faceii)?
    I have rather sever KP Rubra Faceii which covers both of my cheeks fully. I am aware that there is Pulse Dye Laser treatment that can help it but that's quite an expensive option - so could anyone recommend anything that can help reduce surface redness of the face? Any tips of creams/moisturisers/other would be greatly appriciated.

    • ANSWER:
      I'm not sure if this works, but the reviews seem pretty legitimate.
      http://www.amazon.com/KP-Elements-Keratosis-Pilaris-Cream/dp/B004IS1GGC
      I have KP too, it sucks. :(

  20. QUESTION:
    shower gel that will help keratosis pilaris?
    I'm using coconut oil as a moisturiser and a generic moisturising shower gel which I'm not all impressed with. Any suggestion?

    Also is there any other advice people have for my skin? Worst area is my bum, thighs and just under my shoulder blades.

    • ANSWER:
      HELP HAS ARRIVED!!!!!!!!!!!

      I had this for years, my mom told me it was eczema. Most people say eczema is a name used for tons of different dry skin conditions that doctors can’t diagnose. I used eczema creams all through Jr. High and High School, all that did was make me feel greasy and uncomfortable with zero results.

      Keratosis pilaris is a common, genetic follicular condition that causes the appearance of rough bumps on the skin. It most often appears on arms, thighs, hands, legs, sides, buttocks, or face (which on the face are often mistaken for acne). Worldwide, Keratosis pilaris affects an estimated 40% of the adult population and approximately 50%-80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. There are several different types of Keratosis Pilaris, including Keratosis Pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), Keratosis Pilaris Alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), Keratosis Pilaris Rubra Faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.

      Keratosis Pilaris is caused by Hyperkeratosis: when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin, which is cream colored, surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore, resulting in rough clogged pores. The openings are often closed with a white plug of encrusted sebum, the oily, waxy substance produced by glands in the skin to keep it from drying out. Hyperkeratosis is most likely caused by your body having a vitamin A & E deficiency.

      I started taking vitamin A & E pills at dinner every night and 90% of my white bumps on my cheeks, arms, and legs cleared up. My boss also had white bumps on her arms and tried taking the vitamins too, it worked nicely for her. You could try taking the vitamins, but if you stop taking them, your body will go back to being deficient in them unless you start eating more foods naturally containing vitamins A & E:

      Vitamin A: Liver, Red Pepper, Cayenne, Sweet Potatoes, Carrots, Dried Apricots, Cantaloupe, Spinach, Squash, Dried Herbs, Papaya, Mangoes, Green Peas, Tomatoes.

      Vitamin E: Sunflower Seeds, Almonds, Pine Nuts, Peanuts, Dried Apricots, Pickled Green Olives, Cooked Taro Root, Wheat Germ/Flax Seed/Corn/Canola/Soybean Oils, Hazelnuts, Broccoli.

      Both A & E: Paprika, Red Chili Peppers or Powder, Spinach

      If the bumps (clogged dry rough crusty pores) have a red or pink ring around them, it could just be that they are inflamed, or it could be some sort of skin infection, such as yeast, which lives on the skin naturally but could become an infection, or bacterial. If they are a little pink or red I would try an antibacterial soap.

      Antibacterial soaps are full of chemicals and poisons, some are so harmful they cause muscle weakness, such as in the heart and tongue, and should not be in stores. A natural alternative is a soap or lotion containing Tea Tree oil. Tea Tree oil has natural antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and antiseptic qualities. It also has beneficial cosmetic properties. Tea Tree oil has a faint medicinal scent to it like eucalyptus, which is why I would suggest a soap instead of a lotion. Products containing Tea Tree oil can be found in abundance at health and natural and heath stores, but is also available in main stream store such as Wal-Mart for as low as around .

      So in short, vitamin A, vitamin E, soap, and you should be good (: I wish you luck

      Also, ontop of everything listed above, oils like (yes coconut) sunflower, extra virgin olive, jojoba, almond, and argan oil wont clog pores, I would try moisturizing for a few days with lotions containing some of those to soften the KP, then one day of thorough exfoliating to scrape the KP build up on your skin away

  21. QUESTION:
    How can I remove these bumps on my arm?
    I have had these small bumps on my upper arm for almost all of my life and I just recently found out that what I have is called Keratosis Pilaris. Is there any way I can remove these bumps on my arms? thanks

    • ANSWER:
      I also have them, and suffer from the same thing.

      the cure i have found is very simple.
      a little sunlight on the arms.
      less dairy & mainly less milk.
      more fresh produce
      more water.

      mine have faded dramatically, and are almost gone!
      when i have a tran, they are hardly there at all!
      good luck!

      Classification

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faciei (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.[3]

      [edit] Symptoms and signs

      Keratosis pilaris occurs when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore. This causes the formation of hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). The painless bumps are skin-colored, although they can become red and inflamed at times. Usually many plugs form in an area, causing patches of rough, bumpy skin. This gives the skin a sandpaper or goose flesh appearance.[4] This may be more severe in the winter or times of low humidity, which causes the skin to become dry. It will eventually resolve on its own.[5]

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin's "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. The hair, then, grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated. The hair can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though removal can lead to scarring.[6]

      Keratosis pilaris may be hereditary. It is present in babies and continues into adulthood, but is uncommon in elderly people. It is most obvious during the teenage years. KP is prevalent in those who have atopic dermatitis, ichthyosis, or descend from Celtic backgrounds. Keratosis pilaris occurs in otherwise healthy people.[7]

      [edit] Treatment

      There is no cure for Keratosis pilaris, but treatment is available. One option is to use a loofa to remove the dead, dry skin. Another option is to use a dermotologist-prescribed cream or lotion that should be applied daily. The best lotions for this condition would have urea, 15% alphahydroxy acids, or Retin A in them. Over-the-counter lotions work as well and should be applied after showering, as well as several times a day.[8] The lotions are often soothing and can help improve the appearance of the skin. [9] Dermotologists also recommend mild peeling agents, or alpha hydroxy acids, that may open up the plugged follicles. Antibiotics may also help in some cases where the bumps are red and badly inflamed.[10] To temporarily reduce redness but not roughness, pulse dye laser treatment or intense pulsed light (IPL) can be done.[11]

      Although it may clear up with treatment, reccurance of KP is very likely. Therefore, treatment should be continued regularly. It may take several months to years for the condition to completely clear up.

      A dermatologist or physician can usually diagnose a patient for Keratosis pilaris by visually inspecting the patient's skin.[12]

  22. QUESTION:
    how do i get rid of keratosis pilaris red dots? the bump is gone, it is just a red dot now.?
    okay, so i have KP all my life, im 18 now. i have it on my cheeks, my legs, my arms. EVERYWHERE. i have tried everything. urea 10% lacacid, kissmyface lotions, and my kp bumps are gone, what remains is the red dots!! i think its from the pore but what can i do? it wont go away! basically, it is just a red dot where the bump use to be.

    • ANSWER:
      What exactly is keratosis pilaris? I know of natural products that have helped with a variety of skin conditions and red "spots" but am wondering if it would be helpful. Email me at psbskin@yahoo.com if you want to share...........

  23. QUESTION:
    What is keratosis pilaris? and how can i get rid of it?
    someone said i have keratosis pilaris on my arms b/c i have had these pimple like things on my arms for about a year.
    whats it caused by and how can i get rid of it?
    its a real pain cus i don't like to wear sleeveless or short sleeve tops while i have it
    thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (commonly called KP) appears as "chicken skin bumps" on the skin. These bumps usually appear on the upper arms and thighs. They also can appear on the cheeks, back and buttocks. Keratosis pilaris, while unattractive, is harmless.

      Although the condition may remain for years, it gradually disappears before age 30 in most cases. Treatment of keratosis pilaris is not medically necessary; but, individuals with this condition may want to seek treatment for cosmetic reasons.

      The initial treatment of keratosis pilaris should be intensive moisturizing. A cream such as Acid Mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 can be applied after bathing, and then re-applied several times a day. Other treatments may include:

      * Medicated creams containing urea (Carmol-20) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily
      * Efforts to unplug pores by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth or stiff brush

  24. QUESTION:
    My 2 year old has keratosis pilaris?
    My 2 year old daughter has keratosis pilaris. I know it's hereditary, I have it as well. She has it all over her arms and on her cheeks. I need some suggestions for good lotions I can use on her. I have tried all the J&J products and the baby Aveeno lotion. Is there anything else out there?

    • ANSWER:
      Here is a site all about your daughters condition:

      http://kpkids.net/

      What is the recommended treatment for KP in children?

      Treatment of Keratosis Pilaris is not medically necessary; however, many parents of children with this condition choose to seek treatment for cosmetic reasons.

      A common initial treatment of Keratosis Pilaris is often intensive moisturizing. In mild to moderate cases of KP, moisturizers and skin lubricants may help with the dryness and ease KP symptoms, but usually do not clear up the bumps in more severe cases.

      The most common treatment recommended for moderate to sever cases of KP is a topical lotion or cream (urea preparations, lactic acid creams and topical retinoids). Mild peeling agents (alpha-hydroxy acids and skin-smoothing scrubs) are the most effective in opening the clogged hair follicles by removing the excess skin.
      Keratosis Pilaris symptoms often worsen during the Winter months, when your child's skin will likely be the driest. In the Summer months, the increase in humidity leaves skin less dry, and the pinkish-red coloration can easily become camouflaged.

  25. QUESTION:
    how to get rid keratosis pilaris?
    i have this little bumps onmy harms and cheeks taht are called keratosis pilaris. i don't know how to get rid of them. does anybody know?

    • ANSWER:
      I have that also, and it started to go away when I was around 18, now it's almost completely gone. :)

      There is no cure for Keratosis pilaris, though it may improve with age and even disappear completely in adulthood; however, some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, and medicated lotions containing alpha-hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Taking calcium supplements alone will not cure Keratosis pilaris, as it is not a deficiency, but a utilization problem. However, there are supplements specifically designed to help the body process calcium which in turn allow the pores to function properly, thereby smoothing out the skin and alleviating this condition. Sugar consumption and foods with a high glycemic rating should also be reduced if possible, as sugar flushes calcium from the body at a higher rate.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden (if they do not already appear red), and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the ketanized skin "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. Instead, the hair grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated, and can be removed if the bump is picked our squeezed (which can lead to scarring).

  26. QUESTION:
    How can I get nice smooth skin?
    Because at the moment,
    My cheeks are red and blotchy .

    My forehead and nose are perfect though :)
    And my nose is shiny >.<
    I also have Chicken Skin [KP]

    • ANSWER:
      Cleanse, tone and moisturise every day!
      Also, when you get out of the bath/shower, rub some Palmers Coca Butter over your legs and arms. It smells gorgeous and it makes your skin so smooth! I use it everyday =)

  27. QUESTION:
    My skin has all these red bumps all over my skin?
    Its not a rash, but its not the chicken pox either, i have no idea what they are they arent pimples either.

    • ANSWER:
      could be eczema or psoriasis...if it isn't itchy, it could be a skin condition known as keratosis pilaris, or KP. That's a condition where your body produces an excess of a protein called keratin and it accumulates around the hair follicles. its common on thighs, arms, abdomen and rarely the cheeks.

  28. QUESTION:
    Have a rash under both butt cheeks?
    I have a rash under both butt cheeks, they are in the same spot and look the same. The whole area is swollen and red and there are a bunch of small bumps. Not sure how I got it... I haven't used any new lotions, please answer back with any (serious) ideas. Thank you

    • ANSWER:
      Hi there :)

      Assuming you eat a healthy diet and don't abuse your skin with products, that rules out many things.

      Now, from what you're describing, I can think of four possible aliments.

      1. Sometimes symptoms of skin allergies start to appear. They truly appear at random times. It could be a scented detergent or fabric softener. They, in general, can aggravate sensitive skin, especially around the area you are describing, because that area, as well as the thighs, receives a lot of friction from clothes. You can try switching to a "free and clear" detergent and fabric softener.

      2. This brings me to my next point, chaffing. If you have recently worn tight shorts or scratchy shorts or pants, and gone running or hiking, the area underneath your buttocks will feel the effects of friction. You can try wearing loose clothing, or put on some chaffing gel or cream before exercising.

      3. There's a disease called Keratosis Pilaris, a long name for a harmless problem. It appears in early adulthood, and causes skin to be red with bumps, sometimes the bumps are a bit infected. It will go away later in life, but can be treated with using a soothing lotion like Cortizone-10 healing cream. I would double check with your doctor for this, because there are many skin conditions that can appear like KP, but it happens often in the area you described.

      4. A skin virus is unlikely but possible. I had one before, and it was around my buttocks and thighs. With antibiotics and a dermatologist's removal of the bumps, you'll be fine.

      I hope I helped you! Please feel free to contact me with any more questions!

  29. QUESTION:
    Tiny bumps on arms? What are they and how can I get rid of them?
    1. How do I get rid of them?
    2. What exactly is it?
    my mom said i've had it since I was little. I got tiny bumps on my arms, a tiny bit on the legs, and a little bit on my cheeks. After showers I always put fragranceless lotion on my face (so it wont cause pimples) and lotion on my arms and legs and it works for awhile make them smoother on my face anyway.

    they are NOT pimples
    When cold wind blows against my face the bumps turn red on my cheeks. Also if I scratch the bumps, they'll itch for awhile.

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like it might be Keratosis Pilaris (sometimes called chicken skin), a harmless but annoying skin condition that MANY people have. It's most common on the back of arms and legs, but can also be found on the face, butt, torso - basically anywhere except the palms and soles of your feet. Some of us have it forever, while the more fortunate will lose it as they get older.

      It is caused by keratin (the stuff your hair and fingernails are made of) building up around the hair follicles. Most people slough this off without any trouble, but some of us get little hard bumps. Picking them can cause scars (ask me how I know!). The best way to get rid of them is by using a lotion with an alpha hydroxy acid (AHA) or beta hydroxy acid (BHA). The most common BHA is salicylic acid, which is found in a lot of acne treatments. AHA's include lactic acid (found in milk) and glycolic acid. Look for lactic acid in the ingredient list on lotions. It's much milder than glycolic acid. If the lactic acid doesn't work, try lotions with glycolic acid, but be very careful, as it can cause your skin to peel. You also want to look for lotions that have Urea, which helps your skin retain moisture. Lotions with AHA or BHA can make your skin more susceptible to sunburn, so be sure to use sunscreen regularly.

      Check out the links below for more information on Keratosis Pilaris (KP).

  30. QUESTION:
    how can i get rid of chicken skin? (KP)?
    Ok so I have chicken skin on my CHEEKS which really sucks and I have it on my thighs and arms so is there any way to get rid of it? Please help

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.
      - http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pil…
      - http://www.helpforkp.com/

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre…
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co…

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin. The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when low humidity dries out the skin.

      You could make sure to be drinking more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc… And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3’s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3’s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 – 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-…

      For the redness on your cheeks, there are products you can buy that are specifically made to help reduce redness:
      - LaTherapie Paris has a fortifying skin cream that is supposed to help soften high colour (reduce redness)
      - There is a cream called ROSACURE which is an anti-redness cream formulated to reduce redness for rosacea-prone skin types. (even if it's not rosacea)
      - Guinot has a cream called RED LOGIC which claims to neutralize the appearance of red blood vessels.

  31. QUESTION:
    how do i treat Keratosis Pilaris?
    i'm 14 and i just found out that the little white bumps on my arms, cheeks, and, embarisingly, butt, are a condition called keratosis pilaris. i don't have a lot of money to spend on treatments, probably at most. is there anything i can do on my own to get rid of the bumps?

    • ANSWER:
      Okay i know basically everything about Keratosis Pilaris. KP (chicken skin) is a skin disorder passed down from genetics which disappears at the age of +30. half of the worlds population suffers and had suffered from KP. unfortunately KP can NOT be cure but CAN be treated. 1. never pick, itch, squeese, or touch KP because it will bleed. 2. let your affected skin breathe air so dont cover your skin. 3. cleanse ur skin with a loofah sponge. 4. apply lotion such as amlactin or try the dermadocter KP duty cream () or use the dermadocter scrub wash () 5. let ur skin see sunlight. 6.be proud of it because ur not alone. i also (14) have KP and .....acne =,= crap.....and they are everywhere..butt.cheek.arms.legs.back. but dont worry :D people who are good people would never mind these little flaws and wont really care.

  32. QUESTION:
    Can Keratosis pilaris spread to other parts of your body?
    I have these bumps on my upper arm area that I believe is Keratosis pilaris. I was wondering can it be spread to other parts of my body?

    • ANSWER:
      Its not contagious and doesn't spread that way but you can have a flare up on other areas of the body. Its most common on the cheeks, upper arms and thighs.

      KP (Keratosis Pilaris) is a plugging of the hair follicules. Its benign and will not ever harm your health but if you do not like the appearence of it you can use over the counter products for it like Amlactin, Lac-Hydrin or Lacticare. It takes a while for these small little bumps to smooth out but be diligent and they will go away. You can also shower with a loofah daily to help soften them. Worse case see a dermatologist where you can buy a KP kit which is a glycolic acid shower wash and lotion for afterwards that will help the best.

  33. QUESTION:
    I have serious questions about tanning?
    Well I am a white pale girl & I also have some keratosis pilaris on my arms and cheeks.
    I read that tanning helps hide it. I also wanted to tan anyways to get some glow, not jersey shore color.. like Kendall & Khloe Kardashian color.

    My question is, is that even possible? and does it really hide kp? AND How likely am i to get skin cancer if I tan once a month? by the way, I also sit in saunas twice a week.

    • ANSWER:
      Tanning is a bad idea since the chances of skin cancer increases -even once a month (by the way - tanning beds are just as worse if not more).

      The combo of *very dry air* and sun does help KP - but I wouldn't recommend it as a permanent solution.

      Instead - try using acne cream that contains Benzoyl Peroxide, one tube cost about and lasts for a while (depends how big is the area of skin).
      I recommend :
      OXY (10% Benzoyl Peroxide)
      Clearasil (10% Benzoyl Peroxide)
      Neutrogena's "on the spot" (but it has only 2.5% Benzoyl Peroxide)

  34. QUESTION:
    raised red and itchy bumps on my arms only?
    last month I started having raised red itchy bumps on both of my upper arms only, I thought maybe insect bites but no they come and go, I'm taking metatoprol for high blood, I do have a app with my doctor next week I do have allergies can anyone help?

    • ANSWER:
      I have that too Its called Keratosis Pilaris.
      All you have to do to get Rid of It Is Exfoliate with a Loofah Brush.
      If you have a Walgreens near you there is also Vanicream Soap that Helps Me When Im using the Loofah.You can also buy Lubriderm i heard which I will have to do.Heres a little about KP:

      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40% of the adult population and approximately 50%-80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men.

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.

      While KP resembles goose bumps, it is characterized by the appearance of small rough bumps on the skin. As a result, many people with keratosis pilaris do not know they have it, and it is often confused with acne.

      Keratosis pilaris occurs when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin, which is cream color, surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore. This causes the formation of hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). Bearing only cosmetic consequence, the condition most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy. Though people with keratosis pilaris experience this condition year-'round, it is during the colder months, when moisture levels in the air are lower, that the problem can become exacerbated and the goose bumps are apt to look and feel more pronounced in color and texture.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin's "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. The hair, then, grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated. The hair can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though removal can lead to scarring.

  35. QUESTION:
    My 2 year old has bad breathe diarrhea and stinky farts, also red cheeks no fever?
    Is it teething? I mean it really stinks :(

    • ANSWER:
      Stinky farts depends on what you feed him. Like mushed vegies and apple sauce can cause dairrhea and stinky farts. The red cheeks are probably KP (A child hood skin condition) or eczema (This is usually first noticed in child hood). Bad breath. Well did you try brushing his teeth or rinsing out his mouth?

  36. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know anything about Keratosis Pilaris?
    What can i do to make it go away? I am using AmLactin Cream and it is not working!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a very common genetic follicular condition that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin and hence colloquially referred to as "chicken skin". It most often appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms (though the lower arms can also be affected), and can also occur on the thighs and tops of legs, flanks, buttocks or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet). Less commonly, lesions appear on the face and may be mistaken for acne.

      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40 to 50% of the adult population and approximately 50 to 80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. Varying in degree, cases of KP can range from minimal to severe.[citation needed]

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks) and related disorders.

      Many people with keratosis pilaris do not know they have it (if the condition is mild). While KP resembles goose bumps, it is characterized by the appearance of small rough bumps on the skin. As a result, it is often confused with acne.

      Keratosis pilaris occurs as excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin, accumulates within the hair follicles forming hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). Bearing only cosmetic consequence, the condition most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy. Though people with keratosis pilaris experience this condition year round, it’s during the colder months when moisture levels in the air are lower that the problem can become exacerbated and the “goose bumps” are apt to look and feel more pronounced in color and texture.

      Treatment

      There is no known cure for Keratosis pilaris, though it may improve with age and even disappear completely in adulthood; however, some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life.

      Treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden (if they do not already appear red), and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring.

      Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. Instead, the hair grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated, and can be removed if the bump is picked or squeezed (which can lead to scarring.)

  37. QUESTION:
    Help: I have been diagnosed with keratosis pliaris?
    I was recently diagnosed with keratosis pilaris on the back of my arms by a family doctor. They prescribed some cream for it and it has helped a bit, but with summer coming up I am embarrassed to show my arms. It is minimal but there :( and the doctor said it could be worse. Is there any cure for it? Can a peel help? Help please.

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis Pilaris (KP) is a common skin disorder, typified by “chicken skin” bumps on upper arms, thighs, torso, buttocks and occasionally the cheeks. Excess skin forms around individual hair follicles, creating the characteristic minute, rough, grater-like bumps.
      As seen in
      Health Magazine

      Keratosis Pilaris affects almost 50% of the world’s population and is particularly likely to affect anyone prone to eczema, asthma or hayfever.

      It’s never a chore to attain flawless, smooth skin. KP Duty™ effectively eliminates crustiness, flaking, and dry, rough chicken skin – no prep work or scrubbing required.

      KP Duty™ is a concentrated treatment with potent antioxidant Green Tea, moisture replenishing Hyaluronic Acid and texturizing Dimethicone.

      Contains:
      Glycolic Acid - Powerful AHA
      Sodium Glycolate – Glycolic Acid salt with buffering action
      Green Tea – Botanical antioxidant with soothing anti-redness action
      Urea - Humectant
      Algae – Soothing botanical
      Sodium Hyaluronate –Potent hydrating agent
      Dimethicone – Barrier agent – reduces moisture evaporation

      • Dermatologist Tested & Approved
      • Non Comedogenic
      • Non Irritating
      • Allergy Tested
      • Fragrance Free
      • Dye Free
      • pH Balanced
      • No Animal Testing

  38. QUESTION:
    will coconut oil help my redness and KP?
    i have had redness on my cheeks all my life and have had KP (chicken skin) for a few years, and i hate both of them, they make me feel so self-concious. i've read that coconut oil does wonders for both of these and was just wondering if anyone reading this has used coconut oil and if it works for both, if so what type of cocount oil, how do you apply it, should you consume it or rub it on the affected areas. thanks in advance

    • ANSWER:

  39. QUESTION:
    how can you reduce keratosis pilaris?
    well ive had kp for my whole life and i wanted to know how to reduce it... i know its not curable ...yada yada yada
    but i want tips on how to reduce to kind that you get on your face(cheeks) mostly

    • ANSWER:
      i used to have it too but there is a way to get rid of it. use KP duty from dermadoctor this stuff really works. make sure you use it every day & after about two months after using it all of my kp was gone. this stuff works and is amazing!!!! its worth the money.

  40. QUESTION:
    I have weird goosebumps patches around my body. Can it be keratosis pilaris?
    - Just turned 18 in May and never had these symptoms before in my life.
    - Been taking a diet pill that contained LingZhi, Ebony, Fox-nut, Tuckahoe, Seman Pruni, Dioscoreae, Wheat Germ, and Nature Substance since July 8, but no abormal reaction to it
    - "Goosebumps" appeared on July 25 after taking antibiotics called Nitrofurantoin 100MG
    - Started taking those antibiotics on July 23 ; total = 5 pills that was taken
    - It went away after a week or a few days, but I shaved thinking it was okay, then it appeared again!
    - Used the juice of the Aloe Vera plant&used it on my skin which made the bumps a little smooth and appeared for only a few seconds
    - Everything was okay until the day after I used Nair to "shave" ; The bumps appeared again, just like how it was the first time.
    - Sometimes, the "goosebumps" appear in little patches then it appears everywhere on my thighs, legs, and arms. Sometimes my cheeks, but you can't see those, and lately, I feel like I have it appearing on my head..
    - I also been drinking 100% Cranberry Juice which seem to work fine.
    - My boyfriend told me that I seem to get those "goosebumps" when people usually get goosebumps [From being cold, scared, etc.] It's just really weird for these bumps to actually be goosebumps.
    - At first I thought it was ingrown hairs, but it's definately not.
    - I do have similar symptoms to keratosis pilaris, yet not quite sure.
    - When I shower, I don't scrub hard, and afterwards, I gently pat my skin with a towel then apply moisturizer.
    - I do seem to also get the bumps when I shower, like mainly after I start washing the shampoo off of my hair
    - I even changed shampoos to Herberl Essence since the one I bought contains Vitamin E and Aloe Vera. It does seem to still give me that "goosebumps" appearing feeling on my head from time to time since Monday, the 20th of July.
    The bumps look exactly like goosebumps, just sometimes appear in little patches. I've done my research, yet it doesn't seem to fully answer what it is exactly. Also, the "goosebumps" don't permanently stay on my body. It comes and go like actual goosebumps, yet I don't think it's normal goosebumps.

    The bumps don't itch yet I do get some "pimples" on my thighs, and arms, basically ingrown hairs. I don't have much of it, but I do have a few, yet it's mainly on my thighs.

    I can't see a dermatologist, because my doctor has to recommend me to one. It's hard getting an appointment to see him, so I might go check it out at my school's nurse, since I have to pay for the health fee, so I might as well use it.

    • ANSWER:
      firstly do not worry even if it IS ks

      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40 to 50% of the adult population and approximately 50 to 80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men.

      do you feel sore or itchy?

      here are its symptoms

      read them and decide are your conditions similar

      Keratosis pilaris occurs as excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin, accumulates within the hair follicles forming hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). Bearing only cosmetic consequence, the condition most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy. Though people with keratosis pilaris experience this condition year round, it’s during the colder months when moisture levels in the air are lower that the problem can become exacerbated and the “goose bumps” are apt to look and feel more pronounced in color and texture.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. Instead, the hair grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated, and can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though removal can lead to scarring.

      hope that hlped

  41. QUESTION:
    Why is it that "pro-lifers" are against abortion...?
    ...but turn the other cheek and ban the usage of prophylactics and other birth control systems?

    • ANSWER:
      Listen to Fireball

      She has it exactly right.

      Kp

  42. QUESTION:
    Bumpy patches of skin on baby?
    My 6 month old has a bumpy patch of skin on both of his arms, between the elbow and the shoulder. The patch is not red nor does it seem to bother baby. It just looks like tiny little bumps, the same color as his skin. We don't use dryer sheets and it's been there since before I started introducing solids. Does anyone know what this could be? Should I be applying a special cream of some sort? All we use now is J&J baby lotions.

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis Pilaris is a common skin condition diagnosed in approximately 40% of the population. It is characterized by tiny bumps on the skin, usually found on the outer areas of the upper arms, thighs, cheeks and sometimes the face (often referred to as "chicken skin").

      The bumps give a sandpaper-like texture to the skin in these areas. It commonly presents itself as flesh-colored to slightly red, rough little bumps. Visit your child's Physician or Dermatologist for an accurate diagnosis. In most cases, your child's doctor can diagnose Keratosis Pilaris, also known as KP, simply by examining and touching the skin.

      Depending on the severity of your child's case of KP, your child's physician or dermatologist may recommend a prescription medicine including antibiotics.

      here's the website, with tons more info, including over-the-counter suggestions:

      http://kpkids.net/

  43. QUESTION:
    Whats the best cure for KP?
    kp = keratosis pilaris. Its all over my arms and i can't get em out.

    • ANSWER:
      This was borrowed from webmd.com & I've put the link into the source below for you. Hope it helps.

      Keratosis Pilaris

      Keratosis pilaris (commonly called KP) appears as "chicken skin bumps" on the skin. These bumps usually appear on the upper arms and thighs. They also can appear on the cheeks, back and buttocks. Keratosis pilaris, while unattractive, is harmless.

      What Are the Symptoms of Keratosis Pilaris?

      This disorder appears as small, rough bumps. The bumps are usually white or red, but do not itch or hurt. Keratosis pilaris is usually worse during the winter months or other times of low humidity when skin becomes dry. It also may worsen during pregnancy or after childbirth.

      How Is Keratosis Pilaris Treated?

      Although the condition may remain for years, it gradually disappears before age 30 in most cases. Treatment of keratosis pilaris is not medically necessary; but, individuals with this condition may want to seek treatment for cosmetic reasons.

      The initial treatment of keratosis pilaris should be intensive moisturizing. A cream such as Acid Mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 can be applied after bathing, and then re-applied several times a day. Other treatments may include:

      Medicated creams containing urea (Curel, Carmol-20) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily
      Efforts to unplug pores by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth or stiff brush
      Prescription medicines including antibiotics (Erythromycin, Bactrim)

  44. QUESTION:
    I have a lot of really weird pimples on my arms :S?
    I guess the Q says it all, please just serious answers :)
    Need help :S

    • ANSWER:
      It could be keratosis pilaris a.k.a. chicken skin or KP. It's very common, especially on the upper arms and thighs and even cheeks. (I had it when I was a kid, it went away when I got older.. and now I have it again!)

      The best thing for it is exfoliation followed by a moisturizer. There are special KP products (I am using DERMAdoctor's KP Duty exfoliant, for example) and they work pretty well. :)

      Don't pick at them. You'll get bad scars when you get older.. my mom used to pick at hers and she now has deep scars. I'm hoping I don't get scarring, but I did pick at them.. :(

  45. QUESTION:
    Cure for Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have KP on my thighs and my arms. I used to have KP on my cheeks years ago but I eventually began using this product from Almay (some sort of skin milk) and it completely disappeared. Unfortunately, I never used the moisturizer on my legs or my arms and I'm still plagued with KP. Is there anything out there that can cure KP?

    • ANSWER:
      Tyson&Chino,
      Unfortunately there is no cure for keratosis pilaris, the skin condition that leaves little red bumps – “chicken flesh” - on the back of your arms and thighs. Keratosis pilaris is benign, self-limiting, and often disappears with age. It is more common in patients who tend to have very dry skin, or who have atopic dermatitis (eczema). It seems to run in families. Treatment of keratosis pilaris is not necessary, and unfortunately often has disappointing results. However, if you desire to treat it, with persistence, most people can get a fairly satisfactory improvement with intensive moisturizing. Try a moisturizing cream and re-apply it when the skin appears to have dried. Use it especially after a shower/bath and before going to bed.

      ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED.

      It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms.

      The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions.

      I add a link with details of this subject

      http://en.wikipedia.org/
      wiki/Keratosis_pilaris

      Hope this helps
      matador 89

  46. QUESTION:
    Small, painless, flesh-colored bumps on backs of upper arms?
    Anyone know what that is? I can't really give much more info than what I put in the 'question.' Sometimes I can scratch a part of a bump off, and there are about, I dunno, forty VERY small bumps on each arm? It's only on the upper arms, mainly the backs.

    I remember seeing three or four of these five years ago, and since then, they've multiplied. My oldest brother had this, and I know quite a few friends have it, too. Does anyone know the name of this and/or treatments for it?

    • ANSWER:
      This might be Keratosis Pilaris (KP).

      Here is a quote from www.medicinenet.com

      "Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a very common skin disorder seen in many people of all ages. It is a benign condition that presents as numerous small, rough, red, or tan bumps primarily around hair follicles on the upper arms, legs, buttocks, and sometimes cheeks. KP creates a "goose bumps," "gooseflesh," or "chicken skin" appearance on the skin. A majority of people with KP may be unaware that the skin condition has a designated medical term or that it is treatable. In general, KP is often cosmetically displeasing but medically completely harmless. KP is frequently noted in otherwise healthy people."

      Check out the info here: http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pilaris/article.htm

  47. QUESTION:
    Any good makeup for kp?
    I have the skin condition called Keratosis Pilaris (red, rough, bumpy skin). I have it on my cheeks, and it seems that every makeup brand I use (for example clinique and covergirl) it just makes my face redder and itchy. Is there any makeup out there that could cover the kp up without turning my face more red?

    • ANSWER:
      try using natural and organic makeups. i dunno any brands but you can look at ulta and makeup stores. theyll tell u and or make up pros and artist.

  48. QUESTION:
    I have weird bumps on the side of my face? Make them go away!?
    They are the color of my skin. They are on the side of my cheek, some of them are white. I know its not pimples cuz you cant pop them. How can i make the go away!? What are they!?

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like KP- Keratosis Pilaris which is a skin condition that can affect any area of the body but most of the time that I have seen it on peoples faces it does seem to be in the cheek area. Unfortunatly, there isn't a cure yet but I have a co-worker who has a pretty bad case of it all over her arms and legs and she started using a product we carry at our spa that is for acne. Instantly the redness is gone and the roughness is down probably 50% in about a weeks time. She swears by it!! The Clear Skin Ultra Gel is what it is called but what it has in it that is helping her skin is a time-released lactic and glycolic acid exfoliation and a ton of soothing and anti-redness ingredients. I used it on a bride that I was doing makeup for and she couldn't believe her eyes; she bought it right then and continues to buy it now. she was so greatful b/c her arms were not red in her wedding photos. You can find it at www.facesbeautyboutique.com under skin care systems and Visiblly Clear System. I would look up some pictures on the internet and see if that is what your spots look like and read some of the symtoms too. Obviously I can't tell for sure if this is what you have but it kinda sounds like it to me. Hope this helps

  49. QUESTION:
    Keratosis Pilaris HELP?
    So i have this skin problem(KP) on my cheeks, upper arms, legs and bum. Google it if you don't know.

    I need to know a way to cover the ones on my arms. I haven't worn sleeveless tops for 4-5yrs, i'm really embarassed. Any way to help clear it up, tone down the redness and anything that can cover it well enough?? please need help!!!

    • ANSWER:
      KP is a for of hair follicles inflammation. You can get a tube of acne cream that contains Benzoyl Peroxide (5% or 10%), for example OXY or Cleasill. A tube cost around and it did wonders for me ( I use a local brand to my country, but I did try OXY once- same stuff).


kp on cheeks