Lotion For Kp

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What lotion should i use for my Keratosis Pilaris?
    I heard that Amlactin or Eucerin works, but if you have used one which one was it and did it work?
    Or which lotion have you heard works best for keratosis pilaris.

    • ANSWER:
      Derma Doctor KP Derm. My girlfriend says it works wonders. Sephora.com

  2. QUESTION:
    Is there a good body lotion out there?
    I need a body lotion that can keep my skin soft and not dry. But I can't seem to find one that could last all day.

    • ANSWER:
      Kinerase Cream with SPF 30
      Clarins Moisture-Rich Body Lotion
      Fresh Creme Ancienne
      L'Occitane Olive Body Milk
      Dermadoctor KP Duty

  3. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of KP(chicken bumps) This is for my g/f?
    She watns something that will get rid of KP or is there some type of laser surgery or anything. SHe already has DemaDoctor KP scrub and it does work but it makes the bumps feel a little smaller and it last only 3 to 4 days at the most. Thanks. She has DD KP lotion too but that really does not do much.

    • ANSWER:
      Please see the web pages for more details on Keratosis pilaris.

  4. QUESTION:
    Where can i buy KP Duty Moisturizing lotion?
    I need to buy this lotion but i cant find it anywhere! Does anyone know of any drug stores I can buy it from?

    • ANSWER:
      Try this
      http://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=UTF8&keywords=KP%20Duty&tag=189-20&index=blended&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325

  5. QUESTION:
    How can i get rid of these bumps on my upper arms?
    I have these bumps that i have on my upper arms and i don't know how to get rid of them! My grandma said it was because i have dry skin so i started using lotion but it didn't really help. Im so embarrassed about it i won't wear short sleeves anymore. is there anything i could do?

    • ANSWER:
      i think i might have had the same thing as you. if it is, it's called keratosis pilaris.
      http://medimages.healthopedia.com/large/keratosis-pilaris.jpg
      it is because of dry skin but most lotions aren't good enough to hydrate your skin properly. all you have to do is get a rough washcloth and scrub the area to exfoliate. then smooth in oil or cocoa butter (avoid vaseline or baby oil) on it while your skin is still very wet. after it dries rub more into your skin. do this every night (or day depending on when you shower) and if that doesn't work after a few weeks, you might have to buy something called dermadoctor kp duty.

  6. QUESTION:
    How to reduce sight of Keratosis Pilaris?
    I've had red bumps on my arms for years now, and after much online research, I've come to the conclusion that these bumps are Keratosis Pilaris.

    I'm wanting to know how to reduce the sight of them. I've heard using a scrub with a loofah helps, but what kind of scrub? Also, I heard lotion helps, but I'm not sure what kind...Cetaphil, Eucerin, AmLactin, etc.

    I'd appreciate any advice! Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      I have had KP for a very long time and I have tried everything to get rid of it. But I have recently discovered a lotion called KP Duty. After two days, the red bumps were gone completely and the redness was reduced. It has been a week and the redness has been greatly reduced. However, the lotion is a bit pricey () but it does spread easily so you don't need a lot of it. Hope this helps. :)

  7. QUESTION:
    What is the best product for Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris on my buttocks and I have been researching different products. There are quite a few and I don't know which to go with. There's Glytone, KP duty, Biotreatment. Has anyone had success with any of these or a better product? I have dark olive skin and I scar very easily...even without picking, so I'm hoping for a product that helps with that as well.

    • ANSWER:
      I know how you feel. I had Keratosis Pilaris too and always wore long sleeves even when it was really hot. I started using Paula's Choice 2% BHA and it cleared up completely within a few weeks. I don't know if it works for everyone, but it seems to work for a lot of people. I've told several people about it and it has worked for everyone I've told. It is a fairly common thing.

      I started with their liquid formula but I also have used their 2% BHA body lotion. I recommend the liquid to start. You can find out a lot more about KP and the various treatments and products here: http://cosmeticscop.paulaschoice.com/keratosis-pilaris-solutions.aspx

      Good Luck!

  8. QUESTION:
    How to cover keratosis pilaris on arms with makeup for a day?
    My girlfriend wants to wear a sundress for a photo shoot but she has keratosis pilaris on her arms...google it if you don't know what it is and would like to know.

    She is mostly concerned with the redness.
    She already uses lotions etc. Doesn't help.

    Is there like a body makeup she can cover it with that will last ?

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Try the Dermablend Leg Cover... You can use it on arms as well.

      I have found 'Sheer Color'. It is the best for covering redness and leaving skin looking natural. I think it is only available through mail order. It was developed by dermatologists to hide redness, scars, and birth marks. It comes with a concealer. The makeup itself is mineral and gives good coverage, but it is light and natural.

      If her arms flare up, I have found a product that contains Extra Virgin Coconut Oil helps calm the redness down.

      You can also trry Pulse Dye Laser treatment. It is a little radical but it is long-lasting and helpful.

      Palladio is NOTHING compared to bareminerals from bare escentuals. The only thing I have to say is that they have poor costumer service and organization. The makeup will cover redness in a very natural way. It will look like you have no makeup on.

      One month ago I started using the Herbal wet & dry foundation and it is great. They are not very expensive, either. Well, on Amazon.com it is dollars but I found it in Puerto Rico at . :D

      I use eucerin 10% Urea lotion on my skin twice a day.

      I also use Everyday Minerals makeup. They have a mint concealer that is great for covering redness. Also another concealer is Bisque; it is quite pink in color but it somehow manages to cover redness very well. These are used under mineral foundation. You can get free samples, although you have to pay a bit for the postage.

      I am ignorant about UO, but this makeup is great for my skin! I bought it from the Sally Beauty Shop in the U.S. I think the mildness by being talc and rice may have something to do with it and I have found that titanium dioxide makes all my KP worse, whether on my face or arms (sunscreen) or what. It even has chamomile which I suspect is an allergen for me but maybe it's so little or it's tempered by other ingredients. I have even used it on my arms and legs when needed. O:)

      Try Roc Skin Foundation.

  9. QUESTION:
    When and how often should I apply Apple Cider Vinegar on my Keratosis Pilaris?
    I've been suffering from Keratosis Pilaris (those acne-like red bumps) on both of my upper arms for years now. After a lot of research, I came across a forum suggesting that Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV) can cure KP and many of the users praised ACV as a cure. For those whom it worked for: how often should I apply ACV on my arms and during which time of the day (morning, afternoon or night) ? Help is much appreciated!

    • ANSWER:
      once a day homie, there is a mixture on my source site that is suppose to work, i'm heading towards to store tonight to make my own lotion

  10. QUESTION:
    What are good treatments for keratosis pilaris?
    Hey, I have KP on my arms and a little on my face, (but not so much to really notice)..but I can't say the same for my arms,(they're pretty noticeable) soo..I was wondering if there are any GOOD TREATMENTS because unfortunately there is NO CURE!!!

    Oh and Im 13 soooo I would really like to wear a swim suit without being self-consious about my arms...

    Thanks a lot:)

    • ANSWER:
      Hi! ohmygosh, I had the exact same question about a week ago. Im 16, and Ive never really thought too much about KP, until I found out im taking a trip to california in a couple weeks, and I want to try really hard to look good in a bikini as well!

      The appearance of KP can be decreased by these main ingredients: urea, lactic acid, glycolic acid, salicylic acid, tretinoin, or vitamin D These are all keratosis fighting substances that rid your skin of those pesky little keratosis-clogged pores.

      the first four can be found in moisturizers. My tip to you would be to find a moisturizer high in one or several of these ingredients (that means anywhere from 5% of an ingredient to 15%). Vitamin D is found in sunlight, so being in the sun will help a lot (Just don't get sunburned, lol) When I went to taiwan a year ago, I noticed that along with my tan, my kp was completely gone! my skin was baby smooth, and it had never been that way before. I didn't know why, but after some research, I realized Vitamin D helps a lot with KP.

      I have been struggling with KP for almost my entire life, so i can understand the frustration and embarrassment you might experience from having this condition.

      Along with moisturizing day and night with lotions high in those ingredients, I also follow the advice given in this youtube video:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_5S3gmUrXk

      I've only been using her treatment for about 2 days, but my appearance of KP has already decreased tons! Im thinking that by another week, it'll be completely gone :). Oh, and in the video, the girl mentions clearasil's ultra exfoliating scrub. Unfortunately, that product was only available in Canada, so i was pretty disappointed. But then I realized that clearasil's ultra acne scrub is the same thing as the exfoliating scrub. It just has a different name I guess because of different locations.

      Anyways, good luck! I hope this helps with your KP, and that we both look good in time for bikni season :)

  11. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of Chicken Skin on arms and legs?
    I'm 15 years old, a girl, and I've had chicken skin for all of my life. It's only on my legs and arms, and it's really unattractive. I don't wear shorts or short sleeves because it's so embarrassing for me. I can't afford to go to a dermatologist, so what can I do at home? I've tried many lotions, and they never work. Any creams or anything that I can try?

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      What is sometimes referred to as Chicken Skin is actually a condition known as Keratosis Pilaris. (KP) It is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      Although KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured, it can be made less noticeable. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.
      - http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pil…
      - http://www.helpforkp.com/

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre…
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co…

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin.
      Check out this site for some great, inexpensive, homemade exfoliants you can try;
      - http://www.skinway.com/skincare_articles…

      The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers (Hot water tends to dry out the skin) and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when low humidity dries out the skin.

      Make sure to be drinking more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc… And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3’s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3’s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 – 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-…

      Hope this helps!

  12. QUESTION:
    How does one treat chronically dry skin?
    My skin tends to be very dry and it only gets worse during the winter months. Are there any good (affordable) skin products that provide very-dry skin with necessary relief? I use a lotion that contains AHAs for my KP so I can understand how it may dry up my skin even more.

    I would also appreciate any advice for home remedies or any supplements that I can take to better my skin. By the way, I do keep hydrated so I know that my dry skin is not a result of inadequate water intake.
    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I would suggest you use Dr Hess Udder Ointment found at www.udderointment.com. It is amazing on all skin conditions including dry skin, eczema, diaper rash, chafing, cuts, burns...you name it. It's been around for 100 years and is an old tried and true remedy that works fantastic on skin. Sign up as a subscriber and they will send you a coupon code for 20% off your order!

  13. QUESTION:
    How to get smooth, satin soft skin?
    Since I have KP (chicken something) I would love to know how I can minimize that and make my skin feel and appear smoother. Any tips?
    Cheers!! For arms and legs and if you know anything, butt lol.

    • ANSWER:
      Exfoliate your skin once a week with a real loofah. They are easy to find in drug stores. Make sure that after your shower, especially if you use very hot water, that you apply a good natural lotion to your skin before all of the water from the shower evaporates. Lastly, drink plenty of water- this keeps your skin hydrated and looking beautiful.

      If your skin has stretch marks or dimples and you want to wear a bikini or something skimpy, a quick way to alleviate some of your skin issues is to make some very strong coffee, let it cool, then wipe it onto problem areas with a cotton ball. The caffeine in strong coffee tightens your skin temporarily.

      Best wishes!

  14. QUESTION:
    can you recommend a whitening lotion for someone with keratosis pilaris?
    and can people with KP undergo skin bleaching?

    • ANSWER:
      most whitening cremes are for this purpose.

  15. QUESTION:
    Do you know a successful way of delaing with Keratosis Pilaris?
    It's not so much the little bumps that are a problem, but sometimes I get spots that come as a result of scratching at the little bumps, and that seem to take forever to hela so look horrid...ho-hum.

    I exfoliate daily, have tried vinegar with no luck, I try to moisturize as much as possible...other than medicated lotions, is there anything else that might help?

    • ANSWER:
      Try pure vitamin e oil. It sounds counter intuitive because you would think an oil would clog the pores resulting in more bumps, but it actually helped me get rid of KP. It gets rid of the bumps while also healing any abrasions that result from scratching at them. You can find pure vitamin e oil for pretty cheap at any drugstore like CVS or Rite Aid, just massage it into the effected areas. Results are almost immediate, but more obvious after a good exfoliation... which you can also use vitamin e oil for, just add coarse sea salt and scrub yourself down in the shower, then wash off with warm water and a good shower gel.

  16. QUESTION:
    Are there any new developments in Keratosis Pilaris treatments?
    I've had KP my whole life and nothing has ever helped including dermatolgist prescriptions and OTC creams, scrubs, and lotions. I have also tried KP Duty. Any Suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      Will laser hair removal help it?

  17. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of keratosis pilaris?
    I have what looks like goosebumps on the bottom part of my butt. It feels really bumpy, and looks quite unattractive. It's just a little bit pink. I'm assuming it's KP. So how do I get rid of it?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, KP is the abbreviation for keratosis pilaris.

      To CORRECT KP, here are the options:

      Over-the-counter - look for products with glycolic acid, lactic acid, or salicylic acid.

      Alpha Hydrox AHA Enhanced Lotion, Glytone Body Lotion, or any of Paula's Choice exfoliants is a good choice.

      Prescription - tretinoin

  18. QUESTION:
    I have goosebump type bumps on the back of my arms, What are they?
    They are also on my thighs and sides of my torso. I was told it was just dry skin, but i was also told is was something else. Some word with almost every letter of the alphabet in it. I use a heavy moisturizing body lotion, and they aren't going away. They don't itch or anything. Serious answers ONLY please!

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like KP:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keratosis_pilaris

      There are home remedies that work for some people, listed in one of the links on the wiki page. But your best bet would be to go to a dermatologist for professional treatment.

  19. QUESTION:
    What lotions can help my dry, red, bumpy skin on my arms?
    Hey everyone so i have extremely dry skin on my arms and i have a lot of red at the top, it looks like a rash with little red bumps...I really hate it, it makes me arms look patchy and dull...I've tried a lot of different body lotions but none of them help the redness that looks like a rash...or the bumps....Any suggestions on something that could work?

    Thanks for the help!

    • ANSWER:
      you most likely have KP (Keratosis Pilaris). It's a VERY common genetic defect that affects about 1/2 the adult population. It has to do with the way your skin sheds, and the protein is faulty, which make is not shed completely, and can get backed up (causing clogs of pores and creating bumps).

      Treatment depends on whom you ask, and tends to vary for person to person. I have to, too, and I tend to like exfoliting (a salt scrub 2-3x week, and daily moisturizing body wash with a mesh sponge), and daily lotion (put it on going WITH the direction of hair growth, I also find that a little bit of sun helps, too.

      But some people get bad results with exfoliation and sun, so experiement a little! It's hard to make it go away, but it can get better!

  20. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of red SPOTS (not bumps) from keratosis pilaris?
    So I have the dreadful KP and this past winter it was horrible!
    So I got a hydrocortisone cream and lactic acid cream from my dermatologist and it cleared all the bumps! However, now I have unsightly red spots that become super obvious when I'm cold.

    How can I make these go away??? They're very annoying :(

    • ANSWER:
      The dermatologist can probably give you something for that, too.

      I seem to remember Murad.com having something in their acne line that contained hydroquinone to lessen the red spots left behind by acne. Perhaps something like that might work.

      Use gentle shower soap and a good lotion like an unscented lotion like Eucerin to help with keeping your skin calm and non-irritated.

  21. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of Keratosis Pilaris fast?
    i really dont like this, i cant wear short sleeves shirts, i need help !!! Give me a lot of informations as you guys can , and also what type of lotions work for Keratosis Pilaris?? Aloe vera lotion? thanks ;)

    • ANSWER:
      I found that champori cream for psoriasis clears my kp better than anything else: takes just a few days and then my skin stays smooth for months on end. Try it: champori is available without prescription and comes with money back guarantee, so if it doesnt work for you - it's free.
      Best,
      Mol.

  22. QUESTION:
    Anybody got any thing to treat Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have had KP since before i can remember. It gets really annoying. The bumps get red and itchy and they are hard to cover up. I know there is no cure, but does anybody know of anything to make it look better and slightly clear up?

    • ANSWER:
      Aspirin Mask

      Why does it work?
      Aspirin is actually a form of Beta Hydroxy Acids or BHAs, which are found in many skin creams and work by exfoliating the dull, dead layers of skin, revealing fresh new skin underneath. Over time, BHAs can help clarify skin tone and promote healing of blemishes.

      However, do not use the aspirin mask if you have a sensitivity to BHAs or if you have very sensitive skin, or obviously if you are allergic to aspirin!

      How do you make it?
      The Aspirin mask must be made with uncoated, disolvable tablets. Take two or three tablets and dissolve in a teaspoon/tablespoon of warm water.

      To Apply
      Spread the mixture on the area, and leave for a few minutes until it dries. Very gently rub the mask for about 10 seconds, to exfoliate the skin. Rinse off with tepid water. Remember to moisturize as BHAs can be drying.

      I find this an excellent mask to use once or twice a week.

      Make sure you moisturize with something that has little to no fragrance as most fragrant lotions have alcohol, very drying! I prefer to use grape seed oil as is absorbs easily.

  23. QUESTION:
    Are there any non-prescription lotions for Keratosis Pilaris to remove the redness?
    I have been able to minimize the bumps - but now I can't get rid of the red dots the condition leaves behind. If there is anything that can be done to make it look like I don't have KP - I want to know about it!

    • ANSWER:
      they have some kind of cream for sun spots that is supposed to fade the (scar) i dont know of this illness so if it is like a sore that cause a actuall scar try maderma its alot of work but maybe it'll fade it out. good luck

  24. QUESTION:
    Does KP Duty for Keratosis Pilaris really work?
    I have had Keratosis Pilaris ever since I can remember. And I really can not stand it. It makes me feel so ugly, very self conscious and I absolutely hate my arms. I know that there is no proven way to cure it 100%. But I have heard and read great things about KP Duty. Does anyone know if it works pretty well, or if anything else works for this? Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Yes, it works because of glycolic acid.

      I have to say it is expensive for 4 ounces.

      You can get similar product for cheaper: Alpha Hydrox AHA Enhanced Lotion with 10% glycolic acid.

  25. QUESTION:
    What exactly are bath oils? Would they benefit my dry skin, and if so where could I find some?
    I have dry skin with KP, but I hate having to put on lotion all the time after bathing because I'm also hairy and that means extra time rubbing it in to get rid of the film. I would rather use some very effective moisturizing directly in the shower or bath. All the moisturizing cleaners I've tried, including Dove and Cetaphil and Aveeno, have not worked well enough for me. I need something to not only moisturize but also lock it in.

    • ANSWER:
      If u want to lock it in then u put it on right after your shower because the heat open your pores and as soon as you r normal temp then they close.Bath oil is really good because your skin will soak it up in the warm bath.If you go to a nateral herbal etc store they have better products for baths but if nothing like that is around i would recomend oil of olay .It is really good and so is ponds.If you shave your legs don't do it with bath oil in the tub cause u can take chunks of skin off n not even no it oh ya avon has an oil the skin so soft is really really good to .Try the avon one first then oil of olay if that isn't good enough for u .then the ponds.There is also a product from different brands that has a body cream rinse for in the bath n for after you wash u use it while u r in the tub and that is good stuff to the one i use is olay moisturinse in the shower body lotion n it smells awsome to.I hope that helps.

  26. QUESTION:
    What are some products for keratosis pilaris?
    i have bad kp on my upper arms, its starting to appear on my thighs and face. it makes my skin slightly dry and extremely bumpy. i have already tried Amlactin. are there any lotions, scrubs, or anything that would help get rid of it for a good price? thanks (:

    • ANSWER:
      Speak to your Dermatologist--they can prescribe special lotions that may be covered by insurance. Also the fact that it is spreading should be addressed by a medical person.

  27. QUESTION:
    Is There Anyway To Get Rid Of KP?
    I'm fourteen and I've had keratosis pilaris for as long as I can remember. I only have it on my arms, but I am tired of being self conscious about it. So, if anyone can help me out with any tips to get rid of it that would be great. I already exfoliate and use good lotion.

    • ANSWER:
      http://www.helpforkp.com/

      i personally have it.. it gets worse in the winter... but good luck.. look on this web site it might help you <3

  28. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of Keratosis pilaris on arms?
    What's a natural remedy that doesn't require lotion or cream etc. I read somewhere someone was talk about apple cider vinaigre but they didn't say how they used it. Anyone have any personal experience with getting rid of KP?

    • ANSWER:

  29. QUESTION:
    What are some good remedies for Keratosis Pilaris?
    I'd prefer anything that has helped you with KP...but all is appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      Most people say to exfoliate and moisturize, which usually works pretty well but can end up irritating you skin a good deal. There's no actual cure for it, but it usually gets better with age (It's also hereditary, so chances are your mother or father has it as well). Here's a bit of an article that helped me a good deal!

      "You can soften and help slough off bumps by rubbing them with a mixture of equal parts petroleum jelly and either water or cold cream. If that doesn't work, prescription Retin-A probably will, but it can irritate the surrounding skin. A better alternative: prescription LactiCare-HC Lotion 2 1/2%, which contains lactic acid to dissolve dead skin cells and hydrocortisone to soothe any acid-induced irritation. Rub lotion onto bumps twice a day until they clear up."

      I don't have the link to the entire article (That actually might have been all they put) but I got it from http://www.webmd.com/

      Don't stress too much about it though, I have it pretty bad, but most people don't even notice. Even if they do, they could care less!

  30. QUESTION:
    Can I Get Rid of These Weird Bumps I Have on my Arms?
    They're nothing serious, I'm sure. I've had them as long as I remember. They're like little permanent goosebumps, and they're a bit red.... My mom also has them on her legs. I tried to help them with lotion, and it helps a little, but not much. Is there any way to make the appearance and feeling less noticeable?

    • ANSWER:
      by the sounds of it you have KP (keratosis pilaris), also known as the chicken skin condition. It;s just a build-up of karatin around the hair follicle of your skin. there is no cure, but i would recommond using KP double duty, found at Sephora.

  31. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of KP on back arms and face?
    After years and years and one year of high school I noticed how much I HATE my kp right now its bugging me. I see people with silky arms and idt about hair or anything but this kp is driving my head up the walll.... I hate that all these girls can wear tank tops to school and i cant cause of it.. and i want a nice smooth face too... PLEASE HELP ME. Im gettting desperate

    • ANSWER:
      I have it too. There is no cure :( When I was in high school I had a little on my cheeks and on my upper arms. They say it is supposed to get better as you get older. Unfortunately, I am 31 and I still won't wear tank tops, but the bumps on my cheeks went away. I also feel so jealous of people with nice smooth arms. One thing I can tell you is DON'T scrub it. Throw away your loofah sponges if you have them. They make it worse. I got rid of mine a couple of months ago and it has gotten a little less red (still there though). Don't treat it with acne cleanser and use lots of lotion. They sell some creams on the internet. I haven't tried them though. I am so sorry for you - I know how you feel. There are so many people out there with it, more than you realize. I think the stats say one out of three!

  32. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of keratosis pilaris?
    What's a natural remedy that doesn't require lotion or cream etc. I read somewhere someone was talk about apple cider vinaigre but they didn't say how they used it. Anyone have any personal experience with getting rid of KP? I don't want to use any products made for this whatsoever!

    • ANSWER:
      Try squeezing lemon juice and keep it in the frige over night in a bottle with a few garlic cloves mashed/chopped in it.

      Rub it on your area with KP and leave it there to dry as much as possible. Make sure it doesn't go into your eyes or other sensetive places.

  33. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of keratosis pelariis!?!?
    I've had KP my whole life I'm 14 And I have these bumps and acne on my upper arms and I'm afraid to wear tank tops outside. I know it's a hereditary skin disorder but I'm wondering if there's a treAtment, cure, ect. Pleazzzzzz help

    • ANSWER:
      I've tried lots of things personally, and none of them really work. I've tried prescription lotion even, per bottle with insurance did nothing. The best thing I have found (with doctors advise) is bathing in a hot bath at night and getting some sun on my arms. When it's summer time and I have a little tan the bumps go away pretty well. One last thing that works ok for me is Miracle II soap and lotion. You have to find that at a health food store or on the web. I used it for the first time this winter, and my bumps have been a lot less than past years. I hope you find a combo that works for you, and don't dispare cause my doctor said sometimes it goes away as we get older! Good luck!

  34. QUESTION:
    How do i get rid of these red dots on my arms?
    they are not freckles!!
    ive had them since i was little.
    my brother and sisters have them too.
    i forgot what its called but theyre not freckles.
    theyre red, sometimes they stick out like pimples. but they cover my arms. what is it and how do i get rid of it? (i use uncented lotion)

    • ANSWER:
      It may be keratosis pilaris.
      For an accurate, professional diagnosis you would need to consult your doctor or a certified dermatologist.

      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.
      - http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pil…
      - http://www.helpforkp.com/

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre…
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co…

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin.
      Check out this site for some great, inexpensive, homemade exfoliants you can try;
      - http://www.skinway.com/skincare_articles…

      The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers (Hot water tends to dry out the skin) and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when low humidity dries out the skin.

      You should drink more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc… And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3’s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3’s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 – 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-…

      Hope this helps!

  35. QUESTION:
    Do you know any way to get rid of or decrease the look of KP (chicken skin) besides the dermadoctor lotion?
    I only have it on my upper arms, and i dont have it really bad, but it embarrasses me. I'll take home remedies along with store-bought products. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Have you tried aloe vera soap? - natural ingredient.

      It's cheap and worth a try before using more harmful chemicals.

  36. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of bumps on my skin?
    I have them on my arm and on my thighs.. they look like goosebumps. If you squeeze the bumps, little white stuff comes out. I've had it all my life and I have no idea what it is! Does anyone know what it is and how to get rid of it? Everyone in my family has it too. I've been putting lotion on, and it helps a little but it doesn't get rid of it all. Do you know what I have? Thanks for taking the time to answer! =]

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like you have something called Keratosis Pilaris. I have it too. You said it looks like goosebumps, right? It's basically an excess of Keratin in your skin that causes bumps to form over hair follicles. You can use all the lotion you want, but it never seems to completely help. supposedly you can use something called KP duty, its available at Sephora. I've never used it, but its supposed to work well.

  37. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of KP?
    I've tried washing my arms with soap and water two times a day, Noxzema, lotion, drinking lots of water, and I even tried acne products like Clearasil. Nothing seems to work! Gahh, please please please help me! D:

    • ANSWER:
      I've been using regular bodywash ( aveeno is the best ) with those hand sponge....not the loofah kind...a lil on the rougher side..and then I use Eucerin plus with alpha hydroxy after shower, which does the trick....

  38. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of Keratosis Pilaris (Without lotions/medications)?
    I'm 14 and I had KP for a few years now.
    Stop with the Spam!

    • ANSWER:
      Sadly there is no cure for it):
      I also have it, but I have found that carrot juice does help a lot! Just drink around a glass a day and it will improve. Also remember to be in the sun as much as you can.. it helps clear it as well.
      And keep your skin moisturized with lotion or a moisturizer!

      gooooluck!

      xoxo,
      ASH:)

  39. QUESTION:
    I have kp scars on my arms, what type of cream is best at getting rid of scars, a bleaching cream perhaps?
    my upper arms are covered with scars from when i had bad keratosis pilaris and i would scratch and pick at the bumps, i have the kp under control but the scars are still there. i exfoliate and moisturize but what can i use to get rid of these brown spots?
    i recently tried a skin fade cream which had hydroquinone as the main ingredient along with vitamin c and spf 15, it was working great but after 2 weeks or so it started making me itch and my arms began to turn red so i stopped.
    is there a good well known bleaching cream out there that i should try?
    AFRICAN BEAUTY WHERE CAN I FIND FAIR&WHITE PRODUCTS??????
    IVE ACTUALLY HEARD A LOT ABOUT THEM BUT CANNOT FIND THEM, I HEAR SOME PEOPLE SELL FAKES WHICH ARE DANGEROUS.

    • ANSWER:
      please use fair and whote. this is by far the best product i have ever ever used. i had a skin disorder called Pityriasis rosea it left my skin a messed uo. I had dark veins all over my legs. I also pick at my skin at times and i had scars from mosiquito bites on my arms and legs. i was running out of options. i dreaded the summer months because i knew it would be too hot for me to cover up with long sleeve clothes. i began using this product a year ago. it works so well. i saw reults within the first 2-3 weeks. everyday i thouroughly wash my face then apply sunscreen regardless of the weather. the fair and white product line includes lotions,creams, sprays. and soaps. i had some minor acne scarring on my face after washing my face i apply palmers ambi cream then fair and white lotion. i simpathize for you and i know exactly what you are going though. please use this product if you want an improved appearance in your skin.

  40. QUESTION:
    What to use for Kerarosis Pilaris?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris and would like to know what everyone out there uses for theirs. I cant realistically spend the money it takes to buy things like "KP Duty" so I wanna know what different things people have used with results.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello,
      Keratosis pilaris occurs when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris, however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. Treatment includes tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream or Adapalene, a retinoid medication. Exfoliation, intensive moisturizing creams, creams and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. I hope it helps. Take care and regards.

  41. QUESTION:
    why did my keratosis pilaris turn purple?
    i have keratosis pilaris all over my arms and tummy area and it got really really bad and red because of the cold winter. that convinced my mum to take me to see a pharmacist and the pharmacist gave me some calamine lotion. i've been applying it and applying moisturizer (it really really hurts when i apply them), it really helps calm the itch and i scratch less but now my whole arm is purplish and so is the skin at my tummy area. is this good or bad?

    • ANSWER:
      had bad case of KP on my arms for years...went to doc, dermo. and tried many things..nothing worked and then I found something that cleared it up and made my arms feel like silk. Olay Total Effects 7 in 1 moisturizer (NOT the one w/ spf) It's in the wrinkle cream section and -22... try it for 3 days and maybe you'll have same success w/ it..GREAT product to clear up KP

  42. QUESTION:
    How do you get rid of little red bumps on your upper arms?
    Mine look like pimples. They kind of hurt when I pick at them, and they're really annoying. I've had them my whole life, as long as I remember. Any tips?

    • ANSWER:
      ah sounds like you have KP (keratosis pilarsis) ii have it too D:
      if you go onto sephora they have this body scrub and lotion combo that supposedly works for a lot of people - it didn't work for me though :[[
      but it's supposed to be good !! so you might want to try that out ~
      goodluck !!

      http://sephora.com/search/search_results.jhtml;jsessionid=YPIEE0O5ZCIPWCV0KQNQ5UQ?command=text&attr1=kP+duty&attr2=&%2Fcom%2Flvmh%2Fcommerce%2Fcatalog%2Fsearch%2Fiphrase%2Fproxy%2FIPhraseSearchFormHandler.search=search&_D%3A%2Fcom%2Flvmh%2Fcommerce%2Fcatalog%2Fsearch%2Fiphrase%2Fproxy%2FIPhraseSearchFormHandler.search=+&searchString=kP+duty&x=0&y=0&_DARGS=%2Fincludes%2FsearchFinder.jhtml

  43. QUESTION:
    Is there a good remedy for keratosis pilaris?
    I have it on my legs, the back of my upper arms, and my rear also. I have had it for a very long time and tried a lot of things but haven't found anything to work!

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis Pilaris can NEVER be cured unfortunately...
      I have been dealing with this since highschool & for 10 years almost now...
      consuming sugar is known to make it worse..

      the only thing I have found to work is from the website www.dermadoctor.com

      the first product is called DERMAdoctor KP Duty Dermatologist Body Scrub with Chemical + Physical Medi-Exfoliation
      and here is the website direct link...
      http://www.dermadoctor.com/product.asp?p...
      the second one is called derma doctor KP lotion
      and here is the direct link
      http://www.dermadoctor.com/product.asp?p...

      Also.. *Note: If you use any prescription medication (lotions) from your dermatiologist, it will get WORSE before it gets better.. be prepared to experience that..

      If you want my opinion on the prescription lotion (ex: lachydrin, Amlactin, etc... are not succesfful)

      This skin condition sucks. I have tried almost everything out there & this works pretty well I must say! It is made especially for keratosis pilaris! Hope this helps! I know I wanted everything I could when I was first dealing with this!

  44. QUESTION:
    How to get to of keratosis pilaris?
    What's a natural remedy that doesn't require lotion or cream etc. I read somewhere someone was talk about apple cider vinaigre but they didn't say how they used it. Anyone have any personal experience with getting rid of KP? I don't want to use any kind of lotion meant for this whatsoever! ( just throwing that in there because I asked this before!)

    • ANSWER:

  45. QUESTION:
    CHICKEN SKIN aka KERATOSIS PILARIS, how do I get rid of these suckers?
    Does anyone know how to reduce the appearence of chicken skin or also known as keratosis pilaris. I hate having chicken skin, it's so embarassing. I hate showing my arms and legs or any part that has it. ARRRGH! Anyone else have this problem? Please help, I need some magic lotion or something to get rid of them somehow.

    • ANSWER:
      I have it too & it sucks!! I have previously used Am Lactin or Lac Hydrin, Retin-A based creams, and KP duty. The KP duty used to work for me, but doesn't any longer. It might work you you & is available at Sephora.

      Check out http://www.keratosispilaris.org/

      I found this online and am going to give it a try.

      - First I use a thick loofah sponge or buff-puff on the affected areas. I do this daily and I only use Dove Nutrium Body Wash with my sponge. I have tried several moisturizing body washes, and this one has proven to be the best for me. It is a dual formula that contains a gentle cleanser and a moisturizing lotion at the same time. It works great. When using the sponge, scrub as hard as you can on the affected area, and in a circular motion. Exfoliation is very important, especially since the affected areas are so dry. (Note: Dove has also recently come out with a Dove Nutrium Bar! So now I use both, and they are great. They make my skin so soft and silky, and the moisturizers are very good for the keratosis pilaris.)

      - After I exfoliate with this body wash, I then apply an over the counter lotion that has worked wonders for my keratosis pilaris. Neutrogena makes this lotion and it’s called “Multi-Vitamin Acne Treatment”. I know what you are thinking; keratosis pilaris is not acne. No it’s not, but for some reason this stuff works. In my reading and research on the subject, I ran across a treatment that recommended using a moisturizer that contained a small amount of salicylic acid. This product contains both. It is full of vitamins and moisturizers that are great for your skin, and it also contains this salicylic acid. If you apply this lotion right after you have scrubbed with the Dove Nutrium, it will give you results within 2 or 3 days. It did for me!

      - I also apply the Neutrogena Multi Vitamin Acne Treatment at night before going to bed. So I am applying it twice a day, once after showering and exfoliating, and once at bedtime.

      - Adding a humidifier in your bedroom will also help to clear your skin. The moisture will hydrate your dry skin while you sleep at night and help in clearing up the keratosis pilaris.

      - This next “treatment” is one I have found on my own and doctors do not recommend it. I am not telling anyone to do this, I am simply telling you what has worked in clearing up my skin condition. Tanning in the sun or in a tanning bed/salon. I like to tan anyway, so by trial and error I found that it cleared my skin. I started going to a tanning bed 2 or 3 times a week at first, and then dropped down to once a week. Each time I would tan for 12 to 15 minutes. That is not a lot of exposure, and it cleared my skin better than ANYTHING else I have ever done. I still have occasional problems with my arms, but my legs cleared right up and those bumps have never returned to this day, and I have not tanned in over 6 months. So I am very pleased with these results.

      Again, I am not recommending or condoning tanning or sunbathing, but I am telling you that it has helped to clear up my terrible case of Keratosis Pilaris.

      Doing these things consistently has helped me tremendously, but if you miss a day, you pay! Consistency is the key.

  46. QUESTION:
    What are the most affective treatments for Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have a mild case of Keratosis Pilaris on my forearms & biceps. I know there's no permanent cure for this skin condition, but I would like to clear it up for the most part.

    • ANSWER:
      I have keratosis pilaris on my upper arms, and I use Aveeno Daily Moisturizing Lotion. It works better than anything else that I've tried, and it's much cheaper than prescription creams! Keeping KP moist is key to reducing the bumps and redness. It works for me!

  47. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of little bumps on my skin?
    I have nice skin it's mostly smooth but all over my arms there are little bumps. I know it's not a rash because they're not at all red, it's not pimples either, and they aren't goosebumps because even when i'm sweating hot I can still feel the bumps. What do I do to get rid of them?

    • ANSWER:
      I have the same problem. What you have is called keratosis pilaris. It is where the tiny hair follicles get clogged causing rough bumps. Don't use anything too abrasive on it as this can irritate it worse. You need to use a moisturizing cleanser with a washcloth and you need to use a lotion containing either lactic acid or alpha hydroxy acid. The lotion will exfoliate the bumps away and keep your skin moisturized. You should use it twice per day until your bumps go away, then you can revert to once a day to maintain smoothness. You can find these lotions at Walgreen's, cvs, or any other drug store. I like AmLactin it works really well for me. For more information on KP go to this website they have a lot of good info (and aren't trying to sell anything :>) http://www.keratosis-pilaris.com/types.php. You can also find a lot of info just by looking it up on yahoo.

  48. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of bumps on the back of my arms?
    I have small bumps on the back of my upper arms. I used to think that they were caused by some kind of vitamin deficiency, but I take a multivitamin every day, and yet the bumps are still there. How do I get rid of them?

    • ANSWER:
      You have keratosis pilaris. You can go to a regular doctor or dermatologist to get some cream or lotion to treat it or you can also get a product called KP Duty at Sephora.

  49. QUESTION:
    How do you make the skin on your arms smoother?
    My upper arms seem normal, but they feel as though little itte-bitte pimples are covering the surface. How do you clear the skin and make it smoother?

    • ANSWER:
      i think i know what you're talking about. i have the same thing. it's little bumps, and they don't hurt, but they're sometimes dry and almost always annoying.

      Keratosis pilaris (KP, also follicular keratosis) is a very common genetic follicular condition that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin, hence referred to as chicken skin. It most often appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms (though the lower arms can also be affected), and can also occur on the thighs and tops of legs, flanks, buttocks, or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet). Less commonly, lesions appear on the face, which may be mistaken for acne.

      Classification
      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40% of the adult population and approximately 50%-80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men.

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faciei (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.

      Symptoms and signs
      Keratosis pilaris occurs when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore. This causes the formation of hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). The painless bumps are skin-colored, although they can become red and inflamed at times. Usually many plugs form in an area, causing patches of rough, bumpy skin. This gives the skin a sandpaper or goose flesh appearance. This may be more severe in the winter or times of low humidity, which causes the skin to become dry. It will eventually resolve on its own.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin's "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. The hair, then, grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated. The hair can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though removal can lead to scarring.

      Keratosis pilaris may be hereditary. It is present in babies and continues into adulthood, but is uncommon in elderly people. It is most obvious during the teenage years. KP is prevalent in those who are overweight, or have atopic dermatitis, ichthyosis, or descend from Celtic backgrounds. Keratosis pilaris occurs in otherwise healthy people.

      Treatment
      There is no cure for Keratosis pilaris, but treatment is available. One option is to use a loofa to remove the dead, dry skin. Another option is to use a dermotologist-prescribed cream or lotion that should be applied daily. The best lotions for this condition would have urea, 15% alphahydroxy acids, or Retin A in them. Over-the-counter lotions work as well and should be applied after showering, as well as several times a day. The lotions are often soothing and can help improve the appearance of the skin. Dermotologists also recommend mild peeling agents, or alpha hydroxy acids, that may open up the plugged follicles. Antibiotics may also help in some cases where the bumps are red and badly inflamed. To temporarily reduce redness but not roughness, pulse dye laser treatment or intense pulsed light (IPL) can be done.

      Although it may clear up with treatment, reccurance of KP is very likely. Therefore, treatment should be continued regularly. It may take several months to years for the condition to completely clear up.

      A dermotologist or physician can usually diagnose a patient for Keratosis pilaris by visually inspecting the patient's skin.


lotion for kp

Home Remedies For Actinic Keratosis

Bec5 Curaderm cream is a topical cream designed and developed for the treatment of any kind of sun damage including skin cancer. Composed of a specially formulated purified plant extract from the Solanum Sodomaeum, the so-called Devil's apple- which is found in the Australasia region and extract, known as Solasodine Glycosides, found in the eggplant and aubergine, curaderm cream for skin cancer is the most effective cream available to treat any kind of sun damage.

Discovered by scientist Bill E. Cham, Bec5 cream has been clinically found to effectively treat non-melanoma skin cancers, specifically, Basal cell carcinomas (BCC) and Squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) along with treating all signs and kinds of sun damage and benign tumors such as Keratoses, keratoacanthomas, sun spots and age spots. Also featured on the Dr Oz show, BEC5 Curaderm cream for skin cancer was propounded by the well known health and fitness guru, Dr. Mercola for effectively treating skin cancer without surgery.

Bec 5 curaderm cream - a well known age spots cream and sun spot creams has been estimated be used by over 80,000 people for treating and regressing their non melanoma skin cancers. The number is still growing given the skin cream's effectiveness and people's urge to go for non invasive option for the treatment of their skin cancer treatment and other skin ailments caused due to the damaging effect of sun rays.

In a clinical study involving 72 patients, treatment with BEC5 cream resulted in the regression of all treated lesions (56 actinic keratoses, 39 BCCs and 29 SCCs), with 100% healed after 1 to 13 weeks of treatment. Apart from this, as per the latest research and trial work carried in 10 of the famous UK hospitals, has found that when curaderm cream for skin cancer applied religiously on the affected areas of BCC patients two times a day over a period of 8 weeks, completely cured 78% of the patients.

The remaining 22% of patients had also improved but needed a marginally longer treatment time of 13 weeks. All this was facilitated without chemotherapy, radiotherapy or surgery. Dermatologists Royal London Hospital have cited Bec5's efficacy as 'safe and effective' and 'an ideal therapy for outpatient treatment.' However, patients need to be patient with the treatment as they can find initial reddening and worsening of the area, which will only desist with time and is a sign that the cream is working.

Recommended use is twice daily on the affected area, once the skin has been cleansed first. Bec5 side effects are limited to this skin reddening, possible skin ulceration while the process takes place.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Has anyone successfully used a wart treatment from any of the websites that are out there??
    They all sound convincing.

    • ANSWER:
      I have used compound W on actinic keratosis successfully
      and I have used a home made remedy that I learned from my east indian friends.
      make a paste of neem oil and turmeric. rough up the wart and apply the paste, cover with a bandaid.
      if the wart isn't gone within a week, then take 3 neem bark or leaf capsules per day, 1 turmeric, 1 ginger, 1 cinnamon, until it is gone. I have never seen this treatment fail.

  2. QUESTION:
    Is this an age spot?
    I have this funny little spot that has developed on my forehead. It is what I would normally call an "age spot" or "sun spot," but it continuously sloughs off dead skin. Can age spots do this, or is this something different? I have an appt with a derm, but it's an 8-wk waitlist, so if I can find out what it is and start a home remedy, I'd prefer to go that route. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like a typical actinic keratosis spot. (I probably mangled the spelling on that.) They often slough skin yet remain. A dermatologist can put an end to that easily. There's no home remedy that will remove it.

      Aren't you sorry you didn't wear sunscreeen? [wink] I know I am.

  3. QUESTION:
    does anyone know anything about hyperkeratosis?
    symptoms, diagnosis, progosis, treatment...

    • ANSWER:
      Hyperkeratosis is a thickening of the outer layer of the skin, which contains a tough, protective protein called keratin. This thickening is often part of the skin's normal protection against rubbing, pressure and other forms of local irritation, and causes calluses and corns on hands and feet or whitish areas inside the mouth. Other forms of hyperkeratosis can occur as part of the skin's defense against chronic (long-lasting) inflammation, infection, the radiation of sunlight or irritating chemicals. Less often, hyperkeratosis develops on skin that has not been irritated. These types of hyperkeratosis may be part of an inherited condition, may begin soon after birth and can affect skin on large areas of the body.
      Symptoms-
      Many forms of hyperkeratosis are painless. However, corns, calluses and plantar warts can cause a great deal of discomfort.
      Diagnosis
      Depending on your specific pattern of skin symptoms, your doctor will ask whether you have a family history of skin problems, and whether you have a personal history of allergies, frequent sun exposure, use of dentures or orthodontic dental appliances, unconscious chewing on your cheek or tongue or use of smokeless tobacco.
      Sometimes, your doctor can diagnose the cause of your hyperkeratosis by reviewing your history and symptoms and by examining your skin. This often is the case with corns, calluses, warts and chronic eczema. If you have chronic eczema that could be allergy-related, the doctor may suggest that you have allergy testing.
      If your doctor suspects that you have seborrheic keratoses, he or she may use a handheld magnifying lens to examine the affected skin for horn pearls. These are very tiny white or black balls of keratin that can usually be seen on the skin in areas of seborrheic keratoses. In some cases, a biopsy may be taken to confirm the diagnosis. In a biopsy, a small piece of tissue is removed to be examined in a laboratory. If your doctor suspects that you have actinic keratoses, you may need to have a skin biopsy to confirm the diagnosis and rule out skin cancer.
      If your child develops hyperkeratosis in many areas of his or her body, your doctor may review your family history and skin symptoms to determine if your child has an inherited disorder.
      Prognosis
      Most forms of hyperkeratosis are local skin problems that have a good prognosis. Actinic keratoses can develop into squamous cell skin cancer.
      Treatment-
      The treatment of hyperkeratosis depends on the type and possible cause:
      Corns and calluses — Using moleskin or padding next to the affected area can help to relieve pain. Avoid further irritation that stimulates growth of the corn or callus. Never try to shave away or cut a corn or callus by yourself. Consult with your health care professional or a podiatrist.
      Warts — Your health care professional or dermatologist can remove warts by freezing them with liquid nitrogen (cryosurgery), vaporizing them with a laser or trimming them away surgically. If the treatment does not reach the layer of skin infected with the virus, the wart can come back in the same place. Repeat treatments may be necessary. Although warts can be treated at home with nonprescription remedies, self-treatment may take longer than treatments in a medical setting. Self-treatment may be more effective after you have been treated by a health care professional, especially if a wart appears to be large or deep. If you have diabetes or poor circulation, you should always be treated by a health care professional to avoid injury and infection.
      Chronic eczema — Your doctor usually will treat eczema by prescribing a corticosteroid ointment or cream for you to rub into the affected area. Moisturizing the skin is also very important.
      Lichen planus — Like chronic eczema, lichen planus usually is treated with corticosteroid ointment or creams.
      Actinic keratoses — Your doctor may use cryosurgery to remove a single actinic keratosis. Multiple keratoses can be treated with skin peels, laser therapy or dermabrasion.
      Seborrheic keratoses — These growths can be removed with cryosurgery with a scalpel.
      Inherited conditions — There is no cure for these conditions. To treat large areas of scaly skin, your doctor may suggest bathing with bath oil or rubbing special emollients into the skin.


home remedies for actinic keratosis

Precancerous Skin Condition

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Does Skin cancer always start on the skin?
    is it possible for it to say develop on the lymph nodes (is that what they are called) first, or does it always begin on the skin and then work its way inwards ?

    sorry if the question is dumb, just curious about this .

    • ANSWER:
      Yes.

      These small, scaly patches are caused by too much sun, and commonly occur on the head, neck, or hands, but can be found elsewhere. They can be an early warning sign of skin cancer, but it’s hard to tell whether a particular patch will continue to change over time and become cancerous. Most do not, but doctors recommend early treatment to prevent the development of squamous cell skin cancer. Fair-skinned, blond, or red-haired people with blue or green eyes are most at risk.
      Related to actinic keratosis, actinic cheilitis is a precancerous condition that usually appears on the lower lips. Scaly patches or persistent roughness of the lips may be present. Less common symptoms include swelling of the lip, loss of the sharp border between the lip and skin, and prominent lip lines. Actinic cheilitis may evolve into invasive squamous cell carcinoma if not treated.

      WebMD.com

      Beware of Cancer Symptoms: Sudden loss of weight/stamina, anemia, unbearable pains in any organ despite medication, neuralgia, fatigue-getting extremely tired for a little or no work, loss of appetite, unhealed wound in any part of the body for years together, chronic constipation, chronic hemorrhages, hemoptysis. etc. Cancer may affect from any organ to any organ[s]/system[s].
      TARGET THERAPY* It is the God-given therapy communicated to the mankind through THE RIGVEDA, one of the Hindu scriptures.
      Target Therapy---Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies, [comprising Ayurveda, Homeopathy, Bio-chemic salts, Herbal Remedies, Yoga/Meditation, Magneto-therapy, Sidha, etc.,] U can have sizable & perceivable relief in 45-90 days. @ no/affordable costs, No side effects, and No Hospitalization

      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse 'Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.

  2. QUESTION:
    Can you get blood tested for skin cancer?
    Like melenoma or basal cell? Or do you actually have to have a dermatologist/doctor look at your body to see? I have a doctors apt. today because I went in a tanning booth for a week straight a few months ago and not that I have noticed anything new on my body that would worry me, but still, I am a little concerned because I am very fair and I have a family history of skin cancer and I wanted to see how I would get checked for that. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      The Dermatologist should be able to tell by looking closely at the patient. A basal cell carcinoma is not considered a cancer but is something that should be watched as a precancerous condition. A melanoma would be a growth on the skin that is malignant or non, and would need immediate attention (removal) and treatment if necessary. I had malignant melanoma of the nose, surgery, plastic surgery repair later and no further problems, but not something to delay---STAY OUT OF TANNING BOOTHS.

  3. QUESTION:
    What happens if my endometrial biopsy is abnormal?
    I know that I should have asked my doctor but he seemed to be in a hurry. But what is the next step if the test comes up abnormal.

    • ANSWER:
      What is the test?

      Doctors take biopsies of areas that look abnormal and use them to detect cancer, precancerous cells, infections, and other conditions. For some biopsies, the doctor inserts a needle into the skin and draws out a sample; in other cases, tissue is removed during a surgical procedure.

      This test takes a tissue sample from the lining of your uterus (the endometrium) to evaluate it for problems, including endometrial cancer, that might explain unusual bleeding.

      Back to top >
      How do I prepare for the test?

      If you are not bleeding heavily, you might want to take an NSAID medicine such as ibuprofen one to two hours before the test, to reduce the possibility of uterine cramps during the procedure. Ask your physician for a recommendation ahead of time.

      Back to top >
      What happens when the test is performed?

      This test is performed in the doctor's office. It begins with a pelvic examination (see page 44). Then, after cleaning your vagina and cervix (the entrance to the uterus, visible from your vagina) with antibacterial soap, the doctor might put a clamp on your cervix to hold it steady. He or she inserts a flexible, sterile plastic instrument called a pipelle, which looks like a drinking straw, through the opening in your cervix and positions it several inches into the uterus. Then the doctor pulls a thin wire out of the center of the pipelle. As the rod is pulled out, the pipelle becomes hollow and creates suction, drawing some of the cells from the lining of your uterus into the pipelle. To get a good sample, the doctor will move the pipelle forward and backward a few times before removing it. The cell sample is deposited in some fluid to be examined later under a microscope. The entire procedure takes about 10 minutes.

      Back to top >
      What risks are there from the test?

      You might have pelvic cramps (sometimes intense) during the procedure and sometimes for a day or two afterward; you may also experience a small amount of vaginal bleeding. It is extremely rare to have heavy bleeding or to develop an infection that needs treatment.There is also a small risk of disturbing a very early pregnancy. To guard against this, your doctor might order a pregnancy test before performing the biopsy.

      Back to top >
      Must I do anything special after the test is over?

      Call your doctor if you develop a fever of over 100° F, or if you have vaginal bleeding that lasts longer than two days or is heavier than your normal menstrual period. Your doctor may also recommend avoiding sexual intercourse until two or three days after any bleeding has stopped.

      Back to top >
      How long is it before the result of the test is known?

      It usually takes four to seven working days for the doctor to get the final report.

  4. QUESTION:
    What is the connection of HPV to cervical cancer?
    I have been hearing alot about this on the telivison and radio. The comericals arent exactly what I would call clear though.

    • ANSWER:
      From Planned Parenthood:
      "Scientists have identified several types of genital HPV that are associated with certain types of genital cancer — in particular, cervical cancer and, more rarely, penile and anal cancers. These are not the same types of genital HPV that cause warts. The signs of these HPV infections are microscopic. This means that the women and men who are infected with these strains of HPV often have no idea they have them.

      Like genital warts, these microscopic HPV infections often go away on their own in eight to 13 months. But sometimes, HPV infections of the cervix do not go away. These long-term HPV infections can lead to cervical cancer.
      ...
      Remember, HPV infections are very common, and they're almost always harmless. Only a few strains of HPV are associated with cancer, and regular Pap tests can help detect precancerous conditions at the earliest, most treatable stages. Condom use is key in reducing the risk of HPV, because condoms cut down on skin-to-skin contact. Consistent use of condoms can also help reduce the effects of an HPV infection and shorten the time it lasts. As always, prevention is the key to good health."

  5. QUESTION:
    What would be the signs of skin cancer to a guy in his 20's?
    Any possible symptoms, with details if possible would be appreciated, thanks

    • ANSWER:
      You have 2 concerns, melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancers. Melanoma follows the ABCD rules stated here.

      http://www.melanomafoundation.org/prevention/abcd.htm

      Non-melanoma skin cancers often show up as a sore that does not heal, a red or brown bump or lesion that starts growing slowly or any odd growth that is crusty and does not go away. Unless you tan a lot or work outside it would be fairly unusual for you to have a non-melanoma skin cancer in your 20s but the age at which these cancers are appearing is moving down all the time. Read up on basal and squamous cell skin cancers here along with the various precancerous conditions.

      http://www.skincancer.org/basal/index.php
      http://www.skincancer.org/squamous/index.php
      http://www.skincancer.org/ak/index.php

      good luck

  6. QUESTION:
    Can you get skin cancer on your body that never receives sunlight?
    Like if you never take off your shirt etc etc

    • ANSWER:
      Skin cancer — the abnormal growth of skin cells — most often develops on skin exposed to the sun. But this common form of cancer can also occur on areas of your skin not ordinarily exposed to sunlight. Apart from receiving sunlight there are other reasons also by which a person can get skin cancer.

      Heredity (A family history of skin cancer) may play a role. Skin cancer can also develop from exposure to toxic chemicals or as a result of radiation treatments. Exposure to environmental hazards, A weakened immune system, Precancerous skin lesions, Eruption of Moles, ageing and sometimes Fair skined persons, can also lead to different type of skin cancer.

      It is better to avoid such conditions and take precautions -

  7. QUESTION:
    Freckles on Hand from tanning, can it be skin cancer?
    I've been tanning this summer, but there was 2 days i was in the sun all day. I put on tanning oil with SPF 15. Now my hand has a dark spot like a freckle on it. I went tanning again the other day and another one came up with a few smaller freckles. I have asian skin. Could this be melanoma cancer or just freckles from the sun?

    • ANSWER:
      I doubt that this is melanoma cancer - It wouldn't appear quite this suddenly -but these could be spots that eventually 'could' turn itno future precancerous condition.

      You should keep an eye on all spots that appear suddenly - and if you see changes - for instance they change color or grow - then you should see a dermatologist.

      If you do a lot of 'tanning' - as you get older you may see more and more of this type of skin discoloration and these may eventually turn in skin cancer.

      Keep an eye on the spots.

  8. QUESTION:
    Can a person get cancer by getting blood from someone with cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      There are several things that make this extremely unlikely

      1) Most of the cancer cells don't even survive the process of metastasis. Approximately 99 % of the "circulating cancer cells" are destroyed by the immune system.

      2) Cancer cells are more fragile that most people imagine. This is why surviving the transfusion procedure is another obstacle that faces the circulating cancer cells.

      3) The immune system of the recipient will attack the cancer cells, because they express other types of tissue antigens - just as identical blood type is not enough to ensure successful transplantation of other organs (eg. kidneys).

      Here is a link to the American Red Cross page on eligibility criteria for blood donation: http://www.redcrossblood.org/donating-blood/eligibility-requirements/eligibility-criteria-topic

      About cancer it says:

      "Eligibility depends on the type of cancer and treatment history. If you had leukemia or lymphoma, including Hodgkin’s Disease and other cancers of the blood, you are not eligible to donate. Other types of cancer are acceptable if the cancer has been treated successfully and it has been more than 12 months since treatment was completed and there has been no cancer recurrence in this time. Lower risk in-situ cancers including squamous or basal cell cancers of the skin that have been completely removed do not require a 12 month waiting period.

      Precancerous conditions of the uterine cervix do not disqualify you from donation if the abnormality has been treated successfully. You should discuss your particular situation with the health historian at the time of donation."

  9. QUESTION:
    Has anyone here tried a product called moles no more found on amazon.com?
    I need a mole removed and I don't want to go to surgery because insurance won't pay and it is too expensive. So, has anyone tried this product and does it really work?

    • ANSWER:
      The "Moles no more" folks are pretty vague about their ingredients, which is never a good sign, and the clinical literature does not have anything to support the theory that herbal type remedies can safely remove moles. Given that they won’t disclose what they use (so we don’t know how safe it is), and the clinical literature does not support it, I can’t recommend using it.

      Most moles, though, don’t require surgery, unless they’re particularly large or in a difficult or sensitive location (like your face). They can be easily removed in your doctor or dermatologist’s office with a bit of local anesthesia. They also get sent to pathology, which is important to look for cancer or precancerous conditions. I’ve had a number of moles removed this way, and they’ve always been covered by insurance. If, for some reason, your insurance is fussy, your doctor can intervene.

      Also, sometimes what people think are moles are actually skin tags, which are very easily removed, and can sometimes be done at home. So, start by talking to your doc.

  10. QUESTION:
    My doctor has told me i might be able to have Cryotherapy/Cryosurgery for my stage 3 cervical cancer?
    My cells are in progression to cancer but are not currently. im confused, First she said i have stage III cancer and then she says they have not reached full completion ?????

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Baby_amy.
      I am sorry you are going through this honey. Doctors are nut cases? Kaitlyn that is the most negative statement I've ever heard. My doctors are the sanest people I know.
      Found this at the National Cancer Institute;
      1. What is cryosurgery?

      Cryosurgery (also called cryotherapy) is the use of extreme cold produced by liquid nitrogen (or argon gas) to destroy abnormal tissue. Cryosurgery is used to treat external tumors, such as those on the skin. For external tumors, liquid nitrogen is applied directly to the cancer cells with a cotton swab or spraying device.

      Cryosurgery is also used to treat tumors inside the body (internal tumors and tumors in the bone). For internal tumors, liquid nitrogen or argon gas is circulated through a hollow instrument called a cryoprobe, which is placed in contact with the tumor. The doctor uses ultrasound or MRI to guide the cryoprobe and monitor the freezing of the cells, thus limiting damage to nearby healthy tissue. (In ultrasound, sound waves are bounced off organs and other tissues to create a picture called a sonogram.) A ball of ice crystals forms around the probe, freezing nearby cells. Sometimes more than one probe is used to deliver the liquid nitrogen to various parts of the tumor. The probes may be put into the tumor during surgery or through the skin (percutaneously). After cryosurgery, the frozen tissue thaws and is either naturally absorbed by the body (for internal tumors), or it dissolves and forms a scab (for external tumors).
      2. What types of cancer can be treated with cryosurgery?

      Cryosurgery is used to treat several types of cancer, and some precancerous or noncancerous conditions. In addition to prostate and liver tumors, cryosurgery can be an effective treatment for the following:
      * Retinoblastoma (a childhood cancer that affects the retina of the eye). Doctors have found that cryosurgery is most effective when the tumor is small and only in certain parts of the retina.
      * Early-stage skin cancers (both basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas).
      * Precancerous skin growths known as actinic keratosis.
      * Precancerous conditions of the cervix known as cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (abnormal cell changes in the cervix that can develop into cervical cancer).

      Cryosurgery is also used to treat some types of low-grade cancerous and noncancerous tumors of the bone. It may reduce the risk of joint damage when compared with more extensive surgery, and help lessen the need for amputation. The treatment is also used to treat AIDS-related Kaposi sarcoma when the skin lesions are small and localized.

      Researchers are evaluating cryosurgery as a treatment for a number of cancers, including breast, colon, and kidney cancer. They are also exploring cryotherapy in combination with other cancer treatments, such as hormone therapy, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or surgery.
      3. In what situations can cryosurgery be used to treat prostate cancer? What are the side effects?

      Cryosurgery can be used to treat men who have early-stage prostate cancer that is confined to the prostate gland. It is less well established than standard prostatectomy and various types of radiation therapy. Long-term outcomes are not known. Because it is effective only in small areas, cryosurgery is not used to treat prostate cancer that has spread outside the gland, or to distant parts of the body.

      Some advantages of cryosurgery are that the procedure can be repeated, and it can be used to treat men who cannot have surgery or radiation therapy because of their age or other medical problems.

      Cryosurgery for the prostate gland can cause side effects. These side effects may occur more often in men who have had radiation to the prostate.
      * Cryosurgery may obstruct urine flow or cause incontinence (lack of control over urine flow); often, these side effects are temporary.
      * Many men become impotent (loss of sexual function).
      * In some cases, the surgery has caused injury to the rectum.

      4. In what situations can cryosurgery be used to treat primary liver cancer or liver metastases (cancer that has spread to the liver from another part of the body)? What are the side effects?

      Cryosurgery may be used to treat primary liver cancer that has not spread. It is used especially if surgery is not possible due to factors such as other medical conditions. The treatment also may be used for cancer that has spread to the liver from another site (such as the colon or rectum). In some cases, chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy may be given before or after cryosurgery. Cryosurgery in the liver may cause damage to the bile ducts and/or major blood vessels, which can lead to hemorrhage (heavy bleeding) or infection.
      5. Does cryosurgery have any complications or side effects?

      Cryosurgery does have side effects, although th

  11. QUESTION:
    which infection can be cause by the information given below and treatment for the problem?
    my son fell at 5 months old and he burst-ed his tongue ,he is now seven years and has been having white patches on his tongue,he also have bad breath.

    • ANSWER:
      What causes a white tongue?

      In many cases, a white coating on the tongue is caused by a layer of dead skin cells and debris that can be cleaned or scraped off the tongue. Some common conditions that lead to a visible white layer include dehydration, poor oral hygiene, excessive alcohol use, and smoking tobacco. A white tongue can also be a symptom of a variety of other disorders and diseases, such as a bacterial infection or a precancerous lesion.

      White spots or patches on the tongue (and other oral structures) can be due to leukoplakia (precancerous lesion), oral thrush (yeast infection), or oral lichen planus (an inflammatory disorder of the mouth).

      Oral lichen planus can also appear as a lace-like pattern on the tongue and the inside of the cheeks. The underlying cause of lichen planus is not known, although it may be related to oral hygiene and irritants, such as tobacco smoke.

      Oral thrush (candidiasis) can occur in all age groups and populations, but is common in HIV-positive individuals who are immunocompromised and more susceptible to the overgrowth of yeast, such as Candida albicans. Antibiotic use, diabetes, and immunosuppressant therapy can also lead to an overgrowth of Candida albicans.

      A white tongue combined with a sore throat may be due to a streptococcal infection or other bacterial infection. Injured and inflamed areas of the tongue are more susceptible to infectious microorganisms, such as the herpes virus, streptococcal bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, and pathogenic fungi

  12. QUESTION:
    Why does my vagina itch every day?Do i need to go to a clinic?Whats wrong with me?
    First couple weeks it would itch like crazy, everyday all day. Now its at night almost everyday or when ever i take a shower.
    it happened before i started shaving. and there is a clear discharge that comes out.

    • ANSWER:
      •Chemical irritants -- such as detergents, fabric softeners, feminine sprays, ointments, creams, douches, and contraceptive foams or jellies.
      •Menopause -- the drop in estrogen causes thinning of the vaginal wall and less lubrication.
      •Stress -- may increase vaginal itching and make you more susceptible to infections.
      •Vaginal yeast infection -- often includes a discharge that is white and curd-like. Vaginal yeast infections can be brought on by antibiotics, birth control pills, pregnancy, menstruation, condom use, sexual intercourse, diabetes, and a weakened immune system.
      •Vaginitis -- inflammation, itching, discharge, and odor caused by other infections (including sexually transmitted diseases). Vaginitis in girls before puberty is common. If a young girl has a sexually transmitted vaginal infection, however, sexual abuse must be considered and addressed.
      Other possible, but less common, causes of vaginal or vulvar itching include:

      •Certain skin conditions affecting the vulvar skin, some of which may be precancerous
      To prevent and treat vaginal itching:

      •Avoid colored or perfumed toilet tissue and bubble bath.
      •Avoid feminine hygiene sprays and douches.
      •Change out of wet clothing, especially wet bathing suits or exercise clothing, as soon as possible.
      •Cleanse the area by wiping or washing from front to back (vagina to anus) after urinating or having a bowel movement.
      •Eat yogurt with live cultures or take Lactobacillus acidophilus tablets when using antibiotics. Check with your doctor.
      •Keep your genital area clean and dry. Use plain, unscented soap.
      •Keep your blood sugar under good control if you have diabetes.
      •Lose weight if you are overweight.
      •Wear cotton panties or pantyhose with a cotton crotch. Avoid panties made from synthetic materials. For infants and toddlers, change diapers often.
      Call your doctor right away if:

      •You have increased thirst or appetite, unexplained weight loss, frequent urination, or fatigue -- these may be signs of diabetes.
      •You have pelvic or lower abdominal pain or fever.

  13. QUESTION:
    What are all the ways that you can get infected with genital warts?
    For instance can you get genitals warts by sitting on a toliet seat anything concerning things like that

    • ANSWER:
      The virus responsible for genital warts is called human papilloma virus (HPV). This virus can cause warts on the penis, vulva, urethra, vagina, cervix, and around the anus.

      HPV infection around the genitals is common, although most people have no symptoms. Even if you do NOT have symptoms, however, you must be treated to avoid complications and spreading the condition to others.

      There are more than 70 different types of HPV. Several types are associated with genital warts. Other types are associated with common or flat warts elsewhere on the skin.

      HPV grows well in the moist genital area. Warts on the outer genitals are easily recognized. They are raised, flesh-colored lesions that may occur singly or in clusters. Left untreated, warts may rapidly enlarge, taking on a "cauliflower-like" appearance.

      In women, HPV can invade the vagina and cervix. These warts are flat and not easily visible without special procedures. Because HPV can lead to cancerous and precancerous changes in the cervix, it is important that this condition be diagnosed and treated. Regular pap smears are necessary to detect HPV or other abnormal changes related to this virus. Having both HPV and herpes virus together puts you at particular risk for cervical cancer.

      The following factors put you at higher risk for getting genital warts and other complications of HPV:

      Multiple sexual partners
      Not knowing if someone you had sex with had STDs
      Early age when you start to be sexually active
      Tobacco and alcohol use
      Stress and other viral infections (such as HIV or herpes) at the same time
      If a child has genital warts, you should suspect sexual abuse as a possible cause.Prevention Total abstinence is the only fullproof way of avoiding genital warts and other STDs. You can also avoid STDs by having a monogamous sexual relationship with a partner known to be disease-free.

      Skin near the warts and around the genitals, anus, and other areas can pass the virus from one person to the next. Therefore, male and female condoms cannot fully protect you.

      Nonetheless, condoms should still be used. They reduce your chances of getting or spreading STDs.

      These precautions must be taken at all times. HPV can be passed from person to person even when there are no visible warts or other symptoms.

  14. QUESTION:
    Can someone tell me more about Basal Cell Carcinoma?
    Serious answers only please.

    • ANSWER:
      Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common form of cancer, with about a million new cases estimated in the U.S. each year. Basal cells line the deepest layer of the epidermis. Basal cell carcinomas are malignant growths--tumors--that arise in this layer.

      Basal cell carcinoma can usually be diagnosed with a simple biopsy and is fairly easy to treat when detected early. However, 5 to 10 percent of BCCs can be resistant to treatment or locally aggressive, damaging the skin around them, and sometimes invading bone and cartilage. When not treated quickly, they can be difficult to eliminate. Fortunately, however, this is a cancer that has an extremely low rate of metastasis, and although it can result in scars and disfigurement, it is not usually life threatening.

      The sun is responsible for over 90 percent of all skin cancers, including BCCs, which occur most frequently on the sun-exposed areas of the body: face, ears, neck, scalp, shoulders and back.

      The vast majority of BCCs are not serious if detected early and treated quickly. The BCCs that cause trouble are the ones that have been neglected until they have become so thick that they are hard to treat.

      There is no one best method to treat all skin cancers and precancers. The choice is determined by many factors, including the location, type, size, whether it is a primary tumor or a recurrent one, the health and preference of the patient, and the physician's experience with the technique. For example, a treatment that has a high cure rate and is painless but leaves a large scar might be acceptable for a tumor on the body, but not on the face.

      Almost all treatments can be performed in the physician’s office or in a special surgical facility. Most skin cancer removal can be done using a local anesthetic. Rarely, extensive tumors may require general anesthesia and hospital admission.

      Current methods of treating BCC are:

      Curettage-electrodessication

      Cryosurgery

      Chemotherapy: topical or injection

      Excisional surgery

      Mohs micrographic surgery

      Radiation

      Laser therapy

      Photodynamic therapy

      Cure rates for most of the modes of therapy are excellent – from 85 to 99 percent for primary basal cell carcinomas.

      Treatment does not end when the skin cancer has been removed. You and your physician will consider both medical and cosmetic factors in choosing the technique for closing and repairing wounds left after cancer treatment. The decision may be to let your wound heal naturally, close it with stitches, or, if surgery has been extensive, to cover the area with a skin graft.

      Cancerous and precancerous conditions can recur even when they appear to have been adequately treated. A patient should continue to see the physician for regular follow-up visits for several years to make sure that the growth has not recurred.

  15. QUESTION:
    how do you get a cervical infection?
    What is a cervical infection and how do you know if you have it?

    • ANSWER:
      I hope the following information makes things clearer!

      HPV / Cervical infection Definition

      HPV infection is a condition contracted from one of a group of more than 100 related human papillomaviruses (HPVs).

      Each type of HPV has the potential to cause an abnormal growth on a particular part of your body — genital warts and other lesions on or near your genitals or anus, common warts on your hands, plantar warts on your feet, and warts and other lesions in your mouth and upper respiratory system.

      HPV infections are common. About 20 million people in the United States have HPV infections that can cause genital warts and related lesions. Some types of HPV infection can cause cancer, such as cervical cancer, but most HPV infections don't lead to cancer.

      Symptoms

      HPV infections often go undetected because they don't cause warts or other lesions. Even if you don't exhibit signs and symptoms of the infection, they may emerge later and you may transmit the virus to someone else.

      The signs and symptoms that do appear vary according to the type of HPV infection you may have:

      ■Genital warts. Genital warts are nonmalignant and appear as a flat lesion, a tiny cauliflower-like bump or a tiny stem-like protrusion. HPV infections of types 6 and 11 cause most genital warts. These HPV types are generally not associated with cancer.

      In women these warts appear most commonly on the vulva but may also occur near the anus, on the cervix or in the vagina. In men these may appear on the penis and scrotum or around the anus. Genital warts rarely cause discomfort or pain.

      ■Pre-malignant genital lesions. Certain HPV infections can cause cellular changes that result in precancerous lesions. These abnormalities are most often detected by a Pap test, a simple procedure to collect cells from the cervix or vagina for laboratory examination.

      Abnormalities that are determined to be "low grade" usually resolve — the cells return to normal — without treatment. HPV infections of types 6 and 11 are common causes of these low-grade abnormalities.

      High-grade abnormalities are less likely to resolve, and some will advance to cancer of the cervix, vagina or vulva. HPV infections of types 16 and 18 are the most common causes of high-grade abnormalities.

      ■Oral and upper respiratory lesions. Some HPV infections may cause warts and other lesions to form on your tongue, tonsils, soft palate, and larynx and in your nose. These lesions may be the result of low-risk HPV types, such as 6 and 11, or high-risk types, such as 16 and 18.
      ■Cervical cancer and other tumors. Most genital HPV infections of high-risk types don't develop into cancer; however, persistent infections — generally lasting more than two years — create a greater risk of cancer. Abnormal vaginal bleeding, such as excessively heavy menstrual bleeding or bleeding between periods, are common symptoms of cervical cancer.

      Virtually all cases of cervical cancer are caused by HPV infections. An estimated 11,000 women in the United States are diagnosed with cervical cancer annually, and more than 3,800 die of the disease each year. Worldwide, cervical cancer is far more common because many women lack access to Pap test screening. HPV types 16 and 18 account for about 70 percent of all cases of cervical cancer.

      HPV infections of type 16 and 18, as well as other high-risk types, may also contribute to cancers of the genitals, anus, mouth and upper respiratory tract.

      ■Common warts. Common warts are nonmalignant skin growths that usually appear on your hands, fingers or around fingernails. These warts appear as rough, raised bumps. They're generally nuisances because of their appearance, but they may also be painful or susceptible to injury or bleeding.

      Most children and adolescents have been exposed to HPVs that cause these warts, but only a small percentage actually get warts. Most people don't get common warts after age 20.

      ■Plantar warts. Plantar warts are hard, grainy, nonmalignant growths that usually appear on the heel or ball of your feet, areas that feel the most pressure. These warts may cause discomfort or pain. Although plantar warts are common in adulthood, most adults first encountered them during childhood or adolescence.
      ■Flat warts. Flat warts are flat-topped, slightly raised, nonmalignant lesions darker than your regular skin color. They usually appear on your face, neck, hands, wrists, elbows or knees. HPV infections that cause flat warts usually affect children, adolescents and young adults.
      When to see a doctor
      If you or your child has warts of any kind that cause embarrassment, discomfort or pain, seek advice from your doctor.

      For women, it's important to have regular Pap tests. A Pap test is the best tool to detect an HPV infection that could lead to cervical cancer. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that a woman begin annual Pap tests about three years after first having

  16. QUESTION:
    Can I donate plasma if I've had cancer in the past?
    I had testicular cancer a few years ago (yes, one of my balls tried to kill me) but I was treated successfully and have been cancer free since March '08. Am I eligible to donate plasma/blood? Please, no guesses.

    • ANSWER:
      Donating Blood If You Have Cancer
      Updated January 27, 2010

      About.com Health's Disease and Condition content is reviewed by our Medical Review Board
      See More About:

      blood donation
      leukemia
      lymphoma

      Question: Donating Blood If You Have Cancer
      I would like to donate my blood , but was treated for lung cancer three years ago.

      Can people with cancer donate their blood?
      Answer: There isn't a simple 'yes' or 'no' answer. Many people who have been treated for cancer are eligible to donate blood, provided they fall into certain guidelines. Eligibility guidelines do vary among organizations. The American Red Cross is largest blood organizations in the world and their eligibility guidelines have set the standard for for other blood organizations. Overall, guidelines and safety measures are regulated by the FDA.

      Eligibility Guidelines for The American Red Cross
      The American Red Cross does allow some people with a history of cancer to donate blood. You must wait at least 12 months following the completion of treatment to donate your blood. You cannot have had a recurrence. If you are currently in treatment, then you are ineligible to donate.

      The Red Cross does make note that those treated for low risk in-situ carcinomas like basal cell carcinomas or squamous cell carcinoma (two types of skin cancers) do not need to wait 12 months after treatment.Women who have had a precancerous cervical condition can donate, provided their were successfully treated.

      If you have ever had lymphoma or leukemia, or any other blood cancer as an adult, then you cannot donate your blood to the Red Cross. Adults who had these cancer as children can donate, as long it has been 10 years since treatment and it has no recurred.

      There are other conditions and factors that affect donor eligibility. Read the Red Cross's list of conditions that may affect your donor status.

      Tips For When You Give Blood
      Be as thorough as possible about your health history when you give blood. A person called a blood historian will record all of your information before you are accepted. You should tell them how your cancer was treated and when your last treatment was completed. If there are no issues, you will usually be allowed to donate blood the same day. If there are issues, your case may need to be reviewed by a physician at the donor center before you can donate. There is no fee to have your blood reviewed at the Red Cross.

      If you you have any question prior to donating, you can call your local Red Cross or ask your oncologist.

      Source:

      Cancer Society. Blood Donation. July 17, 2007. Accessed January 20, 2010.
      http://www.cancer.org/docroot/ETO/content/ETO_1_4X_Blood_Donation.asp?sitearea=ETO

      American Red Cross. Eligibility Criteria. Accessed January 20, 2010.
      http://www.redcrossblood.org/donating-blood/eligibility-requirements/eligibility-criteria-topic#med_cond

      FDA.Questions About Blood. November 09, 2009. Accessed January 20 2010.
      http://www.fda.gov/BiologicsBloodVaccines/BloodBloodProducts/QuestionsaboutBlood/default.htm.

  17. QUESTION:
    why can't i donate blood now that i have been diagnosed with cancer?
    i was just told that i have to be cancer free for 5 years before i can donate blood. is this true & why can't i donate?

    • ANSWER:
      This is a copy and paste from the Red Cross
      >>>>>>>>>
      Cancer
      Eligibility depends on the type of cancer and treatment history. If you had leukemia or lymphoma, including Hodgkin’s Disease and other cancers of the blood, you are not eligible to donate. Other types of cancer are acceptable if the cancer has been treated successfully and it has been more than 12 months since treatment was completed and there has been no cancer recurrence in this time. Lower risk in-situ cancers including squamous or basal cell cancers of the skin that have been completely removed do not require a 12 month waiting period.

      Precancerous conditions of the uterine cervix do not disqualify you from donation if the abnormality has been treated successfully. You should discuss your particular situation with the health historian at the time of donation.
      http://www.redcross.org/en/eligibility#can
      >>>>>>>>>>>>

      And its for a couple reasons. One, so that there is no risk of passing your cancer to the recipient. But also because if you have cancer, YOU are probably not healthy enough to part with the blood.

  18. QUESTION:
    how the hell do u get rid of spots im a clean person ! and always had good skin!?
    i wash my face 3 times a day with soapy water it always worked before?

    • ANSWER:
      Having 'Spot or Acne' does not mean you are a dirty person. In fact soap can dry out and irritate skin causing a spotty problem. Get the right products for your skin, e.g If you have oily skin buy for that. I suggest you use facial washes instead of soap and remember to tone and moisturise too. Get the right routine and your skin will look better.

      I have found some info that is for both men and women I hope this helps you, as I do not know your age or skin type so this is vast info for different ages.

      Skincare by the Decades

      In Your 20s...
      Swear by sunscreen. Sure, you're probably not thinking about wrinkles and brown spots now -- but they'll creep up on you faster than you can imagine (as early as 30!). And since most of the visible aging we experience is a result of sun damage, preventing it now is the only way to go. Use an SPF 15 sunscreen daily; most skincare lines make daily moisturizers with sunscreen already in them.

      Use salicylic acid. Unfortunately, your skin isn't completely out of the acne stage just yet. That's why a once-daily salicylic acid lotion is a good idea -- it helps nix blackheads and pimples. Look for one in a lotion formula, to add a bit of moisture.

      Try AHAs. To get a jump on anti-aging, begin experimenting with AHA products now. We like the idea of a gentle AHA facial lotion at night.

      In Your 30s...
      Add eye cream. This is the time you're likely to see those first fine wrinkles under and around your eyes. Help plump them up by using an eye preparation daily. Try a light cream if your skin tends to be dry, or a cooling gel if you're oily.

      Go for mild retinols. Over-the-counter retinol products can help minimize the formation of fine lines and begin to boost collagen production deep in the skin. You don't need prescription-grade retinoids at this point -- good news, since OTC retinols are gentler.

      See your dermatologist. Start a yearly derm habit, so your doctor can check you for suspicious (read: precancerous) moles and other skin conditions that tend to show up in your 30s, such as rosacea.

      And keep up that sunscreen habit!

      In Your 40s and 50s...
      Choose a richer eye cream. The eye area is drier than the rest of your face by nature. In your 40s and 50s, however, that dryness can become more dramatic (making wrinkles more prominent). That's why it's a good idea to switch to an eye product that's richer and creamier than the one you used in your 30s.

      Try prescription retinoids. At this point in your skin life, you need stronger retinoids to beat wrinkles. That strength can only be found in prescription products such as Renova and Retin-A. Retinoids have been shown to reduce the depth of wrinkles and to boost collagen production in the skin, making wrinkles less likely to form. A bonus: Retinoids also exfoliate the skin, which is important since older skin is slower to naturally slough off dead skin cells.

      Lighten with hydroquinone. If you see dark spots on your skin, try a lightening preparation. Products containing the ingredient hydroquinone gradually lighten dark spots. Tip: Use hydroquinone products all over your face, not just on dark spots; if you spot-treat, you'll end up with light spots where your dark ones once were.

      Last but not least, don't leave the sunscreen behind -- you still need to use it daily!

  19. QUESTION:
    My fiances ex wife informed him that she has HPV. If he was her only sex partner, how did she get it?
    She was his only sex partner until I came in the picture. Does this mean I have HPV and then he had sex with her since we have been together?

    • ANSWER:
      Lyn43,
      The variables in your question are many, and I am sure that you are able to imagine many of them – I regret that there is no direct answer. I am going to suppose that you are referring to genital HPV which is typically transmitted through direct skin-to-skin contact. The virus may also spread by touching something that has been contaminated with the virus and then touching the skin, although how often this occurs, if at all, is not known. Human papillomavirus (or HPV for short) is a group of over 100 different types of viruses. They can cause several different diseases, depending on the specific type of HPV, as well as where the infection occurs. Some diseases that HPV can cause include warts (including genital warts), precancerous changes, and cancer. Transmission most often occurs from another person. It is possible for a person to infect themselves, although this is thought to be a rare method of transmission. Genital HPV is not always spread through penetrating sex. Some studies have shown that in female virgins, HPV may be spread through nonpenetrating sexual contact. Almost all cases of genital HPV are spread through vaginal or anal intercourse. In rare cases, it may be spread through oral sex. Between 30 and 40 different types of HPV can be spread through genital contact. Most HPV infections, however, have no signs or symptoms, so most infected people have no idea. Even if the infected person has no symptoms, he or she can transmit HPV to a sexual partner. Transmission of genital HPV appears to be high with a new sex partner. This risk is even higher if the partner has been known for less than eight months and if the partner has been sexually active. All that having been said, as mentioned above there have been many different HPV types described. Some are more often associated with cervical cancer or vulvar cancer while other types are more common with benign epithelial lesions such as condyloma accuminata or venereal warts. Having been exposed to one virus type does not prevent getting infection from another virus type. Exposure to human papilloma virus (HPV) can be measured by testing the blood (serum) for antibodies to the viral capsule or by testing actual tissue such as cells from a Pap smear or tissue from a biopsy for viral DNA fragments. This latter test is known as Viratype. It is more commercially available than the blood antibody testing, but this is a rapidly changing field so you must check as to which tests are locally available.

      ALL ANSWERS SHOULD BE THOROUGHLY RESEARCHED, IN ANY FORUM AND ESPECIALLY IN THIS ONE. - MANY ANSWERS ARE FLAWED.

      It is extremely important to obtain an accurate diagnosis before trying to find a cure. Many diseases and conditions share common symptoms.

      The information provided here should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed physician should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions.

      Hope this helps
      matador 89

  20. QUESTION:
    Can cancer patients donate blood, or their body organs after death?

    • ANSWER:
      Eligibility depends on the type of cancer and treatment history. If you had leukemia or lymphoma, including Hodgkin’s Disease and other cancers of the blood, you are not eligible to donate. Other types of cancer are acceptable if the cancer has been treated successfully and it has been at least 5 years since treatment was completed and there has been no cancer recurrence in this time. Some low-risk cancers including squamous or basal cell cancers of the skin do not require a 5 year waiting period.

      Precancerous conditions of the uterine cervix do not disqualify you from donation if the abnormality has been treated successfully. You should discuss your particular situation with the health historian at the time of donation

  21. QUESTION:
    Please help! The entry to my vagina however is slightly swollen/I am passing urine alot which isnt too bad?
    Its doesnt hurt when I wee. its has been on going about 6 days now. the entrance to my vagina is slightly swollen and very sore when i wipe over it with tissue. I am urinating more than usual and its is slightly itchy.
    there is no rash but it is slightly darker in colour than normal...i think.

    Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      I think u have got some infection.

      Consult a doctor . it is very much curable.

      read the following also:

      Chemical irritants such as detergents, fabric softeners, feminine sprays, ointments, creams, douches, and contraceptive foams or jellies.
      Menopause. A drop in the hormone estrogen causes vaginal dryness.
      Stress may increase vaginal itching and make you more susceptible to infections.
      Vaginal yeast infection
      Vaginitis. Vaginitis in girls before puberty is common. If a young girl has a sexually transmitted vaginal infection, however, sexual abuse must be considered and addressed.
      Other possible, but less common, causes of vaginal itching include:

      Precancerous skin conditions of the vulva
      Most women have a vaginal yeast infection at some time. Candida albicans is a common type of fungus. It is often found in small amounts in the vagina, mouth, digestive tract, and on the skin. Usually it does not cause disease or symptoms.

      Candida and the many other germs that normally live in the vagina keep each other in balance. However, sometimes the number of Candida albicans increases, leading to a yeast infection.

      This can happen if you are:

      Taking antibiotics used to treat other types of infections. Antibiotics change the normal balance between germs in the vagina by decreasing the number of protective bacteria.
      Pregnant
      Obese
      Have diabetes
      A yeast infection is not a sexually transmitted illness. However, some men will develop symptoms such as itching and a rash on the penis after having sexual contact with an infected partner.

  22. QUESTION:
    Can evolution explain why humans/animals get sunburns?
    It would seem to me that evolution would do away with sunburns. After millions of years it would seem we would be better able to defend ourselves againist this.

    • ANSWER:
      Evolution can’t explain sunburn, but biochemistry can. UV light has sufficient energy to cause chemical reactions on exposed skin. With sufficient exposure, enough damage accumulates to cause a burn. What evolution can explain are some of the adaptations to UV light that have developed.

      Your question shows one of the common ways people misunderstand evolution. Evolution is not a process of perfection. It is not directed. It cannot plan for the future. There is no such thing as devolution. Random variations in a population are selected for and those that are best able to adapt and survive under a set of environmental conditions are more likely to propagate and pass on those traits. Change those conditions and what was an advantage can become a liability. For example, why are there bacteria that are still susceptible to antibiotics? Why don’t they all become superbugs that are resistant to all known antibiotics? Because, it takes energy and resources to make all those defensive mechanisms to be antibiotic resistant. That’s fine when there are antibiotics around but in the absences of antibiotics, these supergerms have to compete with cells that don’t have to spend resources for a defense against a nonexistent threat.

      UV exposure has been a threat for a long time so animals, including humans, have developed traits that defend against UV light. The obvious one is pigments in skin, which was sufficient until supposedly intelligent apes thought it was aesthetically appealing to acquire precancerous coloration and intentionally bask in sunlight. Another defense that is shared by almost all animals is a period of programmed dormancy in the middle of the day. Even fruit flies have a built in program for a siesta so that they are not active while sunlight is most intense.

  23. QUESTION:
    Can A cancer survivor ever donate tissue or blood?
    I feel kind of silly asking my oncologist this. I have been clean of cancer (end first stage colon cancer) since 9/21/2003. I've always been signed up as a tissue donor and give blood when I can. Can I still do this since I'm no longer on chemo? For some reason I thought my doctor said no.

    • ANSWER:
      Cancer
      Eligibility depends on the type of cancer and treatment history. If you had leukemia or lymphoma, including Hodgkin’s Disease, you are not eligible to donate. Other types of cancer are acceptable if the cancer has been treated successfully and it has been at least 5 years since treatment was completed and there has been no cancer recurrence in this time. Some low-risk cancers including squamous or basal cell cancers of the skin do not require a 5 year waiting period.

      Precancerous conditions of the uterine cervix do not disqualify you from donation if the abnormality has been treated successfully. You should discuss your particular situation with the health historian at the time of donation.

  24. QUESTION:
    What are treatments for non-melanoma skin cancers?
    In detail (:

    • ANSWER:
      Treatment

      Most skin tumors are not cancerous and can be treated in the doctor's office, if treatment is necessary. The following treatment options are available at Mayo Clinic. Specific treatment decisions are based on each patient's condition.

      Curettage and Electrodesiccation
      After scraping away most of a growth with a long thin instrument (curette), physicians apply a mild electric current to destroy any remaining abnormal cells. This simple, quick procedure is commonly used to treat small basal or squamous cell cancers.

      Freezing (Cryosurgery)
      Small, early stage cancers can be destroyed by freezing them with liquid nitrogen. This treatment is usually performed in a physician's office.

      Photodynamic Therapy
      Photodynamic therapy destroys skin cancer cells by combining light and drugs that sensitize cancer cells to light. The treatment is currently used on precancerous skin lesions and small skin cancers. Mayo Clinic researchers are investigating its effectiveness on more advanced skin

  25. QUESTION:
    can anyone tell me some tips or some cream to control vaginal itching?
    i tried using vagisel cream but not working . am not able to sleep at night because of this but there is no itching in day time pls help

    • ANSWER:
      Vaginal itching
      Common causes of vaginal itching include:

      Chemical irritants -- such as detergents, fabric softeners, feminine sprays, ointments, creams, douches, and contraceptive foams or jellies.
      Vaginal yeast infection -- often includes a discharge that is white and curd-like. Vaginal yeast infections can be brought on by antibiotics, birth control pills, pregnancy, menstruation, condom use, sexual intercourse, diabetes, and a weakened immune system.
      Vaginitis -- inflammation, itching, discharge, and odor caused by other infections (including sexually transmitted diseases). Vaginitis in girls before puberty is common. If a young girl has a sexually transmitted vaginal infection, however, sexual abuse must be considered and addressed.
      Menopause -- the drop in estrogen causes thinning of the vaginal wall and less lubrication.
      Stress -- may increase vaginal itching and make you more susceptible to infections.
      Other possible, but less common, causes of vaginal or vulvar itching include:

      Pinworms (a parasitic infection mainly affecting children)
      Certain skin conditions affecting the vulvar skin, some of which may be precancerous
      Home Care Return to top

      To prevent and treat vaginal itching:

      Keep your genital area clean and dry. Use plain, unscented soap.
      Avoid colored or perfumed toilet tissue and bubble bath.
      Wear cotton panties or pantyhose with a cotton crotch. Avoid panties made from synthetic materials. For infants and toddlers, change diapers often.
      Change out of wet clothing, especially wet bathing suits or exercise clothing, as soon as possible.
      Avoid feminine hygiene sprays and douches.
      Eat yogurt with live cultures or take lactobacillus acidophilus tablets when using antibiotics. Check with your doctor.
      Cleanse by wiping or washing from front to back (vagina to anus) after urinating or having a bowel movement.
      Lose weight if you are over weight.
      Keep your blood sugars under good control if you have diabetes.
      It is also helpful to:

      Avoid scratching, which will only aggravate the problem.
      Avoid overexertion, heat, and excessive sweating.
      Delay sexual activity until your symptoms get better or at least use a lubricant during intercourse.
      Use condoms to avoid catching or spreading sexually transmitted diseases.
      If you know that you have a yeast infection because your symptoms are exactly the same as those in the past, try over-the-counter creams or vaginal suppositories
      http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003159.htm#Definition

      WHEN TO SEE YOUR DOCTOR

      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      * Itching persists more than three days, doesn't respond to home remedies or is getting progressively worse.

      What Your Symptom Is Telling You

      Unless you spend your summers at a nudist camp, your private parts are often covered in three or four layers of material—perhaps a pantiliner, panties, a pair of snug-fitting pantyhose and your coolest Calvin Kleins.

      So what is that warm, moist part of you doing under all those layers?

      It's itching! And it's driving you nuts.

      Vaginal itching can come from something as simple as trapping bacteria for too long under too many layers of too-tight clothes. All that warmth and moisture provide perfect conditions for incubating infections.

      In fact, itching can be the unwelcome calling card of a wide variety of infections, ranging from bacterial vaginitis to yeast (also called Candida albicans or monilia) and trichomoniasis.

      The itching can also signal an allergy to a chemical in soap, deodorant or dye, or may simply be a sign of thinning vaginal tissues in women approaching menopause.

      Symptom Relief

      Let's take a soothing look at how to banish that infernal itching.

      Sitz in some salt. Several forms of vaginitis will often respond to a simple home remedy—the saline sitz bath. Here's the recipe from Gideon Panter, M.D., a gynecologist in New York City.

      Dissolve a half-cup table salt in a shallow tub of warm water. In the tub, insert your finger into your vagina to let the warm salt water in, then remove your finger and relax for 10 to 15 minutes. Two or three consecutive nights of sitz baths should ease the itch, if yours is home treatable, Dr. Panter says.

      Abstain for the duration. Don't have sexual intercourse until your itching has cleared up, Dr. Panter says. If the organism that set up its itchy housekeeping in your vagina was transmitted by your partner, there's no sense in re-exposing yourself to trouble. Take a few days to show love in other ways, he suggests.

      Consider the condom. Condoms provide wonderful protection against both unwanted pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease. If condom use always seems to be followed by a bout of vaginal itching, however, it's possible that an allergy to the condom's latex rubber, powder coating or lubricant could be the problem.

      Try this simple home patch test from Bruce Katz, M.D., a dermatologist and assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City. Tape an inner-side piece cut from a fresh condom to one arm, and an outer-side piece to the other arm. Leave both pieces in place for 48 hours, and keep the areas dry. If both arms react, you're allergic to the rubber. If only the arm with the inside of the condom taped to it gets itchy or rashy, you're allergic to the powder. If only the arm with the outside piece reacts, you're allergic to the lubricant.

      Does this mean you should avoid using condoms? Absolutely not, says Dr. Katz. Their role in reducing infection risk is too critical. Instead, have your partner use two—lambskin over latex if you are allergic to rubber, or reverse the order if the powder is the problem. Why not just switch to lambskin? Lambskin on its own can't protect against some organisms, including the virus that causes AIDS. Dr. Katz says a nonlatex condom should be on the market shortly, which will solve the problem entirely.

      Ask your doctor. You'll need your doctor's help to determine which type of infection is causing your itching. If you've been diagnosed with yeast infections in the past, and are very familiar with the specific symptoms, call your doctor for a prescription, recommends R. Don Gambrell, Jr., M.D., clinical professor of endocrinology and obstetrics and gynecology at the Medical College of Georgia Hospital and Clinics in Augusta. Your doctor will prescribe antifungal medications such as Vagistat, Nystatin or Monistat.

      Trichomoniasis is treated with the prescription antibiotic Flagyl. Bacterial infections call for antibacterial agents—either sulfa drugs or, if you're allergic to sulfa, with Betadine antiseptic, an over-the-counter product, says Dr. Gambrell.

      "And be sure to have your doctor test you for the human papilloma virus (HPV)," recommends Jessica L. Thomasson, M.D., a gynecologist at Columbia Medical Center in Milwaukee. This virus, which causes genital warts, is an important and frequently overlooked cause of vaginal itching, she says.

      Get help for menopause symptoms. If you're approaching menopause, ask your doctor about treatments for itching caused by changes that are taking place in the vagina. Hormone replacement therapy is an option, but you should also ask about prescription hormonal creams for the vagina.

      Bag the douche and powder. Douching not only won't help to relieve itching or vaginitis, it may be dangerous, says David Eschenbach, M.D., professor and chief of the Division of Gynecology at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle. Douching may drive infectious material up through the cervix and cause pelvic inflammatory disease, he says.

      The use of talcum powder or cornstarch is questionable, too, Dr. Eschenbach says. Over time, the tiny particles may collect near the ovaries and increase ovarian cancer risk.

      Defeating the Yeast Beast and more....
      http://www.mothernature.com/Library/bookshelf/Books/16/254.cfm
      http://health.allrefer.com/health/vaginal-itching-info.html
      http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/sym/vaginal_itching.htm
      http://www.vagisil.com/understanding_itch.shtml

      Now you have a lot to read and I am sure you'll find the right way to deal with your problem.

  26. QUESTION:
    My entire vaginal area is itchy?
    I'm not sure what is causing this but over the past few days, my entire vulva has been unarable itchy, even up as for as the clitoral hood. Could it be a yeast infection?
    I havent noticed any changes in my usual vaginal discharge.

    • ANSWER:
      The following medical conditions are some of the possible causes of Vaginal itching. There are likely to be other possible causes, so ask your doctor about your symptoms.

      Vulval itch - itching outside the vagina rather than internal vaginal itch.
      Vaginal infections
      Vaginitis - see also causes of vaginitis and causes of vaginal discharge
      Bacterial vaginosis
      Yeast infections (type of Fungal infections)
      Vaginal candidiasis
      Trichomoniasis
      Human papilloma virus (HPV)
      Menopause
      Perimenopause
      Chemical allergy
      Soap allergy
      Hygiene product allergy
      Perfume allergy
      Dye allergy
      Douche allergy
      Latex allergy - from a latex condom.
      See also vaginal pain, vaginal discharge, or vaginal discomfort
      [See full list of 20 causes of Vaginal itching]
      - (Source - WD writers)
      Review Symptoms of Each Cause of Vaginal itching
      http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/sym/vaginal_itching.htm

      Not all vaginal irritations are yeast infections. There are many problems that can cause vaginal itching.

      While most are infections, some are due to irritation caused by substances such as detergents and soaps. Other possible causes of irritation include reactions to tampons, sanitary napkins, spermicides or even condoms.

      Estrogen depletion can also cause vaginal irritation. While this occurs commonly with menopause, there are uncommon circumstances in which a premenopausal woman could be deficient in estrogen.

      Skin conditions including precancerous or cancerous changes may all produce itching and burning.

      A much more common cause of itching, however, is infection. While most vaginal infections are sexually transmitted, many are not.

      Trichomoniasis is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases. This infection causes a vaginal discharge and intense itching. While trichomoniasis is usually sexually transmitted, it can also be spread in hot tubs or on contaminated towels.

      Bacterial vaginosis is a similar syndrome that is usually caused by the bacterium Gardnerella vaginalis. While this syndrome occurs most commonly in sexually active WOMEN....
      http://health.ivillage.com/bv/bvvaginalinf/0,,9vpc94b3,00.html

  27. QUESTION:
    I have an itchy balding spot in the top of my head. Sometimes it bleeds and scabs up. What is this?

    • ANSWER:
      Do you have thin hair on the top of your head? You will want to see a dermatologist, preferably one who specializes in skin cancer. It sounds like it could be precancerous cells. There is a condition in skin cancer that spots especially on the face and head will scab up (they are itchy) and when the scab comes off it never heals and continues the cycle. In some cases it looks like flaky skin that keeps growing back. There is a cream that the doctor can give you after a biopsy is completed to make sure it is indeed pre-cancer.

  28. QUESTION:
    Why does my vagina constantly itch?
    it ONLY itches sooo much all the time. there's nothing else wrong with it but itches. there are no bumps no nothing. me and my bf has had sex for a year now but the itching didn't start since couple months ago. he is perfectly safe of any STIs or anything. When I try to ignore the itch it irritates me more that its almost a habit to scratch at it when nobody is looking.

    • ANSWER:
      The thing is its feminine itching ...
      Vaginal itching is a tingling or uneasy irritation of the skin of the vagina and the surrounding area (vulva). The itching may cause a desire to scratch the affected area.
      Common causes of vaginal itching include:

      Chemical irritants -- such as detergents, fabric softeners, feminine sprays, ointments, creams, douches, and contraceptive foams or jellies.
      Menopause -- the drop in estrogen causes thinning of the vaginal wall and less lubrication.
      Stress -- may increase vaginal itching and make you more susceptible to infections.
      Vaginal yeast infection -- often includes a discharge that is white and curd-like. Vaginal yeast infections can be brought on by antibiotics, birth control pills, pregnancy, menstruation, condom use, sexual intercourse, diabetes, and a weakened immune system.
      Vaginitis -- inflammation, itching, discharge, and odor caused by other infections (including sexually transmitted diseases). Vaginitis in girls before puberty is common. If a young girl has a sexually transmitted vaginal infection, however, sexual abuse must be considered and addressed.
      Other possible, but less common, causes of vaginal or vulvar itching include:

      Certain skin conditions affecting the vulvar skin, some of which may be precancerous
      Pinworms (a parasitic infection mainly affecting children)

  29. QUESTION:
    What are other symptoms of skin cancer?
    besides the symptoms on the actual skin

    • ANSWER:
      Skin cancer develops primarily on areas of sun-exposed skin, including the scalp, face, lips, ears, neck, chest, arms and hands, and on the legs in women. But it can also form on areas that rarely see the light of day — your palms, beneath your fingernails, the spaces between your toes or under your toenails, and your genital area.

      Skin cancer affects people of all skin tones, including those with darker complexions. When melanoma occurs in those with dark skin tones, it's more likely to occur in areas not normally considered to be sun-exposed.

      A cancerous skin lesion can appear suddenly or develop slowly. Its appearance depends on the type of cancer.

      Basal cell carcinoma
      This is the most common skin cancer. It's also the most easily treated and the least likely to spread. Basal cell carcinoma usually appears as one of the following:

      A pearly or waxy bump on your face, ears or neck
      A flat, flesh-colored or brown scar-like lesion on your chest or back
      Squamous cell carcinoma
      Squamous cell carcinoma is easily treated if detected early, but it's slightly more apt to spread than is basal cell carcinoma. Most often, squamous cell carcinoma appears as one of the following:

      A firm, red nodule on your face, lips, ears, neck, hands or arms
      A flat lesion with a scaly, crusted surface on your face, ears, neck, hands or arms
      Melanoma
      This is the most serious form of skin cancer and the one responsible for most skin cancer deaths. Melanoma can develop anywhere on your body, in otherwise normal skin or in an existing mole that turns malignant. Melanoma most often appears on the trunk, head or neck of affected men. In women, this type of cancer most often develops on the arms or legs.

      Warning signs of melanoma include:

      A large brownish spot with darker speckles located anywhere on your body
      A simple mole located anywhere on your body that changes in color, size or feel or that bleeds
      A small lesion with an irregular border and red, white, blue or blue-black spots on your trunk or limbs
      Shiny, firm, dome-shaped bumps located anywhere on your body
      Dark lesions on your palms, soles, fingertips and toes, or on mucous membranes lining your mouth, nose, vagina and anus
      Less common skin cancers
      Other, less common types of skin cancer include:

      Kaposi sarcoma. This rare form of skin cancer develops in the skin's blood vessels and causes red or purple patches on the skin or mucous membranes. Like melanoma, it's a serious form of skin cancer. It's mainly seen in people with weakened immune systems, such as people with AIDS, and in people taking medications that suppress their natural immunity, such as people who've undergone organ transplants.
      Merkel cell carcinoma. In this rare cancer, firm, shiny nodules occur on or just beneath the skin and in hair follicles. The nodules may be red, pink or blue and can vary in size from a quarter of an inch (about 6 millimeters) to more than 2 inches (about 50 millimeters). Merkel cell carcinoma is usually found on sun-exposed areas on the head, neck, arms and legs. Unlike basal and squamous cell carcinomas, Merkel cell carcinoma grows rapidly and often spreads to other parts of the body.
      Sebaceous gland carcinoma. This uncommon and aggressive cancer originates in the oil glands in the skin. Sebaceous gland carcinomas — which usually appear as hard, painless nodules — can develop anywhere, but most occur on the eyelid, where they're frequently mistaken for benign conditions.
      Precancerous skin lesions, such as an actinic keratosis, also can develop into squamous cell skin cancer. Actinic keratoses appear as rough, scaly, brown or dark-pink patches. They're most commonly found on the face, ears, lower arms and hands of fair-skinned people whose skin has been damaged by the sun.

      Not all skin changes are cancerous. The only way to know for sure is to have your skin examined by your doctor or dermatologist. -

  30. QUESTION:
    I have a lump in my breast and schuled for a breast aspiration..I am sick about the whole thing but scared to?
    I am scared so terribly of the needle going in my breast...they said this is probably nothing is that true? Any one been through this?

    • ANSWER:
      Friend, don't be worried too much now! It's possible not to be cancer.

      You should learn more knowlege about breast disease and cancer.
      "There are a variety of breast diseases, ranging from infections to excessive cell growth (neoplasms). Unfortunately, many breast diseases mimic the symptoms of cancer and therefore require tests and possibly surgical biopsy to obtain an accurate diagnosis. The majority of biopsies are found to be benign (non-cancerous) forms of breast disease. While most breast diseases are not dangerous in themselves, they may increase the risk of developing breast cancer. Hyperplasia, cysts, fibroadenomas, and calcifications are the common benign breast diseases.

      Calcifications
      Calcifications are randomly scattered residues of calcium that in older women may have left the bones to appear in other parts of the body, such as the joints or breasts. Microcalcifications are small, tight clusters of tiny calcifications in the ducts that can be seen on a mammogram and may indicate a precancerous or cancerous condition.

      Cysts
      Cysts are sacs filled with fluid; they are almost always benign. Although most are too small to feel, approximately a third of women between the ages of 35-50 have cysts in their breasts. If large enough, cysts may feel like lumps in the breast. Normally, cysts are left untreated. However, if a cyst becomes painful, it can be aspirated or drained of its fluid. Some women may prefer to have a cyst removed if, after being aspirated repeatedly, it continues to recur.

      Cysts are not associated with an increased risk of cancer; yet, they are more common in women as they approach menopause and occur much less frequently after menopause (Donegan 1995). What causes cysts to develop is unknown; however, certain dietary factors, such as the intake of caffeine have been proposed as possible risk factors for the development of breast cysts.

      Fibroadenomas
      Fibroadenomas are a type of benign lump most commonly found in younger women. They are usually not removed since they pose no risk. If a fibroadenoma is large, uncomfortable, and produces a lump, it may be removed. In older women, fibroadenomas are generally removed to ensure that they are not malignant tumors. Fibroadenomas do not pose an increased risk of cancer.

      Hyperplasia
      Hyperplasia is not a precancerous condition. It is the excessive accumulation or proliferation of normal cells typically found on the inside of the lobules or the ducts in the breast tissue. Hyperplasia is associated with approximately a two-fold risk of breast cancer.

      Atypical Hyperplasia
      Atypical hyperplasia occurs when excess cells in the lobules or ducts are abnormal. This condition falls between hyperplasia (too many normal cells) and carcinoma in situ (too many abnormal cells). However, atypical hyperplasia is associated with an approximately 3.5-5 times increased risk of developing breast cancer (Page et al. 1985; Colditz 1993; Marshall et al. 1997).
      Ductal carcinoma is usually formed from ductal epithelial cells. This malignant tumor may be noninvasive (contained) or invasive (may involve the underlying muscles, skin, and lymphatics). The first sign is often a painless or tender lump. "
      (source:http://www.smile.org.au/cancers/breast%20cancer.htm)

      Suggest you visit the website "www.smile.org.au" by yourself. There are some valuable information there.

  31. QUESTION:
    what are issues surrounding the use of copper?
    economic, social, environmental and political issues surrounding issues related to the use of copper as a natural resource??
    thanks all :)

    • ANSWER:
      Copper is a (Symbol Cu) ductile, malleable, reddish-brown metallic element that is an excellent conductor of heat and electricity and is widely used for electrical wiring, water piping, and corrosion-resistant parts, either pure or in alloys such as brass and bronze. Atomic number 29; atomic weight 63.54; melting point 1,083°C; boiling point 2,595°C; specific gravity 8.96; valence 1, 2.

      Copper is sometimes used to make coins, and often times used in making electrical wires.

      Copper is a mineral found in trace amounts in all tissues in the body. Although only a small amount is needed, copper is an essential nutrient that plays a role in the production of hemoglobin (the main iron component of red blood cells), myelin (the substance that surrounds nerve fibers), collagen (a key component of bones and connective tissue), and melanin (a dark pigment that colors the hair and skin). Copper also works with vitamin C to help make a component of connective tissue known as elastin.

      Copper can act as both an antioxidant and a pro-oxidant. As an antioxidant, it scavenges damaging particles in the body known as free radicals. Free radicals occur naturally in the body and can damage cell walls, interact with genetic material, and possibly contribute to the aging process as well as the development of a number of health conditions. Antioxidants can neutralize free radicals and may reduce or even help prevent some of the damage they cause.

      When copper acts as a pro-oxidant at times, it promotes free radical damage and may contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease and, possibly, cervical dysplasia (precancerous lesions of the cervix which forms the opening to the uterus). Maintaining the proper dietary balance of copper (along with other minerals such as zinc and manganese) is important. Your doctor or dietitian can help you do this.

      While the Government was trying to restrict the operation of the several mints, it was confronted by a further difficulty on account of insufficiency of copper coins; the relation between silver and copper was almost abnormal and an edict was issued early in February 1902 authorizing the Yangtsze provinces and those on the sea board to coin the new copper Yuan on the model of those struck at the provincial mint of Kiangsu. These new coins were neat and without a square hole, and naturally the people took to them very rapidly and an enormous amount of Yuans were put into circulation within a few years

  32. QUESTION:
    Can key tone cause a vaginal itch, ( for diabetic)?
    I have been to the doctor for this before and he said it was a high level of key tones that was causing the itch i take my medicine not always like i should, and have just moved to a new town so i don't have a doctor here yet , trying to avoid an amergency room visit , but theres no sign of rash or anything out of the ordinary, So can you tell me is this a sign of high key tones?

    • ANSWER:
      Pruritus vulvae; Itching - vaginal area; Vulvar itching
      Definition Return to top

      Vaginal itching is a tingling or uneasy irritation of the skin of the vagina and the surrounding area (vulva). The itching may cause a desire to scratch the affected area.

      Causes Return to top

      Common causes of vaginal itching include:

      Chemical irritants -- such as detergents, fabric softeners, feminine sprays, ointments, creams, douches, and contraceptive foams or jellies.
      Vaginal yeast infection -- often includes a discharge that is white and curd-like. Vaginal yeast infections can be brought on by antibiotics, birth control pills, pregnancy, menstruation, condom use, sexual intercourse, diabetes, and a weakened immune system.
      Vaginitis -- inflammation, itching, discharge, and odor caused by other infections (including sexually transmitted diseases). Vaginitis in girls before puberty is common. If a young girl has a sexually transmitted vaginal infection, however, sexual abuse must be considered and addressed.
      Menopause -- the drop in estrogen causes thinning of the vaginal wall and less lubrication.
      Stress -- may increase vaginal itching and make you more susceptible to infections.
      Other possible, but less common, causes of vaginal or vulvar itching include:

      Pinworms (a parasitic infection mainly affecting children)
      Certain skin conditions affecting the vulvar skin, some of which may be precancerous
      Home Care Return to top

      To prevent and treat vaginal itching:

      Keep your genital area clean and dry. Use plain, unscented soap.
      Avoid colored or perfumed toilet tissue and bubble bath.
      Wear cotton panties or pantyhose with a cotton crotch. Avoid panties made from synthetic materials. For infants and toddlers, change diapers often.
      Change out of wet clothing, especially wet bathing suits or exercise clothing, as soon as possible.
      Avoid feminine hygiene sprays and douches.
      Eat yogurt with live cultures or take lactobacillus acidophilus tablets when using antibiotics. Check with your doctor.
      Cleanse by wiping or washing from front to back (vagina to anus) after urinating or having a bowel movement.
      Lose weight if you are over weight.
      Keep your blood sugars under good control if you have diabetes.
      It is also helpful to:

      Avoid scratching, which will only aggravate the problem.
      Avoid overexertion, heat, and excessive sweating.
      Delay sexual activity until your symptoms get better or at least use a lubricant during intercourse.
      Use condoms to avoid catching or spreading sexually transmitted diseases.
      If you know that you have a yeast infection because your symptoms are exactly the same as those in the past, try over-the-counter creams or vaginal suppositories.

      Yeast infections are not considered sexually transmitted. However, sometimes men also develop itching and redness following sexual contact. If this is the case or you get recurrent infections for unclear reasons, both you and your partner may require treatment. Talk to your doctor.

      For itching related to menopause, your doctor may consider estrogen cream or tablets to insert vaginally.

      You must keep you diabetes under control.Diabetics are prone to all sorts of skin infections.

  33. QUESTION:
    What is HPV, and how can it be treated?
    I think that I may have contracted HPV.

    • ANSWER:
      What are genital warts?

      Genital warts are skin growths in the groin, genital, or anal areas. They are considered a sexually transmitted disease (STD) because they are caused by a virus that can be spread by sexual contact.

      Genital warts occur in women, men, and children.

      In women, the virus that causes genital warts (human papillomavirus, or HPV) can infect the cervix, vagina, vulva, urethra, and the groin or anal areas. HPV can cause abnormal changes in cells of the cervix. Women who are infected with certain types of HPV are more likely than other women to have an abnormal Pap test. The types of HPV that cause visible warts usually are not the same types that cause abnormal cervical cell changes.
      In men, HPV can infect the penis, scrotum, urethra, groin, or anal area.
      In children, HPV can infect the genital area. A child can get genital warts in several ways. Any child with genital warts needs to be evaluated by a health professional to determine the cause and to assess for possible sexual abuse.
      HPV infection can cause cell changes that increase the risk of anal or rectal cancer.

      What causes genital warts?

      Genital warts are caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV). Of the many types of HPV, types 6 and 11 produce visible genital warts. Usually, they eventually disappear without treatment. Other HPV types, such as 16 and 18, usually do not produce visible genital warts. However, they are associated with precancerous and cancerous changes to the cervix.

      Risk factors for genital warts include:

      Having unprotected sexual or genital contact (not using condoms).
      Having multiple sex partners or a high-risk partner(s) who has had multiple sex partners or HPV-infected sex partners.
      Starting sexual activity before age 18.
      Having an impaired immune system.
      What are the symptoms?

      Infection with HPV usually does not cause symptoms. Most HPV infections are latent, meaning the virus is present but is not multiplying or producing any signs of infection. Visible genital warts appear only during active infection. (However, you may spread the virus even if you do not have warts.) Warts may look like tiny bunches of cauliflower or like flat, white areas that may be difficult to see.

      When symptoms do develop, they usually occur 2 to 3 months after infection. However, they may develop from 3 weeks to many years after infection. Possible symptoms include irritation, itching, and bleeding.

      How are genital warts diagnosed?

      A health professional usually diagnoses genital warts using a medical history and a physical examination. During the medical history, your health professional will ask about possible risk factors for warts, such as whether you have recently had unprotected sex.

      He or she will do a physical examination to look for signs of genital warts or other sexually transmitted diseases. Women will have a gynecological exam, including a Pap test. If the exam reveals abnormal tissue but a definite diagnosis cannot be made, your health professional may take a sample of tissue (known as a biopsy) for laboratory tests to identify the tissue.

      How are they treated?

      Genital warts caused by the most common types of HPV often go away on their own without treatment. After you are diagnosed, if you do not have symptoms or cosmetic concerns, you may observe your condition without using treatment. This is called watchful waiting.

      Experts sometimes differ on how to treat the condition because genital warts often go away without treatment and because treatment does not eliminate the HPV infection.

      Treatment will depend on:

      The number of warts and their size and location.
      Any problems the warts are causing.
      The side effects and costs of treatment.
      Your health professional's skill in treating warts.
      Your preferences.
      Even if you are treated to remove visible warts or your warts go away without treatment, the HPV infection is not cured; it remains in your body's cells.

      Even with treatment for genital warts, you still may be able to spread the infection. Condoms may help reduce the risk of spreading the infection, but they do not fully protect against genital contact.

  34. QUESTION:
    What are the benefits of vitamin A?

    • ANSWER:
      Vitamin A is a fat soluble vitamin it is needed to promote a healthy body tissue, to ward off infections especially in the mucous membrane and to aid in building of teeth and bones. It also prevent the formation of rough, hard skin. Individual who lacks vitamin A develop night blindness.

      Other Benefits of Vitamin A :

      1. Development and maintenance of healthy epithelium.
      2. Helps treat pimples, emphysema and hyperthyroidism.
      3. Antioxidant neutralizing free radicals, thus prevents premature aging. Free radical can cause degenerative changes like arthritis, atherosclerosis, etc.
      4. It is said that Vitamin A may help in the prevention of cancer in organs and glands with epithelial tissues such as the mammary glands, skin and passages of the body. The lungs gut, bladder and reproductive organs (including prostate gland) are lined by epithelial tissues.
      5. Builds body resistance to prevent respiratory tract infections.

      Symptoms of Vitamin A Deficiency :

      * Acne
      * Keratinization of the skin and mucous membranes
      * Dry coarse skin
      * Night blindness
      * Achy, tired, burning, itching eyes
      * Inflamed eyelids
      * Eyeball pain
      * Xerophthalmia (a dry and thickened condition of the conjunctiva)
      * Dull lusterless hair
      * Dandruff
      * Ridged nails that peel easily
      * Sexual disorders
      * Birth defects
      * Calcium phosphate kidney stones
      * Precancerous changes in the body tissues
      * Mental changes - insomnia, chronic fatigue, depression, nerve pains in the extremities, growth failure.

  35. QUESTION:
    What causes a white tongue?
    my little girl is 18 months old and yesterday I noticed her tongue was a little white towards the back.
    Now it is covered in white at the back. She seems ok in herself but is getting a bit whingy.

    I will be taking her to the doctors tomo but just wondered if anyone knows what is causing this?

    Thanks in advance

    • ANSWER:
      couple of answers for you:

      1st URL: White tongue is a coating of debris, bacteria and dead cells on your tongue that makes it look white. Although the appearance of white tongue may be alarming, the condition is usually harmless and temporary. However, white tongue can be an indication of some serious conditions, ranging from infection to a precancerous condition, such as leukoplakia.

      2nd URL: Generally, the occasional white tongue, especially when the whole tongue is white (not white in spots or patches), is due to minor inflammation of papillae, the tiny bumps that coat your tongue. These can, like skin cells, collect things like white blood cells, bits of bacteria and the like and as a result, look swollen and white in color. This condition can be caused by poor oral hygiene, dehydration or may be chronic for smokers. People who take medications that cause dry mouth may encounter white tongue on a fairly regular basis, with symptoms residing after hydrating the mouth in the morning.

  36. QUESTION:
    Please Help i have a white tongue?
    Ever since yesterday I've had a white tongue and it's kinda worrying me can anyone help please I can't sleep.

    • ANSWER:
      Oh dear... You have the dreaded white toungue disease! effects one in 10 million people.

      No just joking, In many cases, a white coating on the tongue is caused by a layer of dead skin cells and debris that can be cleaned or scraped off the tongue. Some common conditions that lead to a visible white layer include dehydration, poor oral hygiene, excessive alcohol use, and smoking tobacco. A white tongue can also be a symptom of a variety of other disorders and diseases, such as a bacterial infection or a precancerous lesion.

  37. QUESTION:
    what are nivas? it's a skin conditions and i'm not sure it's spelled right.?
    the doctor said i would have to go to cosmetic dermetologist to fix that. tiny little bumps in a small area.

    • ANSWER:
      A nevi (s) is a mole that can be congenital ( born with), that occurs at birth or develops shortly after birth. Treatment of congenital nevi depends on the size of the mole (s), location, or perceived risk for melanoma ( to change from a normal mole to a precancerous or cancerous mole), and cosmetic outcome. Signs of malignant ( cancerous) include sudden development of a nodule ( a lump), an ulcer ( the mole becomes an open sore), or itching within the mole, as well as pain, bleeding, and color change. It is best that you are evaluated by a Cosmetic Dermatologist as this is one of their specialties. I hope that this helps. Here's a web:
      http://www.dermatologychannel.net/moles/congenitalnevi.shtml

  38. QUESTION:
    Can you donate blood if you have ever had chemotherapy?

    • ANSWER:
      Cancer
      Eligibility depends on the type of cancer and treatment history. If you had leukemia or lymphoma, including Hodgkin’s Disease and other cancers of the blood, you are not eligible to donate. Other types of cancer are acceptable if the cancer has been treated successfully and it has been more than 12 months since treatment was completed and there has been no cancer recurrence in this time. Lower risk in-situ cancers including squamous or basal cell cancers of the skin that have been completely removed do not require a 12 month waiting period.

      Precancerous conditions of the uterine cervix do not disqualify you from donation if the abnormality has been treated successfully. You should discuss your particular situation with the health historian at the time of donation.

      Diabetes
      Diabetics who are well controlled on insulin or oral medications are eligible to donate.

      Insulin
      Donors with diabetes who since 1980, ever used bovine (beef) insulin made from cattle from the United Kingdom are not eligible to donate. This requirement is related to concerns about variant CJD, or 'mad cow' disease. Learn more about variant CJD and blood donation.

      Donation Intervals
      Wait at least 8 weeks between whole blood (standard) donations.
      Wait at least 3 days between plateletpheresis donations.
      Wait at least 16 weeks between double red cell (automated) donations.

  39. QUESTION:
    Can people who have cancer donate blood?
    not in the late stages of cancer but early on while you are still healthy

    • ANSWER:
      Eligibility depends on the type of cancer and treatment history. If you had leukemia or lymphoma, including Hodgkin’s Disease and other cancers of the blood, you are not eligible to donate. Other types of cancer are acceptable if the cancer has been treated successfully and it has been more than 12 months since treatment was completed and there has been no cancer recurrence in this time. Lower risk in-situ cancers including squamous or basal cell cancers of the skin that have been completely removed do not require a 12 month waiting period.

      Precancerous conditions of the uterine cervix do not disqualify you from donation if the abnormality has been treated successfully. You should discuss your particular situation with the health historian at the time of donation.

  40. QUESTION:
    rubbed off skin on top of nose?
    so basically I was washing, and I rubbed the skin off of the top of my nose (I went abit tough on a small spot with the sponge), the next day I woke up and the top of my nose looked red and scabby, pretty horrible.

    I was wondering how long it takes to heal up?

    thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      I JUST had a similar situation and it never quite healed (over 6 months) 'cause every time I rubbed it, the same thing would happen again. I went and they removed a circle on the tip of my nose....diagnosis was a precancerous condition. Go to see a dermatologist, it could be serious.

  41. QUESTION:
    what is the medical condition known as Bowers Disease?

    • ANSWER:
      I think you may mean Bowens disease also.

      Bowen's Disease: Definition

      A superficial precancerous squamous cell cancer, slow growing (i.e. has not started spreading) skin malignancy.

      Description:Red-brown, scaly or crusty patch on the skin that resembles psoriasis, dermatitis or eczema that can occur on any part of the body.

  42. QUESTION:
    what are signs of viginal infection?
    my boyfriend has fingered me roughly in my kitchen counter, my viginal currently itches when i touch it it also has a red color in the opening and the hymen is white as well as part of my pussy.. i need help asap ! pleasee

    • ANSWER:
      Common causes of vaginal itching include:

      * Chemical irritants -- such as detergents, fabric softeners, feminine sprays, ointments, creams, douches, and contraceptive foams or jellies.
      * Menopause -- the drop in estrogen causes thinning of the vaginal wall and less lubrication.
      * Stress -- may increase vaginal itching and make you more susceptible to infections.
      * Vaginal yeast infection -- often includes a discharge that is white and curd-like. Vaginal yeast infections can be brought on by antibiotics, birth control pills, pregnancy, menstruation, condom use, sexual intercourse, diabetes, and a weakened immune system.
      * Vaginitis -- inflammation, itching, discharge, and odor caused by other infections (including sexually transmitted diseases). Vaginitis in girls before puberty is common. If a young girl has a sexually transmitted vaginal infection, however, sexual abuse must be considered and addressed.

      Other possible, but less common, causes of vaginal or vulvar itching include:

      * Certain skin conditions affecting the vulvar skin, some of which may be precancerous
      * Pinworms (a parasitic infection mainly affecting children)

      Go to a doctor for professional advice

  43. QUESTION:
    I sometimes get itchy around my vagina?
    Sometimes I get really itchy around my vagina area and my clit. I am a Virgin.
    But lately I have noticed some small bumps down there... Kinda like goose bumps. Is it STI's I am really worried..

    • ANSWER:
      Vaginal itchiness is common but frequent itchiness is not. you may get these from the detergent used in your undies, Stress that make you more susceptible to infections, Precancerous conditions of the vulva, or Pinworms (mainly affecting children).

      To prevent or treating vaginal itching:
      avoid using colored tissues.
      Cleanse the area by wiping or washing from front to back (vagina to anus) after urinating or having a bowel movement.
      Eat yogurt with live cultures or take Lactobacillus acidophilus tablets when using antibiotics. Check with your doctor.
      Keep your genital area clean and dry. Use plain, unscented soap.(mild soaps)
      Keep your blood sugar under good control if you have diabetes.
      Lose weight if you are overweight.
      Wear cotton panties or pantyhose with a cotton crotch.(so that your skin can breathe easily sweats can be itchy too) Avoid panties made from synthetic materials. For infants and toddlers, change diapers often.

  44. QUESTION:
    Hi im 26 year old women ... im not married and i have irritation and itching around my vagina ...?
    i have no irritation while passing urine and my periods has to come by next week.. so want 2 know whats would be the problem

    • ANSWER:
      Hi dear, I think it will help you, Generally Vaginal itching is a tingling or uneasy irritation of the skin of the vagina and the surrounding area (vulva). The itching may cause a desire to scratch the affected area.

      Common causes of vaginal itching include:
      Chemical irritants such as detergents, fabric softeners, feminine sprays, ointments, creams, douches, and contraceptive foams or jellies.
      Stress may increase vaginal itching and make you more susceptible to infections.
      Vaginal yeast infection

      Other possible, but less common, causes of vaginal itching include:
      Precancerous skin conditions of the vulva
      Pinworms (a parasite infection mainly affecting children)

      To prevent and treat vaginal itching:
      Avoid colored or perfumed toilet tissue and bubble bath.
      Avoid feminine hygiene sprays and douches.
      Change out of wet clothing, especially wet bathing suits or exercise clothing, as soon as possible.
      Cleanse the area by wiping or washing from front to back (vagina to anus) after urinating or having a bowel movement.
      Eat yogurt with live cultures or take Lactobacillus acidophilus tablets when using antibiotics. Check with your doctor.
      Keep your genital area clean and dry. Use plain, unscented soap.
      Keep your blood sugar under good control if you have diabetes.
      Lose weight if you are overweight.
      Wear cotton panties or pantyhose with a cotton crotch. Avoid panties made from synthetic materials. For infants and toddlers, change diapers often.

      If you are sure that you have a yeast infection, try over-the-counter creams or vaginal suppositories.

      I think it will help you. In addition you may have some infections.

  45. QUESTION:
    my vagina has been itching me for two months now?
    i tried using aveeno and another itch cream that i have but it doesn,t really help.even though it itches there is no sores ,boils or bumps.it itches me at the lower and outer part of my vagina near to where you would insert when having sex.i am going to see a doctor just having made the time yet but just want to know how serious it might be.

    • ANSWER:
      Common causes of vaginal itching include:

      Chemical irritants -- such as detergents, fabric softeners, feminine sprays, ointments, creams, douches, and contraceptive foams or jellies.
      Vaginal yeast infection -- often includes a discharge that is white and curd-like. Vaginal yeast infections can be brought on by antibiotics, birth control pills, pregnancy, menstruation, condom use, sexual intercourse, diabetes, and a weakened immune system.
      Vaginitis -- inflammation, itching, discharge, and odor caused by other infections (including sexually transmitted diseases). Vaginitis in girls before puberty is common. If a young girl has a sexually transmitted vaginal infection, however, sexual abuse must be considered and addressed.
      Menopause -- the drop in estrogen causes thinning of the vaginal wall and less lubrication.
      Stress -- may increase vaginal itching and make you more susceptible to infections.
      Other possible, but less common, causes of vaginal or vulvar itching include:

      Pinworms (a parasitic infection mainly affecting children)
      Certain skin conditions affecting the vulvar skin, some of which may be precancerous
      Home Care Return to top

      To prevent and treat vaginal itching:

      Keep your genital area clean and dry. Use plain, unscented soap.
      Avoid colored or perfumed toilet tissue and bubble bath.
      Wear cotton panties or pantyhose with a cotton crotch. Avoid panties made from synthetic materials. For infants and toddlers, change diapers often.
      Change out of wet clothing, especially wet bathing suits or exercise clothing, as soon as possible.
      Avoid feminine hygiene sprays and douches.
      Eat yogurt with live cultures or take lactobacillus acidophilus tablets when using antibiotics. Check with your doctor.
      Cleanse by wiping or washing from front to back (vagina to anus) after urinating or having a bowel movement.
      Lose weight if you are over weight.
      Keep your blood sugars under good control if you have diabetes.
      It is also helpful to:

      Avoid scratching, which will only aggravate the problem.
      Avoid overexertion, heat, and excessive sweating.
      Delay sexual activity until your symptoms get better or at least use a lubricant during intercourse.
      Use condoms to avoid catching or spreading sexually transmitted diseases.
      If you know that you have a yeast infection because your symptoms are exactly the same as those in the past, try over-the-counter creams or vaginal suppositories.

      Yeast infections are not considered sexually transmitted. However, sometimes men also develop itching and redness following sexual contact. If this is the case or you get recurrent infections for unclear reasons, both you and your partner may require treatment. Talk to your doctor.

      For itching related to menopause, your doctor may consider estrogen cream or tablets to insert vaginally.

      Teach children to resist and report any attempted sexual contact by another person. Don't try to remove any foreign object from a child's vagina. Take the child to a doctor right away for removal.

      Call your health care provider if Return to top

      Call your doctor right away if:

      You have pelvic or lower abdominal pain or fever.
      You have increased thirst or appetite, unexplained weight loss, frequent urination, or fatigue -- these may be signs of diabetes.
      Call your doctor if:

      Your symptoms worsen, last longer than 1 week, or recur despite self-care.
      You have unusual vaginal bleeding, swelling, or discharge.
      Your partner also has symptoms or you think you may have a sexually transmitted disease.
      You have burning with urination or other urinary symptoms -- you may have a urinary tract infection.
      You have blisters or ulcers on your vagina or vulva.

  46. QUESTION:
    Cancer treatment research progress?
    Just wondering really. Are scientists closer to finding a cure or high levels of treatment more so than the past few years? Is a cure for cancer or some types possible in the near future?

    Would appreciate any responses. Hopefully they can find some.

    Thanks
    Hi. This question isn't from personal experience altho a grandfather a few years ago was hit with it but more as a general question and interest to see cures for things like this.

    • ANSWER:
      Some types of cancer are curable. The obvious example is squamous cell carcinoma or basal cell carcinoma of the skin. People are often cured of leukaemias and lymphomas (some kinds more than others). It's a lot more complicated than one cancer and one cure. There are a shocking number of different kinds of cancers, all with different causes and risk factors, and among these, the grade and stage of the cancer (grade is how aggressively it advances and stage is how far it's advanced by the time it's picked up) determine the treatment options and likelihood of survival. Many cancers have recognizeable 'pre-cancerous stages' e.g. cervical or colorectal cancers which is why people get screened with pap smears and colonoscopies respectively... treatment can then be initiated that removes the precancerous cells and stops the cancer before it's properly formed.

      Depending on the type of cancer and the grade and stage, there are several treatment options, some of which are curative, some to treat the symptoms and palliation (making you comfortable in a terminal condition). Examples are surgical removal, chemotherapies (hundreds of different kinds... 'chemotherapy' does NOT equal one drug), radiation therapy, hormonal therapies and immunotherapies.

      There is LOTS of cancer research being conducted all the time all around the world, and this includes the different types of cancers, the risk factors, the prevention, the treatment, the genetics, etc.

  47. QUESTION:
    what is wrong with my skin?
    have rashes on my skin i thought it may have been bed bugs but its not, they started out as dots and now have grown up to the size of a dime, the are real scabby but dont peel of, they dont hurt and they are my skin color, i have no stds, i had a metal rod put in my leg about 4 months ago because my leg broke, i am a 24 year old black male

    • ANSWER:
      I would see a doctor as soon as possible. It could be actinic keratosis which is a precancerous condition. See for yourself...

      http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/tc/actinic-keratosis-topic-overview

  48. QUESTION:
    Skin Cancer Symptoms?
    What are the symptoms of skin cancer?

    Ive got this mole-like spot near my wrist area, i first noticed it three years ago. I have scratched/picked it off countless times (I have a habit of scratching off scabs, etc.) Its kind of a mishaped oval, and the same color as my skin. My mother doesnt think anything about it, but im getting a little scared because skin cancer runs in the family.

    • ANSWER:
      Skin cancer — the abnormal growth of skin cells — most often develops on skin exposed to the sun. But this common form of cancer can also occur on areas of your skin not ordinarily exposed to sunlight.

      Skin cancer develops primarily on areas of sun-exposed skin, including the scalp, face, lips, ears, neck, chest, arms and hands, and on the legs in women. But it can also form on areas that rarely see the light of day — your palms, beneath your fingernails, the spaces between your toes or under your toenails, and your genital area.

      Skin cancer affects people of all skin tones, including those with darker complexions. When melanoma occurs in those with dark skin tones, it's more likely to occur in areas not normally considered to be sun-exposed.

      A cancerous skin lesion can appear suddenly or develop slowly. Its appearance depends on the type of cancer.

      Basal cell carcinoma
      This is the most common skin cancer. It's also the most easily treated and the least likely to spread. Basal cell carcinoma usually appears as one of the following:

      * A pearly or waxy bump on your face, ears or neck
      * A flat, flesh-colored or brown scar-like lesion on your chest or back

      Squamous cell carcinoma
      Squamous cell carcinoma is easily treated if detected early, but it's slightly more apt to spread than is basal cell carcinoma. Most often, squamous cell carcinoma appears as one of the following:

      * A firm, red nodule on your face, lips, ears, neck, hands or arms
      * A flat lesion with a scaly, crusted surface on your face, ears, neck, hands or arms

      Melanoma
      This is the most serious form of skin cancer and the one responsible for most skin cancer deaths. Melanoma can develop anywhere on your body, in otherwise normal skin or in an existing mole that turns malignant. Melanoma most often appears on the trunk, head or neck of affected men. In women, this type of cancer most often develops on the arms or legs.

      Warning signs of melanoma include:

      * A large brownish spot with darker speckles located anywhere on your body
      * A simple mole located anywhere on your body that changes in color, size or feel or that bleeds
      * A small lesion with an irregular border and red, white, blue or blue-black spots on your trunk or limbs
      * Shiny, firm, dome-shaped bumps located anywhere on your body
      * Dark lesions on your palms, soles, fingertips and toes, or on mucous membranes lining your mouth, nose, vagina and anus

      Less common skin cancers
      Other, less common types of skin cancer include:

      * Kaposi sarcoma. This rare form of skin cancer develops in the skin's blood vessels and causes red or purple patches on the skin or mucous membranes. Like melanoma, it's a serious form of skin cancer. It's mainly seen in people with weakened immune systems, such as people with AIDS, and in people taking medications that suppress their natural immunity, such as people who've undergone organ transplants.
      * Merkel cell carcinoma. In this rare cancer, firm, shiny nodules occur on or just beneath the skin and in hair follicles. The nodules may be red, pink or blue and can vary in size from a quarter of an inch (about 6 millimeters) to more than 2 inches (about 50 millimeters). Merkel cell carcinoma is usually found on sun-exposed areas on the head, neck, arms and legs. Unlike basal and squamous cell carcinomas, Merkel cell carcinoma grows rapidly and often spreads to other parts of the body.
      * Sebaceous gland carcinoma. This uncommon and aggressive cancer originates in the oil glands in the skin. Sebaceous gland carcinomas — which usually appear as hard, painless nodules — can develop anywhere, but most occur on the eyelid, where they're frequently mistaken for benign conditions.

      Precancerous skin lesions, such as an actinic keratosis, also can develop into squamous cell skin cancer. Actinic keratoses appear as rough, scaly, brown or dark-pink patches. They're most commonly found on the face, ears, lower arms and hands of fair-skinned people whose skin has been damaged by the sun.

      Not all skin changes are cancerous. The only way to know for sure is to have your skin examined by your doctor or dermatologist. -

  49. QUESTION:
    i have vagina itching and the doc says all test came negative?
    whats wrong with me ,ive been itching for quite some time,im pregnet and have been to the doc 3 times.they all say they find nothing.is this normal?what should i do,im like irrated.please ladies i need advice?

    • ANSWER:
      Common causes of vaginal itching include:

      Chemical irritants -- such as detergents, fabric softeners, feminine sprays, ointments, creams, douches, and contraceptive foams or jellies.
      Vaginal yeast infection -- often includes a discharge that is white and curd-like. Vaginal yeast infections can be brought on by antibiotics, birth control pills, pregnancy, menstruation, condom use, sexual intercourse, diabetes, and a weakened immune system.
      Vaginitis -- inflammation, itching, discharge, and odor caused by other infections (including sexually transmitted diseases). Vaginitis in girls before puberty is common. If a young girl has a sexually transmitted vaginal infection, however, sexual abuse must be considered and addressed.
      Menopause -- the drop in estrogen causes thinning of the vaginal wall and less lubrication.
      Stress -- may increase vaginal itching and make you more susceptible to infections.
      Other possible, but less common, causes of vaginal or vulvar itching include:

      Pinworms (a parasitic infection mainly affecting children)
      Certain skin conditions affecting the vulvar skin, some of which may be precancerous
      Home Care Return to top

      To prevent and treat vaginal itching:

      Keep your genital area clean and dry. Use plain, unscented soap.
      Avoid colored or perfumed toilet tissue and bubble bath.
      Wear cotton panties or pantyhose with a cotton crotch. Avoid panties made from synthetic materials. For infants and toddlers, change diapers often.
      Change out of wet clothing, especially wet bathing suits or exercise clothing, as soon as possible.
      Avoid feminine hygiene sprays and douches.
      Eat yogurt with live cultures or take lactobacillus acidophilus tablets when using antibiotics. Check with your doctor.
      Cleanse by wiping or washing from front to back (vagina to anus) after urinating or having a bowel movement.
      Lose weight if you are over weight.
      Keep your blood sugars under good control if you have diabetes.
      It is also helpful to:

      Avoid scratching, which will only aggravate the problem.
      Avoid overexertion, heat, and excessive sweating.
      Delay sexual activity until your symptoms get better or at least use a lubricant during intercourse.
      Use condoms to avoid catching or spreading sexually transmitted diseases.
      If you know that you have a yeast infection because your symptoms are exactly the same as those in the past, try over-the-counter creams or vaginal suppositories.

      Yeast infections are not considered sexually transmitted. However, sometimes men also develop itching and redness following sexual contact. If this is the case or you get recurrent infections for unclear reasons, both you and your partner may require treatment. Talk to your doctor.

      For itching related to menopause, your doctor may consider estrogen cream or tablets to insert vaginally.

      Teach children to resist and report any attempted sexual contact by another person. Don't try to remove any foreign object from a child's vagina. Take the child to a doctor right away for removal.

      Call your health care provider if Return to top

      Call your doctor right away if:

      You have pelvic or lower abdominal pain or fever.
      You have increased thirst or appetite, unexplained weight loss, frequent urination, or fatigue -- these may be signs of diabetes.
      Call your doctor if:

      Your symptoms worsen, last longer than 1 week, or recur despite self-care.
      You have unusual vaginal bleeding, swelling, or discharge.
      Your partner also has symptoms or you think you may have a sexually transmitted disease.
      You have burning with urination or other urinary symptoms -- you may have a urinary tract infection.
      You have blisters or ulcers on your vagina or vulva.


precancerous skin condition

Keratosis Moles

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What is a home-made remedy to get rid of moles?
    I've heard onion juice won't by some people but others say it does work. The mole is on my face and quite big so obviously I want it gone. I'm willing to go through pain if it means it will be gone forever. I hate it so much. :( Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      For one if its a true mole there is no home remedy of getting rid of it.A doctor can remove a facial mole one of two ways both of which need local anesthesia (lidocaine,usually) DO NOT try to remove a true mole yourself please. If your are told any other "methods" there not true that is if its an actual mole. Some people confuse letigos (i.e sun-spots and or freckles) or seborrehic keratosis (hereditary warty like spots) with a true mole which can both be frozen off or lightened with bleaching creams.

  2. QUESTION:
    Why has this mole on my neck been bleeding?
    It's been sore for the last few days now, and has been bleeding a bit on the tip of the mole, as its edges. Why has this been bleeding? I haven't done anything to it, and don't recall scratching it on anything that would cause it.

    Should I have it checked out by my doctor? Help please
    *checks neck*

    It's certainly a mole.

    • ANSWER:
      While bleeding moles should ALWAYS be checked out by a skin doctor, it may be that you have a traumatic keratosis. This can be "frozen" using liquid nitrogen and cleared up in one visit to the skind doctor.

  3. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of facial and arm redness?
    I have redness on my cheeks and redness on the upper part of my arms. It's not any type of skin condition on my face. I've been checked by a dermatologist. It just looks like somebody slapped me across the face but the redness never goes away. On my arms, some people have said it may be Keratosis Pilaris. I'm very pale and this redness really stands out. Any way to get rid of it or at least make it less noticeable? Thanks!
    I'm a girl if that helps.

    • ANSWER:
      Maybe try a skin bleaching agent. Not something real strong though. I know theirs products on the market that help even out skin tone or reduce facial reddening. You'll just have to look around. They come in the forms of lotions, creams, ect. Aveeno has such products. I use their face moisturizer with spf and their body one also. I haven't tried the ones for skin reddening or the ones that even out skin tone, but I am sure they are worth a try. Heres a link to the products. http://www.aveeno.com/segmentAction.do?segid=1002&catid=1000

      If this dont help then maybe with the help of a laser or Microdermabrasion. I have heard it can help lighten skin, like freckles, and obviously a laser is stronger and can remove things like moles, but if its just redness, then microdermabrasion if all else fails.

      In the mean time you can always do what they show on tv (think bare minerals) and cover with powders on your face. As for your arms wear longer sleeves? I'm not sure if a skin bronzer lotion would help any,,,but try to keep these areas safe from the sun with spf as you may have sensative skin in these areas.

      I too am quit pale. Blonde hair, blue eyes, freckles. I am less red with sunblock. Also, just wearing makeup helps,,,,i never darkened my skin since i like light skin. Also, i want to protect it from wrinkles and think it would look silly and fake on my complexion. I like you probably suffer the same kind of issue. I look red in these areas more than others. I just bare with it since i'm sure its common in pale skin types.

  4. QUESTION:
    Does every skin cancer start with a mole?
    i was just wondering if every skin cancer had to begin in a mole.

    • ANSWER:
      No, Skin cancers are of 3 major types: basal cell carcinoma (BCC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and melanoma.
      Skin cancer is the most common of all human cancers.
      Cancer occurs when normal cells undergo a transformation during which they grow and multiply without normal controls.

      Medical professionals often refer to these changes as dysplasia. Some specific dysplastic changes that occur in skin are as follows:

      * Actinic keratosis is a patch of red or brown, scaly, rough skin, which can develop into squamous cell carcinoma.

      * A nevus is a mole, and dysplastic nevi are abnormal moles. These can develop into melanoma over time.

      Moles are simply growths on the skin. They are very common. Very few moles become cancer.

      An individual's moles usually look pretty much alike. A mole that looks different from the others should be examined by your health care provider.

      Dysplastic nevi are not cancer, but they can become cancer.

  5. QUESTION:
    Are there any good over-the-counter mole or sebborheic keratosis remover creams?
    I know that there are wart remover lliquids that are acidic and are applied over several days; but for moles and what are called sebborheic keratoses, are there any topical treatments?
    (the standard treatment is to freeze them off, I know, but most HMOs are pretty stingy in what they will do.)

    • ANSWER:
      There is a problem with taking a mole of one's self. And that is that moles can be canceres, or can cause cancer. if you've got a mole that's big enough that it's bothering you, I would go and save up the money and get it taken off proffessionally. Maybe your HMO would be more willing to help pay if you got your mole cut off, which I believe is a safer way then frozen off. I have hadc many moles and warts removed, never frozen always cut, and have been very pleased with the end result!

  6. QUESTION:
    What does it look like nonmelanoma cancer look like?
    I have had these to spots on my arm for 3 years they look like they are scars, but they are not. About a week and a half ago one of them starting growing really quickly into a pink bump. Right now it's bigger then a pencil earser. It is getting bigger by the day. And a few days ago it started to hurt. I have pre cancerous melanoma for the last eight years so I know what to look for with that but this is not mole. Thank you for your help

    • ANSWER:
      Anytime any lesion begins to grow and change shape, is an indication that it is time to go to a doctor.

      No one can diagnose a lesion/mole/whateve without actually seeing it. And if you have a hx of melanoma (there is no such thing as pre-cancerous melanoma - melanoma by defination is cancer - do you mean actinic keratosis - that is pre-cancerous changes) then you are at increased risk for more - you really need to see a doctor.

      Although it sounds more like you have an infection or an abcess (growing fast is not good for anything)

  7. QUESTION:
    Im a fair complexioned indian with keratosis pilaris please help?
    For a few years now ive been having Keratosis pilaris on my bum it is so embarassing because it discolors my otherwise fair and smooth skin..this is very serious because it is affecting my self confidence...i dont feel sexy even if people say im very pretty or that i have a nice body
    suggestions of creams that are available in Indian market would help..thanks in advance

    • ANSWER:
      I can understand how this would be embarrassing for you, but it's very easy to be your own worst critic. You won't ever find a person that doesn't have some sort of skin condition somewhere on their body, whether it be keratosis, acne vulgaris, stretch marks, moles, or many other conditions. You should believe the people that say you are sexy, because I'm sure you are despite your small skin problem. If anyone says otherwise, they are being hypocritical, because they surely suffer from one skin problem or another.

      If it's truly embarrassing for you, say if you go swimming, wear some short-type bottoms instead of a bikini. The only other time I would imagine someone would be seeing your butt is during sex, and I can pretty much guarantee you that by that point they won't notice and/or care about your condition.

      Unfortunately, I live in the US, so I don't know the brand names of the drugs available to you. If you have the money, make a doctor appointment and get a prescription. If you can't, I'm sure you could google some information up pretty quickly.

  8. QUESTION:
    I have a blackhead on my tummy that might be a mole?
    I have what looks like a blackhead on my stomach but it might be a mole, it would be a big black head so would hard to get out but when i squeeze it, it kind of sinks in like blackheads do, but could be a very small mole but its black and really annoying me as if its a blackhead i cant get it out, any ideas what i can do?

    • ANSWER:
      There are other skin growths that look like moles called Seborrheic keratosis. These are black an hard but not cancerous.

  9. QUESTION:
    How long does it take to remove skin tags?
    I'm trying to get rid of one by tying a string around it, (well about to) and i was wondering how long it would take to remove it. Thanks if you help any.

    • ANSWER:
      Skin Tag
      http://www.medicinenet.com/skin_tag/page2.htm How are skin tags treated?

      There are several effective medical ways to remove a skin tag, including removing with scissors, freezing (using liquid nitrogen), and burning (using medical electric cautery at the physician's office).

      Usually small tags may be removed easily without anesthesia while larger growths may require some local anesthesia (injected lidocaine) prior to removal. Application of a topical anesthesia cream prior to the procedure may be desirable in areas where there are a large number of tags.

      Dermatologists (skin doctors), family physicians, and internal medicine physicians are the doctors who treat tags most often. Occasionally, an eye specialist (ophthalmologist) is needed to remove tags very close to the eyelid margin.

      There are also home remedies and self-treatments, including tying off the small tag stalk with a piece of thread or dental floss and allowing the tag to fall off over several days.

      The advantage of scissor removal is that the growth is immediately removed and there are instant results. The potential disadvantage of any kind of scissor or minor surgical procedure to remove tags is minor bleeding.

      Possible risks with freezing or burning include temporary skin discoloration, need for repeat treatment(s), and failure for the tag to fall off.

      There is no evidence that removing tags causes more tags to grow. Rather, there are some people that may be more prone to developing skin tags and may have new growths periodically. Some patients even require periodic removal of tags at annual or quarterly intervals. Do skin tags need to be sent for pathology?

      Most typical small skin tags may be removed without sending tissue for microscopic examination. However, there are some larger or atypical growths that may be removed and sent to a pathologist for examination under a microscope to make sure that the tissue is really a tag and nothing more. Additionally, skin bumps that have bled or rapidly changed may also need pathologic examination. While extremely rare, there are a few reports of skin cancers found in skin tags.
      What else could it be?

      While classic skin tags are typically very characteristic in appearance and occur in specific locations such as the underarms, necks, under breasts, eyelids and groin folds, there are tags that may occur in less obvious locations.

      Other skin growths that may look similar to a skin tag but are not tags include moles (dermal nevus), nerve and fiber-type moles (neurofibromas), warts, and "barnacles" or "Rice Krispies" (seborrheic keratosis).

      Warts tend to be rougher, with a "warty" irregular surface whereas skin tags are usually smooth. Warts tend to be flat whereas tags are more like bumps hanging from thin stalk. While warts are almost entirely caused by human papilloma virus (HPV), tags are only sometimes associated with HPV.

      Groin and genital lesions resembling skin tags may actually be genital warts or condyloma. A biopsy would help diagnose which of these growths are not skin tags. Very rarely, a basal cell skin or squamous cancer or melanoma may mimic a skin tag, but this is very uncommon.

      Is there another medical name for a skin tag?

      Medical terms your physician or dermatologist may use to describe a skin tag include fibroepithelial polyp, acrochordon, cutaneous papilloma, and soft fibroma. All of these terms describe skin tags and are benign (noncancerous), painless skin growths. Some people refer to these as "skin tabs" or warts. However, a skin tag is best known as a skin tag.

      http://www.medicinenet.com/skin_tag/page2.htm

  10. QUESTION:
    How fast can skin cancer spread and grow? does it take days, weeks, or months?
    I see all of these things that say... you need to catch skin cancer early. But nothing says what early means, does this mean every time i see an abnormal thing on my skin i should run to the doctor? Or should I wait a day, or a week, or a month?

    When people go to the doctor and the cancer is in it's late stages, were they an hour too late, a day too late, a week too late, 10 years to late?

    Seriously... cancer sites need to put more information out there about rate of growth and timing.

    • ANSWER:
      There are several degrees of 'skin cancer' ... malignant melanoma (a mole with an uneven shape, raised, dark color or mixed color) is the very worst and you should see a doctor within two weeks of noticing a new mole that isn't perfectly round or is slightly raised. There is also keratosis ... skin cancer that older people get, especially when they have been sunburned when young. This looks like a freckle, but if you touch it there is some tenderness, as if it's a 'scab' ... show those to your doctor at your annual check up, or your next check up ... the doctor will 'watch' them for you, and if they turn to an 'active' cancer you will be advised you need surgical removal. Many people get these taken off in the office (outpatient surgery) and are just fine ... but a few go on to develop serious skin cancer or malignant melanoma later in the same spot.

  11. QUESTION:
    does anyone know a way to treat and prevent hyperpigmentation?
    i have a problem with hyperpigmentation....scars not fully healing any blemish automatically becomes a HUGE dark spot. I need to figure out a way to treat and try to prevent my hyperpigmentation. Does anyone know how????

    • ANSWER:
      Basically, stay out of the sun and use plenty of sunscreen, also, another site said to use hydroquinone or seek out certain medication from a dermatologist; here is some more information:

      Definition

      Hyperpigmentation is the increase in the natural color of the skin.

      Description

      Melanin, a brown pigment manufactured by certain cells in the skin called melanocytes, is responsible for skin color. Melanin production is stimulated by a pituitary hormone called melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH). Other pigments appear in the skin much less often.

      Causes and symptoms

      Darkened spots on the skin come in several varieties. The most ominous is malignant melanoma, a very aggressive cancer that begins as an innocent mole. The majority of moles (nevus), however, are and remain benign (harmless). The average person has several dozen, and certain people with a hereditary excess may have hundreds. Freckles, age spots, and cafe au lait spots, known as ephelides, are always flat and not as dark. Cafe au lait spots are seen mostly in people with another hereditary disorder called neurofibromatosis. "Port wine stains" are congenital dark red blotches on the skin. Other common dark colorations on the skin are called keratosis and consist of locally overgrown layers of skin that are dark primarily because there is more tissue than normal. A few of these turn into skin cancers of a much less dangerous kind than melanoma.

      Darkened regions of the skin occur as a result of abnormal tanning when the skin is sensitive to sunlight. Several diseases and many drugs can cause photosensitivity. Among the common drugs responsible for this uncommon reaction are birth control pills, antibiotics (sulfonamides and tetracyclines), diuretics, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), pain relievers, and some psychoactive medications. Some of the same drugs may also cause patches of discolored skin known as localized drug reactions and representing an allergy to that drug. Sunlight darkens an abnormal chemical in the skin of patients with porphyria cutanea tarda. Several endocrine diseases, some cancers, and several drugs abnormally stimulate melanocytes, usually through an overproduction of MSH. Arsenic poisoning and Addison's disease are among these causes. A condition known as acanthosis nigricans is a velvety darkening of skin in folded areas (arm pits, groin, and neck) that can signal a cancer or hormone imbalance.

      Of particular note is a condition called melasma (dark pigmentation of the skin), caused by the female hormone estrogen. Normal in pregnancy, this brownish discoloration of the face can also happen with birth control pills that contain estrogen.

      Overall darkening of the skin may be due to pigmented chemicals in the skin. Silver, gold, and iron each have a characteristic color when visible in the skin. Several drugs and body chemicals, like bilirubin, can end up as deposits in the skin and discolor it.

      There are a number of other rare entities that color the skin, each in its own peculiar way. Among these are strange syndromes that seem to be birth defects and vitamin and nutritional deficiencies.

      Diagnosis

      The pattern of discoloration is immediately visible to the trained dermatologist, a physician specializing in skin diseases, and may be all that is required to name and characterize the discoloration. Many of these pigment changes are signs of internal disease that must be identified. Pigmentation changes may also be caused by medication, and the drug responsible for the reaction must be identified and removed.

      Treatment

      Skin sensitive to sunlight must be protected by shade or sunscreens with an SPF of 15 or greater. Skin cancers must be, and unsightly benign lesions may be, surgically removed. Laser surgery is an effective removal technique for many localized lesions. Because it spreads so rapidly, melanoma should be immediately removed, as well as some of the surrounding tissue to prevent regrowth.

      Prevention

      Sunlight is the leading cause of dark spots on the skin, so shade and sunscreens are necessary preventive strategies, especially in people who burn easily.

      Key Terms

      Addison's disease
      A degenerative disease that is characterized by weight loss, low blood pressure, extreme weakness, and dark brown pigmentation of the skin.

      Dermatologist
      A physician specializing in the study of skin conditions and diseases

      Diuretic
      A cause of increased urine flow.

      Keratosis
      A skin disease characterized by an overgrowth of skin, which usually appears discolored.

      Lesion
      Any localized abnormality.

      Melasma
      Dark pigmentation of the skin.

      Neurofibromatosis
      Otherwise known as von Recklinghausen's disease, consists of pigmented skin spots and numerous soft tumors all over the body.

      Nevus
      Birthmark or mole.

      NSAID
      Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs--aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, and many others.

      Porphyria cutanea tarda
      An inherited disease that results in the overproduction of porphyrins.

      Syndrome
      Common features of a disease or features that appear together often enough to suggest they may represent a single, as yet unknown, disease entity.

  12. QUESTION:
    I have colorless spots on my arms and need to know how to cover them up to match the surrounding skin tone?
    I need to know before june 21. that is my wedding date, and my dress is sleevless. Please find the cheapest way as well. After paying for a wedding there's no money for expensive makeup

    • ANSWER:
      The person above listed most possible causes of skin problems, but there is one called keratosis pilaris. It is mostly across the back of upper arms and can also appear on the backs of necks and shoulders. There is no cure for it, but it sometimes goes away on its own. Don’t scrub the area, and pat it dry. You can get medicated soaps and lotions from your doctor or in the pharmacy.

      To cover up the spots, I recommend SALLY HANSEN AIRBRUSH LEGS. Yes, it’s for legs, but I’ve used it on my arms. It’s like foundation for non-facial skin. It doesn’t cover moles, but covers my spots and looks like smooth, natural skin. Just don’t get the color “light glow” unless you are VERY pale, like Scandinavian pale, because it is really light. It also doesn’t come off until you wash it with soap and water. Alternatively, you can use a self-tanner lotion all over, but this won’t cover nearly as well.

      Good luck, and blessings to your marriage =)

  13. QUESTION:
    What exactly are precancerous cells?
    What exactly is it and how do you get it?

    • ANSWER:
      this is a general laymen's term for the many types of cells that are not following thier normal life (form, divid, die) and have become abnormal. They become cancer when thier rate of division rapidly increases.

      On a pathology report you might see the word dysplastic which is the medical term for it. There are also cell types by many names such as skin cancer which I am familar with; keratosis without treatment might become squamous cell cancer; dysplastic nevus or layman's terms atypical mole, could lead to Melanoma.

  14. QUESTION:
    Could this possibly be skin cancer?
    I just noticed a small mole-looking thing on my back yesterday. Its a reddish-brown color and about half the diameter of a pencil eraser. Should I be concerned? However, it does not bleed and is not tender or sensitive to touch.

    • ANSWER:
      skin cancers:
      malignant melanoma- usually from a dark changing mole....better to catch them flat, more raised means the deeper theyre going. if a moles is multicolored, changing colors suddenly or black get it checked asap.new mole doesnt mean changing u can get new moles into 50s and 60s their okay as long as they dont change after the initial show up. also melanoma doesnt need sun

      aks(precancers), squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carinoma- all from the sun, any red scaly spot that doesnt go away or comes&goes often or bleeds needs to be checked out, the most common story for a basal cell is it started like a pimple but wouldnt go away. theres also keratoacanthoma which is a quick growing form of a squamous cell...they can double in sz in 1week.

      *general rule if it goes away on its own and doesnt come back its generally benign.

      hope this helped u...... brownish red could be an angioma or a sebborehic keratosis.... google those see if pictures match up at all.

  15. QUESTION:
    does it seem like i have skin cancer?
    i CONSTANTLY have new moles. and some of them itch? some hurt if rubbed. some are really light, others really dark. does it sound like i have skin cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      it sounds like you need to be checked out by a doctor, just in case. If the moles have to be removed, the doctor can do that quite quickly.

      the things you want too look out for are:

      Basal and squamous cell cancers

      Basal cell cancers and squamous cell cancers are most often found in areas that get exposed to a lot of sun, such as the head, neck, and arms, but they can occur elsewhere. Look for new growths, spots, bumps, patches, or sores that don't heal after 2 to 3 months.

      Basal cell carcinomas often look like flat, firm, pale areas or small, raised, pink or red, translucent, shiny, waxy areas that may bleed after a minor injury. They may have one or more abnormal blood vessels, a lower area in their center, and/or blue, brown, or black areas. Large basal cell carcinomas may have oozing or crusted areas.

      Squamous cell carcinomas may look like growing lumps, often with a rough, scaly, or crusted surface. They may also look like flat reddish patches in the skin that grow slowly.

      Both of these types of skin cancer may develop as a flat area showing only slight changes from normal skin.

      Actinic keratosis, also known as solar keratosis, is a skin condition that is sometimes pre-cancerous and is caused by too much sun exposure. Actinic keratoses are usually small (less than ¼ inch), rough spots that may be pink-red or flesh-colored. Usually they develop on the face, ears, back of the hands, and arms of middle-aged or older people with fair skin, although they can occur in younger people or on other sun-exposed areas of the skin. People with one actinic keratosis usually develop many more. Some can grow into squamous cell cancers, but others may stay the same or even go away on their own. Because they can turn cancerous, such areas should be looked at by a doctor. Your doctor can then decide whether they should be treated.
      Melanomas

      The most important warning sign for melanoma is a new spot on the skin or a spot that is changing in size, shape, or color. Another important sign is a spot that looks different from all of the other spots on your skin (known as the ugly duckling sign). If you have any of these warning signs, have your skin checked by a doctor.

      The ABCD rule is another guide to the usual signs of melanoma. Be on the lookout and tell your doctor about any spots that match the following description:

      * A is for Asymmetry: One half of a mole or birthmark does not match the other.
      * B is for Border: The edges are irregular, ragged, notched, or blurred.
      * C is for Color: The color is not the same all over and may include shades of brown or black, or sometimes with patches of pink, red, white, or blue.
      * D is for Diameter: The spot is larger than 6 millimeters across (about ¼ inch -- the size of a pencil eraser), although melanomas can sometimes be smaller than this.

      Some melanomas do not fit the rules described above, so it is important to tell your doctor about any changes in skin lesions, new skin lesions, or growths that look different from the rest of your moles.

      Other warning signs are:

      * A sore that does not heal
      * Spread of pigment from the border of a spot to surrounding skin
      * Redness or a new swelling beyond the border
      * Change in sensation -- itchiness, tenderness, or pain
      * Change in the surface of a mole -- scaliness, oozing, bleeding, or the appearance of a bump or nodule

  16. QUESTION:
    Can freckles turn into skin cancer?
    One time i got a second degree burn from the sun, ever since then i have had millions of freckles on my shoulders (where i got burnt). They get worse every year, and i was wondering if that could turn into skin cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      Wondering if that strange spot on your skin is a freckle, mole, or a form of skin cancer? There are ways to tell. Most people don't really pay much attention to their skin, especially those segments that we can't see easily. Those that are in a high risk group for skin cancer should consider full body photographs made at their dermatologist yearly so that they can keep track of changes in any freckle, mole, or suspicious spots. Take out your mirror and start inspecting because you'll now be able to tell if that little brown spot is a freckle, a mole, or a suspicious area that could indeed be skin cancer.
      Freckles are usually found on the face and the arms as small brown spots. They are more common in summer with sun exposure, after a sunburn, and in higher prevalence with people that are fair skinned and with light or red hair. Freckles are sometimes genetic and do not pose any type of health risk to the people that have them. Freckles don't have a real treatment other than using a sunscreen in the summer, but if you really want them removed there are laser treatments that can rid you of them, or you can cover them with makeup. There are those that believe that freckles add character and depth, especially to faces and shoulders. It is a personal opinion and they shouldn't be immediately thought to be rid of as "imperfections".

      Moles are brown or black growths on the skin. Moles can be in a single formation or in a group and appear anywhere on the body. They usually appear in childhood and cease around the mid-20s. Moles appearing after age 30 are usually suspicious and need to be monitored. The vast majority of moles are benign and don't pose a threat to those that have them

      If any mole bleeds, oozes, itches, or becomes tender and scaly then you will need to see a physician. Changes in any mole that you've had for a while, new moles that pop up, or a mole that becomes tender, should have special attention paid to. There is a simple moniker on when moles become suspicious: A, B, C, D, E.

      Asymmetry: When half of the mole does not match with the other half in size.
      Border: When the edges or borders of a mole are irregular, blurry, and jagged.
      Color: When the color of a mole is not the same, has shades of tan, brown, black, blue, white, or red.
      Diameter: When the diameter of the mole in question is over the size of a normal pencil eraser.
      Elevation: When part of the mole is raised or becomes elevated from the rest of the skin on the mole.

      Melanoma
      An asymmetrical mole that has uneven borders. It usually is scalloped. They have black, brown, red, white, or blue shades and will be larger than a pencil's eraser. This can be a new mole or manifest in an already existing mole. This is the most serious form of skin cancer and it can spread throughout the body.This is a curable cancer when it caught early.

      Basal Cell Carcinoma
      These are red patches that are pink, red, or white bumps that can bleed or ooze. This can only be a new mole, and doesn't manifest in already existing moles. It is easy to treat and usually isn't fatal.

      Acitinic Keratosis
      Scaly or Crusty bumps that are tan, pink, red, or skin colored. These can also be patches. They are rough and can itch on occasion. You may find that they are tender to the touch. These usually will appear in the lips, face, ears, scalp, neck, forearms, or backs of the hands. They are precancerous, but don't always turn into cancer. Still they should be removed when they are detected.

      Squamous Cell Carcinoma
      This looks like one of three different things: A rough, thick area that looks like a wart, A scaly patch that is red with irregular borders, or an open sore that will crust or bleed. They will not manifest in already existing moles. They are common on the lower lip, face, neck, arms, scalp, backs of hands, and the ears. Another curable cancer when it is detected early.

      If you do find a suspicious mole on you, don't panic and call and make an appointment with a dermatologist. They will be able to tell you if it is okay or if there is further looking needed and a biopsy may be ordered. There are times when they will just excise (cut out) the spot and put in a single stitch, or they may opt to freeze it off. Either way, they will have a better knowledge of what it is and the best method of taking care of it. One way or another, you will now have a better idea to the spots on your body and what they really are.

      Published by Tina Samuels - Featured Contributor in Lifestyle
      Author of three books, Tina Samuels is also the owner of Turtle Trax Hobbies. She s been a freelance writer for 20 years and a small business owner for three. Two of her three books are slated for a Spring 2... View profile
      How to Detect Skin Cancer
      An informative guide on how to detect symptoms of skin cancer before it gets into advanced stages.

  17. QUESTION:
    I have a BIG mole on my leg?
    I have a BIG brown mole on my leg, what is it?
    I think its a mole, but how do you get rid of it?

    • ANSWER:
      It could be a keratosis - scaly, brown, looks 'stuck-on'? A dermatologist will be able to remove whatever it is.

  18. QUESTION:
    My dad had a growth on his head, could it be cancer?
    My father had it removed today and now they are doing tests if it is cancer. what are the chances of it being cancer? If it is, how long would he have to live?

    • ANSWER:
      He might only have an actinic keratois or pre-cancerous lesion caused by sun exposure. Most adults have at least one of these and many adults have a half dozen or more if they work outdoors or play golf or swim. Often the Dr will remove one lesion for biopsy so a pathologist can determine whether or not the lesion has progressed to skin cancer.

      Most skin cancers found in adult men are basal cell carcinomas. There are 750,000 basal cells diagnosed yearly in the US alone. Basal cell carcinomas have a very high cure rate, above 95% after their initial removal. Only very rarely can a basal cell skin cancer kill and this happens only when the cancer has been ignored and allowed to become so locally destructive that sepsis (infection) becomes a serious problem. Basal cell cancers are exceedingly rare to metastacize so they are not dangerous like a melanoma. If your father has a basal cell cancer he will be easily cured unless the cancer is located on his eyelid, lip, top of ear or a few other difficult areas to treat which might take an additional excision to assure a complete cure.

      Squamous cell carcinoma is the next most common non-melanoma cancer and it too is easily cured when caught early. However if a squamous cell is ignored it can spread and possibly metastacize into the body.

      Melanoma is the most dangerous of the common skin cancers. Even though melanoma is dangerous and can spread the cure rate for melanoma in situ (localized) is 99% so just because you are diagnosed with melanoma does not mean you are going to die.

      Here is a good web page where you can read up on actinic keratosis, moles and the various types of skin cancer plus what the treatments and prognosis statitsics are for each type.

      It is good of you to be worried for him but just because he had a skin lesion removed does not mean he is in dire danger. The good news is that he saw a dermatologist and has had the problem area taken care of. I'm sure your father will do just fine.

      http://www.skincancer.org/

      good luck to you both

  19. QUESTION:
    Could this be Nodular Melanoma or just a regular mole?
    I've noticed this mole on my head for a few years now. I didn't really pay attention to it much because I keep my hair longer but when I shaved my head it seems to have maybe gotten bigger. I'm so scared it may be Nodular Melanoma. Here is a link to the photo. Being on my head it's really hard to observe.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/7815614@N03/2305475691/

    • ANSWER:
      The average untrained individual can never figure out whether or not a lesion on their own skin is malignant or not by comparing their lesion to photos they see on the internet. Also, derm photos on the internet tend to show more serious examples that might have been ignored rather than the more typical early lesion so comparing your lesion to interent photos will tend to not be an accurate comparison.

      This is almost certainly not a malignant nodular melanoma because there is no dark melanin center to the lesion. Also nodular melanomas grow very quickly, over a period of weeks or a few months, so your chances of having had a nodular melanoma present for a few years without developing severe symptoms or illness are next to none.

      Here are a couple web pages on nodular melanoma. On this first one scroll down to the section on nodular melanoma.

      http://www.emedicine.com/DERM/topic257.htm

      http://dermnetnz.org/lesions/melanoma.html

      I've had numerous skin cancers of various types and this does not look like any type of melanoma to me. However it is possibly a basal cell carcinoma or a common precancer known as an actinic keratosis. Both can be present for years while growing slowly. A basal cell will not cause death unless ignored for many years and allowed to become very destructive. That is not the situation here. A basal cell will be cured by simple excision and an actinic keratosis can be treated & cured by freezing or excision or several other ways. This might also be one of several types of benign skin lesions.

      basal cell - http://www.emedicine.com/ent/TOPIC722.HTM

      AK - http://www.emedicine.com/derm/TOPIC9.HTM

      Bottom line, you need to see a dermatologist to get this bump removed and biopsied to find out for sure what it is. This will be a minor procedure that will take a minute after the area is numbed up. You might or might not have a stitch or two. In a year any scar will be disappearing. Get this taken care of soon so you do not have to worry about it any longer.

      good luck

  20. QUESTION:
    Should I see a dermatologist?
    I've had a very small mole located under my chin for years now (it's roughly the size of the tip of a sharpened pencil). It hasn't grown, hasn't changed in color, isn't painful/crusty/anything really. However, I recently noticed that the skin just below it has become very dry and rough. Is this a sign of something? Should I see a dermatologist? I'm only 20 and I never go in the sun.

    • ANSWER:
      It doesn't sound like it is anything worrisome. It sounds to me like it is an irritated seborrheic keratosis, which is just fancy talk for a small mole/freckle that got irritated. If it is bothersome, you can go to your dermatologist and have it treated with liquid nitrogen. Try putting some aquaphor on it and leave it alone for a while. I would advise that you take a picture with a digital camera and monitor it though for changes, every 3 months or so. Google ABCD's of melanoma and it'll show you the warnings of what to look for (asymmetry, borders, color variegation and diameter).

  21. QUESTION:
    I have a weird bump or wart on my foot is it serious
    im 13 and its as big as my pinky nail and its prob 1.5mm tall its brownish yelloww and i picked at it once and it bled what coulb it be??
    its on the top right likke 1 cm away from big toe its doeesntt seem to be getting bigger

    • ANSWER:
      Is it on the bottom or top of your foot?

      bottom may mean it is a plantar wart
      one the top is could be melanoma, mole, seborrheic keratosis, etc.

  22. QUESTION:
    I have an itchy mole. Should I be concerned?
    Saw my GP, referred me to a dermatologiest. Will see the dermn in a few weeks. Here is the deal
    Last year I got a mole in the middle of my back that started itching now and then. Didnt pay attention to it. Now its driving me crazy. Has this happened to anyone?

    • ANSWER:
      I'm going to venture a guess that it's not a mole, but a seborrheic keratosis. They often itch considerably, and will sometimes come loose because of the scratching.

      If that's all it is, it's nothing to worry about. If you're seeing a derm, he or she will probably remove it because it's causing you problems. They might numb the area and scrape it with a curette, or shave it off, or just freeze it with liquid nitrogen and wait for it to fall off. All methods are fine.

  23. QUESTION:
    Bumps on the back of my arms...what should I do?
    I have these little bumps, not zits, pimples, moles, or anything. They are the color of my skin, and they just stick out. The only way they turn red is if i pick at them and they become irratated. I used to have them on my face, but not as much now. You can definatly see them and they drive me crazy because they are not attractive. I do wash my face and arms but they are just there. I was born with them and have had them for as long as i can remember. What can i do and what are they???

    • ANSWER:
      they could be keratosis pilaris, which is what i have, and it sounds like what you have. 'lac-hydrin' cream is the most recommended 'cure' but that never worked for me, but if it didn't work for anyone i don't think they'd recommend it, so you should try that. moisturizing makes them stand out less for me. i also just started trying hydrocortisone cream and i'll let you know if that helps at all.

  24. QUESTION:
    Sun cancer? What are these small red dots?
    I have sensitive skin. Today, after rafting, I stripped down to my 2-piece bathing suit. I put sunscreen on my arms, legs, and face, but not on my stomach. I was exposed to the hot sun for maybe 30 minutes. And now, after showering, I realize that there are about a hundred little red dots all over the area where I did not apply sun block. Is this keratosis? Am I at risk for sun cancer? I knew my skin was sensitive, but I didn't expect it to react like this!

    • ANSWER:
      It is most likely sun blisters or heat rash, sun cancer makes a mole like spot that is irregular in shape and darkens

  25. QUESTION:
    Are there any symptoms that occur if you have melanoma?

    • ANSWER:
      To detect melanomas (and increase survival rates), it is recommended to learn what they look like (see "ABCD" mnemonic below), to be aware of moles and check for changes (shape, size, color, itching or bleeding) and to show any suspicious moles to a doctor with an interest and skills in skin malignancy.[32][33]
      A popular method for remembering the signs and symptoms of melanoma is the mnemonic "ABCD":
      Asymmetrical skin lesion.
      Border of the lesion is irregular.
      Color: melanomas usually have multiple colors.
      Diameter: moles greater than 6 mm are more likely to be melanomas than smaller moles.
      A weakness in this system is the D. Many melanomas present themselves as lesions smaller than 6 mm in diameter; and likely all melanomas were melanomas on day 1 of growth, which is merely a dot. An astute physician will examine all abnormal moles, including ones less than 6 mm in diameter. Unfortunately for the average person, many seborrheic keratosis breaks most if not all of the ABCD rules, and can not be distinguished from a melanoma without a trained eye or dermatoscopy.

      -xo

  26. QUESTION:
    What are other symptoms of skin cancer?
    besides the symptoms on the actual skin

    • ANSWER:
      Skin cancer develops primarily on areas of sun-exposed skin, including the scalp, face, lips, ears, neck, chest, arms and hands, and on the legs in women. But it can also form on areas that rarely see the light of day — your palms, beneath your fingernails, the spaces between your toes or under your toenails, and your genital area.

      Skin cancer affects people of all skin tones, including those with darker complexions. When melanoma occurs in those with dark skin tones, it's more likely to occur in areas not normally considered to be sun-exposed.

      A cancerous skin lesion can appear suddenly or develop slowly. Its appearance depends on the type of cancer.

      Basal cell carcinoma
      This is the most common skin cancer. It's also the most easily treated and the least likely to spread. Basal cell carcinoma usually appears as one of the following:

      A pearly or waxy bump on your face, ears or neck
      A flat, flesh-colored or brown scar-like lesion on your chest or back
      Squamous cell carcinoma
      Squamous cell carcinoma is easily treated if detected early, but it's slightly more apt to spread than is basal cell carcinoma. Most often, squamous cell carcinoma appears as one of the following:

      A firm, red nodule on your face, lips, ears, neck, hands or arms
      A flat lesion with a scaly, crusted surface on your face, ears, neck, hands or arms
      Melanoma
      This is the most serious form of skin cancer and the one responsible for most skin cancer deaths. Melanoma can develop anywhere on your body, in otherwise normal skin or in an existing mole that turns malignant. Melanoma most often appears on the trunk, head or neck of affected men. In women, this type of cancer most often develops on the arms or legs.

      Warning signs of melanoma include:

      A large brownish spot with darker speckles located anywhere on your body
      A simple mole located anywhere on your body that changes in color, size or feel or that bleeds
      A small lesion with an irregular border and red, white, blue or blue-black spots on your trunk or limbs
      Shiny, firm, dome-shaped bumps located anywhere on your body
      Dark lesions on your palms, soles, fingertips and toes, or on mucous membranes lining your mouth, nose, vagina and anus
      Less common skin cancers
      Other, less common types of skin cancer include:

      Kaposi sarcoma. This rare form of skin cancer develops in the skin's blood vessels and causes red or purple patches on the skin or mucous membranes. Like melanoma, it's a serious form of skin cancer. It's mainly seen in people with weakened immune systems, such as people with AIDS, and in people taking medications that suppress their natural immunity, such as people who've undergone organ transplants.
      Merkel cell carcinoma. In this rare cancer, firm, shiny nodules occur on or just beneath the skin and in hair follicles. The nodules may be red, pink or blue and can vary in size from a quarter of an inch (about 6 millimeters) to more than 2 inches (about 50 millimeters). Merkel cell carcinoma is usually found on sun-exposed areas on the head, neck, arms and legs. Unlike basal and squamous cell carcinomas, Merkel cell carcinoma grows rapidly and often spreads to other parts of the body.
      Sebaceous gland carcinoma. This uncommon and aggressive cancer originates in the oil glands in the skin. Sebaceous gland carcinomas — which usually appear as hard, painless nodules — can develop anywhere, but most occur on the eyelid, where they're frequently mistaken for benign conditions.
      Precancerous skin lesions, such as an actinic keratosis, also can develop into squamous cell skin cancer. Actinic keratoses appear as rough, scaly, brown or dark-pink patches. They're most commonly found on the face, ears, lower arms and hands of fair-skinned people whose skin has been damaged by the sun.

      Not all skin changes are cancerous. The only way to know for sure is to have your skin examined by your doctor or dermatologist. -

  27. QUESTION:
    Do freckles eventually go away as you get older?

    • ANSWER:
      Some people like their freckles, while others may be more bothered by their appearance. The cosmetic improvement of the skin is a frequent request among people with freckles. On the other hand, freckles are desirable by some people who like the special character or uniqueness these give them.

      Freckles?

      True freckles pose essentially no health risk at all. They are all absolutely harmless. They are not cancerous and generally do not become cancerous.

      Rare concerns about freckles may arise when they are associated with other diseases like xeroderma pigmentosum and neurofibromatosis or when they are confused with the following, more serious conditions:

      Lentigo maligna ("malignant freckle"): This is an uncommon fairly superficial skin cancer that generally occurs on the faces of older adults who have a history of considerable sun exposure. Over the course of months to years, this condition may, if untreated, develop into a more aggressive malignant variety called lentigo maligna melanoma. There are, of course, many hundreds of ordinary facial freckles for every one that is potentially malignant. A simple in-office test called a skin biopsy can help diagnose lentigo maligna.

      Melanoma: This very dangerous form of skin cancer may appear even in young people and on parts of the body that are sun-exposed as well as those that are protected.. While the exact cause of melanoma is not entirely known, ultraviolet rays (particularly UVA) are known to play a part. Melanomas can arise from a previously normal mole or pigmented spot that has been present many years or lifelong. Melanomas can also arise from completely normal skin without an apparent preexisting mole. In comparison with benign (noncancerous) freckles, melanomas tend to be larger, darker, and have more irregular color and shape variations.. Most melanomas are actually flat and not raised as many people tend to incorrectly assume.

      Basal cell carcinoma: This is the most common type of skin cancer. These are usually pearly, pink or reddish in color and may bleed easily. Pigmented basal cell carcinoma is a type of basal cell that may be confused for a freckle or seborrheic keratosis because of its brown or dark color. A simple procedure called a skin biopsy can help diagnose this growth.

      So, no they don't go away as you get older. They may fade. You may even develop "liver spots" which some folks mistake as "freckles" ... but, this about covers it.

  28. QUESTION:
    Do dermatologists perform surgery?
    I'm seriously considering dermatology as a career choice but I wanted to know if dermatologists have to perform any kind of surgery.

    Also, is cosmetic dermatology a different field? What do you do as a cosmetic dermatologist apart from botox?

    • ANSWER:
      Well, having been what my Derm affectionately calls (and accordingly prices) a "Frequent Flyer" I will say that yes, surgery is on the plate. Even things such as laser procedures and such cosmetic procedures are considered to be surgery. However, they also perform other procedures such as mole removals, biopsies on skin lesions and Keratosis spots and also more invasive procedures for melanoma which require cutting and stitching. Some are also board certified in other cosmetic procedures such as eye lifts and other procedures which are considered more along the lines of plastic surgery. I suppose the sky is the limit if you continue your education throughout your career...good luck! Here in AZ in the sun belt, dermatologists are in high demand!

  29. QUESTION:
    what is chryotherapy?
    i went to a GP because i wanted to remove a mole on my face.that doctor told me to make an appointment for chryotherapy which is done once every month in that GP.i got home and googled a bit about chryotherapy and i got confused about it because none of the website mentions 'mole' but they are only talking about some fluid coming out and cervix and all.
    should i just go to surgery clinic to remove it?but it costs heaps of money :(

    • ANSWER:
      I think the doctor meant "cryotherapy" which is the use of extreme cold to remove warts, skin tags etc.

      Here is an extract from Mosby's Dental Dictionary:
      cryotherapy
      (krī´ōther´əpē); n

      a use of cryosurgery in the treatment of cutaneous tags, warts, actinic keratosis, and dermatofibromas. The agent is usually liquid nitrogen, applied briefly with a sterile cotton-tipped applicator.

      This answer was provided by Enquire, a 24-hour, live question answering and enquiry service offered by public libraries across England and Scotland in collaboration with partners in the United States. If you liked our answer and would like us to help you find another, you can chat with one of us right now by clicking on Enquire on the People’s Network site at
      http://www.peoplesnetwork.go.uk

  30. QUESTION:
    how doctors remove moles?
    how do the doctors remove the moles dont tell me to do it at home because im not

    • ANSWER:
      Moles are pigmented macules, papules, or nodules composed of clusters of melanocytes or nevus cells. Their main significance (other than cosmetic) is their potential for being or becoming malignant. Lesions with characteristics of concern (changing or highly irregular borders, color changes, pain, bleeding, ulceration, or itching) are biopsied.(Merck)
      Moles may be removed surgically if they affect your appearance or have an increased cancer risk.(MedlinePlus)
      First, a diagnosis must be made. If the lesion is a seborrheic keratosis, shave excision, electrodessication or cryosurgery may be performed - usually leaving very little if any scarring. If the lesion is suspected to be a skin cancer, a skin biopsy must be done first, before considering removal. This is unless an excisional biopsy is warranted. If the lesion is a melanocytic nevus - one has to decide if it is medically indicated or not. Many insurance companies will not pay for cosmetic removal of benign moles.
      If a melanocytic nevus is suspected of being a melanoma, it needs to be removed and sent for microscopic evaluation by a pathologist by a method called skin biopsy. One can do a complete excisional skin biopsy or a punch skin biopsy, depending on the size and location of the original nevus. Other reasons for removal may be cosmetic, or because a raised mole interferes with daily life (e.g. shaving). Removal can be by excisional biopsy or by shaving. A shaved site leaves a red mark on the site which returns to the patient’s usual skin color in about two weeks. However, there might still be a risk of spread of the melanoma, so the methods of Melanoma diagnosis, including excisional biopsy, are still recommended even in these instances. Additionally, moles can be removed by laser, surgery or electrocautery.
      In properly trained hands, some medical lasers are used to remove flat moles level with the surface of the skin, as well as some raised moles. While laser treatment is commonly offered and may require several appointments, other dermatologists think lasers are not the best method for removing moles because the laser only cauterizes or, in certain cases, removes very superficial levels of skin. Moles tend to go deeper into the skin than non-invasive lasers can penetrate. After a laser treatment a scab is formed, which falls off about seven days later, in contrast to surgery, where the wound has to be sutured. A second concern about the laser treatment is that if the lesion is a melanoma, and was misdiagnosed as a benign mole, the procedure might delay diagnosis. If the mole is incompletely removed by the laser, and the pigmented lesion regrows, it might form a recurrent nevus.
      For surgery, many dermatologic and plastic surgeons first use a freezing solution, usually liquid nitrogen, on a raised mole and then shave it away with a scalpel. If the surgeon opts for the shaving method, he or she usually also cauterizes the stump. Because a circle is difficult to close with stitches, the incision is usually elliptical or eye-shaped.
      Electrocautery is also used for removing skin tags and only reaches the outermost level of skin so that scarring is not a problem.
      (Wikipedia)

  31. QUESTION:
    Itchy mole.?? please helpppp?
    I have a mole, and its sometimes itchy. Well, a lot of the time.. even when its NOT itchy, and I scratch it, it becomes itchy. So if I get this mole removed by a dermatologist, can this be a good medical reason to get it removed? Because I only have Medi-Cal and I can't afford a cosmetic surgery. So is this a good medical reason to get it removed for free by Medi-Cal ?

    • ANSWER:
      From your description it sounds more like a seborrheic keratosis rather than a mole. Moles are not typically itchy. Have a doctor tell you if this is really a mole or not. Seborrheic keratosis removal is far less expensive than mole removal and can usually be covered by insurance since theses are known to get irritated. They can be removed by liquid nitrogen.

      If it's a mole it can still be removed for medical reasons although it will have to be surgically removed since liquid nitrogen can't penetrate to the root and it will come back.

  32. QUESTION:
    in what two ways does the sun damage your skin?

    • ANSWER:
      think of it like this there are two rays and two ways..
      the A ray is the aging ray causing damage over a long extended period of time thus causing melanomas and wrinkles
      the B ray is the Burning ray causing instant burning or how some get a burn then tan which also causes damage and melanomas

      they cause:
      basal cell carcinomas
      squamous cell carcinomas
      melanomas
      freckles
      lentigines
      moles
      per cancers or sebborehic keratosis
      wrinkles
      sun poisoning
      hyper or hypopigmentation to just name a few

  33. QUESTION:
    Question about mole, please help?
    I have a mole on the side of my head, (in my hair line), that is about the size of a dime. I have had it my whole life. For the past year I have noticed white stuff forming on it which I thought was shampoo build up or something along those lines. Well, tonight I noticed the "build up" grew making my mole actually stick out more, so like an idiot, I picked at it and it seems like half of my mole fell off? It is red underneath and there looks to be a smig of blood. I plan on trying to go to the doctor tomorrow, but what could this be? Do I have cancer????

    • ANSWER:
      You should go see your Doctor for sure, because he will know better than anyone here....but it sounds to me like a seborrheic keratosis, which is basically a build-up of waxy skin that grows faster than your normal skin cells. If you pick at them, they will peel off, showing an under layer of pink, new skin. You may just have scalp dandruff, that affects your mole as well as the rest of your head.
      If your mole has become "cancerous" it probably just needs to be removed, and that will most likely end it there. Always see your Doctor if you see any changes in a mole. Skin cancer is highly treatable, and most of the time no big deal at all, if you have the offending lesion removed.
      Do go see your Doctor...don't put it off! You don't want it to get worse, but you don't need to freak out about it.
      My parents have had dozens of skin cancers removed from their faces, and they never went any further than that. They grew up in age without sunscreen, so it was bound to happen.
      Best Wishes!

  34. QUESTION:
    I need to go to the doctors but my mom is to busy to make an appointment?
    I actually need to go to three different doctors.

    My mom is incredibly busy because she's going through a couple major things right now. She's working on having a book come out, and she's also dealing with her mother who is deteriorating mentally.

    I'm 16 by the way.
    I've been asking her to make me an appointment for an dermatologist since July. The reason being that 1. I have a mole that looks suspicious and 2. I have keratosis pilaris would like to consult a doctor about it before prom season. Way back in the summer I had given her a deadline to do this and told her that if she failed to meet it that I had the right to be angry with her. I reminded her almost every day for a month and the deadline came and went. Now it's March.

    I need to see my dentist because an old filling is breaking up and it needs to be replaced. We had an appointment but missed it and now she's to busy to make me another one.

    The main thing.. I have a lump in my breast. Now I know at 16 it's unlikely to be anything bad... but it's been here for a while and I think it would be a good idea to get it checked out. I mentioned it to her and she agreed that it would be good to get it checked if it didn't go away after my period.. which it didn't. All I need to do is go to my pediatrician... and if she thinks it's something bad she can send me somewhere else.. but the thing is that if my mom is incapable of coming through with a request I made in July.. I don't see how she will have time to make me an appointment for this.

    I'm very disappointed in her. I understand that she's busy but it's a simple phone call. I've talked to her about this countless times but she tells me she's too busy to talk and shuts me up. She is the only one who can get my these appointments. My dad can't. I can't. I also can't drive so that's out.

    This is just so frustrating to me and I WILL blame her if there's anything wrong with me at this point because she is being ridiculous and not putting my health first. I understand that she's at a major point in her life but she's neglecting to take care of me. How can I make her listen and make me these doctors appointments?

    By the way it's not that she doesn't think that these things are important to get checked out, she does, I'm just not her priority right now.
    I don't have the resources to make an appointment. During the summer my UNCLE even tried to help me find a dermatologist but my mom didn't like the ones he picked out. It's turning out to be more complicated because she DID call two offices, the first one could not guarantee a female doctor, which I need, so they referred us to another one which was not taking new clients so they referred us to yet another. It's in her hands, I have no control over this. As for my pediatrician, I could attempt to make an appointment but that would involve speaking to my mother and coordinating times because she would have to drive me, again, I cannot drive. So in all that time, it would have made more sense for my mom to call her because she would be just as disrupted with me talking to her as she would be with making the call herself.

    • ANSWER:

  35. QUESTION:
    FLAT skin moles, is it safe to remove with a sharp needle?
    I've been growing skin moles that are flat rapidly now-a-days. I've removed some in my hands and one on my foot. it's like old skin. do you think it's safe and nothing wrong will happen? Some on my hands are sensitive other not. So give all the advise/facts you have. My moles are flat like a tattoo, so I think it's like peeling old skin. Also can you guys give me info about moles; how they produce, why and will it ever stop! lol help! thx.
    well. Tina D I find like safety pin easier. the thought of using tweezers feels like a red mark or something will result in pulling a mole w/ tweezers, but thx for the advise
    I saw pics on google, L R and they are HUGE! my are like small polka dots. I have one that is pretty dark, and i got some stuff out. They say (Wiki) that they are common in 40 year olds. I am no way near 40!

    • ANSWER:
      Of course without seeing them, it would be hard to diagnose and it's probably best that a dermatologist was seen to make sure, but I'm guessing that what you might have is seborrheic keratosis.

      keratosis, seborrheic (basal cell papilloma, verruca senilis)
      (seb´rē´ik pap´lōm vroo´k sē´nilis),
      n benign, pigmented, superficial epithelial tumors that clinically appear to be pasted on the skin of the trunk, arms, or face. Characterized histologically by marked hyperkeratosis, with keratin cyst formation, acanthosis of basal cells, and melanin pigmentation, all above the level of the adjacent epidermis.
      http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/keratosis

      If, this is indeed what you have, you're not going to do any harm. They will grow back in most cases, however, and you run the risk of scarring.

      These are the most common form of non-cancerous growths in adults and are not benign although they often look like they are. For that reason, an annual check should be done to make sure that any serious lesions are not overlooked.

      It is considered by some to be genetic as well as a possible result of exposure to UV rays.

      The following are all methods of removal:

      * Freezing with liquid nitrogen (cryosurgery). Cryosurgery can be an effective way to remove seborrheic keratosis. However, it may not work on large, thick growths, and it may lighten the treated skin (hypopigmentation).
      * Scraping the skin's surface with a special instrument (curettage). Sometimes curettage is used along with cryosurgery to treat thinner or flat growths. It may be used with electrocautery.
      * Burning with an electric current (electrocautery). Used alone or with curettage, electrocautery can be effective in removing seborrheic keratosis. This procedure can leave scars if it's not done properly, and it may take longer than other removal methods.

      As I mentioned at the top of my post, this is, by no means, a diagnosis - just the most common form of moles, why they pop up, their treatment, etc.

      I'm afraid it's fairly certain to say that IF you do, indeed, have seborrheic keratosis, they won't go away or stop. They just increase in number each year. Sorry! The good news is that they ARE removeable and that they are not cancerous.
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/seborrheic-keratosis/DS00846/DSECTION=1

      Hope you found this helpful,
      LR

      Figure Skater, SK starts out very small and it's very flat almost blending with the skin. As I mentioned above, it's difficult without seeing your skin, to diagnose but this is one of the most common benign skin growths that occur. It was just the best educated guess I could give based on the info I had. If you have any more symptoms or "characteristics" I might be able to narrow it down for you. My best advice would be to see a dermatologist to make sure none of them are of suspicious nature. Try using the following guidelines to help you decipher the benign spots from those that are more suspicious in nature:

      The majority of malignant melanomas are brown to black pigmented lesions.

      * Warning signs include change in size, shape, color, or elevation of a mole.

      * The appearance of a new mole during adulthood, or new pain, itching, ulceration, or bleeding of an existing mole should all be checked by a health-care provider.

      The following easy-to-remember guideline, "ABCD," is useful for identifying malignant melanoma:

      * Asymmetry—One side of the lesion does not look like the other.

      * Border irregularity—Margins may be notched or irregular.

      * Color—Melanomas are often a mixture of black, tan, brown, blue, red, or white.

      * Diameter—Cancerous lesions are usually larger than 6 mm across (about the size of a pencil eraser), but any change in size may be significant.
      http://www.emedicinehealth.com/skin_canc...

  36. QUESTION:
    freezing a mole?
    well i went to the doctor after everyone said not to freeze my irregular, itchy mole,and guess what,he froze it!

    • ANSWER:
      Then it probably wasn't a mole, but a seborrheic keratosis. They can look like moles and be itchy, but they are never malignant.

  37. QUESTION:
    Is a growing mole normal?
    My mom has a lot of moles as she inherited this from his father (who also had a lot of colorful moles but never had any sort of cancer and lived up to 92 years). I haven't seen her in 6 years because she moved to another country to work. But when I saw her again this year, I saw a 2 centimeter mole that grew on her neck. It's black. I've never seen it before and she said that it just grew over the period of 6 years. I also remember such large moles on my grandfather.

    Is it normal?

    • ANSWER:
      You can not be sure it is a mole until a dermatologist tells you that it is a mole. It might be a seborrhea keratosis which is a common benign skin lesion that looks similar to a mole and can range in size from a small brown bump to a 2-3cm dark brownish lesion. Here are a few images.

      http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://courses.washington.edu/hubio567/melanoma/large/mel13.jpg&imgrefurl=http://courses.washington.edu/hubio567/melanoma/dx1.htm&h=512&w=602&sz=55&hl=en&start=6&um=1&tbnid=C0Aas2JuEw5hkM:&tbnh=115&tbnw=135&prev=/images%3Fq%3DSeborrheic%2BKeratosis%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26safe%3Doff%26rls%3DGGLJ,GGLJ:2006-32,GGLJ:en%26sa%3DN

      http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.crutchfielddermatology.com/images/SeborrheicKeratosis/001.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.crutchfielddermatology.com/treatments/Seborrheickeratosis/&h=304&w=211&sz=14&hl=en&start=64&um=1&tbnid=rW89ppZAgRSGnM:&tbnh=116&tbnw=81&prev=/images%3Fq%3DSeborrheic%2BKeratosis%26start%3D60%26ndsp%3D20%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26safe%3Doff%26rls%3DGGLJ,GGLJ:2006-32,GGLJ:en%26sa%3DN

      A seborrheic keratosis is often caused by UV exposure and grows slowly over a period of years. You can often see huge ones on some elderly people. They can be removed by excision or treated with a laser.

      Unfortunately they also often look very similar to a basal cell carcinoma so your mom's best bet is to see a dermatologist and have him take a look at it. good luck

  38. QUESTION:
    Really important skin mole question?
    Last night I was scratching this mole that I have on the underside of my boob. This mole isn't cancerous or anything, but is a darker brown with even darker tiny brown spots on it. REALLY tiny spots. Anyway, so I was scratching it and then one of these spots came off. Naturally I was really confused so I tried to pull the other ones off, and they came off too. I've had these tiny brown spots on this mole ever since I've had the mole. Now it looks like there are tiny holes on my mole. It didn't bleed or hurt or anything but I'm kind of worried. I tried looking online but couldn't find anything. Please help?

    • ANSWER:
      It's possible that your mole is actually a seborrheic keratosis, and that the darker plugs that you pulled out are really "pseudohorn cysts." Without seeing the "mole", I can't say for sure, though.

  39. QUESTION:
    I have this mole and it recently...?
    started getting crusty.
    I have had this mole my whole life..
    I know this is disgusting..
    but I was wondering if that meant something..
    I heard somewhere cutting off a mole caused cancer..but what doesn't now-a-days.

    • ANSWER:
      I'm sure going to see a doctor would be better than trying to get an answer from us. But from experience, it could either be melanoma (bad) or seborrheic keratosis (good). Just cutting off a mole DOES NOT cause cancer. GO SEE A DOCTOR!!!

  40. QUESTION:
    Does Baking Soda remove: scars,blemishes, acne, pores,moles,warts, keratosis pilaris, etc.on the face and body?
    Please explain. Thank you. I'd appreciate it.

    • ANSWER:
      no! :D
      baking soda is not universal treatment for everything!

  41. QUESTION:
    want to get a mole/wart removed..?
    i went to see a doctor to check a mole because i thought it was cancerous and he said its totally fine and a wart mole which is called seborrheic keratosis. i want it removed however, i told him i wanted it removed but he said that it would be burnt off and there was a chance it would grow back and if it grew back it would grow back much larger and wouldnt be able to be removed again?..... i really want it removed tho cos its near a personal place! but if it grows back? :S

    • ANSWER:
      i thin you should risk and remove it!!!

  42. QUESTION:
    Skin Cancer Symptoms?
    What are the symptoms of skin cancer?

    Ive got this mole-like spot near my wrist area, i first noticed it three years ago. I have scratched/picked it off countless times (I have a habit of scratching off scabs, etc.) Its kind of a mishaped oval, and the same color as my skin. My mother doesnt think anything about it, but im getting a little scared because skin cancer runs in the family.

    • ANSWER:
      Skin cancer — the abnormal growth of skin cells — most often develops on skin exposed to the sun. But this common form of cancer can also occur on areas of your skin not ordinarily exposed to sunlight.

      Skin cancer develops primarily on areas of sun-exposed skin, including the scalp, face, lips, ears, neck, chest, arms and hands, and on the legs in women. But it can also form on areas that rarely see the light of day — your palms, beneath your fingernails, the spaces between your toes or under your toenails, and your genital area.

      Skin cancer affects people of all skin tones, including those with darker complexions. When melanoma occurs in those with dark skin tones, it's more likely to occur in areas not normally considered to be sun-exposed.

      A cancerous skin lesion can appear suddenly or develop slowly. Its appearance depends on the type of cancer.

      Basal cell carcinoma
      This is the most common skin cancer. It's also the most easily treated and the least likely to spread. Basal cell carcinoma usually appears as one of the following:

      * A pearly or waxy bump on your face, ears or neck
      * A flat, flesh-colored or brown scar-like lesion on your chest or back

      Squamous cell carcinoma
      Squamous cell carcinoma is easily treated if detected early, but it's slightly more apt to spread than is basal cell carcinoma. Most often, squamous cell carcinoma appears as one of the following:

      * A firm, red nodule on your face, lips, ears, neck, hands or arms
      * A flat lesion with a scaly, crusted surface on your face, ears, neck, hands or arms

      Melanoma
      This is the most serious form of skin cancer and the one responsible for most skin cancer deaths. Melanoma can develop anywhere on your body, in otherwise normal skin or in an existing mole that turns malignant. Melanoma most often appears on the trunk, head or neck of affected men. In women, this type of cancer most often develops on the arms or legs.

      Warning signs of melanoma include:

      * A large brownish spot with darker speckles located anywhere on your body
      * A simple mole located anywhere on your body that changes in color, size or feel or that bleeds
      * A small lesion with an irregular border and red, white, blue or blue-black spots on your trunk or limbs
      * Shiny, firm, dome-shaped bumps located anywhere on your body
      * Dark lesions on your palms, soles, fingertips and toes, or on mucous membranes lining your mouth, nose, vagina and anus

      Less common skin cancers
      Other, less common types of skin cancer include:

      * Kaposi sarcoma. This rare form of skin cancer develops in the skin's blood vessels and causes red or purple patches on the skin or mucous membranes. Like melanoma, it's a serious form of skin cancer. It's mainly seen in people with weakened immune systems, such as people with AIDS, and in people taking medications that suppress their natural immunity, such as people who've undergone organ transplants.
      * Merkel cell carcinoma. In this rare cancer, firm, shiny nodules occur on or just beneath the skin and in hair follicles. The nodules may be red, pink or blue and can vary in size from a quarter of an inch (about 6 millimeters) to more than 2 inches (about 50 millimeters). Merkel cell carcinoma is usually found on sun-exposed areas on the head, neck, arms and legs. Unlike basal and squamous cell carcinomas, Merkel cell carcinoma grows rapidly and often spreads to other parts of the body.
      * Sebaceous gland carcinoma. This uncommon and aggressive cancer originates in the oil glands in the skin. Sebaceous gland carcinomas — which usually appear as hard, painless nodules — can develop anywhere, but most occur on the eyelid, where they're frequently mistaken for benign conditions.

      Precancerous skin lesions, such as an actinic keratosis, also can develop into squamous cell skin cancer. Actinic keratoses appear as rough, scaly, brown or dark-pink patches. They're most commonly found on the face, ears, lower arms and hands of fair-skinned people whose skin has been damaged by the sun.

      Not all skin changes are cancerous. The only way to know for sure is to have your skin examined by your doctor or dermatologist. -

  43. QUESTION:
    More likely Seborrheic Keratosis or Melanoma? Raised Mole (picture included)?
    Hello,

    I am a 26 year old male and I've got a strange looking mole on the right side of my trunk. I've had it for as long as I can remember know for certain I've had it for 5 years. It is about 5mm tall and 4mm wide, but it concerns me because the border is irregular on the right side, it is raised, and multicolored. In my mind it seems to have extended a bit recently but my wife thinks it has been stable.

    I'm unable to see a dermatologist until October but have an appointment with a GP next Friday who will presumably give me a referral if necessary.

    My gut tells me that it is sebhorreic keratosis because it seems to fit some of those categories (pearly, kind of seems pasted on), but I'm still quite concerned because of the discoloration and extension on the left side of the mole (right side of the photo).

    I've included a link to a photo of the mole below. This is zoomed in fairly far. As I said, the mole is roughly .5mm tall and .4mm wide. Should I be concerned? If the GP says it is an SK should that be it or should I press for a referral/excision from a dermatologist? Thanks for any help.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/83377486@N02/7638340974/

    • ANSWER:
      There is absolutely nothing abnormal looking about that mole and furthermore, most skin cancers correlate with age (i.e. a lifetime of sun exposure). Now that you have a picture, check it every year or so and see if it changes. CHANGES are what you want to really look out for...

  44. QUESTION:
    Make red spots on my back go away?
    I'm 13 and I live in the uk and I have these horrible red spots on my back, they contain no puss or anything, they're just there. Some are flat and are jus red marks others are bumps, but it's stopping me from wearing certain tops that show the top part of your back. it's on my shoulders and my upper back, I exfoliate everyday, any products I suggest or should i get prescribed with something? thanks

    • ANSWER:
      how big? are they moles, or are they tiny? If they're tiny, it's likely keratosis pilaris. Go to a dermatologist and they'll prescribe you salvax or something similar-- it will clear the sebum from your pores causing the keratosis pilaris to disappear.

  45. QUESTION:
    Sun affected Skin, Curiosity.?
    Tuesday i found a freckle like patch of skin. It has now grown to 2mm (W) x 5mm (L), looks like a scab, feels like a burn.

    Additional info:
    I spend alot of time outside toppless in the sun. No sun cream. Different colloured moles have appeared since, Shoulders are burnt.

    • ANSWER:
      James - What you describe is likely known as seborrheic keratosis (SK). SK are the most common benign tumor in older individuals. They have a variety of clinical appearances. Although no specific causes have been identified, they occur more frequently in sunlight-exposed areas. The frequency appears to increase with age. Seborrheic keratoses are benign but secondary tumors, and Bowen disease (squamous cell carcinoma in situ) or malignant melanoma may occasionally arise within the lesion. Seborrheic keratoses can also catch on clothing and become irritated. They can itch, grow, and bleed. Scratching seborrheic keratoses or trying to pick them off the skin can result in a secondary infection. People sometimes have many seborrheic keratoses, and they may obscure the detection of a dysplastic nevus or malignant melanoma. A variety of techniques may be used to treat SK. They include cryotherapy with carbon dioxide (dry ice) or liquid nitrogen, electrodesiccation, electrodesiccation and curettage, curettage alone, shave biopsy or excision using a scalpel, or a laser or dermabrasion surgery.
      Next, schedule a visit to a dermatologist MD for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment. My SKs have successfully been removed with carbon dioxide cryotherapy. Good luck!

  46. QUESTION:
    pllleeeaaassseeee!!! help me im so worry!!!?
    ok yesterday i saw a mole that hav 2 color (black on top and pinkish around the bottom) on my dad's shoulder. im really worry cause i dont want my dad to have skin cancer. so pleasssee tell me is it ok? just tell me the truth plleeassee! thank you so so much!!!
    p.s. he have that mole when he was born so its not a new mole
    and it is a raise mole

    • ANSWER:
      Has this mole always been there? If if has i wouldnt worry unless it has changed. I have a black mole similar to the one you described and mine is fine. He can get it removed if that would make him more comfertable.

      Hope this helps

      Signs and symptoms

      Basal cell skin cancer
      Squamous cell cancer
      Melanoma
      Skin cancer develops primarily on areas of sun-exposed skin, including the scalp, face, lips, ears, neck, chest, arms and hands, and on the legs in women. But it can also form on areas that rarely see the light of day — the palms, spaces between the toes and the genital area. Skin cancer affects people of all skin tones, including those with darker complexions.

      A cancerous skin lesion can appear suddenly or develop slowly. Its appearance depends on the type of cancer.

      Basal cell carcinoma
      This is the most common skin cancer. It's also the most easily treated and the least likely to spread. Basal cell carcinoma usually appears as one of the following:

      A pearly or waxy bump on your face, ears or neck
      A flat, flesh-colored or brown scar-like lesion on your chest or back
      Squamous cell carcinoma
      Squamous cell carcinoma is easily treated if detected early, but it's slightly more apt to spread than is basal cell carcinoma. Most often, squamous cell carcinoma appears as one of the following:

      A firm, red nodule on your face, lips, ears, neck, hands or arms
      A flat lesion with a scaly, crusted surface on your face, ears, neck, hands or arms
      Melanoma
      This is the most serious form of skin cancer and the one responsible for most skin cancer deaths. Melanoma can develop in otherwise normal skin or in an existing mole that turns malignant. Although it can occur anywhere on the body, melanoma appears most often on the upper back or face in both men and women.

      Warning signs of melanoma include:

      A large brownish spot with darker speckles located anywhere on your body
      A simple mole located anywhere on your body that changes in color, size or feel or that bleeds
      A small lesion with an irregular border and red, white, blue or blue-black spots on your trunk or limbs
      Shiny, firm, dome-shaped bumps located anywhere on your body
      Dark lesions on your palms, soles, fingertips and toes, or on mucous membranes lining your mouth, nose, vagina and anus
      Less common skin cancers
      Other, less common types of skin cancer include:

      Kaposi sarcoma. This rare form of skin cancer develops in the skin's blood vessels and causes red or purple patches on the skin or mucous membranes. Like melanoma, it's a serious form of skin cancer. It's mainly seen in people with weakened immune systems, such as people with AIDS and people taking medications that suppress their natural immunity, such as people who've undergone organ transplants.
      Merkel cell carcinoma. In this rare cancer, firm, shiny nodules occur on or just beneath the skin and in hair follicles. The nodules may be red, pink or blue and can vary in size from a quarter of an inch to more than 2 inches. Merkel cell carcinoma is usually found on sun-exposed areas on the head, neck, arms and legs. Unlike basal and squamous cell carcinomas, Merkel cell carcinoma grows rapidly and often spreads to other parts of the body.
      Sebaceous gland carcinoma. This uncommon and aggressive cancer originates in the oil glands in the skin. Sebaceous gland carcinomas — which usually appear as hard, painless nodules — can develop anywhere, but most occur on the eyelid, where they're frequently mistaken for benign conditions.
      Precancerous skin lesions, such as an actinic keratosis, also can develop into squamous cell skin cancer. Actinic keratoses appear as rough, scaly, brown or dark-pink patches. They're most commonly found on the face, ears, lower arms and hands of fair-skinned people whose skin has been damaged by the sun.

      Not all skin changes are cancerous. The only way to know for sure is to have your skin examined by your doctor or dermatologist.

  47. QUESTION:
    Can't be skin cancer right?
    I had what I thought was a weird mole, than it scabbed and I picked at it, it is scabbed now, skin cancer doesn't fall off, therefore it's not skin cancer correct? I'm not a hypochondriac it was just really weird looking)

    • ANSWER:
      Hi, I know haw scarey that can be. Ultimately, the doctor is the only one who can tell you for sure. I hope that you have money or insurance to go. I used to work for a doctor and there is a pre-cancerous condition called Actinic Keratosis that sounds similar to what you described. It is when cells in a weakened spot of skin begin to reproduce badly, although it is NOT malignant at the time, it is considered to be pre-cancerous and will require treatment. When I worked there, my doctor prescribed a very strong creme to apply to the area that dried it up on a deep level and smoothed it out and then it was gone. BUT you have to watch the spot, and the rest of your body too, for changes. Go to a website called WebMD and type in "skin cancer", there is a slide show of all different types of skin cancers with pictures and information. I had a mole on my thigh several summers ago that did what you described and I left it alone and it healed and nothing ever came of it. Moles can get dry. I know from experience that you can have one for years, it can then dry up like a scab, and fall off and never return. They don't behave like normal skin and thats what makes them something to keep your eye on. Good luck, and if you can, please let a doctor look at that.

  48. QUESTION:
    What defines beauty?
    A lot of the time (mostly all the time) I don't feel pretty. I was a cute little kid in elementary school and had lots of boys bringing me teddy bears on valentine's day when I was like 10, lol :D But now I'm 17 and have been through a lot and I feel bad about myself a lot. I have keratosis pilaris on my arms, which makes me have little bumps all over and after my dad died I got really low confidence and started scratching them, and now I have scars that my mom says will never go away. I have acne scars too, and I'm worried those will always be there. And that makes me feel like I've already screwed up past the point of no repair. I don't really wear makeup except for concealer and what not, and I wear my hair up like every day because it's thick and long and its like 110 degrees out. I put on weight too, so I went from like a size 1 to 7-8 in the past three years. I don't have any college money, so I stress about school and get little sleep, because I need to get a scholarship to a good school to make these past 8 years of agony worth it and prove to everyone I'm not a failure.
    I'm really worried about my scars though, and I want to be a doctor so I hope they will go away. I'm worried people will think I have a contagious skin disorder or something, which it's not. Just genetic. I'm also on meds for anxiety and depression, which makes me feel like a failure sometimes. But my dad died of depression, so I think that's genetic too. And I have allergies to pretty much everything, which is tied to my skin issue and makes my voice really scratchy so I tend to keep my mouth shut when I know the answer. My teachers must think I'm mute or something, or constantly sick. Everyone thinks I'm sick all the time.
    My eyes are really bad too and my vision gets blurry throughout the day despite my contacts. I have no money, so I haven't been shopping in the last year or so, and my clothes don't really fit. I have like one pair of jeans and one pair of shorts that I recycle throughout the week. I wish I at least had long sleeve shirts to cover up my arms.
    Am I just screwed up beyond repair? All I've got right now is brains, but there are people WAY prettier and with way less problems than me who are even smarter than me, so there you go.
    Sorry for dumping all my insecurities on you.

    • ANSWER:
      AW, i'm sorry you feel so bad. But you have to realize that everyone has problems. EVERYONE. Even people who you think are prettier and smarter, they have their own issues.

      The key is to not dwell on the. The more sorry you feel for yourself, the deeper you'll dig your own hole. You have to get out of it by systematically dealing with the issues you can. And accepting the ones you can't.

      Your scares and marks are just a part of you, and even though you are self conscious now, it really won't be a big deal when you are older and around more mature people. My bf insists its my imperfections that make me special, and i am choosing to believe it. Or else i can cry everyday about my moles and scares and just be sad all the time, but where would that get me?

      I really have been through what you have, but for different reasons, and also am in a family with a LOT of depression. And although i have already been through a few set backs, i am not going to let my family history keep me from living a fulfilling life. You have to be strong and know that your mind can help you overcome a lot of issues. And to not get caught up in the sadness that can eat you up inside.

      As for clothing, do you have any family members who can give you some 'hand me downs'? Taking better care of yourself can let you feel batter about yourself. Try to put your hair up in cute clips or sleek headbands.

      Hope you feel better. You are in more control than you think :)

  49. QUESTION:
    Skin condition... very worried?
    I have a friend -- he is male, 61 years old -- and I'm very concerned that he may be in danger of skin cancer. He is bald on the top of his head (he started loosing hair early on in his life, in his 30's I would say) and he has many brown, irregularly-shaped spots/moles on the crown of his head. I would say they have been developing within the last 6-7 years. The more worrisome thing is that there is a some sort of growth on the side of his face, in the side-burn area, that has been growing for the past 2 1/2 - 3 years or so. It's hard to describe but I'll try: it's not a significantly different color than his skin, but it is very elevated, and seems to be very tiny sections of raised skin, almost like little spikes (but not very hard) and clumped together in a cluster. It's at least a centimeter in diameter and still slowly growing. I've tried to research it, looking at pictures of skin conditions online but nothing matches it.

    I, my mother, and his step-daughter have all expressed concern about it in the past year and said he should go to the doctor and have it checked out, but he hasn't. He had a doctor's check-up a few months ago, but he forgot to bring it up. I'm not sure if he's concerned about it much. He's very healthy otherwise, apart from being a bit overweight -- he takes lots of different vitamins and such every day.

    I know skin cancer can be very deadly and doesn't have any other symptoms. What can I do to help him? Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      The deadly form of skin cancer (melanoma) is best screened for with the ABCD rule:
      A - is the mole asymmetric? For a healthy mole you should be able to "cut it in half" and it still looks the same on either side
      B - Are the borders irregular? Healthy moles should have smooth regular and defined borders
      C - Are there multiple colours? Moles should be only one colour.
      D - Is the diameter large? Moles should be no larger than the eraser at the end of a pencil

      Having irregularities in any of the ABCD rules does not mean you have melanoma, but it raises the likelihood of that mole being cancerous. Probably the most important rule of all to follow is looking for moles or skin lesions that are new, or that have been changing in their appearance from how they used to look.

      There are other forms of skin cancer which can present in older individuals like basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. These can present as ulcerating lesions, sores that don't heal, crater-like lesions, and so forth. These are less dangerous but can on rare occasions become deadly if left untreated for a very long time.

      Another common condition in older individuals which is benign is called seborrheic keratosis. These are coin-like lesions on the skin that are elevated and look like they're "stuck to the skin". That sounds like it could be what your friend has.

      At any rate, there is NO way I could tell you for sure what your friend has based on a verbal description. It is really essential that he sees a doctor to ensure that none of his moles or skin lesions are cancerous. Even if he has gone for a checkup for something else, doctors are busy and may not have noticed anything on his skin if their attention wasn't drawn towards it.

      I'm sure everything is fine but please encourage your friend to see a doctor for a skin checkup as soon as possible.


keratosis moles

Allergic Dermatitis Pictures

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How can i get rid of an allergic reaction on my face overnight?
    I don't know what caused it but I have an allergic reaction on my face right now. It's really hot, itchy, and bright red.
    Please help me, I have school pictures tomorrow and I can't show up with a disgusting red face.

    • ANSWER:
      *Wash your hands and face with soap and water if you know you have come in contact with a substance such as poison ivy or poison oak that causes a rash. The oils from these plants produces an adverse reaction called contact dermatitis. Removing the oils as soon as possible can help you get rid of your face allergic more quickly.

      *Refrain from wearing makeup or using scented or abrasive products on your face while you have a face allergy. Regardless of the cause of your face allergy, cleansing products and cosmetics can be irritating to skin that is already inflamed, and can prolong the rash. Wash your face with lukewarm water, using only your fingertips as a cleaning tool.

      *Make an appointment to have your doctor look at your face allergy ,. You may have a bacterial or fungal infection that requires treatment with prescription medications.

  2. QUESTION:
    Are there any home remedies to get rid of moles or make them smaller or faded?
    I have two moles that are so distracting and ugly... Whenever I am in pictures I turn one way because I have Dark moles on the other side. They are soo ugly. I dont want to buy anything or go to the doctors or have surgery. They are small and dark (non-cancerous) and they are such adistraction. Plzz Help

    • ANSWER:
      Here are some tips to try:

      http://www.natural-homeremedies.com/homeremedies_moles.htm

      The 1st suggestion says to try VASELINE, but DO NOT EVER PUT VASELINE ANYWHERE ON YOUR BODY.

      MOST beauty products on the market have harmful chemicals in them; do your favorite beauty products contain any of these things?:

      * Mineral Oil, Paraffin & Petrolatum – Petroleum products coat the skin like plastic, clogging pores and creating a build-up of toxins, which in turn accumulate and can lead to dermatological issues, like slowing cellular development, which can cause you to show earlier signs of aging, and vitamin deficiency. Suspected cause of cancer & disruptive of hormonal activity. Mineral oils contain hydrocarbons, a real danger to the stomach and especially the lungs.

      * PARABENS – Such as methyl- propyl- butyl- & ethyl- parabens: Widely used as preservatives in the cosmetic industry (including moisturizers). An estimated 13,200 cosmetic and skin care products contain parabens. Studies implicate their connection with cancer. They have hormone-disrupting qualities – mimicking estrogen – and interfere with the body’s endocrine system.

      * Propylene Glycol – Used as a moisturizer in cosmetics and as a carrier in fragrance oils. Shown to cause dermatitis, kidney or liver abnormalities, may inhibit skin cell growth, and is a skin irritant and sensitizer.

      * ALCOHOLS – Such as Isopropyl Alcohol, SD Alcohol 40, Ethyl Alcohol: Alcohols dissolve the body’s natural moisturizers and strip the skin of its protection, leaving it vulnerable to infection. Alcohols destroy skin’s pH balance, and since they absorb water, they speed up wrinkling.

      * Sodium laurel or lauryl sulfate (SLS), also known as sodium laureth sulfate (SLES) – Found in car washes, engine degreasers, garage floor cleaners… and in OVER 90% of personal care products! SLS breaks down the skin’s moisture barrier, easily penetrates the skin, and allows other chemicals to easily penetrate. Combined with other chemicals, SLS becomes a “nitrosamine”, a potent class of carcinogen. It can also cause hair loss. SLES is sometimes disguised with the labeling “comes from coconut” or “coconut-derived" - and is found in many popular body washes and toothpastes!

      * Toluene – Poison! Danger! Harmful or fatal if swallowed! Harmful if inhaled or absorbed through the skin. Made from petroleum or coal tar, and found in most synthetic fragrances. Chronic exposure linked to anemia, lowered blood cell count, liver or kidney damage, and may affect a developing fetus. Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) contains toluene. Other names may include benzoic and benzyl.

      * WAXES – Such as Paraffin, Candelilla Wax, Carnuba Wax: Waxes are widely used in cleansing creams, eye creams, and moisturizers. Waxes clog pores, creating blackheads and whiteheads. They also smother the skin, which over time creates an enlarged pore problem.

      * FD&C – When this abbreviation precedes the name of a color, it means that the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) has certified it as safe for use in drugs and cosmetics, but not food. D&C colors are usually synthetic, coal tar colors. They’re toxic and should be avoided when at all possible.

      * PHTHALATES – These chemicals rarely find their way onto an ingredients list, but they are present in many health and beauty products just the same. Wherever you see “perfume” or “fragrance,” phthalates are present, because they are used to preserve these synthetic scents. Recent studies have shown that phthalates may be mutagenic, carcinogenic, and adversely affect male sperm, that they increase levels of testosterone and estrogen in humans, and are central to breast cancer risk. They are an ingredient in nail polish and other lacquers, and in soft plastics (e.g., infant chew toys).

      * Lanolin – A yellow, semi-solid, fatty secretion from sheep’s wool is widely used in skin and beauty care products. It can cause an allergic reaction in some people, as well as enlarged pores.

      * Acetone – Used in nail polish and nail polish removers, this colorless, volatile liquid is often used in astringents, fresheners, or clarifying lotions. It is extremely toxic and will dehydrate the skin, while speeding up the aging process.

      * Acrylamide – Found in many hand and face creams. Linked to mammary tumors in lab research.

      * Phenol carbolic acid – Found in many lotions and skin creams. Can cause circulatory collapse, paralysis, convulsions, coma and even death from respiratory failure.

      * Dioxane – Found in compounds known as PEG, Polysorbates, Laureth, ethoxylated alcohols. Common in a wide range of personal care products. The compounds are usually contaminated with high concentrations of highly volatile 1,4-dioxane, easily absorbed through the skin. Dioxane’s carcinogenicity was first reported in 1965 and later confirmed in studies including one from the National Cancer Institute in 1978. Nasal passages and liver are the most vulnerable. Dioxane is easily removed during the manufacturing process by “vacuum stripping”. Warning: It is a synthetic derivative of coconut. Watch for hidden language on labels, such as “comes from coconut”.

      IF SO, you should throw them away IMMEDIATELY and Tell ALL your friends and family!!! (Extra-virgin olive and/or coconut oils are great alternative moisturizers, and they contain natural sunscreens, until you find something else without these toxins) Hope this helps!!! Good Luck!!!!!

  3. QUESTION:
    My eyes have been swollen since last night?
    Last night i noticed my eyes were swelling, and it was swelling particularly uner my eyes. But my eyelids itch too, and throughout the night and this morning they have been swelling up and down. I could send a picture if anyone wants to see. I took an alergy pill last night, and work up with it looking just about the same. This happened around last week too.

    • ANSWER:
      I've been having contact dermatitis for a year, it caused my eyelids to swell. I still have it everyone once in a well, unless I use a product I'm allergic to. Try taking benedryl ever 4 -6 hours for a day or two and see if that helps. I had to go to a allergist and dermatologist, and we narrowed it down to the shampoo and make i used

  4. QUESTION:
    Anybody know any sites that show pictures of skin conditions/rashes and tell about them?
    Ive noticed on my legs ive got red blotches all over, and if u look close they look like a bunch of little red dots but blotches all over. It doesnt itch or burn, I cant even feel it & its smooth There not bumps. Ive very confused on wat it could be and its kinda scaring me. If anyone knos wat it could be please let me kno. Thanx!

    • ANSWER:
      You could be allergic to something ie. detergent used for laundry. Doesn't sound serious, you probably have contact dermatitis which means you're allergic to something. Either topically or something you are eating. Don't use any product that contains fragrances or dyes. See your doctor, there are creams that will help you.

  5. QUESTION:
    What would happen if a person [see details]?
    What would happen if a person used a flea remedy meant for dogs? Either a pill or the liquid that goes on the back of the neck? This has not happened to anybody that I know of, I just wondered.

    • ANSWER:
      As you have read above, the medications meant for dogs, are sometimes too irritant for humans. (an example is the anti flea compount called permethrin), because the conentration, acidity etc, are adjusted to hairy surfaces....
      A rash could be the most likely outcome.
      However, every human responds in different intensity to the same stimulus, and a serious allergic reaction (contact dermatitis) can result of using some liquid not meant for human skin......with red skin, blisters, itching and the rest of the medical picture..
      As far as I know, there are no pills against fleas, that are meant for dogs, only topical (locally applied) medications (drops, fluids, and collars) can be found in the market ....
      In humans, against fleas, (and lice too) its better to use benzyl benzoate lotion or crotamiton ointment. (Eurax, by Ciba Geigy Novartis)
      Those compounds are well studied, and the risk of a local irritation is quite unlikely......

  6. QUESTION:
    I have these weird bumps on my stomach back chest and arms?
    Me and my sister recently went to play in the woods (a week ago) and the next morning i woke up with weird bumps all over my stomach back chest and arms. they itch and hurt. she didnt wake up with anything. it has been a week and they're STILL there. ive put calamine lotion on them and whatnot, my mom and dad say im fine and dont need a doctor. im a tad scared. does anyone have any ida what it may be?

    • ANSWER:
      Poison Ivy,Oak,or Sumac - Topic Overview
      What are poison ivy, oak, and sumac?

      Poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac are plants that can cause a skin rash called allergic contact dermatitis when they touch your skin. The red, uncomfortable, and itchy rash often shows up in lines or streaks and is marked by fluid-filled bumps (blisters) or large raised areas (hives). It is the most common skin problem caused by contact with plants (plant dermatitis).

      See a picture of poison ivy, oak, and sumac leaves .
      What causes a poison ivy, oak, or sumac rash?

      The rash is caused by contact with an oil (urushiol) found in poison ivy, oak, or sumac. The oil is present in all parts of the plants, including the leaves, stems, flowers, berries, and roots. Urushiol is an allergen, so the rash is actually an allergic reaction to the oil in these plants. Indirect contact with urushiol can also cause the rash. This may happen when you touch clothing, pet fur, sporting gear, gardening tools, or other objects that have come in contact with one of these plants. But urushiol does not cause a rash on everyone who gets it on his or her skin.
      What are the symptoms of the rash?

      The usual symptoms of the rash are:

      * Itchy skin where the plant touched your skin.
      * Red streaks or general redness where the plant brushed against the skin.
      * Small bumps or larger raised areas (hives).
      * Blisters filled with fluid that may leak out.

      The rash usually appears 8 to 48 hours after your contact with the urushiol. But it can occur from 5 hours to 15 days after touching the plant.1 The rash usually takes more than a week to show up the first time you get urushiol on your skin. But the rash develops much more quickly (within 1 to 2 days) after later contacts. The rash will continue to develop in new areas over several days but only on the parts of your skin that had contact with the urushiol or those parts where the urushiol was spread by touching.

      The rash is not contagious. You cannot catch or spread a rash after it appears, even if you touch it or the blister fluid, because the urushiol will already be absorbed or washed off the skin. The rash may seem to be spreading, but either it is still developing from earlier contact or you have touched something that still has urushiol on it.

      The more urushiol you come in contact with, the more severe your skin reaction. Severe reactions to smaller amounts of urushiol also may occur in people who are highly sensitive to urushiol. Serious symptoms may include:

      * Swelling of the face, mouth, neck, genitals, or eyelids (which may prevent the eyes from opening).
      * Widespread, large blisters that ooze large amounts of fluid.

  7. QUESTION:
    Can someone identify my skin condition?
    I have this skin condition since I was a teen- it started like pimples on my upper arms and back- but the pimples stay red for years and never seem to get better. Can someone identify my condition through picture alone? What kind of skin condition I actually have? By the wat I don't know how to upload my back pic, so if someone wants to know maybe I can email it.

    • ANSWER:
      I would tend to suspect that it really is just pimples (acne).
      It could also be an allergic reaction, say to your shirts. I get pimple-like skin reactions everywhere that I wear clothes anytime I wear something washed with a particular detergent.
      Another guess, for something that is often mistaken for pimples, is herpetiformis dermatitis, which is a symptom of celiac sprue. Although the picture of dermatitis herpetiformis on wikipedia doesn't look at all like pimples, I have heard from a few people diagnosed with celiac that what they thought were pimples were DH.

      If you want to have a doctor look at it, the type of doctor to see is a dermatologist. Acne can be treated with medication, although if it doesn't bother you then it's not worth it, because the acne medication does have potential side effects.

  8. QUESTION:
    How can I get rid of my ugly-bulgy-undereye-bags (PICTURE)?
    they look HORRIBLE when i smile. makeup tips, home remedies, medicine etc anything will do :D
    any answers will be much appreciated. thanks!

    http://s459.photobucket.com/albums/qq312/xxFuture_Cullen/?action=view&current=Screenshot2010-02-06at44724PM.png
    i think it may be hereditary because i've had them since i was a toddler.

    • ANSWER:
      These "puffy eyes" are caused by many things including:
      Lack of sleep
      Excessive crying
      much sodium or salt intake
      Emotional or physical stress
      Build-up of toxins and wastes in the body
      Post operation or surgical recovery
      Heredity or genetic predisposition
      Allergic reaction or symptom of dermatitis
      Over consumption of alcoholic beverages
      Irritation from contact lenses
      Body fluid fluctuations due to hormones or changes in the weather or temperature
      Sinus problems

      Some solutions of this can be:
      Elevate your head - Use several pillows to elevate you head to keep fluid from 'pooling" under the eyes. Symptoms should be gone in 2- 6 hours.
      Cold Compress- Use a small Ziploc bag filled with ice, wrap it in a washcloth, and place it on the eyes. Repeat as necessary until the swelling is gone.
      Cucumber / Potato Eye Press- Use either sliced raw potatoes or cucumbers and place slices on closed eyes for 15-30 minutes. This should eliminate puffiness.
      Witch Hazel / Rose water Eye Press- Use a cotton or wool pad as an eye press. Soak the pad in either witch hazel or rose water. Close eyes and leave eye pads on for 15-20 minutes.
      Eye Exercises- Simply move both eyes in a circular motion first clockwise, and then counter clockwise for one rotation. Then move your eyes in all directions. You can do this exercise as needed to relieve symptoms.

      Hope this helps!!
      :)

  9. QUESTION:
    Hi does anyone have a cure for excema?
    I've had excema since birth, and I am now 34 and STILL have it! ANybody have a cure!

    • ANSWER:
      Moisturizing

      Dermatitis severely dries out the skin,and keeping the affected area moistened can promote healing and retain natural moisture. This is the most important self-care treatment that one can use in atopic eczema.

      The use of anything that may dry out the skin should be discontinued and this includes both normal soaps and bubble baths that remove the natural oils from the skin.

      The moistening agents are called 'emollients'. The rule to use is: match the thicker ointments to the driest, flakiest skin. Light emollients like Aqueous Cream may dry the skin if it is very flaky and whilst it is the moisturiser traditionally prescribed by doctors in the UK, it is in fact only licensed for use as a soap substitute on washing.

      Emollient bath oils should be added to bath water and then suitable agents applied after patting-dry the skin. Generally twice daily applications of emollients work best and whilst creams are easy to apply, they are quickly absorbed into the skin and so need frequent re-application. Ointments, with their lesser water content, stay on the skin for longer and so need fewer applications but they must be applied sparingly if to avoid a sticky mess.

      Typical emollients in the U.K. are: Oilatum or Balneum bath oils, Aqueous cream for washing with, Diprobase or Doublebase pump-action creams also used for washing and may be later applied directly to the skin. The preferred moisturiser of dermatologists is a mix of liquid and white-soft paraffins. Sebexol, Epaderm ointment and Eucerin lotion or cream may be helpful with itching. Moisturizing gloves can be worn while sleeping.

      Some report improvement of symptoms after treatment of the skin with porridge oats, either directly or with an extract. Others report improvement of symptoms after treatment of the skin with the rich natural oils contained Repcillin, a skin balm containing crocodile oil.

      Eczema and detergents

      The first and primary recommendation is that people suffering from eczema shouldn't use detergents of any kind unless absolutely necessary. The current medical school of thought is that people wash too much and that eczema sufferers should use cleansers only when water is not sufficient to remove dirt from skin.

      Another point of view is that detergents are so ubiquitous in modern environments and so persistent in tissues and surfaces, safe soaps are necessary to remove them in order to eliminate the eczema in a percentage of cases. Although most recommendations use the terms "detergents" and "soaps" interchangeably, and tell eczema sufferers to avoid both, detergents and soaps are not the same and are not equally problematic to eczema sufferers. Detergents increase the permeability of skin membranes in a way that soaps and water alone do not. Sodium lauryl sulfate, the most common household detergent, has been shown to amplify the allergenicity of other substances ("increase antigen penetration"). (For example, Corazza M, Virgili A, Allergic contact dermatitis from ophthalmic products: can pre-treatment with sodium lauryl sulfate increase patch test sensitivity? Contact Dermatitis.

      The use of detergents in recent decades has increased dramatically, while the use of soaps began to decline when detergents were invented, and leveled off to a constant around the '60s. Complicating this picture is the recent development of mild plant-based detergents for the natural products sector.

      Unfortunately there is no one agreed upon best kind of cleanser for eczema sufferers. Different clinical tests, sponsored by different personal product companies, unsurprisingly tout various brands as the most skin friendly based on specific properties of various products and different underlying assumptions as to what really determines skin friendliness. The terms "hypoallergenic" and "doctor tested" are not regulated (according to Consumer Reports), and no research has been done showing that products labeled "hypoallergenic" are in fact less problematic than any others.

      Dermatological recommendations in choosing a soap generally include:

      * Avoid harsh detergents or drying soaps.
      * Choose a soap that has an oil or fat base; a "superfatted" soap is best.
      * Use an unscented soap.
      * Patch test your soap choice, by using it only on a chosen area until you are sure of its results.
      * Use a non-soap based cleanser.

      How to use soap when one must

      * Bathe in warm water — not hot.
      * Use soap sparingly.
      * Avoid using washcloths, sponges, or loofahs.
      * Use soap only on areas where it is necessary.
      * Soap up only at the very end of your bath.
      * Use a fragrance free barrier type moisturizer such as vaseline or aquaphor before drying off.
      * Never use any kind of lotion, soap, or fragrance unless your doctor tells you to or it's allergen free
      * Never rub your skin dry, elsewise your skin's oil/moisture will be on the towel and not your body.

      Itch Relief

      Antihistamine medication may reduce the itch during a flare up of ezcema, and the reduced scratching in turn reduces damage & irritation to the skin (the Itch cycle).

      Capsaicin applied to the skin acts as a counter irritant (see Gate control theory of nerve signal transmission). Other agents that act on nerve transmissions, like menthol, also have been found to mitigate the body's itch signals, providing some relief. Whilst research has suggested Naloxone hydrochloride and dibucaine suppress the itch cycle in atopic-dermatitis model mice.

      Repcillin which contains crocodile oil relieves the symptomatic itch associated with eczema and psoriasis.

      Corticosteroids

      Dermatitis is often treated by doctors with prescribed Glucocorticoid (a corticosteroid steroid) ointments or creams. For mild-moderate eczema a weak steroid may be used (e.g. Hydrocortisone or Desonide), whilst more severe cases require a higher-potency steroid (e.g. Clobetasol propionate). They are highly effective in most cases, but must be used sparingly to avoid possible side effects, the most significant of which is that their prolonged use can cause the skin to thin and become fragile (atrophy). High strength steroids used over large areas may be significantly absorbed into the body causing bone demineralisation (osteoporosis). Finally by their immunosuppression action they can, if used alone, exacerbate some skin infections (fungal or viral).

      Hence a steroid of an appropriate strength to promptly settle an episode of eczema should be sparingly applied. Once the desired response has been achieved, it should be discontinued and not used for long-term prevention.

      Immunomodulators

      Topical immunomodulators like pimecrolimus (Elidel® and Douglan®) and tacrolimus (Protopic®) were developed after corticosteroid treatments, effectively suppressing the immune system in the affected area, and appear to yield better results in some populations. The US Food and Drug Administration has issued a public health advisory about the possible risk of lymph node or skin cancer from use of these products, but many professional medical organizations disagree with the FDA's findings:

      * The postulation is that the immune system may help remove some pre-cancerous abnormal cells which is prevented by these drugs. However, any chronic inflammatory condition such as eczema, by the very nature of increased metabolism and cell replication, has a tiny associated risk of cancer (see Bowen's disease).
      * Current practice by UK dermatologists [1] is not to consider this a significant real concern and they are increasingly recommending the use of these new drugs. The dramatic improvement on the condition can significantly improve the quality of life of sufferers (and families kept awake by the distress of affected children). The major debate, in the UK, has been about the cost of such newer treatments and, given only finite NHS resources, when they are most appropriate to use.

      Antibiotics

      The disruption to the skin's normal barrier protection through dry and cracked skin allows easy entry for bacteria and fungi. Scratching by the patient both introduces infection and spreads it from one area to another. Any skin infection further irritates the skin and a rapid detoriation in the condition may ensue; the appropriate antibiotic should be given.

      Psychological Effects

      Eczema often comes and goes in cycles and this means that sufferers at some times of the year are able to feel normal and at other times distance themselves from social contact. Sufferers with visible marks can act normal, but when it's mentioned they become withdrawn and self-conscious at their problems. Also, when told to stop scratching the sufferer can sometimes feel annoyance at the person who said it. Since it's a disease, which is made worse by scratching the sufferer feels bad in themselves and sometimes experiences feelings that everyone is looking at them. Although scratching does give pain it can feel like a release and this leads to problems with constant scratching. Sufferers may also be able to not scratch for example at school or at work and scratch the moment they get home. In summary sufferers of eczema, especially children, may suffer psychological distress in addition to the physical discomfort of their condition. This may both be through their own embarrassment about the condition and from any teasing or social rejection by their peers.

      Light Therapy

      See also light therapy.

      Light therapy using ultraviolet light can help. PUVA, UVB, and Narrow Band UVB are all used. Current research seems to show that Narrow Band UVB is the most effective, in addition to having lowest risk of skin cancer.

      When light therapy alone is found to be ineffective, it is combined with a drug called Psoralen. This treatment is termed as photo-chemotherapy.

      Traditional remedies

      Other historical sources - notably traditional Chinese medicine and Western herbalism - suggest a wide variety of treatments, each of which may vary from individual to individual as to efficacy or harm. Toxicity may be present in some.

      * Ledeboureilla seseloides
      * Potentilla chinensis
      * Aebia clematidis
      * Clematis armandii
      * Rehmannia glutinosa
      * Paeonia lactiflora
      * Lophatherum gracile
      * Dictamnus dasycarpus
      * Tribulus terrestris
      * Glycyrrhiza uralensis
      * Glycyrrhiza glabra
      * Schizonepeta tenuifolia
      * Schizonepeta tennuifolia
      * Azadirachta indica
      * evening primrose oil
      * tea tree oil
      * burdock
      * rooibos
      * calamine
      * oatmeal
      * crocodile oil
      * Repcillin

      Some alternative (and even conventional) medicine sources state that oatmeal in solution applied topically has a healing effect. This has been noticed through occupational sources, where a person's skin is often exposed to oatmeal at work, e.g., through baking or milling. Often such people retain exceptionally soft and healthy skin into old age.

      The symptoms of Biotin deficiency include Seborrheic dermatitis, a skin disorder which is similar to eczema. Current research has found that taking biotin alleviates the symptoms of eczema

      Patients should inform their doctor/allergist/dermatologist if they are pursuing one of these treatment routes.

  10. QUESTION:
    I have little redish bumps on my arms. What are they?
    i am a female, and ever since 4th grade i have had these little red bumps above my elbow on my arms. they don't hurt but the just look odd. Does anyone else have these?, know what they are? or know how to get rid of them?

    • ANSWER:
      I have little redish bumps on my upper arms as well. My dermatologist said they are called "keratosis pilaris rubra". Here is a picture of it http://keratosispilaris.org/images/kp/arm_01.jpg

      This is from their website
      "Why KP occurs?

      The bumps of KP result from the way in which scales are shed from the outer skin around KP affected hair follicles. In these follicles, the outer skin scales are excessively adherent and do not shed easily. This phenomenon is known as abnormal keratinization or hyperkeratinization. The fact that it is localized to the individual follicles and occurs in each and every one in a certain area, explains its characteristic "millions of bumps" appearance.

      Sometimes, this hyperkeratotic buildup entraps the hair within the follicle. The trapped hair gets bunched up and may lead to a red irritated bump that may fill with pus. These pus filled red bumps are often confused with bacterial folliculitis or acne.

      People with a history of skin allergies are most susceptible to this condition. The papules tend to occur in association with allergic dermatitis and several types of xerotic (dry) skin disorders. Both of these conditions have a strong hereditary link.

      Keratosis pilaris tends to be more severe during the winter months or other times of low humidity when skin dries out. Areas where relative humidity is low have a higher incidence of Keratosis Pilaris."

  11. QUESTION:
    how do you know when you have posion oak?
    how do you identifie the posion oak rash?

    • ANSWER:
      Urushiol-induced contact dermatitis (also Toxicodendron dermatitis and Rhus dermatitis) is the medical name given to allergic rashes produced by urushiol oil contained in various plants. This includes the genus Toxicodendron (including poison-ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac), as well as other plants in the family Anacardiaceae (mango, Rengas tree, Burmese lacquer tree, India marking nut tree, and the shell of the cashew nut), and even unrelated plants such as Ginkgo biloba.

      The American Academy of Dermatology estimates that there are up to 50 million cases of urushiol-induced dermatitis annually in the United States alone, accounting for 10% of all lost-time injuries in the United States Forest Service. Poison-oak is a significant problem in the rural western and southern U.S., while poison-ivy is most rampant in the eastern U.S. Dermatitis from poison sumac is not common, but it heavily impacted construction work on Disney World in Florida.

      Click the link to see a picture.

  12. QUESTION:
    Does this look like mild eczema to you?
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/56854852@N07/

    Someone suggested eczema but I have seen so many pictures of eczema and none seemed to look like this.

    • ANSWER:
      It's very difficult to tell from the pictures, but from what I see, it does not look like eczema. Does it itch? How long have you had it, and has it gotten progressively worse? To me, it looks like basic Dermatitis, which is the inflammation of the skin, usually due to some sort of allergic reaction. If it doesn't go away on its own in a few days, or if it becomes too painful/itchy, it'd be a good idea to see a doctor. Best of luck :)

  13. QUESTION:
    Can I dye my hair lighter? or should I go darker?
    I have naturally dirty blonde hair but near black eyebrows. i want to dye my hair because i recently noticed it totally looks like straw in pictures. AND its also such a boring color. Can I go lighter with it or should I go darker because of my eyebrows. I don't want to bleach my eyebrows though.

    • ANSWER:
      AND YOU should NEVER bleach your eyebrows, it promotes blindness.

      Call the 1-800# found on the box of dye or email them, (to find #, go online & search the brand if you don't have the box) they're the hair color experts they can advice you best.

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.
      Example: "My hair is right about armpit length as it is, but I've severely damaged it by bleaching it all at once. As a student of cosmetology myself, I would have to say that it was probably one of the worst mistakes I could have ever made."
      Another example: ok i did my hair yesterday i DIDN'T bleach it ,but im not sure what its called but she took the color out of my hair and then dies it a blond color and my head was on fire it killed me so after that i hated my hair color so i colored it my self a darker color, it looked so ugly and it burned me again it rully hrt so after i washed it my mom checked it for me and found small spots of blood all over my top scalp like over 20 of em now im scared and don't know why its there is it from the color am i sick and something is wrong ??

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. 11-22-11. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND.

      Permanent black hair dye is linked to causing leukemia and lymphomas.

      Sources:
      Google FDA.gov & search for Hair Dye & Relaxers.
      Google: Hair Dye FAQ's Are Hair Dyes Safe?

  14. QUESTION:
    Allergic reaction to hair dye?
    I recently dyed my hair a bright (and I mean bright) cheery red. I liked it for a while but realized it was a bad time for it (senior pictures and whatnot) so about two weeks later, I dyed it as close to my natural color as possible at a salon. My natural color is somewhere between a dirty blonde and brown. The salon had to bleach my hair and then they dyed it an auburn to counteract the red. Now it's an auburn with red tint and highlights of my natural color (not sure how that happend but I like it). But now I've got big red bumps all over my head. It hurts to brush my hair. What do I do?

    • ANSWER:
      1. Call the salon and tell them.

      2. Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.

      3. Take them to court.

      4. Write a negative review on them go to YELP or Craigslist and post on their message board.

      5. Call your doctor.

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Another example posted on YA! 8-20-12. Is it just me or does xxl live max blonde make your scalp feel like it on fire? I've recently used a max blonde on my hair and I had to wash it wash off straight away because my scalp felt like it was on fire has this happend to anyone else?

      A WOMAN was temporarily blinded when her face swelled up "like a football" following what she told was a severe reaction to hair dye.
      Carmen Rowe, 25, from Swansea was hospitalised for three days after using the Clairol 'Nice n' Easy' natural black colour. She said: "I lost my job, all for the sake of a glamorous hairstyle. I just want to warn parents what could happen." She claimed she carried out a skin test 48 hours before using the dye without a problem and has been colouring her hair since she was 13. March 3, 2012.

  15. QUESTION:
    I keep breaking out in a rash all over my body?
    This started about 3 weeks ago... I noticed one day that my stomach had a slight itch to it and all day at work I was kind of rubbing it through my shirt and realized when I got home that it was a pink bumpy rash that resembled Alaska. I still wasn't worried because I thought it was just irritated from me scratching it all day... until over the next few days it had spread to my thighs my shins my elbows, hands, wrists, ankles and butt cheeks. Now when I asked my dad he said he thought it was poison oak but I've never been allergic so I wasn't to sure. I went to urgent care and they diagnosed it as "dermatitis" and said it was definitely not poison oak. they prescribed me with a topical cream an sent me on my way. It appeared to keep spreading and with me being frustrated I went back just incase I was diagnosed wrong... a different doctor said the same thing. After another week I decided to go to a real dermatologist. He also wasn't 100% positive on what it is because he said it can be an allergic reaction to just about ANYTHING... he did say that it was Confusing because it looked like poison oak but didn't make sense how it looked. So he prescribed me with a different stronger topical cream... it started making all of the rash fade amazingly. Now after a week of using it, I started itching again but in new places an now the rash has a different look more like chaffing rather than the bumpy lines and streaks that the rash looked like before. I woke this morning to it being in my ear, all over my face, my inner arms (by my arm pit) my inner thighs and my hips. it's so frustrating because i don't know what to do and the doctors didn't really help. For some background information I was hiking in the Santa monica mountains (Malibu state creek) and Stoney point(chatsworth) when this started occurring. also I have been rock climbing for the past two or three months... could I possibly be allergic to the rock? the chalk? please help. I can attach pictures if need be

    • ANSWER:

  16. QUESTION:
    why are my hands dry cracked, peely, splotchy and broken out.
    I work at a restaurant but I bring my own natural sensitive soap. I moisturize daily with organic lotion or oils (tea tree) I avoid cleaners/chemicals and if i have to touch anything questionable I use vinyl gloves. Also I take daily wholefoods supplements along with my vegan diet. Still my hands are dry, cracked, peely, splotchy and red in spots. Am I allergic to something? Or what could cause it?

    • ANSWER:
      Probably contact dermatitis (aka eczema). The picture is a bit extreme but you get the idea. Contact your doctor. Try for hydrocortisone cream. Walmart, first aid section, or ask pharmacist, about . Could also be stuff you put on your hands, washing hands to much (defatted them), too long wearing gloves, dish washing soap, etc. My sister is an registered nurse. She has eczema because they wash their hands all the time. I got my hand eczema from the chemicals at work.

  17. QUESTION:
    Should I go blonde or a different color? (pics included)?
    I really want to dye my hair asap. but idk which color will look the cutest on me.
    http://www.polyvore.com/web_resizer_making_photos_faster/thing?id=62821844 That is my picture for reference.
    thank you guys for all your help!

    • ANSWER:
      Hairfall is NO FUN, either.

      Style meets chemistry meets biology: We're talking hair coloring.

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.

      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.

      Vanessa Minnillo Lachey: "I dated a guy once who wanted me to have blonde hair. Clearly, he was the wrong guy for me! I went to a lady who bleached my hair and it literally fell out. So, not only did I go back to my natural hair, I broke up with the guy!"

      NOR these:
      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. 11-22-11. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND.

      One example: MY HAIR DRESSER DYED MY HAIR GREY. I've been crying for the last 2 hours, I want to kill that bish for destroying what was amazing bleach blonde hair. AND to make things worse, she cut my extensions WAY too short.

      "23 years old Rihanna is well known for changing her hairstyle and hair colour on a regular basis and it looks as though all those treatments have finally begun to take their toll on her mane and perhaps her common sense." US Showbiz 2-18-12 Rihanna has reportedly paid ,500 for an emergency haircut after hers was ruined in a sauna, to fly out hair stylist from L.A. to London..The Province 3-1-12.
      A WOMAN was temporarily blinded when her face swelled up "like a football" following what she told was a severe reaction to hair dye.
      Carmen Rowe, 25, from Swansea was hospitalised for three days after using the Clairol 'Nice n' Easy' natural black colour. She said: "I lost my job, all for the sake of a glamorous hairstyle. I just want to warn parents what could happen." She claimed she carried out a skin test 48 hours before using the dye without a problem and has been colouring her hair since she was 13. March 3, 2012.

      Sources:
      Google FDA.gov & search for Hair Dye & Relaxers.
      Google: Hair Dye FAQ's Are Hair Dyes Safe?

  18. QUESTION:
    i woke up yesterday mornin and i noticed little bumps on my lip..?
    i woke up yesterday morning and i noticed like three tiny little bumps on my lip. i dont know what this means. 1 day passed and they grew a little not really noticible u have to look really close to see them good. and i havent had any other symptoms. oh i was sexually active on saturday which was like 5 days ago. what could this mean.? did i get a disease or something.? serious answers only please

    • ANSWER:
      Most likely what you have is NOT a sexually transmitted disease. What you have sounds more like a cold sore (communicable) or just contact dermatitis (non-communicable). If it gets worse, I would suggest going to a doctor or dermatologist to have a more accurate understanding of what you have. In the mean time, you can try some of these tips to alleviate and shrink the tiny bumps on your lip:

      1. Drink lots of water (Of course, this is what everyone says. Well, it is one of the most important tips you'll ever hear for almost any condition or ailment as it helps to wash away the toxins and unwanted bacteria in the body. It also helps to hydrate the body. And in this case, your lips will become naturally hydrated).

      2. Take a multivitamin daily.

      3. Apply shea butter or vaseline to the lips. You can also try applying a remedy of honey and turmeric to the lips for about 30 minutes a day. Honey and turmeric are both anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, and anti-fungal thus really beneficial as a topical ointment.

      3. Eat foods high in calcium, magnesium, and flaxseed oil.

      4. Or if you'd rather rely on science, you can use a 1% hydrocortisone ointment to the lips.

      THINGS TO AVOID:

      1. Avoid licking the lips. Saliva's chemical properties cause it to evaporate relatively quickly leaving the lips dry.

      2. Avoid lipstick or cosmetic products for a while as you may have an allergic reaction to them causing your skin to break out (contact dermatitis).

      *Since my diagnosis and tips are formulated based on what you've told me without the aid of pictures, I would still suggest that you visit your local MD. But like I said, most likely what you have is NOT sexually transmitted. It's very common that I see patients with this condition.

  19. QUESTION:
    why wont my dermatitis go away?
    ok, so i am a 15y/o male.
    and i have dermatitis. i've had it only for about a year now.
    i have it SMACK middle on my forehead so it's unbelievably noticeable.

    i wash my face everyday, i shower twice every day, put lotion on everyday, so i make sure i have very moisturized skin.
    and i went to see the doctor and he prescribed me some hydrocortisone cream. which only seems to assuage the irritation for about an hour or so til it comes back to haunt me again.
    i put it on EVERY day, just as i was told to, and have been doing so for this whole year.

    but for some reason it just will NOT go away. nor will it even show SIGNS of it going away.
    on some days it doesn't itch or bother me what so ever, and some days it will be very irritating and sometimes even get scaly from me itching it so much.

    so i have some questions:

    1. i have very long curly hair, and so when i shower, i use shampoo and conditioner ( Suave and TRESemme` ) so am i maybe having an allergic dermatitis reaction? are the chemicals too harsh for my skin?

    2.i am a VERY active person, i am out all day every day doing some physical activity, and i have come to notice, when i sweat, ( i sweat EXTREMELY easily ) that is when my forehead is the most irritant, so could it be again, the shampoo and conditioner i use, sweating from the top of my head to my forehead?

    3. how can i get rid of it if the hair products aren't the things causing it?

    4. will i have to suffer from dermatitis my whole life? is there any hope of it going away? so far i've lost it all.

    it's very hard for me to even go out in public cause every time i do, people always stare at my forehead, and whenever i talk to people, one of the first things they mention, is my forehead!

    ALL and ANY answers will be BEYOND appreciated.
    thanking whomever may help in advance,

    Brandon A.

    • ANSWER:
      Hello,

      If you have had this for a year, I think it needs a re-consideration of the diagnosis, - I mean, for someone to think about the diagnosis again and whether it really is dermatitis.

      There are some other possibilities, - one thinks of "seborrhoeic dermatitis," "neuro-dermatitis," and "tinea capitis," for example.

      You don't include a digital phone picture, but anyway I think you should ask to be referred to a hospital skin specialist, a Dermatologist. If the "dermatitis" diagnosis is just by a G.P., I mean.

      I'm not saying it is going to be anything serious, - - but the long-term outlook, and the best possible treatment, both depend on the most exact diagnosis.

      I hope this is of some help.

      Best wishes,

      Belliger
      retired uk gp

  20. QUESTION:
    I'm in a debate on whether tattoos (for Christians) are okay, or if they're not please help!
    So I'm on the side that is against tattoos. My brother is on the side that is for tattoos and so far he is winning. What should I say? I have already said that it could ruin your body and your body is a holy temple of the Lord, and I told him about Leviticus 19:27. So please help, and I will choose best answer!

    • ANSWER:
      I have a favorite magazine that will probably answer your question. It's interesting to hear a question like this, not many people would check the bible's viewpoint before getting/ letting a person you know to get a tattoo. Anyways, The article that I will show you is called "Should I Get a Tattoo?":

      Why So Popular?

      For some, a tattoo is a way of making a grand romantic gesture. Michelle relates: “On his ankle my brother has the name of a girl he used to go out with.” The problem? “He’s not dating her anymore.” According to Teen magazine, “doctors estimate that more than 30 percent of all tattoo removal is done on teen girls who want the name of an ex-boyfriend taken off.”

      Some youths view tattoos as works of art. Others see them as symbols of independence. “I’m in charge of my life,” proclaimed Josie, adding that getting a tattoo was “the only life decision I’ve ever made.” Tattooing allows some youths to experiment—to feel they have control over their appearance. Tattoos can also serve as a symbol of rebellion or of alternative life-styles. Some tattoos thus contain obscene words and drawings or provocative slogans.

      The majority of youths, however, may simply have become caught up in a fad. But just because it seems as if everyone is getting tattooed, does it mean that you should?

      The Ancient Art of Tattooing

      Tattooing is by no means a modern practice. Tattoo-bearing Egyptian and Libyan mummies have been found that date back hundreds of years before the time of Christ. Tattooed mummies have also been found in South America. Many of the tattooed images were directly related to the worship of pagan gods. According to researcher Steve Gilbert, “the earliest known tattoo that is a picture of something, rather than an abstract pattern, represents the god Bes. In Egyptian mythology Bes is the lascivious god of revelry.”

      Significantly, the Mosaic Law forbade God’s people to tattoo themselves. Said Leviticus 19:28: “You must not make cuts in your flesh for a deceased soul, and you must not put tattoo marking upon yourselves. I am Jehovah.” Pagan worshipers, such as the Egyptians, tattooed the names or symbols of their deities on their breast or arms. By complying with Jehovah’s ban on tattoo markings, the Israelites would stand out as different from other nations.—Deuteronomy 14:1, 2.

      While Christians today are not under the Law of Moses, the prohibition it laid on tattooing is sobering. (Ephesians 2:15; Colossians 2:14, 15) If you are a Christian, you would certainly not want to make markings on your body—even temporarily—that smack of paganism or false worship.—2 Corinthians 6:15-18.
      Health Risks

      There are also health concerns you should consider. Dr. Robert Tomsick, an associate professor of dermatology, comments: “What you’re doing is breaking the skin and introducing pigmented material into the area. Even though the needle only goes in a little way, anytime you break the skin, you have a risk of bacterial or viral infection. I think [getting a tattoo] is generally a risky thing to do.” Dr. Tomsick continues: “Once pigment is in, even if there’s no infection, there’s always the chance of contact allergies, dermatitis and allergic reactions that can cause skin to get red, swollen, crusty and itchy.”

      Despite the intended permanence of tattoos, various methods are used in attempts to remove them: Laser removal (burning the tattoo away), surgical removal (cutting the tattoo away), dermabrasion (sanding the skin with a wire brush to remove the epidermis and dermis), salabrasion (using a salt solution to soak the tattooed skin), and scarification (removing the tattoo with an acid solution and creating a scar in its place). These methods are expensive and can be painful. “It’s more painful to have a tattoo removed by laser than to get the original tattoo,” says Teen magazine.

      What Will Others Think?

      You should also give serious thought to how others might feel about your wearing a tattoo, as many react negatively. (1 Corinthians 10:29-33) On a whim, Li, a woman in Taiwan, got a tattoo at age 16. Now she is a 21-year-old office worker. “It bothers me the way my co-workers stare at the tattoo,” Li admits. British mental-health worker Theodore Dalrymple says that to many people, tattoos “are often the visible sign that a man . . . belongs to a violent, brutal, antisocial, and criminalized subculture.”

      An article in American Demographics magazine similarly observed: “It is clear that most Americans consider it risky to have visible body art. Eighty-five percent [of youths] agree with the statement, ‘people who have visible tattoos . . . should realize that this form of self-expression is likely to create obstacles in their career or personal relationships.’”

      Consider also whether choosing to get a tattoo would enhance or undermine your claim of being a Christian. Could it be a “cause for stumbling” others? (2 Corinthians 6:3) True, some youths have had their tattoos placed on hidden areas of the body. Even their parents may not know about these secret tattoos. But beware! An emergency trip to the doctor or simply taking a shower at school could make your secret common knowledge! Better it is to “conduct ourselves honestly in all things,” avoiding foolish deception.—Hebrews 13:18.

      Like all fads, tattoos may lose their appeal over time. Really, is there any garment—whether a pair of jeans, a shirt, a dress, or a pair of shoes—that you love so much that you would commit to wearing it for the rest of your life? Of course not! Styles, cuts, and colors change. Unlike a piece of clothing, however, tattoos are hard to shed. Besides, what is “cool” to you when you are 16 might not be very appealing when you are 30.

      Many have come to regret making permanent alterations to their appearance. “I got a tattoo before learning about Jehovah,” relates Amy. “I try to keep it covered. When others in the congregation happen to see it, I feel embarrassed.” The message? Think before you ink. Don’t make a decision that you may regret later.

      Long advice, but I hope it will help your brother with his decision :)

      P.S: Feel free to check these scriptures in your OWN copy of the Bible if you wish.

  21. QUESTION:
    Comparing Chromium 3+ and Chromium 6+, which one is more toxic?

    • ANSWER:
      Chromium 6+ is toxic
      Chromium 3+ is considered to be not toxic and is needed for life.
      (huge doses could be toxic though, but not in dosages of up to 4,000 times of the toxic levels of Chromium 6+. Higher doses could cause cancer, but that has only been proven in rats.)

      - Chromium 6+ can be toxic in as small concentrations as 0.05 milligrams per liter.
      - The lethal dose of poisonous chromium 6+ compounds is about one half teaspoon of material.

      Of course in large enough quantities Chromium 3+, like anything can be toxic. But it is required for sugar metabolism in humans, and a deficiency of Chromium 3+ causes a disease called chromium deficiency.

      μg = a microgram is 1/1,000,000 of a gram (1 × 10^-6)
      μg = 1/1000 of a milligram = 0.001 milligrams (1X10^-3).

      According to the WHO (World Health Organization) recommended values of daily chromium should be 25-35 micrograms, however supplements as high as 200 micrograms have been sold without any reported problems. In rats such dosages can cause chromosome damage, but that is the dietary supplement chromium picolinate.

      Smaller amounts of Chromium 3+ are recommend for health between 500 and 700 times the lethal dosage of Chromium 6+, but it is possible to take large (unknown, but over 4,000 times the lethal level of Chromium 6+) levels of Chromium 3+ without receiving more than some chromosome damage; this kind of damage CAN lead to cancer.

      According to Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromium
      "Trivalent chromium (Cr(III), or Cr3+) is required in trace amounts for sugar metabolism in humans (Glucose Tolerance Factor) and its deficiency may cause a disease called chromium deficiency. In contrast, hexavalent chromium is very toxic and mutagenic when inhaled as publicized by the film Erin Brockovich. Cr(VI) has not been established as a carcinogen when not inhaled but in solution it is well established as a cause of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD).

      Recently it was shown that the popular dietary supplement chromium picolinate complex generates chromosome damage in hamster cells. In the United States the dietary guidelines for daily chromium uptake were lowered from 50-200 µg for an adult to 35 µg (adult male) and to 25 µg (adult female)...

      Chromium metal and chromium(III) compounds are not usually considered health hazards; chromium is an essential trace mineral. However, hexavalent chromium (chromium VI) compounds can be toxic if ingested or inhaled. The lethal dose of poisonous chromium (VI) compounds is about one half teaspoon of material. Most chromium (VI) compounds are irritating to eyes, skin and mucous membranes. Chronic exposure to chromium (VI) compounds can cause permanent eye injury, unless properly treated. Chromium(VI) is an established human carcinogen. An investigation into hexavalent chromium release into drinking water formed the plot of the motion picture Erin Brockovich.

      World Health Organization recommended maximum allowable concentration in drinking water for chromium (VI) is 0.05 milligrams per liter. Hexavalent chromium is also one of the substances whose use is restricted by the European Restriction of Hazardous Substances Directive.

      In some parts of Russia, pentavalent chromium was reported as one of the factors of incidence of premature senility."

  22. QUESTION:
    Contact Dermatitis?.......What is eating my skin?!?!?
    I have had this rash for a few days now. .....I had gone outside to read, it was a nice day, 70 and sunny so I was in shorts in a tank top laying in the weeds.
    That never used to bother me before...I could swim in lakes and roll around in a pile of brambles if I wanted to but this Spring, a few days after I had a taste of this nice weather, I started breaking out!
    It started in two areas. A place on the inside of my leg and then another spot where it touches when I bend my leg. They were simple red itchy spots, I took to be bug bites. But then, I scratched and scratched (shame on me) until I had welts and the wound would even LEAK CLEAR LIQUID and that has never happened before. So now, in consequence, I have two dark red spots that look like bruises and they're hard and crusty now.
    I think the rash is spreading because then I have a red, raised blotch on my shoulder that itches but I have heard that contact dermatitis does not spread but I am wondering why since I have not been outside since my first rash. Sometimes, I even feel flushed (but that might be all in my head)
    Any ideas on what this is? Am I right in my guess that this is contact dermatitis? Some pictures of it online look similar to what I have while others do not. Please be serious when you answer too, it gets annoying when people who don't know what they're talking about give me smart alec answers. =) I'm...eh, kinda concerned that this rash will eat me alive. I am trying sooo hard not to scratch but the effectiveness or not scratching is not showing yet. Any home remedies that you know of? My Drs. office is closed on weekends and it's Sunday -.-
    Thank you all very much!!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Most likely bites , and you spread it when you scratched with the serous drainage. Wash with warm water and mild soap, and get some Benadryl cream or calomine lotion. Take some oral dipenhydramine as well if really itchy. VERY good hand washing, watch your mucous membranes , especially your eyes.The welts would be likely hives, an allergic reaction. Think those little bugs called no-seeums got you.If this isn't significantly improved by Monday, please see your Doc.

  23. QUESTION:
    What are these itchy bumps?
    the bumps first appeared after i got a 2nd degree sunburn on my chest. they were small and not visible, you could only feel them. they were very itchy. they went away but the area sill itches. soon after i got the same bumps on my arms and neck, but i did not get sun burnt on my arms or neck. what could these be? they don't look red. i looked up pictures of skin rashes but nothing really compared.

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds like an allergic reaction to something. Maybe contact dermatitis. Did someone put any kind of medicine on your skin. Neck and arms rings a bell. How about armpits? That really sounds like a histamine response. I'd try over the counter Benadryl and if that doesn't help see a doctor or better still a dermatologist. If you start to have trouble breathing or feel like you throat is getting tight get to a hospital. While rare the allergic reactions can lead to breathing problems and if left untreated death.

  24. QUESTION:
    Is this allergic dermatitis (pic)?
    Well I think I have alergic dermatitis... what do u think.

    Here is the picture:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/37124863@N06/4866186179/in/photostream

    note expecially the thing near my eye...

    I get these rashes that normally occur when i sweat or in high heat, at least I think. They always occure in the same area, normally just a bit itchy and sometimes, although rarely it has inflamed spots., but the one that really disturbs me (and occurs in the same spot ALWAYS) is an inflamed " bump" near my eyes, doesnt itch though. Normally all the "rashes" occure in the same spots in my body as well. Its really bothering me, have any idea what it is and if there are any treatments to at least, well get ride of it (at least the eye one when it occres )

    Note, this only occurs maybe once every 2 weeks or so, any ideas what is it? and normally by a few hours with a few exceptions, is all gone :) (thank goodness :D )

    • ANSWER:
      i think what you have is called Cholinergic urticaria.
      you can google it,it happens to a lot of people.
      there is medication for it(yes, allergy type medication)

  25. QUESTION:
    What crazy hair color would look good on me? Picture?
    This is me http://s1292.beta.photobucket.com/user/DignaLovee/media/399313_391297060954625_1525415520_n_zps555e1a70.jpg.html

    • ANSWER:
      Turquoise, are shown in many runway shows for 2012.
      Know your school policy mandating a "natural color, brown, blond, black, natural red/auburn." before dyeing your hair pink, for example: 3-21-12 "Honor Student Banned from School for Pink Hair." a 6th grader who was rewarded for getting good grades.
      Red hair gets 13-year-old suspended KCTV-5 Posted: Apr 12, 2012 8:13 PM PDT Updated: Apr 13, 2012 4:01 AM PDT
      Recently from YA HAIR: "I have red tips on my fringe, I got in trouble at school and they want it out by tomorrow."
      And another: "I dyed it purple. It was supposed to wash out after about a month. Now, many months later, it's still there. And it looks really stupid because it's grown out about three or four inches from my roots. I'm also not suppose dot have it at my job. I've tried dying my hair the same color as my natural hair color but that didn't work."
      Three Somerset High School seniors learned the hard way that there are limits to showing their support for Breast Cancer Awareness Month by wearing pink. The teens were asked to leave the campus or sit in suspension when they showed up with pink hair. The teens said they were just trying to support one of their teachers.
      HOT PINK ROOTS?
      i dyed my hair with loreal hicolor hilights magenta hair dye yesterday and ended up with hot hot hot pink roots and barely red hair?!?! i did it like i was doing a root touch up so i worked roots down, that was my mistake. now i have hot ppink roots omg. HELP!!!!!! what color can i use to make my whole head the color of ariana grande ah help i neeed to even this out

      Example: I died my hair about 2 months ago and it hasnt faded, i used aussie shampoo and conditioner.

      Semi-permanent or permanent USUALLY takes up to 28 washings or months, some brands takes 2 washings for semi-perm., depends on the brand really.

      Example: GREELEY — Ariel Davila was asked to leave Brentwood Middle School in Greeley on Monday when she showed up with blue hair, which is a violation of school dress code directly related to gang colors.
      Her parents were okay with the blue hair, and they say they are now upset her daughter is being punished for self-expression.
      The school handbook includes a section on dress code that specifically refers to blue and red.

      Style meets chemistry meets biology: We're talking hair coloring.

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.
      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND. The British woman who went into coma after a reaction to hair dye has died after a year. Updated 11-25-12. The woman suffered a heart failure, struggled for breath and became unconsciousness. Her family blamed paraphenylenediamine, a chemical found in hair colour. Her family has now called for paraphenylenediamine to be banned from home dye kits. In 2000, a 38-year-old Indian-origin woman from Birmingham, Narinder Devi, died after an allergic reaction to hair dye.

  26. QUESTION:
    how to treat sunburn?
    i have sunburn across my forhead, it really hurts to a light touch and stings if i press it or scratch an itch i have on my head.

    ive tried vinegar and water, it doesnt work.

    how can i soothe the pain or get rid of it?

    and will it look ugly when it starts peeling? because i have school picture day on monday!

    my forehead temperature is 39 degrees celcius/102.2 degrees farenheit!

    • ANSWER:
      •Take anti-inflammatory medications such as ibuprophen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve) or aspirin. These stop inflammation and reduce the amount of redness and pain. It is important to take them early as they can help block the release of interleukins, the skin’s main sunburn cytokine.
      •Apply cool compresses and cool moisturizers. Try Eucerin Calming Cream. Put it in the refrigerator for a few hours before applying to your burn.•Avoid hot showers. Instead, take a luke warm bath with Aveeno Collodial Oatmeal. The oatmeal is both a soothing anti-inflammatory and a moisturizer, which are the two things your skin needs most.
      •Avoid any additional sun exposure. The best way is to cover up with clothing; applying a sunscreen to a sunburn can worsen the inflammation and itching.
      •If you have blisters, resist the urge to pop them. They form a protectant seal on your skin; if they tear, the sensitive underlayers of skin will be exposed. You won’t like it. Don’t peel off the dead skin either; rather let it slough off on its own in the shower.
      •If you have extensive burns or blistering, see your physician. He or she can prescribe topical steroids to help minimize the inflammation.
      •Avoid numbing sprays such as benzocaine. Although they can feel great when applied, they are notorious for causing allergic contact dermatitis.

  27. QUESTION:
    stop itching from stasis ulcers?
    stasis ulcers cause dermatitis and ankles itch.
    any good home remedies

    • ANSWER:
      Hi,

      I am not an expert on skin ulcers but it sounds like the malady may be an allergic reaction to something that is toxic to the liver/kidneys AND/OR a bacteria_fungus i.e. ringworm and/or yeast infection but it's hard to tell without seeing and learning the details about what one has been eating breathing and applying to the skin. SEE https://health.google.com/health/ref/Ringworm Monistat 7 will likely kill any fungus in a few days and better micro-nutrition will keep it killed and will also strengthen your liver lymph and kidney systems to handle allergic reactions with less suffering in the future.

      IF you think it may be an allergic reaction - although it may be a difficult process - try to identify the triggers from cosmetics meds nuts milk grains other-foods chlorine-water-in-showers etcetera by discontinuing them until the symptoms stop and then beginning them again to see how the body reacts. If you are like me you may start to see allergies to many things because the root problem for me was a severely weakened liver from too many nutritional supplements that were toxic and I never knew it until it was almost too late.

      After several months of pruritus Urticaria that began during the colder months of November inside a gas heated low humidity home, I have identified enough of my own triggers to allow my legs to heal with only a super-minimal amount of coconut cream and water rubbed on my skin and a minimal number of full body showers.

      After several applications my lymph glands have become severely allergic to petrolatum products that are similar to Vaseline Petroleum Jelly, and common sense has now taught me that any petroleum products should always become toxic to anyone’s kidney and liver with repeated applications. I had flare-ups immediately after I had applied organic olive oil so I eventually changed to minimal amounts of coconut oil after I had used a minimal amount of a petrolatum steroid for a few days to allow my legs to heal up. I also have flareups when I eat over 150 calories of nuts and/or milk fats and/or oils, but these usually flare up about three hours after eating them, but the olive oil always took about five to thirty minutes to begin itching.

      Skin diseases can always return again and again and again and can get much much worse over time if they are not resolved. Soo after reading your symptoms I would strongly encourage you to seek out a 'good' doctor or a ‘good’ nurse and s/he will make a knowledgeable medical diagnosis and thoroughly explain the causes preventions and solutions much better than anyone on Yahoo_Answers could do without being able to see you personally.

      Also, to know how difficult or easy it should be for a doctor to make a ‘good’ diagnosis - I encourage you to also become a ‘good’ medical diagnostician from your doctor’s advice and your own research through Yahoo_Answers and via browser searches.

      FOR HELP WITH PICTURES & INFO SEE:
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yeast_infection
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/skin-rash/SN00016
      http://dermatology.about.com/cs/dermphotos/a/dermgallery.htm
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dermatosis_of_pregnancy
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gestational_diabetes
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skin_disease

      ITCHINGS & RASHES/BLISTERS CAN BE CAUSED BY EITHER:

      * an allergic reaction to ‘toxins’ in one’s food or skin applications or meds or air (i.e. molds or smoke or vapors) etc.

      * fungal bacterial = thrush yeast_infection jock_itch ringworm etc.

      * viral = measles smallpox etc.

      * parasitical = scabies_mite lice etc.

      * inadequate micro-nutrition absorption in the gut = pellagra scurvy beriberi rickets etc.
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pellagra

      * either sun or hormonal or stress related or a combination of the above that make it difficult to find a definite cause
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/formication

      I truly hope what you learn will help you to decide on the correct choices that will remedy your painful experience of pruritus-itching and rashes in the future.

      My best to you and yours,

      AI – a self taught nutritionIsT >[(-:]

      PS - IF you are interested, I feel I have become a quasi-expert on rashes and pruritus itching after many years of off and on flare ups due to my own nutritionally related asthma and gallbladder disease that ‘continued’ to become heart disease and T2 diabetes and then non-alcoholic fatty liver disease with either PBC or PSC. So you are not alone. Many many people suffer from pruritus and I have learned very late in my own disease(s) that when it is nutritionally related most doctors do not tell their patients that inadequate micro-nutrition absorption in the gut and liver ‘might’ be the root cause and the best solution, and is also the most likely cause to the pruritus and liver diseases that are currently overwhelming our American culture. So to do my part to make a difference in the world I now take a little time each week to help others understand why better micro-nutrition absorption in the gut is so important, and I have posted much of my own story via the link at: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20091025223942AAni6lC . I hope you will have learned something today from my own mistakes and would not duplicate them – please pass on what you will learn from your own malady to your family friends neighbors and acquaintances. My best to you and yours. AI - nutritionIsT >[(-:]

  28. QUESTION:
    What type of bites are these? (picture)?
    We're certain they're not beg bugs as my husband doesn't have any and I have changed my pjs. there are more groups of them on my legs and stomach. they itch and are slightly blistered. any ideas?
    thanks
    http://i847.photobucket.com/albums/ab40/alex_the_bug/Bite/2010-04-12-54515.jpg

    • ANSWER:
      You said you changed your PJ's, so maybe you are allergic to the new PJ's and the bumps are contact dermatitis, maybe?

  29. QUESTION:
    Peeling skin on my hands?
    I have painless white bubbles on my hands and feet. They are not itchy, and they are not painful. They aren't full of pus or serum or anything like that. However, they will grow and spread if they are not peeled immediately. It gets worse when my hands are wet. It happens all year round, so I haven't seen a seasonal trigger or factor. I do not have seasonal allergies, nor do I have a family history of hay fever or allergic reactions/dermatitis. I went to the dermatologist, and he diagnosed me with "hand and foot eczema."

    After talking to my primary care doctor and consulting the internet (several different sources), I'm convinced that this is not the case. None of my symptoms match up except for the peeling.

    I have no used any new soaps or shampoos, and this has been happening for months. What's wrong with me?
    Oh, and I've tried using non scented lotion(s), thinking that it might just be dry skin, but it doesn't work. In fact, it just gets worse.

    • ANSWER:
      just in case it happens to be eczema after all, I'll recommend you look at the pictures at expresschemist:co:uk under the product Salcura dermaspray There's a pic of a man with severe hand eczema that was healed with salcura. For our child it worked 10 times better than every other eczema product we tried.

      Wish you luck in finding the solution

  30. QUESTION:
    If Noah got a tattoo what would it be and why?

    • ANSWER:
      TATTOOS are everywhere—or so it seems. Rock stars, sports figures, fashion models, and movie stars flaunt them. Many teenagers have followed suit, proudly displaying tattoos on their shoulders, hands, waists, and ankles. Andrew contends: "Tattoos are cool. Having one or not is a personal choice."

      Says the World Book Encyclopedia: "Tattooing is the practice of making permanent designs on the body. It is done by pricking small holes in the skin with a sharpened stick, bone, or needle that has been dipped in pigments with natural colors."

      Although exact statistics are hard to come by, one source estimates that 25 percent of all 15- to 25-year-olds in the United States have a tattoo. Sandy says: "It's the popular thing to do." Why are tattoos so appealing to some youths?

      Why So Popular?
      Tattoos are often associated with rebellious life-styles
      For some, a tattoo is a way of making a grand romantic gesture. Michelle relates: "On his ankle my brother has the name of a girl he used to go out with." The problem? "He's not dating her anymore." According to Teen magazine, "doctors estimate that more than 30 percent of all tattoo removal is done on teen girls who want the name of an ex-boyfriend taken off."

      Some youths view tattoos as works of art. Others see them as symbols of independence. "I'm in charge of my life," proclaimed Josie, adding that getting a tattoo was "the only life decision I've ever made." Tattooing allows some youths to experiment—to feel they have control over their appearance. Tattoos can also serve as a symbol of rebellion or of alternative life-styles. Some tattoos thus contain obscene words and drawings or provocative slogans.

      The majority of youths, however, may simply have become caught up in a fad. But just because it seems as if everyone is getting tattooed, does it mean that you should?

      The Ancient Art of TattooingTattooing is by no means a modern practice. Tattoo-bearing Egyptian and Libyan mummies have been found that date back hundreds of years before the time of Christ. Tattooed mummies have also been found in South America. Many of the tattooed images were directly related to the worship of pagan gods. According to researcher Steve Gilbert, "the earliest known tattoo that is a picture of something, rather than an abstract pattern, represents the god Bes. In Egyptian mythology Bes is the lascivious god of revelry."

      Significantly, the Mosaic Law forbade God's people to tattoo themselves. Said Leviticus 19:28: "You must not make cuts in your flesh for a deceased soul, and you must not put tattoo marking upon yourselves. I am Jehovah." Pagan worshipers, such as the Egyptians, tattooed the names or symbols of their deities on their breast or arms. By complying with Jehovah's ban on tattoo markings, the Israelites would stand out as different from other nations.—Deuteronomy 14:1, 2.

      While Christians today are not under the Law of Moses, the prohibition it laid on tattooing is sobering. (Ephesians 2:15; Colossians 2:14, 15) If you are a Christian, you would certainly not want to make markings on your body—even temporarily—that smack of paganism or false worship.—2 Corinthians 6:15-18.

      Health Risks
      Think before you ink
      There are also health concerns you should consider. Dr. Robert Tomsick, an associate professor of dermatology, comments: "What you're doing is breaking the skin and introducing pigmented material into the area. Even though the needle only goes in a little way, anytime you break the skin, you have a risk of bacterial or viral infection. I think [getting a tattoo] is generally a risky thing to do." Dr. Tomsick continues: "Once pigment is in, even if there's no infection, there's always the chance of contact allergies, dermatitis and allergic reactions that can cause skin to get red, swollen, crusty and itchy."

      Despite the intended permanence of tattoos, various methods are used in attempts to remove them: Laser removal (burning the tattoo away), surgical removal (cutting the tattoo away), dermabrasion (sanding the skin with a wire brush to remove the epidermis and dermis), salabrasion (using a salt solution to soak the tattooed skin), and scarification (removing the tattoo with an acid solution and creating a scar in its place). These methods are expensive and can be painful. "It's more painful to have a tattoo removed by laser than to get the original tattoo," says Teen magazine.

      What Will Others Think?You should also give serious thought to how others might feel about your wearing a tattoo, as many react negatively. (1 Corinthians 10:29-33) On a whim, Li, a woman in Taiwan, got a tattoo at age 16. Now she is a 21-year-old office worker. "It bothers me the way my co-workers stare at the tattoo," Li admits. British mental-health worker Theodore Dalrymple says that to many people, tattoos "are often the visible sign that a man . . . belongs to a violent, brutal, antisocial, and criminalized subculture."

      An article in American Demograph

  31. QUESTION:
    Letting my parents bleach/dye my hair?
    so I've dyed my hair probably over 5 times and i want to bleach my hair blonde, so i can dye it blue. Right now my hair is a dark brown (faded black) and want it bleach blonde so i can dye my hair a fun color, my parents say that its going to turn orange and not work so they want a pro to bleach it and that would be a lot of money! "you cant just do it, your hair is colored x ? It will not get blue" that's what my mom said to me and my dad said " Just need to wait until it is actually possible, you will either ruin you hair or it will not look right if you do it right now!" HELP... please! I wrote this to themOkay so I’ve brought this up before and so yeah. As you know I want to dye my hair blue… I mean you only live once don’t you? Why not have a little fun with my hair? I know I’m working on getting my hair blonde but I really don’t want to have my hair blonde any more. I like my hair darker or even if I got my hair blonde I would like to dye my bangs blue like how I had my pink… But blue. If I don’t like it I would learn a lesson and pay the price for fixing it again… Like what’s happing now. I want to be myself and I want to be different, I don’t want to be like everyone else. I know I would have to bleach it, with past experience with dying my whole head I don’t think it would be that hard, you could always buy more bleach and fix it. I don’t think it’s a “trend” but I think it’s for my own joy! I want to be my own person and I want to be different! I want to express myself through my hair; otherwise you can’t really express yourself. I mean yeah I went through stuff in 6th grade but I think I’m mentally stronger after all of that. You where okay with dying my hair the pink and blue before, also the red and brown. It can always be fixed and I would pay for it to be fixed. It’s not your hair now is it? That was a rhetorical question by the way… This isn’t going to change my behavior or school grades! It’s not permanent hair dye. I want to find my own style too, I can’t follow everyone else, and you’ve always told me to be different. I would use Manic Panic this time because it doesn’t have the same chemicals like Splat, it is vegan therefore its not going to damage my hair more after bleaching it. I want to do this for ME and no one else, it’s my hair it’s not like I should care what others think about it. I’ll respect whatever you pick, I mean I understand the things that your thinking, cost to get it back to “normal”, people calling me names again, that I will mess it up, ect. I think I would fit me as a person and my personality, wild and fun. I want to be my own person, take responsibility for my actions. Just picture it, I mean yeah it might not be the most attractive thing (pictures) ever but isn’t my hair, don’t you only live once, don’t you need to be your own person, and don’t need to be different from others? I hope you understand my point of view and I will respect your option’s because you are the ones raising me! Thank you everyone!

    • ANSWER:
      I read all yours, now it's your turn to read all mine! Yeah, you live only ONCE, but do you want to have cancer, or hair loss before you start having a family and a home? People actually die from hair dyes! And right now you've got more chemicals than I have in a year, when I was abusing? I had frequent migraines, the 1st one lasted 14 hours.

      Style meets chemistry meets biology: We're talking hair coloring.

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.
      Example: "My hair is right about armpit length as it is, but I've severely damaged it by bleaching it all at once. As a student of cosmetology myself, I would have to say that it was probably one of the worst mistakes I could have ever made."
      Another example: ok i did my hair yesterday i DIDN'T bleach it ,but im not sure what its called but she took the color out of my hair and then dies it a blond color and my head was on fire it killed me so after that i hated my hair color so i colored it my self a darker color, it looked so ugly and it burned me again it rully hrt so after i washed it my mom checked it for me and found small spots of blood all over my top scalp like over 20 of em now im scared and don't know why its there is it from the color am i sick and something is wrong ??

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND. The British woman who went into coma after a reaction to hair dye has died after a year. Updated 11-25-12. The woman suffered a heart failure, struggled for breath and became unconsciousness. Her family blamed paraphenylenediamine, a chemical found in hair colour. Her family has now called for paraphenylenediamine to be banned from home dye kits. In 2000, a 38-year-old Indian-origin woman from Birmingham, Narinder Devi, died after an allergic reaction to hair dye.

      Permanent black hair dye is linked to causing leukemia and lymphomas.

      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.
      Vanessa Minnillo Lachey: "I dated a guy once who wanted me to have blonde hair. Clearly, he was the wrong guy for me! I went to a lady who bleached my hair and it literally fell out. So, not only did I go back to my natural hair, I broke up with the guy!"

      A WOMAN was temporarily blinded when her face swelled up "like a football" following what she told was a severe reaction to hair dye.
      Carmen Rowe, 25, from Swansea was hospitalised for three days after using the Clairol 'Nice n' Easy' natural black colour. She said: "I lost my job, all for the sake of a glamorous hairstyle. I just want to warn parents what could happen." She claimed she carried out a skin test 48 hours before using the dye without a problem and has been colouring her hair since she was 13. March 3, 2012.

  32. QUESTION:
    HAIR ! what will happen if i dye my hair blonde? help?
    okay, so heres a picture of my hair.. im the one on the right! with the darker hair
    http://tinypic.com/r/28gz4t3/6
    anyways, i want it to be blonder.. but i cant afford the salon to keep highlighting it.. i was wondering what would happen if i used a drugstore blonde hair dye and applied it. Would the brown just stay brown? HELP :)?

    • ANSWER:
      Done @ home or @ the salon, there are risk, just the same.
      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.
      Vanessa Minnillo Lachey: "I dated a guy once who wanted me to have blonde hair. Clearly, he was the wrong guy for me! I went to a lady who bleached my hair and it literally fell out. So, not only did I go back to my natural hair, I broke up with the guy!"

      Style meets chemistry meets biology: We're talking hair coloring.

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.
      Example: "My hair is right about armpit length as it is, but I've severely damaged it by bleaching it all at once. As a student of cosmetology myself, I would have to say that it was probably one of the worst mistakes I could have ever made."

      A WOMAN was temporarily blinded when her face swelled up "like a football" following what she told was a severe reaction to hair dye.
      Carmen Rowe, 25, from Swansea was hospitalised for three days after using the Clairol 'Nice n' Easy' natural black colour. She said: "I lost my job, all for the sake of a glamorous hairstyle. I just want to warn parents what could happen." She claimed she carried out a skin test 48 hours before using the dye without a problem and has been colouring her hair since she was 13. March 3, 2012.

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. 11-22-11. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND.

  33. QUESTION:
    Should I dye my hair black?
    I've never dyed my hair until about 3 days ago. I just had a sudden urge for change and dyed my hair darker brown, it barely made a difference and it was only semi-permanent. I always loved black hair and envy girls who can pull it off, do you think it would match me?
    http://s1308.beta.photobucket.com/user/sarahxosaid/profile/
    its kind of a weird picture but its the only one i could put quickly haha

    Thank you!

    • ANSWER:
      No.

      Permanent black hair dye is linked to causing leukemia and lymphomas.

      Style meets chemistry meets biology: We're talking hair coloring.

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.
      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND. The British woman who went into coma after a reaction to hair dye has died after a year. Updated 11-25-12. The woman suffered a heart failure, struggled for breath and became unconsciousness. Her family blamed paraphenylenediamine, a chemical found in hair colour. Her family has now called for paraphenylenediamine to be banned from home dye kits. In 2000, a 38-year-old Indian-origin woman from Birmingham, Narinder Devi, died after an allergic reaction to hair dye.

      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.

      A WOMAN was temporarily blinded when her face swelled up "like a football" following what she told was a severe reaction to hair dye.
      Carmen Rowe, 25, from Swansea was hospitalised for three days after using the Clairol 'Nice n' Easy' natural black colour. She said: "I lost my job, all for the sake of a glamorous hairstyle. I just want to warn parents what could happen." She claimed she carried out a skin test 48 hours before using the dye without a problem and has been colouring her hair since she was 13. March 3, 2012.

      Example of one who's hair is falling and stopped growing from YA!:
      "my hair had been bleached many times and can't grow past a certain length
      its also falling out . i stopped bleaching it.
      i just need to add lenght! but if i can stop it from falling out..that be great too"

  34. QUESTION:
    Had a hair dye accident,how to hide it?!?
    Hello,I am a fourteen year old female and I am in the 8th grade.Last year,I got talked into dying my bangs and a strip of my hair on the other side blonde,I did this twice.I then got talked into dying it black.It turned blue.Now,it is an off green color with a blond tint to it. Here is a picture: http://m.flickr.com/#/photos/90326349@N02/8232715655/
    Is there any hair cut I could get to hide it?Or anyway I can hide it?I cannot dye it again.Please help :(

    • ANSWER:
      Playing with chemicals are not for children. You can style your hair differently, and let your hair grow. But right now, you've got more chemicals on your hair than I have in a year! Heat & chemicals are hair's worst enemies.
      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      You can do TWO THINGS:
      1. Celebrity wears two-tone hair dye all the time, trying to grow out their dye. Watch Victoria Newman on the Young & the Restless (her dyed blond hair had been growing for months & months), now Chloe on Y&R has two-tone hair, and another on Entertainment Tonight, she's one of the correspondence. Chloe Kardashian, Drew Barrymore & Guiliana Rancic (btw, she just had double mastectomy), Sarah Jessica Parker, Rachel Bilson,Jennifer Lopez (when she's not wearing hair extensions) have had their hair done like that (letting their highlights fade) for years! The other night, I even spotted Ivanka Trump's hair, she's letting her hair grow naturally on the Apprentice. They call that look ombre hair color — darker roots, lighter ends — but colorists sees that fading. Women are wanting dimensional color with natural highlights that look like they've been playing out in the sun.

      2. Fade them by using anti-dandruff (no conditioner) or it won't work, to wash your hair.

      Don't allow peer PRESSURE take over your, next time. Start the New Year right.

  35. QUESTION:
    Is this a rash? how did that happened?
    Its on my wrist and sometimes it itches
    I know the picture is gross...
    Do you know what this is? is it a rash? what do you think bit me? or how I got it?
    https://picasaweb.google.com/gotmail321/Something#5577078096770564466

    • ANSWER:
      Some sort of allergic dermatitis - it almost looks like poison oak or even chicken pox. Have your doctor look at it.

  36. QUESTION:
    Hand Swollen, Red/Brown. Hospital?
    About 3 days ago I woke up to my right hand being a light pink in certain areas. Myself and the Pharmacist thought it was an "Allergic Reaction", so right away I went to Benedryl and Ibprophen.
    Day 2. I still had it and it seemed as if it had gotten worse. It looked as if it was spreading. I went to the Dr. and he couldn't see any bite marks or anything that he could think of. Although, they did do blood work on me.
    Day 3. It got worse!!! I took Benedryl & Ibprophen, I bought a Medicated Anti- Itch Cream that helps out Minor skin irritations, allergic itches, rashes, insect bites, dry skin itch, hives & other skin irritations. I've been applying it as it directs me too. I'm scared that it may be something severe. It takes about 1 week or so to get my blood results back, but I can't wait that long.
    * I also did some research under " Hands itchy, swollen & red" and everything I read is about Hand Eczema or Hand Dermatitis, but the picture they illustrate looks nothing like what I have. * It's not dry, just swollen and a little bumpy from the minor scratches.

    • ANSWER:
      allergic or eczema sounds like a good guess especially with the itching.

      There's a picture of someone with hand eczema at expresschemist:co:uk look under Salcura Dermaspray If it's hand eczema then I'd recommend the salcura products to you. It worked dramatic results for our child, his skin is perfect now and it stopped the itch and healed the inflamed skin rapidly. Plus it's all natural and isn't messy, greasy or anything.

  37. QUESTION:
    pinks color bumps on my penis (adults only)?
    i go pinks color bumps on my penis what can they be and i never have sex befor so please help,i took a picture ican send it to you and you chould tell me what they are oh ya an 20 just let ya know

    • ANSWER:
      Well, there are free clinics in every city, and I think it would be beneficial for you to go. If you have never had sex before, it soounds like it could be something simple, such as contact dermatitis from using soap that you are allergic to. Don't be alarmed, just go to the Doctor.

  38. QUESTION:
    what are differences lesion on dermatitis corporis and psoriasis??

    • ANSWER:
      Honestly? It's going to be difficult to put diagnosis just based on inspection of the lesions. But with careful questioning and tests, a doctor would be able to notice a difference.

      Dermatitis rashes usually erupt right after a contact with an allergen, or something the person is particularly allergic towards. Psoriasis on the other hand, errupts anytime of the year, without any prior contacts to any allergen.

      Dermatitis lesion have extremely irregular margins. The rash may break over a small area of skin, or may include the whole body surface (I have seen pictures of such cases during my classes), Psoriasis on the other hand have a characteristic patch. It normally have margins, which looks like ring of dark red/pinkish colour.

      Dermatitic lesions are almost almost accompanied by pain and itchiness. Not so in Psoriasis.

      Dermatitic lesions may be situated at any place of the body, from face to eyelids to extremities, etc, without any characteristic. Psoriasis on the other hand, have a tendency to develop on the front, back of the body, and extensor surface of the limbs. It is true, almost all cases of psoriatic patients that I have seen, have lesions on anterior surface of their legs and posterior surface of their arm.

      Also, there are some tests, or as we describe it, 'signs' to differentiate one from the other.
      1. With Dermatitis, we have a test called 'skin patch test', where we leave a patch of allergen, which we suspect the patient has an allergic reaction to. After a few hours, we can see marked lesion around the area of the patch.

      2. With Psoriasis, there is a psoriatic triad that is extremely helpful in making a diagnosis.
      i.) scratching the lesion, we will see peeling of scales
      ii.) continuous scratching, we will see silvery white lesion
      iii.) if you continue to scratch on the lesions, you will find what we call blood dew, little pinpoint haemorrhage, or little drops of blood.

      Also, there is a test called Koebner's phenomena, which is really characteristic for Psoriasis. We scratch on the skin of the patients, then after 7-9 days, we will see a line of lesions corresponding to the line at which you scratched.

  39. QUESTION:
    Marks on my chest? with pictures but ladies only unless you're a guy doctor?
    I'm 16 years old girl and i've noticed these strange marks on my chest about 2 months ago. At first there were just spots so i thought they were there because it's really hot outside and they are there because of sweating so much. I talked to my dad (yes. my dad. i don't have a mother) and he said that i should try shower even more and they should go away. So i did shower 4 times a day for about a month but nothing happened. It actually got worse because there are not some other weird looking marks on my chest and discolouration. I don't know what to do. I can't weird a medium/low cut shirt because it looks horrible. Could i be allergic to something? Also, my breasts are really swollen and you can see all the blood vessels really well and it looks disgusting. My nipples are light pink and it looks like something is pushing them out and my boobs look like triangles from the side. What is happening to me?

    http://i.imgur.com/82Irr.jpg

    http://i.imgur.com/siw42.jpg

    • ANSWER:
      looks like some kind of mild dermatitis, showering more often will make it worse. try to wash less often and keep it dry.

      you would be better off seeing a doctor about it, they will give you a steroid cream that you apply very thinly every day and it should clear up.

      Edit_

      if your breasts are swollen and the red blotch's, i know what it might be, it's probably an alergic reaction to washing powder. you need to change it to a none biological powder, wash all your cloaths in the new non biological powder (or the powder you used to use before it was changed.)

      if your breasts and/or nipples are changing shape, bulging or nipple has changed or doesn't come out or sticks out all the time, or you have leakage you need to get yourself checked out by a doctor.

  40. QUESTION:
    Hair coloring question?
    Hey I am looking for a good single process hair color to go with my skin type. My skin is more of a sallow yellow tone but I'm relatively pretty pale. I have blue eyes and a longer face. My natural color is this ugly ash brown that does nothing for me. I have dark feature so something brightening would be best. I'm 18 so something a bit interesting and fun too. Any help would be appreciated. Pictures would help the most : )

    • ANSWER:
      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.
      Vanessa Minnillo Lachey: "I dated a guy once who wanted me to have blonde hair. Clearly, he was the wrong guy for me! I went to a lady who bleached my hair and it literally fell out. So, not only did I go back to my natural hair, I broke up with the guy!"
      Another example posted on YA! 8-20-12. Is it just me or does xxl live max blonde make your scalp feel like it on fire? I've recently used a max blonde on my hair and I had to wash it wash off straight away because my scalp felt like it was on fire has this happend to anyone else? Should I try again?
      One example: MY HAIR DRESSER DYED MY HAIR GREY. I've been crying for the last 2 hours, I want to kill that bish for destroying what was amazing bleach blonde hair. AND to make things worse, she cut my extensions WAY too short.
      And one from a hairdresser:
      There are spots ( level 8 & very orange) and they will not come off! This was accidental. Not a result from lifting as she has been a client of mine for 3 years. Her formula has never changed and I have nEver used bleach on her until today! I believe this was a result of left over color in the sink bowl. I tried bleach and 20 volume. Nothing. Bleach and 40 volume, still nothing. Any suggestions?

      Style meets chemistry meets biology: We're talking hair coloring.

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.
      Example: "My hair is right about armpit length as it is, but I've severely damaged it by bleaching it all at once. As a student of cosmetology myself, I would have to say that it was probably one of the worst mistakes I could have ever made."
      Another example: ok i did my hair yesterday i DIDN'T bleach it ,but im not sure what its called but she took the color out of my hair and then dies it a blond color and my head was on fire it killed me so after that i hated my hair color so i colored it my self a darker color, it looked so ugly and it burned me again it rully hrt so after i washed it my mom checked it for me and found small spots of blood all over my top scalp like over 20 of em now im scared and don't know why its there is it from the color am i sick and something is wrong ??

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. 11-22-11. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND.

  41. QUESTION:
    do i have a cyst? PIC'S?
    sorry, i just asked this question, no one answered. i think i might have a cyst, or im really not sure. the links to the pictures and description is on this page as well.

    http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AorKTfD1yZoaP4GYVPeJ4QHty6IX;_ylv=3?qid=20110722150347AAN9h0S

    • ANSWER:
      the welts that were very red, are they hot to the touch and itched profusely.

      I think from your bra or clothing

      Formaldehyde, most commonly known as embalming fluid, serves a number of purposes in manufactured products. It is actually frequently used in fabrics to give them a variety of “easy care properties” such as:

      Permanent press
      Anti-cling, anti-static, anti-wrinkle, and anti-shrink
      Waterproofing and stain resistance
      Perspiration proof
      Moth proof
      Mildew resistance
      Color-fastness

      According to the American Contact Dermatitis Society, rayon, blended cotton, corduroy, wrinkle-resistant 100 percent cotton, and any synthetic blended polymer are likely to have been treated with formaldehyde resins.

      But as some are finding out the hard way, easy care comes at a price.

      Formaldehyde has also been shown to cause cancer in animals, and may cause cancer in humans. Other common adverse health effects include:

      fatigue
      skin rash (contact dermatitis)
      severe allergic reactions
      eye, nose, and throat irritation
      wheezing and coughing

      Be aware that it takes several washings, with dryings and airings in between, to significantly reduce the amount of formaldehyde found in clothing and other household fabrics like window drapes.

  42. QUESTION:
    Is it Ok a christian ( evangelist ) to get a tattoo ? :))?
    thanks
    I am not going to have It :D
    Asking for someone :P

    • ANSWER:
      Tattooing is by no means a modern practice. Tattoo-bearing Egyptian and Libyan mummies have been found that date back hundreds of years before the time of Christ. Tattooed mummies have also been found in South America. Many of the tattooed images were directly related to the worship of pagan gods. According to researcher Steve Gilbert, "the earliest known tattoo that is a picture of something, rather than an abstract pattern, represents the god Bes. In Egyptian mythology Bes is the lascivious god of revelry."
      Significantly, the Mosaic Law forbade God's people to tattoo themselves. Said Leviticus 19:28: "You must not make cuts in your flesh for a deceased soul, and you must not put tattoo marking upon yourselves. I am Jehovah." Pagan worshipers, such as the Egyptians, tattooed the names or symbols of their deities on their breast or arms. By complying with Jehovah's ban on tattoo markings, the Israelites would stand out as different from other nations.—Deuteronomy 14:1, 2.
      While Christians today are not under the Law of Moses, the prohibition it laid on tattooing is sobering. (Ephesians 2:15; Colossians 2:14, 15) If you are a Christian, you would certainly not want to make markings on your body—even temporarily—that smack of paganism or false worship.—2 Corinthians 6:15-18.
      There are also health concerns you should consider. Dr. Robert Tomsick, an associate professor of dermatology, comments: "What you're doing is breaking the skin and introducing pigmented material into the area. Even though the needle only goes in a little way, anytime you break the skin, you have a risk of bacterial or viral infection. I think [getting a tattoo] is generally a risky thing to do." Dr. Tomsick continues: "Once pigment is in, even if there's no infection, there's always the chance of contact allergies, dermatitis and allergic reactions that can cause skin to get red, swollen, crusty and itchy."
      Despite the intended permanence of tattoos, various methods are used in attempts to remove them: Laser removal (burning the tattoo away), surgical removal (cutting the tattoo away), dermabrasion (sanding the skin with a wire brush to remove the epidermis and dermis), salabrasion (using a salt solution to soak the tattooed skin), and scarification (removing the tattoo with an acid solution and creating a scar in its place). These methods are expensive and can be painful. "It's more painful to have a tattoo removed by laser than to get the original tattoo," says Teen magazine.
      You should also give serious thought to how others might feel about your wearing a tattoo, as many react negatively. (1 Corinthians 10:29-33) On a whim, Li, a woman in Taiwan, got a tattoo at age 16. Now she is a 21-year-old office worker. "It bothers me the way my co-workers stare at the tattoo," Li admits. British mental-health worker Theodore Dalrymple says that to many people, tattoos "are often the visible sign that a man . . . belongs to a violent, brutal, antisocial, and criminalized subculture."
      An article in American Demographics magazine similarly observed: "It is clear that most Americans consider it risky to have visible body art. Eighty-five percent [of youths] agree with the statement, 'people who have visible tattoos . . . should realize that this form of self-expression is likely to create obstacles in their career or personal relationships.'"
      Consider also whether choosing to get a tattoo would enhance or undermine your claim of being a Christian. Could it be a "cause for stumbling" others? (2 Corinthians 6:3) True, some youths have had their tattoos placed on hidden areas of the body. Even their parents may not know about these secret tattoos. But beware! An emergency trip to the doctor or simply taking a shower at school could make your secret common knowledge! Better it is to "conduct ourselves honestly in all things," avoiding foolish deception.—Hebrews 13:18.
      Like all fads, tattoos may lose their appeal over time. Really, is there any garment—whether a pair of jeans, a shirt, a dress, or a pair of shoes—that you love so much that you would commit to wearing it for the rest of your life? Of course not! Styles, cuts, and colors change. Unlike a piece of clothing, however, tattoos are hard to shed. Besides, what is "cool" to you when you are 16 might not be very appealing when you are 30.
      Many have come to regret making permanent alterations to their appearance. "I got a tattoo before learning about Jehovah," relates Amy. "I try to keep it covered. When others in the congregation happen to see it, I feel embarrassed." The message? Think before you ink. Don't make a decision that you may regret later.

      * Some of the names have been changed.

  43. QUESTION:
    What are these bumps? heat rash, allergic reaction, mites? PICTURE.?
    i woke up after a long sleep and my left arm (on my inner wrist) began to itch. when it was irriated & itchy the bumps were BIG stayed the same color as my skin. not red. it itched no more than ten minutes, and i went on with my day forgetting about it. it subsided into small red spots that are NOT itchy. throughout the day its hardly noticable.

    then when i got up again this morning, it itched horribly. but only for a little while. same thing. BIG bumps no color change when itchy, but when the itch stops, it just subtles down to a small patch of red marks that DO NOT ITCH for the rest of the day.

    I have not eaten anything new or different.
    i have never been allergic to anything that i know of in my 25 years of living, this is the first time this has happened.
    i do not think it is bed mites, because they would have been all over my body.
    and my little brother sometimes naps on the same bed and he hasn't gotten anything.

    can someone please help.
    i posted a link to picture of what it has turned into when it is not itchy anymore, and stays red. it's like it lies dormant until every morning and i dont know why.

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v48/earswithfeet/IMG_4005.jpg

    • ANSWER:
      The picture is not the best, but it looks like contact dermatitis, which is the reaction of your skin to any number of things, like poison ivy, sawdust, chemical spray, bug bites, the little blisters, red rash, do not scratch, do everything you can to not scratch it. Clariton works great even after the fact, the rash will run it's course no matter what it is or what you do, lasts about a week. Steroid cremes over the counter will help with the itching, also calamine lotions and other anti itch medications will help, but you still have to wait it out. 100 cordizone zone shots won't make it go away any faster, I have tried everything in the book. I get from looking at plants.

  44. QUESTION:
    what is this rash on my sons skin? (pics)?
    so... the rash on his face he's had since he was a baby, I have taken him into the doctors before and they say, either an allergic reaction, or eczema or dry skin... so I am not sure what it is!
    and he just got this rash on his arm like a few days ago... it looks like dry scabs, but not sure! and sometimes he gets little dots on his back, but again the doctors say its really nothing but dry skin...
    but is it? have you seen it before?

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v210/snowaball/Picture516.jpg
    face ^

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v210/snowaball/Picture517.jpg
    arm^

    thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I agree with the doctors, it looks like allergy / eczema.

      By the way, eczema = dermatitis = allergic dermatitis = irritant dermatitis.

      Technically allergic and irritant dermatitis are two different things, but they have the same treatment and same symptoms, so they are functionally the same thing as far as you're concerned. They are both dermatitis, and eczema is another word for dermatitis. So, when we use any of those terms, they all mean more or less the same thing.

      What it all boils down to, is that something bothers his skin and causes a rash. You can treat it with topical creams, but you should be very careful using those on a pre-pubescent child. I'd have a conversation with the doctor about how to use these creams safely on a baby, to avoid systemic absorption.

      It would be best if you can figure out what bothers his skin. This can be challenging. Personally I have eczema on my elbows, forearms, hands, ankles, the back of my neck, and sometimes my shins. the elbows, ankles, and neck are the worst, because it's irritated by my clothing constantly touching those places. If the flareup is bad, it can be aggravated by water as well. Plain old water, lol.

      Eczema flareups are worse in the winter for most people. Things that can aggravate it - contact (such as clothing), excessive moisture, hot water, dry skin, scented or colored laundry detergents - fabric softeners - soaps - moisturizers - etc, acidic substances such as lemon juice, household cleansing products, ...... etc etc. Everyone has their own irritants but those things are really common.

      Edit: The arm picture actually does look like ringworm, but it's hard to tell. I'm going to guess that it's actually eczema, due to its location and the fact that he obviously has eczema on his face. You might want to have a doctor or nurse look at it in person though.

  45. QUESTION:
    Would I look good blonde?
    I'm thinking of going blonde, not like white, just like a light honey blonde.
    If you cant tell from the picture, I'm reasonably fair, with hazel eyes+light brown hair

    http://s1206.beta.photobucket.com/user/Kitty_Walker/media/374099_171823682907925_1110582861_n.jpg.html?sort=3&o=0

    Tell me if you can't see the picture:)
    thank you <3

    • ANSWER:
      If you want to look older than your mom.

      My church friend went blonde, or ash blonde, who knows, her orig. hair color was black, now she's older looking than her mom - 56. It didn't even go with her complexion, and she's hating every minute of it.
      She's in her 30's. If you're getting bored with your hair, try to teach yourself to style your hair so you can be more unique. I can do mine 7 different ways a week, takes 2-10 mins. I've posted 58 photos in 25 months. If I can do it, so can you!

      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.
      Vanessa Minnillo Lachey: "I dated a guy once who wanted me to have blonde hair. Clearly, he was the wrong guy for me! I went to a lady who bleached my hair and it literally fell out. So, not only did I go back to my natural hair, I broke up with the guy!"
      Another example posted on YA! 8-20-12. Is it just me or does xxl live max blonde make your scalp feel like it on fire? I've recently used a max blonde on my hair and I had to wash it wash off straight away because my scalp felt like it was on fire has this happend to anyone else?

      Style meets chemistry meets biology: We're talking hair coloring.

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.
      Example: "My hair is right about armpit length as it is, but I've severely damaged it by bleaching it all at once. As a student of cosmetology myself, I would have to say that it was probably one of the worst mistakes I could have ever made."
      Another example: ok i did my hair yesterday i DIDN'T bleach it ,but im not sure what its called but she took the color out of my hair and then dies it a blond color and my head was on fire it killed me so after that i hated my hair color so i colored it my self a darker color, it looked so ugly and it burned me again it rully hrt so after i washed it my mom checked it for me and found small spots of blood all over my top scalp like over 20 of em now im scared and don't know why its there is it from the color am i sick and something is wrong ??

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND. The British woman who went into coma after a reaction to hair dye has died after a year. Updated 11-25-12. The woman suffered a heart failure, struggled for breath and became unconsciousness. Her family blamed paraphenylenediamine, a chemical found in hair colour. Her family has now called for paraphenylenediamine to be banned from home dye kits. In 2000, a 38-year-old Indian-origin woman from Birmingham, Narinder Devi, died after an allergic reaction to hair dye.

      Dyeing hair like JLo turned out to be disaster: Nicole Scherzinger
      Published: Saturday, Nov 24, 2012, 16:40 IST

      Example of one who's hair is falling and stopped growing from YA!:
      "my hair had been bleached many times and can't grow past a certain length
      its also falling out . i stopped bleaching it.
      i just need to add lenght! but if i can stop it from falling out..that be great too"

  46. QUESTION:
    Is this eczema, dermatitis, something else? More painful than itchy.. -read more-?
    I can't link a picture, but everyone (no one with a medical degree or anything) who looks at my hands, when I ask them if they know what it is, says eczema. It does itch, just not as often as it does hurt. It hurts a LOT. It's red, dry, cracked, blistered, occasionally bleeds, stuff like that. It happens when I'm stressed mainly, or when I put on lotion. I AM allergic to lotion, but the rest of my body doesn't react this way. So, any ideas? I plan to see a doctor soon.

    Also, sorry for if this gives too little detail, makes no sense or has bad grammar.. I'm quite tired.

    • ANSWER:
      I would say you definatly have Eczema, Dermatitis or Psoriasis.

      Use Non Perfumed Moisturisors not any with perfume in because this effects it. If you are doing any washing up or using other substances make sure you wear gloves.

      Maybe bathe them in warm water and soft soap or baby oil. Also try using Aquius cream to wash or use as a moisturiser. You can get this in any local supermarket or chemist.

      Make sure you see a doctor as you don't want to carry on putting yourself through pain when it could be something simple that would cure or help it.

  47. QUESTION:
    I have poison ivy.?
    I have poison ivy, I think anyway. The bumps look just like the ones in the picture on the internet, only smaller and there aren't as many. Although I have no idea where I got poison ivy, I was wondering if it could get worse if I don't treat it? The websites say it's not contagious, but I find myself scratching at places that look like they're developing poison ivy too. Is it just me imagining things, or should I get an over the counter cream or something?

    • ANSWER:
      Ok, first, take a hot bath, then put some Calamine lotion on it, yes, even the invisible itchy places will bloom nicely in time, and I'm sorry to hear it...
      The pharmacy ought to have "Caladryll" lotion, which has worked the best for me....
      Poison Ivy is a form of dermatitis, an allergic reaction that not everyone gets if they contact it.... Touching it is one way to get it, but hyper sensitive people also get it from the air. One way to avaid it in the future is to build up some immunity, eat a little bit of it, and then you'll never get it again for a while....

  48. QUESTION:
    what are these bumps?
    I have a link to a picture of it, I hope it works. I noticed them a few days ago. They are on both of my hands, but not on the palms. Only thing I can think of is that I had some kind of reaction to the gloves I wear at work..

    http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3397/3665173168_eec19d7162.jpg?v=0
    I already have an app. with my doctor on the 10th so I will bring it up when I see him.. Been to Canada uhh.. I was born in Canada. I always wear the same brand of gloves and have never seen this before.

    • ANSWER:
      Your picture is showing an area of small vesicles with some redness, which is consistent with a case of eczema. In that particular location, it's possible that it's an allergic dermatitis, due to some chemical that touched you there. And, yes, the gloves could be the culprit. It's possible that over the years, you have developed a sensitivity to one of the ingredients in the glove (the material it's made of, any dye in the glove, any material that it was sewn or glued together with, some chemical that made its way thru the glove, etc), and finallly made u develop this eruption. A cortisone cream should help this situation. However, I'd advise you to take the glove with you to your doctor's appt, so that he can see what it's made of, and possibly consider doing a patch test for allergies.

  49. QUESTION:
    What could have caused this rash?
    It is on the inside of my upper arm and it really only itched for a bit before it was even visible. I wasn't even outside much of any the day before I got it, when I did go outside I didn't do anything or touch anything unusual.

    Is there just a general possible way to get rid of it?

    http://i92.photobucket.com/albums/l7/darkninja93/rash.jpg?t=1284426517

    • ANSWER:
      This could really be one of a few things. So, I will give advice on all of the possibilities I believe they could be.

      A. Insect Bites.
      This does look like insect bites or a reaction to it. These aren't usually harmful. Use hydrocortisone cream, antihistamine and ice to relieve itching. If symptoms get worse or don't clear up, call your doctor. If new symptoms arise, such as difficulty breathing, dizziness or nausea, go to the emergency room right away.

      B. Possible Allergic Reaction.
      Call your doctor. Try an antihistamine for itching and rash ie, Benadryl.

      C. Hives.
      Hives are a skin reaction to an allergen, medicine or infection. They can also appear in some people who are very nervous. Use an antihistamine and cool compresses for itching. If the hives don't go away on their own or are accompanied by other symptoms, such as swelling around the lips or trouble breathing, see your doctor or go to the emergency room right away.

      D. Allergic Contact Dermatitis.
      This could be caused by poison ivy, poison oak or poison sumac. The oil from these plants causes an allergic reaction. Wash the area with soap and water to remove any oil that remains on the skin. The rash will go away after about a week. To relieve itching, apply hydrocortisone cream or calamine lotion to the rash. See your doctor if the rash covers a large area of your body, does not go away, or if new symptoms, such as fever, appear.

      E. Pityriasis Rosacea.
      Pityriasis Rosacea is a rash that started with a single scaly, red and slightly itchy spot, and within a few days, large numbers of smaller patches of the rash, some red and others tan, break out over your chest and abdomen. The causes aren't known. Check with your doctor. Calamine lotion and antihistamines may relieve itching and redness. The rash will probably go away in a few weeks. Pityriasis rosea doesn't usually respond to treatment.

      F. Dermatitis Herpetiforms.
      This is an intensely itchy rash with red bumps and blisters. It is a rash associated with a sensitivity to gluten, a protein found in cereal grains such as barley and wheat. See your doctor. Antibiotics can help control symptoms. Avoid foods that contain gluten.

      So, basically...

      1. Cleanse the area with Dial soap and a warm, wet, washcloth. (.67 Walmart)
      2. Try caladryl or calamine lotion on the area. (.97 Walmart)
      3. Take some benedryl or other antihistimine. (.97 Walmart)
      4. See your doctor if symptoms persist or home remedies don't work.

      Good luck. Thanks for including a picture, it helped!


allergic dermatitis pictures

Keratis Pilaris

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Why do i always have rough bumpy legs and arms?
    I have noticed that I have very bumpy legs and arms. I am wondering if they are some sort of permanent goose bumps. Maybe a deficency? The hairs of my arms and legs stick up sometimes (LoLz). I try rubbing on them to make them warmer so the goose bumps would go away but that doesnt work. I keep my laptop on my legs for a few hours which heats up hot and Im still bumpy. Thanks yahoo answerers and answer appropriatley :3 thank you ^_^

    • ANSWER:
      its keratis pilaris...u need to start takin g vitamin a, d, and e everyday...it will improve them..and use moisterizer

  2. QUESTION:
    Treatment for keratis pilaris?
    I've had keratis pilaris for about 2 years and when I went vegetarian it started clearing up. The scars from messing with it are still kinda there but it has improved alot. I've tried many creams and lotions and home remedies and rubbing olive oil(pure) on it seemed to help the most with the general scars or blemishes. An the general color of skin has improved also. Ive also heard that cortizone 10 helps for milder cases but idk. But I would still like to have any tips.

    • ANSWER:
      I hear you. I've had keratosis pilaris for my whole life. Try taking sea salt bath once a week, and that should help to clear it up. You can find sea salt at Bath and Body Works, and other places I'm sure.Also, there is this scrub from Arbonne and it works wonders: https://www.arbonne.com/shop_online/showitem.asp?ProductId=7089&menuId=52 It is kind of expensive, but you can find cheaper brands of the product that work just as well. Don't scrub too hard beacause it will just make your keratosis pilaris worse. Use gentle body washes and try to get 20 minutes of sun each day. Oil plunking (what you mentioned) is supposed to work pretty well too, or so I've heard. I hope everything works out :)

  3. QUESTION:
    what is my skin tone?
    i am pale with pink undertones, i have rosacea and keratis pilaris rubra.

    • ANSWER:
      ivory?

      help me(:
      http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;_ylt=AsJzxus9NBF9n4A5_mg2oSvsy6IX;_ylv=3?qid=20110118121209AA6i2vg

  4. QUESTION:
    i got acne in my arms just a bit, pores?
    its not acne from the face like ugly looking that you can pop its just pores that annoy me is there any way i can get rid of this without any damn medication? and look you dumb ppl around there read this closly WITHOUT MEDICATION

    • ANSWER:
      its a chronic dry skin condition call keratis pilaris aka kp (i have it too) u wanna exfoliate and moisturize. there's also a brand called DermaDoctor that makes lotions and exfoliants specifically for this skin condition. u can find it online or at sephora (the products are called KP Duty). and btw that "dumb ppl" line was a bit rude and superfluous

  5. QUESTION:
    Bumps that have seeds in them? WTF IS THIS!?
    Ok so I am a 15 year old girl.
    When I was like 12 I had this teeny tiny bump on my arm. It wasnt red or anything like a pimple it was just a bump like my skin was raised up and it was really small. and so it started turning dark like grey and black and one day i got a needle and stuck it through and it didnt do anything i kept trying to get the black out and then like a month later one day i squeezed it and like a black seed came out. it was really effin weird. some like gunk came out too. and then just yesterday like 3 inches above my ribs on my left side i noticed two of the small bumps, already black so i squeezed and the gunk stuff came out followed by the little tiny seeds. what are these? i tried looking on google but like no results.

    • ANSWER:
      its called keratis pilaris look it up i would suggest a good benzoyl peroxide wash and a scrubbie like a loofah or a apricot scrub.


keratis pilaris

Contact Dermatitis Treatment

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What is the difference between allergic contact dermatitis and irritant contact dermatitis?
    My dog Brandon, an American Staffordshire Terrier/Rottweiler Mix was diagnosed with allergic contact dermatitis and irritant contact dermatitis. What is the difference between these two diseases? The way they are described, they sound like the exact same disease. Could somebody tell me what the difference is?

    • ANSWER:
      'Irritant' indicates that the skin has been damaged by contact with something that directly harmed it, e.g. a chemical. 'Allergic' indicates that the skin was damaged due to an overreaction by the body's immune system, e.g. contact with grass or hay.
      It is very difficult to tell the difference between the two by looking at them, a biopsy may tell more. Treatment is usually very similar.

      Frankly, a skin condition that is first diagnosed as contact dermatitis often is eventually diagnosed as atopy, or an allergy that manifests itself in a place on the body that is NOT in contact with the allergen, ironically. Most commonly seen are food allergies or inhalant allergies (dust, pollen, etc). Some dogs have trouble with pollen both by inhaling it and with direct contact. Regardless, the trouble shows on their skin, whereas humans with 'hay fever' show respiratory signs. Is Brandon itchy? If not, it very well may be contact dermatitis; if he is, he may have allergies that will need further workup. I'm assuming the vet checked for mites as well. Best wishes to you and your poor pup!

  2. QUESTION:
    What are the symptoms of allergic and irritant contact dermatitis?
    I just want to check with other pet owners to make sure my veterinarian's diagnosis is correct, as I've never heard of allergic and irritant contact dermatitis in dogs. My dog has sores all over his paws, which are very red. I have to keep him from licking at them, because if he does, they bleed. Does this sound like allergic or irritant contact dermatitis to you?

    • ANSWER:
      The only person to tell you that is another vet. We cannot examine or see or know your dog's history. If you are concerned, first discuss with vet cuz you obviously didn't ask enough questions there then decide if you want a 2nd opinion. For these types of skin problems I advise going to a dermatologist vet who has far more experience in handling allergies/treatments than the average vet. Write down your questions before speaking to vet so you don't forget any.

  3. QUESTION:
    How are allergic and irritant contact dermatitis diagnosed?
    I plan on taking my dog to a canine dermatologist now, since the vet thinks he has allergic and irritant contact dermatitis. What exactly will the dermatologist do to diagnose my dog's problem? I know I'll be telling them the entire history of my dog's health and they will physically examine him, but are there any other tests that they will do?

    • ANSWER:
      A skin allergy test - same as the prick test they do on humans to test to see which substances cause your dog to have reactions. They will be able to give better info once they have narrow it down on the type of shampoo you will need, what food to feed or avoid & what you should be doing at home. The vet would the one to decide which tests are necessary based on your individual dog - not every allergy prone dog is the same or requires the same treatment, meds or testing. Sometimes there are other health issues going on that make the allergies worse or more noticeable. Dermatologist vet is the best choice for skin treatments & diagnosis.

  4. QUESTION:
    What do cyclists use for contact dermatitis?
    There is a product you can buy at bike and/or triathelon shops for contact dermatitis but I can't remember the name of it. It's an ointment not a cream.

    • ANSWER:
      You're going to laugh, but these work well. For light cases, use either calamine lotion or A&D ointment. Yes, you read that correctly. These reduce the irritation and let your body heal itself.
      If these don't work, a mild steroid cream such as hyrdrocortisone.
      If the rash is caused by something like poison ivy or poison oak, then use a product that will remove the irritating oil. The best stuff I've found is Technu. Works like a champ.
      But the best treatment is prevention. Immediately take off cycling clothes after a ride. This will allow the sensitive areas to dry. If you are getting saddle sores, I recommend a lubricant. Vasaline and Bag Balm are effective, but very messy and difficult to clean. There's a product called chamois butter. Some people use some kind of fat. It makes sense since fat is the natural lubricant in your body.

  5. QUESTION:
    I have developed a skin rash on my legs - doctor called it contact dermatitis. I need to know of products used?
    I have developed a skin rash on my legs - below the knee - the doctor called it "contact dermatitis". I am on day 3 of prednisone (a 5-day prescription) and no notable difference. I am using benadryl cream on it as well. Does anyone know of any products that could speed the healing process or take some color out of it. It itches from time to time but not terrible.

    • ANSWER:
      Initial treatment includes thorough washing with lots of water to remove any trace of the irritant that may remain on the skin. You should avoid further exposure to known irritants or allergens.
      In some cases, the best treatment is to do nothing to the area.

  6. QUESTION:
    How long should you wait before seeing a doctor for dermatology issue?
    I've had this persistent rash on both of my elbows that comes & goes since August. I've tried home treatments like Benadryl, a prescription hydrocortisone previously prescribed for something else by my dermatologist, lotions, etc. It's a red itchy bump rash. The bumps sometimes puss & bleed. It looks like it's going away, then comes back.

    This week I finally relented and called my dermatologist for an appointment. I have a feeling they are going to say it's eczema because it doesn't fit for psoriasis or contact dermatitis. Nonetheless, after 3 months of this I think it's time to have it looked at.

    I was wondering though - how long should I try to self-treat something or wait to see if it clears on it's own before seeking medical attention? Was 3 months too long? Obviously it's not life threatening but looking for some guidelines in the future.

    • ANSWER:
      as a young boy I lived on the beach. I used to get sunburned all the time. 40 years later I am finding that I get a lot of precancerous skin growth. When I go to the dermatologist he just freezes it off and tells me to come back in six months. I will wait two or three years. I tried freezing my own precancerous skin growths off myself and sometimes it works for a while but the Dr. seems to do a much better job. They're no big deal there just a rough hardly unnoticeable dry patch of skin. But the doctor recommends every six months and I am sure I should listen. I have found self diagnosing some things are not very wise. Sometimes it's something completely different than what you think it is and your treating it with the wrong kind of medication.any time you bleed and or have puss that is more likely an infection that may require antibiotics you just really don't know. If you can go to a dermatologist by all means you should go every six months until your problem goes way. I need to adhere to that same advice. Good luck

  7. QUESTION:
    wil contact dermatitis go away by itself eventually?
    Using a strong hydro-cortisone cream and antihistamines. Would rather not use a prednisone prescription if I can avoid it due to horrible reactions I've read about.. The dermatologist thinks this is a contact dermatitis.

    • ANSWER:
      No it won't. That's why your physician gave you medication; it's part of your treatment plan. Don't take it upon yourself to not take the prednisone based on what you've read! Even though you've read about "horrible reactions", you would have to know the complete medical history of a person to know why they had a reaction. Follow your physicians directions.

  8. QUESTION:
    What is the treatment for the following freak disease?
    A boy of 14 years old is suffering from burning sensation of both his feet (up to ankle).Many treatments have been given still no cure is possible.He has to immerse his both legs in a bucket of water.For the past one and a half years he has been struggling with this,without attending school.He is too poor to show to socialists.
    Slip of the finger

    not 'socialists' but 'specialists'

    • ANSWER:
      Hi...........U need to know the cause ........
      Treatment of burning feet needs the cause to be established, so consultation with a Podiatrist, rheumatologist (arthritis doctor) or a neurologist (nerve doctor) is important.

      Many feet just ache and burn at the end of a long day, especially in those who are on their feet all day or are overweight.
      Hot and sweaty feet can cause a burning foot sensation.
      other types of neuropathy (nerve damage) that can cause a burning foot include those that occur in chronic alcoholism, vitamin deficiencies (usually B).
      nerve entrapments, such as tarsal tunnel syndrome, which is the compression of a nerve at the inside of the ankle joint can cause a burning sensation.
      it could also be due to a sensitivity to chemical substances in socks and shoes (contact dermatitis).
      TREATMENT.....................

      1) if its mechanical, good fitting shoes with support is a good place to start to help.
      2) if hot and sweaty, there are various self treatments for the sweaty foot.
      3) wear socks made of cotton rather than synthetic fabrics.
      4) avoid prolonged period of standing.
      5) Massaging the feet will increase the circulation in your feet.

  9. QUESTION:
    do you think I have eczema and contact dermatitis?
    whenever I go outside in extreme cold or hot weather my skin turns bright red, when I drink cold or hot drinks it turns red, when I exercise too hard my face is red, and even if i rub it. Could this be part of eczema AND contact dermatitis? Even when I am mad or depressed my face breaks out. And what treatment could I get for this? Would cortisone be a good choice?

    • ANSWER:
      If it is just a red flush with no other symptoms, I don't think it is eczema.

      Eczema skin is dry, itchy and inflammed. You get rashes and marks that you can't help not itching and scratching.

      If eczema is not what you are having, I don't suggest cortisone. Cortisone comes with side effects. I know - I am an eczema sufferer.

  10. QUESTION:
    How can I get my hair to be white so that I can dye a blonde over it?
    I'm going from black to blonde and I have already tried so much. I have used a lightening treatment 3 times, a hair color stripper, a blonde hair dye, and I last tried "splat lightening bleach" I have come a long way from black, but it's still not as light as I want it. I feel like I'm stuck at the "orange with yellow roots" stage. HELP!

    • ANSWER:
      Call the 1-800# found on the box of dye or email them, (to find #, go online & search the brand if you don't have the box) they're the hair color experts they can advice you best. Style meets chemistry meets biology: We're talking hair coloring.

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.
      Example: "My hair is right about armpit length as it is, but I've severely damaged it by bleaching it all at once. As a student of cosmetology myself, I would have to say that it was probably one of the worst mistakes I could have ever made."
      Another example: ok i did my hair yesterday i DIDN'T bleach it ,but im not sure what its called but she took the color out of my hair and then dies it a blond color and my head was on fire it killed me so after that i hated my hair color so i colored it my self a darker color, it looked so ugly and it burned me again it rully hrt so after i washed it my mom checked it for me and found small spots of blood all over my top scalp like over 20 of em now im scared and don't know why its there is it from the color am i sick and something is wrong ??

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. 11-22-11. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND.

      Permanent black hair dye is linked to causing leukemia and lymphomas.

      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.

      Vanessa Minnillo Lachey: "I dated a guy once who wanted me to have blonde hair. Clearly, he was the wrong guy for me! I went to a lady who bleached my hair and it literally fell out. So, not only did I go back to my natural hair, I broke up with the guy!"

      One example: MY HAIR DRESSER DYED MY HAIR GREY. I've been crying for the last 2 hours, I want to kill that bish for destroying what was amazing bleach blonde hair. AND to make things worse, she cut my extensions WAY too short.

      "23 years old Rihanna is well known for changing her hairstyle and hair colour on a regular basis and it looks as though all those treatments have finally begun to take their toll on her mane and perhaps her common sense." US Showbiz 2-18-12 Rihanna has reportedly paid ,500 for an emergency haircut after hers was ruined in a sauna, to fly out hair stylist from L.A. to London..The Province 3-1-12.
      A WOMAN was temporarily blinded when her face swelled up "like a football" following what she told was a severe reaction to hair dye.
      Carmen Rowe, 25, from Swansea was hospitalised for three days after using the Clairol 'Nice n' Easy' natural black colour. She said: "I lost my job, all for the sake of a glamorous hairstyle. I just want to warn parents what could happen." She claimed she carried out a skin test 48 hours before using the dye without a problem and has been colouring her hair since she was 13. March 3, 2012.

      Know your school school policy mandating a "natural color, brown, blond, black, natural red/auburn." before dyeing your hair pink, for example: 3-21-12 "Honor Student Banned from School for Pink Hair." a 6th grader who was rewarded for getting good grades.

      Sources:
      Google FDA.gov & search for Hair Dye & Relaxers.
      Google: Hair Dye FAQ's Are Hair Dyes Safe?

  11. QUESTION:
    I have chronic contact dermatitis, does anyone know of any treatments for when it erupts?
    I have been to the Doctor and had patch tests done but they all seem to be useless and the doctors aren't listening to me when I explain what’s happening. I don’t know what is causing it, but i need something in the mean time to help with the pustules, sores, crusting and weeping. it’s really painful. Please someone help!

    • ANSWER:
      E45 or Norwegian Formula Unscented (unscented part is vital)-both available in Boots,Tesco etc.
      I've had contact dermatitis for years - you never gid rid it,it's a reaction to certain household chemicals-common soap(use moisturising liquid soap),dishwasher powder,washing powder, washing up liquid,bleach,nail varnish remover and the like are the most common culprits. You can stop it occuring by wearing gloves when doing household jobs - here's my top 5 tips on keeping it at bay;
      1-Always make sure you've rinsed soap,shower gel etc. completely off and dry your hands very thoroughly after washing them and use unscented (or mildly scented after your break out clears i.e. when there is no broken skin or flakes left)
      2-Be VERY wary of using steroid creams-they do heal your skin but leave your skin very thin permenantly after use no matter what doctors or pharmacists say!!
      3-Eat plenty of food with essential fatty acids in to heal the skin fron within-sardines,unsalted nuts etc The 2 best foods for keeping your skin soft and strong are definitelty using olive oil in cooking and if you like them avocados are the number one thing you can eat to speed up skin healing. I now only get a small breakout once a year or so and when I do I eat an avocado a day for about 4 or 5 days and it clears it up very well( shop bought guacamole might do but iy doesn't seem to have the same effect)
      4-Get a product called Bio Oil or just plain Vit-E oil and rub a little into the area at night like a cream and they eliminate a lot of the "tight" feeling in your skin
      5-Don't let it get you down and learn all you can about the condition-I developed Contact Dermatitis in my teens and it was very distressing because I didn't know how to prevent an outbreak , how to stop it gettting worse and how to speed up healing.It barely crosses my mind now but when I saw your question the distress I felt as a teenager came flooding back so I had to give you all the info I've learnt through asking,reading,triall and error etc.If you have any doubts about anything I've told you can check them out with your a doctor,nurse or a pharmacist but as my doctor once told me - they have to learn a bit about every condition disease etc. it's in your interest to learn a lot about what is happening with you

  12. QUESTION:
    What is canine Chronic hypersensitivity dermatitis and what treatments are available?
    My dog, Lady keeps having recurring outbreaks. The diagnosis was made by a lab from samples taken from the vet. Treatments with Prednisone 10mg have given some relief. After treatment Lady may stay cleared up for a couple of weeks but soon has a relapse. Of course with the treatments of Prednisone she inflates like a basketball and it causes her to be unable to control her bowel and bladder. Hair loss, and itching are prevalent prior to treatment. She has been on this current treatment at least 3 times but continues to have outbreaks.

    • ANSWER:
      Skin conditions in dogs can be a real bear to combat. There are literally hundreds of factors that can contribute to generally itchy or unhealthy skin - things eaten, things breathed in, things layed upon... it's a very frustrating problem, and I understand your desperation with your dog's condition, as one of my greyhounds suffer some of the same problems.

      This condition is often referred to as "atopy". In short, it's a predisposition to become allergic to normally innocuous substances, like pollens, molds, dust mites and other environmental allergens. It's estimated that only 3-12% of dogs have this condition.

      I'm assuming the diagnosis was made via skin biospy performed at your vet's office. It's unusual that the lab or your vet wouldn't then try to identify the irritating agent more in depth - often times they run a series of allergy tests to determine what steps should be taken to avoid contact with said irritants. The condition is rarely in remission and cannot be cured; it's simply a matter of maintaining as healthy a state as possible.

      Prednisone is the most common used form of controlling the discomfort associated with atopy, and sometimes you won't see a response for 3-6 months after starting, but if you're interested, there are some more natural methods that may help keep things under control. Sometimes, supplementing your dog's diet with essential fatty acids can help promote healthier skin and coat. Frequent bathing in shampoos labelled "antipruritic" can be beneficial. There's a great company based out of Wisconsin called Animals Apawthecary - they make a stellar formula called "Detox Blend" made specifically for chronic allergy sufferers that's manufactered with herbal remedies like burdock, dandelion, milk thistle and red clover.

      Best of luck with your dog - I really commend your effort to become more educated and do the best you can for her. I hope this response wasn't too long!

  13. QUESTION:
    What is the best treatment for a yeast infection?
    What treatment is best and how long does it take?

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Your best bet will be to go to the doctor to get a prescription for Diflucan.

      You should have it formally diagnosed to makes sure that is what is wrong becaue a lot of the time women have contact dermatitis or a bacterial infection and they think it is a yeast infection.

      Once you have a proper diagnosis you will know for sure what a yeast infection is like and in the future you can try more natural remedies if you want (acidophilous either through pills or yogurt, tea tree oil, etc. etc.) but for now, go to the doctor.

  14. QUESTION:
    I have a small rash on lower part of my labia minora of my vagina. It just itches, no discharge. Serious?
    I developed a small rash on the lower wings of my labia minora. It just itches (no discharge, pain, or sensitivity. Nor are there any blisters or sores). It started during my last period (which ended a couple of days ago). I usually wear tampons in addition to pads but this developed while I was wearing the pad. There were days where I couldn't change the pad for quite some time so I thought maybe the pad may have irritated the area (what with the rubbing back and forth over the area that has the rash). I don't want to go to the hospital if I don't need to. I looked it up and the symptoms I have match something called Contact Dermatitis, and it was said that this was just a very minor rash that just itches, and that it would go away on its own. It didn't say how to treat it though so I am at a loss here.

    • ANSWER:
      It could be a number of things, you may have thrush or something as simple as a sweat rash, for instance. The only way to take the guess work out of the equation is to have someone do some tests. It will put your mind at ease and provide you with the right diagnosis and/or treatment if necessary.

  15. QUESTION:
    I have chronic contact dermatitis, does anyone know of any treatments for when it erupts?
    I have been to the Doctor and had patch tests done but they all seem to be useless and the doctors aren't listening to me when I explain what’s happening. I don’t know what is causing it, but i need something in the mean time to help with the pustules, sores, crusting and weeping. it’s really painful. Please someone help!

    • ANSWER:
      skin ailments are the most frustrating conditions because they are difficult to treat, they often have psychological reasons or are due to allergies or -none wants to hear that- a genetic predisposition.

      My advice:
      1) try to get a specialized dermatologist to see you when the problem is apparent.
      2) avoid all possible irritants/allergenic materials from fabric softener to textiles.
      3) avoid allergenic food
      4) make sure that you are in good health overall and do not stress too much, stress affects your skin more than you'd know

      5) make sure your skin is well moisturized. Use a dermatological moisturizer. Your skin is much more likely to be sensitive when it is dry. For a similar problem -that was very painful with bleeding, sores etc.- I used vaseline and I stopped using commercial soap [I use a pharmaceutical liquid cleaner that is more expensive but more gentle with my skin, you can find a variety of similar stuff at your drugstore].

      Maybe your problem is more serious than mine but for me, as long as I make sure that my skin is well moisturized and never gets dry it is perfectly healthy. It sounds too simple, I know, and I never believed I could solve my horrid looking sores by vaseline but it happened. At times I looked at my skin -at my arms- and I was sure it would never look normal again and now none would know I had this problem.

      Give it a go.

  16. QUESTION:
    I have chronic contact dermatitis, does anyone know of any treatments for when it erupts?

    I have been to the Doctor and had patch tests done but they all seem to be useless and the doctors aren't listening to me when I explain what’s happening. I don’t know what is causing it, but i need something in the mean time to help with the pustules, sores, crusting and weeping. it’s really painful. Please someone help!

    • ANSWER:
      Find a Dermatologist who will listen to you & help you find the right anecdote for your dermatitis.

  17. QUESTION:
    Would putting cider vinegar on my hair affect the highlights?
    I've head that apple cider vinegar is a good treatment for dandruff but I have highlighted blonde/ strawberry blonde hair (bleach). Would this strip my colour?

    • ANSWER:
      A very good supplement to your high alkaline food diet is Apple cider vinegar. Apple cider vinegar has a very alkaline effect on the body. Apple Cider Vinegar cures more physical ailments than any other alternative health remedy.

      The cures (reported over thousands of years) from drinking Apple Cider Vinegar are far too many to count: allergies, acid reflux, sinus infections, high cholesterol, acne, flu, chronic fatigue, candida, sore throats, arthritis, contact dermatitis and gout. Apple cider vinegar has been used for centuries as a folk remedy for a selection of ills.

  18. QUESTION:
    I have chronic contact dermatitis, does anyone know of any treatments for when it erupts?
    I have been to the Doctor and had patch tests done but they all seem to be useless and the doctors aren't listening to me when i explain whats happening. i dont know what is causing it, but i need something in the mean time to help with the pustules, sores, crusting and weeping. its really painful. please someone help!

    • ANSWER:
      Dry well after washing, gloves when doing housework, use unscented products and a non bio sensitive washing liquid in your machine, look at the range of E45 creams.

  19. QUESTION:
    Has anybody here ever had allergic contact dermatitis?
    Did your skin crack and ooze? How long did it last for? What kind of treatment did you receive?
    Also, were you left with scars?

    • ANSWER:
      Yes i have its not that bad just looks it. It will go away before too long, just try to stay away from whatever you had been in contact with. It leaves no scars and will quit itching i promise.

  20. QUESTION:
    What can a company or hospital do to you if you refuse to pay your bill?
    For example - I took my husband to an ER - where they did nothing for him. He had a rash all over his body, and the doctor we took him to said he couldn't help him and he needed to be seen IMMEDIATELY. So we took him to the ER, but didn't have insurance. I imagined we would be in debt for years, as they would have to do tests and all that - but it was worth it.

    Anyway, seriously the dr. LOOKED at him and wrote a prescription. That was it. No tests. No bandages. Nothing. Just looked - said it was a dermatitis gone horribly wrong and wrote him a prescription for cortizone and allergy meds and sent us on our way. We paid 200 dollars, which was expensive for a visit - and left.

    Now we have a bill for the DR for 700 and the ER for another 350.

    I have refused to pay.

    My credit sucks... so I am not worried about that.

    But what can any company really do to enforce that bills are paid?
    I don't plan on working for a large company or buying a house. We live pretty meagerly and are moving into an RV. LOL

    I read tarot for a job and basically we are hippies, lol.

    We have no credit cards and don't have any plans on buying a car.

    We filed bk 3 years ago - and since then we don't have anything bad on it. We made some mistakes before - but we generally pay our bills on time. Maybe a late here or there now.

    Also, I have written letters to each of them to dispute the claim.

    • ANSWER:
      All they can do is put it on your credit and send it to collections. I have several ER bills on my credit that should have been paid by patient assistance but for some reason were not entirely covered. Medical bills are not supposed to affect your numerical credit score. However, once the hospital sells it to a collection agency, it will show up as a collection agency, not a medical bill, since you are not worried about your credit, that isn't a problem. My advice: talk to a lawyer. Get a report from the first doctor you talked to that said he could not help you, that advised you to go to the ER. For one thing, you should NEVER EVER have to pay up front for an ER visit, not even at a private ER, which I assume is what you meant by the 0. Or did you mean for the meds? Anyway, if you believe that it was improper care, then talk to a lawyer and sue to at least have the charges dropped and have any follow up care covered. Have you been to another doctor? Did the problem get better? ER docs are NOTORIOUS for crap like this. They get tired of seeing people, so they dismiss everyone that walks in the door as being a hypochondriac. I have been the brunt of this too many times too count, when because I did not have insurance to pay up front for an office visit I ended up in the ER. Again, I think you should speak to a lawyer if the problem was not resolved by the prescribed treatment. Good Luck, I hope your hubby feels better.

      -------------------------------

      Well, actually, I will amend my statements, they can sue you for it yes, but they will not for the amount that you stated. Why? it would cost them more in legal fees than it will to just write it off to their insurance. The thing about ER's is that they cannot refuse treatment, even if you do not provide them with your real name, or any name at all. And if you send them even a penny a month, or a letter stating intent to pay, then they cannot legally sue you, but in my experience, unless you owe them thousands of dollars, they are not going to sue you to collect. I owe in excess of probably 00; maybe not that much, but between 00 and 00 surely, and they haven't even contacted me in over two years about it. That is probably 5 or 6 separate bills from 3 separate visits. and another thing, each bill is a separate charge, so it would be written off to their insurance separately. The Doctor's, Radiology, Laboratory, etc. , if they did sue you, it would be for each bill separately, can you really see them spending thousands of dollars to take you to court over 350 dollars and 700 dollars respectively? Anyway, like I said, talk to a lawyer, they should do an initial free consultation, but make sure you have everything in order before you go, like a report from the first doctor, the scripts written at the ER any documents they gave you, etc. Also, if you could see the first doc again and have him write up a follow up report, that would be beneficial. anyway, I'll say it again, good luck.

  21. QUESTION:
    What is the best treatment for blisters?
    I've been a outdoors person my whole life, and I've gotten the occasional blister, and my rule of thumb was if it was in danger of being popped (ex: on the heel of your foot) drain it and wrap it. And if not, stick some mole skin on it and let it be. But after years of passing on my view on blisters, I've received a variety of responces, and most of them are keen on the opinion that you should not pop a blister, no matter what. So what's the best thing to do? I've never had any infections or whatnot, but are blisters more likely to heal faster one way or the other?

    • ANSWER:
      What Is It?

      A blister is a bubble of fluid under the skin. The clear, watery liquid inside a blister is called serum. It leaks in from neighboring tissues as a reaction to injured skin. If the blister remains unopened, serum can provide natural protection for the skin beneath it. Small blisters are called vesicles. Those larger than half an inch are called bullae. A blood blister is filled with blood, rather than serum.

      There are many causes of blisters, including:

      Irritation — Blisters can be caused by physical factors that irritate the skin, such as friction (rubbing the skin), irritating chemicals or extreme cold or heat. Blisters on the feet can result from shoes that are either too tight or rub the skin in one particular area. Blisters also can be caused by contact dermatitis, a skin reaction to some type of chemical irritant. Intense cold can trigger frostbite, which often leads to blisters once the skin is rewarmed. Any type of burn, even sunburn, also can cause blisters.

      Allergies — Allergic contact dermatitis, a form of dermatitis or eczema, may result in blisters. Allergic contact dermatitis is caused by an allergy to a chemical or poison, such as poison ivy, poison oak or poison sumac.

      Infections — Infections that cause blisters include bullous impetigo, an infection of the skin caused by staphylococci (staph) bacteria; viral infections of the lips and genital area due to the herpes simplex virus (types 1 and 2); chickenpox and shingles, which are caused by the varicella zoster virus; and coxsackievirus infections, which are more common in childhood.

      Skin diseases — Numerous skin diseases cause blisters. Examples include dermatitis herpetiformis, pemphigoid and pemphigus. There also are inherited forms of blistering skin conditions, such as epidermolysis bullosa (in which pressure or trauma commonly leads to blisters) and porphyria cutanea tarda (in which sun exposure provokes blisters).

      Medications — Many medications, such as nalidixic acid (NegGram) and furosemide (Lasix), can cause mild, blistering skin reactions. Others, such as the doxycycline (Vibramycin), can increase the risk of blistering sunburn by increasing the skin's sensitivity to sunlight. In more dramatic cases, medications can trigger more severe, even life-threatening, blistering disorders, such as erythema multiforme or toxic epidermal necrolysis, also known as TEN, an illness that causes severe skin damage and typically involves 30% or more of the body's surface.
      Symptoms

      In general, blisters are round or oval bubbles of fluid under the skin that may be painful or itchy, or they may not cause any symptoms. Symptoms vary depending on the cause.

      Irritation, burns and allergies — Blisters caused by friction or burns are usually painful. Blisters resulting from eczema can be accompanied by redness, severe itching and small bumps on the affected skin.

      Infections — When blisters are caused by an infection, the symptoms depend on the type of infection. Examples include:

      Bullous impetigo — The affected skin can redden, and the blisters may burst easily.

      Herpes simplex virus — When herpes simplex type 1 is the cause, the tiny blisters commonly are known as fever blisters or cold sores. They typically appear on the lips. The affected skin may itch, tingle, swell and become red before the blisters appear. When the blisters eventually break, they leak fluid, and then painful sores develop. Herpes simplex type 2 is the most common cause of genital herpes, a sexually transmitted infection (although type 1 also can cause genital herpes). Generally, small red bumps appear before blisters develop in the affected area, typically the vaginal area or penis, the buttocks and thighs, or the anus. Other symptoms can include fever, muscle aches, headache and burning with urination.

      Varicella zoster virus — When this virus causes chickenpox, the infection starts with a diffuse, itchy rash that develops quickly into itchy blisters. Varicella zoster also can cause shingles (herpes zoster). People with shingles may experience small, painful blisters that usually erupt in a linear pattern along the length of an infected nerve.

      Coxsackievirus — Coxsackievirus A16 can cause a condition commonly called hand-foot-and-mouth disease, in which painful blisters often occur on the hands, on the soles of the feet and in the mouth.

      Skin diseases — Erythema multiforme typically causes blisters on the palms of the hands, the forearms, the soles of the feet, and on the mucous membranes in the eyes, nose, mouth and genitals. Other symptoms include fever, sore throat, cough and muscle pain. The autoimmune diseases (also known as bullous diseases because of the large blisters seen) vary in appearance as well. Dermatitis herpetiformis causes itchy, red bumps or blisters. Pemphigoid, an uncommon condition that primarily affects the elderly, results in large, itchy blisters, and pemphigus, an uncommon disease that tends to strike in middle age, causes blisters inside the mouth and on the surface of the skin. The blisters of pemphigus break easily and leave painful areas.

      Medications — Reactions to medications vary. In some cases, there is only an increased sensitivity to the sun, which can lead to blistering sunburn if the skin is exposed to the sun. In more severe reactions, such as TEN, blisters can involve larger areas of tissue, including parts of the respiratory passages and gastrointestinal tract, accompanied by fever and malaise (a generally sick feeling).
      Diagnosis

      If the cause of your blisters is not obvious, your doctor will ask about your family history and your personal medical history, including any allergies you have and any medications you take, including over-the-counter medications. You also will be asked about any recent exposure to irritating chemicals or allergens.

      Your doctor often can diagnose the cause of your blisters by their appearance and your history. If your doctor suspects an allergic reaction, he or she may recommend patch tests with chemicals to identify the allergen. Some blistering diseases are diagnosed with a skin biopsy, in which a small piece of tissue is removed and examined in a laboratory.

      Expected Duration

      How long blisters last depends on their cause. For example, blisters caused by irritation generally go away on their own within a few days, and those triggered by infections and skin diseases can remain for weeks or months. With an autoimmune blistering disorder, blistering may be chronic (long-lasting) and requires ongoing treatment. In skin infections, such as herpes simplex virus infection, the blisters can come back periodically. Blistering skin diseases that result from inherited causes also are long-lasting.

      Prevention

      There are many simple strategies to prevent blisters caused by skin irritation. You can wear comfortable shoes that fit well, with socks that cushion the feet and absorb sweat. Apply sunscreen to protect your skin from sunburn. Be particularly vigilant about avoiding sun exposure if you are taking medications that are known to cause sun sensitivity, such as doxycycline (sold under many brand names). During cold months, use mittens, hats and heavy socks to protect your skin against freezing temperatures and chilling winds.

      As much as possible, avoid irritants and allergens that tend to trigger eczema, such as certain hygiene products (bubble baths, feminine hygiene sprays, detergents), certain metals in jewelry, especially nickel, and irritating plants such as poison ivy.

      To prevent blisters caused by infections, wash your hands often and never touch skin sores, cuts or any open or broken areas of skin on other people. To reduce the risk of herpes simplex, never have sex (even with a condom) with someone with active herpes. In addition, the fewer sexual partners you have, the lower your risk of herpes simplex. To avoid the spread of childhood infections, try to prevent children from sharing toys and utensils that have touched another child's mouth.

      To prevent chickenpox and to help prevent shingles later, have your child immunized with the varicella vaccine. People who have not had chickenpox should avoid people with chickenpox or shingles until all of the blisters have crusted over. Adults can be vaccinated if they have never had chickenpox, especially if they are at risk of exposure (for example, day-care workers and teachers).

      There is no known way to prevent many of the blistering diseases such as the hereditary forms and the autoimmune (bullous) diseases.

      Treatment

      Usually, it is best to leave blisters alone. Because blisters protect the underlying skin, breaking blisters open can increase the chance of infection. Protect blisters with a bandage and cover them until they heal on their own. The liquid in the blister will be re-absorbed and the skin will flatten naturally. If a blister breaks, wash the area with soap and water, then apply a bandage. If a blister is very large or painful, your doctor may drain it and apply an antibacterial cream to prevent infection.

      The treatment for blisters caused by eczema, infections and other diseases varies. Some cases of eczema can be treated with corticosteroid cream or pills. Herpes simplex infections and shingles (herpes zoster) sometimes are treated with antiviral medications. Antibiotic cream or pills may be given for impetigo. Chickenpox and coxsackievirus generally are left to go away on their own. The itching caused by chickenpox can be relieved with over-the-counter, anti-itch lotions, such as calamine. With medication-related erythema multiforme, the medication must be discontinued immediately. Corticosteroids sometimes may be prescribed.

      Pemphigoid and pemphigus are treated with corticosteroids and/or other immunosuppressive agents. Because dermatitis herpetiformis is associated with celiac sprue (a condition that develops as an immune reaction to gluten in the diet), people with dermatitis herpetiformis may benefit from a diet that does not contain any gluten (a substance found in most grains). Porphyria can be treated with regular removal of blood (phlebotomy) or with medications, including cholestyramine (Questran), chloroquine (Aralen) and beta-carotene. Some inherited skin disorders that cause blistering may respond to measures that protect the skin from trauma.

      When To Call A Professional

      Call your doctor whenever you have blisters of unknown cause, very painful blisters, or blisters accompanied by other symptoms such as fever and malaise (a generally sick feeling). Also call your doctor if a blister develops signs of infection, such as increasing redness, red streaks in nearby skin, oozing blood or pus, increased pain or swelling of the surrounding skin.

      Prognosis

      In many cases, blisters will disappear when the cause is removed or the infection has gone away, usually in a matter of days or weeks. In most herpes infections, blisters can return in the same spot (such as fever blisters on the lips or genital herpes) weeks, months or even years after the first blisters appear. Pemphigoid and pemphigus are typically chronic (long-lasting) and require long-term therapy.

  22. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know anything about alopecia, and treatment for it?
    I was just curious if anyone had any information about alopecia, and if there is a cure for it. I have had it for a while, but this it the worst it has ever been. It is fairly deppressing for me and I would love to know if there is a cure or some sort of treatment.

    • ANSWER:
      Alopecia areata is a type of hair loss that occurs when your immune system mistakenly attacks hair follicles, which is where hair growth begins. Experts do not know why the immune system attacks the follicles. Alopecia areata is most common in people younger than 20, but children and adults of any age may be affected

      Rarely, complete loss of scalp hair and body hair occurs. The hair loss often comes and goes—hair will grow back over several months in one area but will fall out in another area.

      When alopecia areata results in patches of hair loss, the hair usually grows back in 6 months to 1 year. Although the new hair is usually the same color and texture as the rest of the hair, it sometimes is fine and white.

      Because hair usually grows back within a year, you may decide not to treat alopecia areata.

      If you choose not to treat the condition and wait for your hair to grow back, you may wish to:

      Wear hairpieces or hair weaves. Hairpieces are made from human or synthetic hair that is implanted into a nylon netting. Hairpieces may be attached to the scalp with glue, metal clips, or tape. Hair weaving involves sewing or braiding pieces of longer hair into existing hair.
      Use certain hair care products and styling techniques. Hair care products or perms may make hair appear thicker. Dyes may be used to color the scalp. However, continual use of perms or dyes may result in more hair loss.
      The most common treatment for patchy hair loss is many injections of corticosteroids into the scalp, about 1 cm (0.4 in.) apart, every 4 to 6 weeks. Limited research reports that hair grows back at the site of injection in some people.

      Contact immunotherapy may be the most effective treatment for severe alopecia areata. A medication is "painted" on the scalp once a week. Hair growth may appear within 3 months of beginning treatment. A review of research on contact immunotherapy notes that about half of those with severe alopecia areata had a good response, but how much hair grew back varied widely. Side effects of contact immunotherapy include a severe rash (contact dermatitis) and swollen lymph nodes, especially in the neck.

      Other medications used to treat alopecia areata include minoxidil (Rogaine), anthralin, and cyclosporine. Anthralin is sometimes used in combination with minoxidil. These medications affect the immune system and may stimulate hair growth, but they do not prevent hair loss.

  23. QUESTION:
    To medical experts: How to prevent sebaceous cysts, and can they turn cancerous?
    I have several sebaceous cysts all over my head. It seems like every 1 or 2 weeks I'll feel my scalp and there'll be a new one (which is usually tender at first). I used to just have one on the back of my head for the longest time, now they're all over! I'm not worried about them except for wondering if they've ever been known to turn into tumours or become malignant. That's also the reason I want to stop more from forming. (I've long had an issue with dandruff, dry scalp, and sometimes seborrheic dermatitis).

    • ANSWER:
      Sebaceous cysts are benign. There are ways to treat them topically like shampoos and such; however, there is a treatment that involves the the use of an antibiotic which you may ask your dermatologist or primary care physician about. The antibiotic is called Doxycycline and it is taken orally (pill form). I know I said it's an antibiotic but in this case it works as an anti-seborrheic.

      Please contact a doctor BEFORE you take any medications especially an antibiotic like this.

  24. QUESTION:
    What's the best treatment for a vicious case of Poison Ivy?
    My skin itches so bad I feel like tearing myself apart but I know if I scratch it it gets worse so what is the best way to get some relief? Is there a shot you can get from the doctor?

    • ANSWER:
      Your doctor can give you a shot such as Aristocort (a corticosteroid) and/or oral corticosteroids, to decrease the contact dermatitis that exposure to the poison ivy has caused. He/she may also recommend a topical hydrocortisone cream, or a diphenhydramine ("Benadryl") to help with the itching.

      While scratching doesn't generally cause poison ivy to spread (by the time the blisters form, the urushiol (poison ivy oil) is usually no longer on your skin), it can end up causing an infection. See your doctor.

  25. QUESTION:
    How do hairdressers make someones hair a lighter colour?
    My hair is naturally a medium brown colour, and I want to change the colour to a golden or almost dark sandy blonde shade! How do hairdressers do it? I'm planning on getting it done as soon as possible but I want to know if it's going to take more than one session! Anyone know the answer?

    • ANSWER:
      They experiment on you, like they do in the lab, UNTIL they get it right. But not everyone coming out of the salon are happy!
      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.
      Vanessa Minnillo Lachey: "I dated a guy once who wanted me to have blonde hair. Clearly, he was the wrong guy for me! I went to a lady who bleached my hair and it literally fell out. So, not only did I go back to my natural hair, I broke up with the guy!"
      Another example posted on YA! 8-20-12. Is it just me or does xxl live max blonde make your scalp feel like it on fire? I've recently used a max blonde on my hair and I had to wash it wash off straight away because my scalp felt like it was on fire has this happend to anyone else?

      Style meets chemistry meets biology: We're talking hair coloring.

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.
      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND. The British woman who went into coma after a reaction to hair dye has died after a year. Updated 11-25-12. The woman suffered a heart failure, struggled for breath and became unconsciousness. Her family blamed paraphenylenediamine, a chemical found in hair colour. Her family has now called for paraphenylenediamine to be banned from home dye kits. In 2000, a 38-year-old Indian-origin woman from Birmingham, Narinder Devi, died after an allergic reaction to hair dye.

      Another example posted on YA! 8-20-12. Is it just me or does xxl live max blonde make your scalp feel like it on fire? I've recently used a max blonde on my hair and I had to wash it wash off straight away because my scalp felt like it was on fire has this happend to anyone else?

      Example of one who's hair is falling and stopped growing from YA!:
      "my hair had been bleached many times and can't grow past a certain length
      its also falling out . i stopped bleaching it.
      i just need to add lenght! but if i can stop it from falling out..that be great too"

  26. QUESTION:
    How much does it cost to get your hair professionally dyed?
    I have dark dark brown hair and i wanna dye it blonde but i want it to look good so i wanna get it professionally done. About how much would that be ? And would they have to bleach it ? Or no ?

    • ANSWER:
      My SIL pays for hers.

      Done @ the salon or @ home by you or someone you know, cost only the price of box of hair dye kit and/ or lunch for your friend.

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.
      Example: "My hair is right about armpit length as it is, but I've severely damaged it by bleaching it all at once. As a student of cosmetology myself, I would have to say that it was probably one of the worst mistakes I could have ever made."
      Another example: ok i did my hair yesterday i DIDN'T bleach it ,but im not sure what its called but she took the color out of my hair and then dies it a blond color and my head was on fire it killed me so after that i hated my hair color so i colored it my self a darker color, it looked so ugly and it burned me again it rully hrt so after i washed it my mom checked it for me and found small spots of blood all over my top scalp like over 20 of em now im scared and don't know why its there is it from the color am i sick and something is wrong ??

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. 11-22-11. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND.

      Permanent black hair dye is linked to causing leukemia and lymphomas.

      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.
      Vanessa Minnillo Lachey: "I dated a guy once who wanted me to have blonde hair. Clearly, he was the wrong guy for me! I went to a lady who bleached my hair and it literally fell out. So, not only did I go back to my natural hair, I broke up with the guy!"

      One example: MY HAIR DRESSER DYED MY HAIR GREY. I've been crying for the last 2 hours, I want to kill that bish for destroying what was amazing bleach blonde hair. AND to make things worse, she cut my extensions WAY too short.

      "23 years old Rihanna is well known for changing her hairstyle and hair colour on a regular basis and it looks as though all those treatments have finally begun to take their toll on her mane and perhaps her common sense." US Showbiz 2-18-12 Rihanna has reportedly paid ,500 for an emergency haircut after hers was ruined in a sauna, to fly out hair stylist from L.A. to London..The Province 3-1-12.

      Sources:
      Google FDA.gov & search for Hair Dye & Relaxers.
      Google: Hair Dye FAQ's Are Hair Dyes Safe?

  27. QUESTION:
    How do i get my hair blonde from a semi permanent red crazy colour?
    I started off with light brown hair but gradually went darker. I then used a colour b4 to get the darkness out. My hair went ginger. I then had my hair bleached and a semi permanent red crazy colour put on. I want to now be a blonde. What do you recomend??
    So if i strip it with a colour before then put a xxl live blonde on will that be okay?

    • ANSWER:
      How many layers of dye & chemicals (b4) on your head within the last week or month?

      You're taking more risks after another. Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Call the 1-800# found on the box of dye or email them, (to find #, go online & search the brand if you don't have the box) they're the hair color experts they can advice you best. Style meets chemistry meets biology: We're talking hair coloring.

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.
      Example: "My hair is right about armpit length as it is, but I've severely damaged it by bleaching it all at once. As a student of cosmetology myself, I would have to say that it was probably one of the worst mistakes I could have ever made."
      Another example: ok i did my hair yesterday i DIDN'T bleach it ,but im not sure what its called but she took the color out of my hair and then dies it a blond color and my head was on fire it killed me so after that i hated my hair color so i colored it my self a darker color, it looked so ugly and it burned me again it rully hrt so after i washed it my mom checked it for me and found small spots of blood all over my top scalp like over 20 of em now im scared and don't know why its there is it from the color am i sick and something is wrong ??

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. 11-22-11. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND.

      Permanent black hair dye is linked to causing leukemia and lymphomas.

      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.
      Vanessa Minnillo Lachey: "I dated a guy once who wanted me to have blonde hair. Clearly, he was the wrong guy for me! I went to a lady who bleached my hair and it literally fell out. So, not only did I go back to my natural hair, I broke up with the guy!"

      One example: MY HAIR DRESSER DYED MY HAIR GREY. I've been crying for the last 2 hours, I want to kill that bish for destroying what was amazing bleach blonde hair. AND to make things worse, she cut my extensions WAY too short.

      "23 years old Rihanna is well known for changing her hairstyle and hair colour on a regular basis and it looks as though all those treatments have finally begun to take their toll on her mane and perhaps her common sense." US Showbiz 2-18-12 Rihanna has reportedly paid ,500 for an emergency haircut after hers was ruined in a sauna, to fly out hair stylist from L.A. to London..The Province 3-1-12.
      A WOMAN was temporarily blinded when her face swelled up "like a football" following what she told was a severe reaction to hair dye.
      Carmen Rowe, 25, from Swansea was hospitalised for three days after using the Clairol 'Nice n' Easy' natural black colour. She said: "I lost my job, all for the sake of a glamorous hairstyle. I just want to warn parents what could happen." She claimed she carried out a skin test 48 hours before using the dye without a problem and has been colouring her hair since she was 13. March 3, 2012.

  28. QUESTION:
    What is the difference between clear and creme developer?
    I heard that clear developer is more harsh to the hairbut also helps to get the hair to a lighter blonde or brighter red. Creme developer is just average. What's the difference and does Clear developer harm the hair more?

    • ANSWER:
      I haven't dyed my hair since the 80's.

      Call the 1-800# found on the box of dye or email them, (to find #, go online & search the brand if you don't have the box) they're the hair color experts they can advice you best.

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.
      Example: "My hair is right about armpit length as it is, but I've severely damaged it by bleaching it all at once. As a student of cosmetology myself, I would have to say that it was probably one of the worst mistakes I could have ever made."
      Another example: ok i did my hair yesterday i DIDN'T bleach it ,but im not sure what its called but she took the color out of my hair and then dies it a blond color and my head was on fire it killed me so after that i hated my hair color so i colored it my self a darker color, it looked so ugly and it burned me again it rully hrt so after i washed it my mom checked it for me and found small spots of blood all over my top scalp like over 20 of em now im scared and don't know why its there is it from the color am i sick and something is wrong ??

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. 11-22-11. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND.

      Permanent black hair dye is linked to causing leukemia and lymphomas.

      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.
      Vanessa Minnillo Lachey: "I dated a guy once who wanted me to have blonde hair. Clearly, he was the wrong guy for me! I went to a lady who bleached my hair and it literally fell out. So, not only did I go back to my natural hair, I broke up with the guy!"

      One example: MY HAIR DRESSER DYED MY HAIR GREY. I've been crying for the last 2 hours, I want to kill that bish for destroying what was amazing bleach blonde hair. AND to make things worse, she cut my extensions WAY too short.

      "23 years old Rihanna is well known for changing her hairstyle and hair colour on a regular basis and it looks as though all those treatments have finally begun to take their toll on her mane and perhaps her common sense." US Showbiz 2-18-12

      Sources:
      Google FDA.gov & search for Hair Dye & Relaxers.
      Google: Hair Dye FAQ's Are Hair Dyes Safe?

  29. QUESTION:
    How can i get rid of an allergic reaction on my face overnight?
    I don't know what caused it but I have an allergic reaction on my face right now. It's really hot, itchy, and bright red.
    Please help me, I have school pictures tomorrow and I can't show up with a disgusting red face.

    • ANSWER:
      *Wash your hands and face with soap and water if you know you have come in contact with a substance such as poison ivy or poison oak that causes a rash. The oils from these plants produces an adverse reaction called contact dermatitis. Removing the oils as soon as possible can help you get rid of your face allergic more quickly.

      *Refrain from wearing makeup or using scented or abrasive products on your face while you have a face allergy. Regardless of the cause of your face allergy, cleansing products and cosmetics can be irritating to skin that is already inflamed, and can prolong the rash. Wash your face with lukewarm water, using only your fingertips as a cleaning tool.

      *Make an appointment to have your doctor look at your face allergy ,. You may have a bacterial or fungal infection that requires treatment with prescription medications.

  30. QUESTION:
    What are home remeidies to get rid of ance scars?
    I have tons of ance scars on my face, and I want to have a clear face that lots of people. I do not have money to go and buy tons of stuff, so please, make it stuff around the house. And i need it to work fast and easy.

    • ANSWER:
      Sorry, there is nothing at home you can do for acne scars. I have heard of a scar treatment cream you can get over-the-counter, but you don't want to spend money. Even the cream won't smooth out deep dimple scars caused by pimples, it only works for light, surface scars.

      When you do have the money, go get surgery. I hate to say it, but in the meantime, you'll have to make do with the face you have.

      Edit: In response to any claims concerning vitamin E, it doesn't work. The healing powers of vitamin E have been debunked by scientists. In some cases, it actually causes skin irritation known as contact dermatitis.

  31. QUESTION:
    What is the best brand of red hair dye that will turn your hair a natural looking bright red?
    I am a natural blonde and I usually dye the underneath of my hair red. (Known as a peekaboo) But I'm not sure what hair dye might be the best to make it look bright but natural if you know what I mean. My mom wont let me use Splat or Manic Panic etc.. So if you could give me suggestions on hair dye brands and the color (Specific shade of red) then I would appreciate it. Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      You're mom IS A SMART WOMAN!

      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.
      Vanessa Minnillo Lachey: "I dated a guy once who wanted me to have blonde hair. Clearly, he was the wrong guy for me! I went to a lady who bleached my hair and it literally fell out. So, not only did I go back to my natural hair, I broke up with the guy!"
      Another example posted on YA! 8-20-12. Is it just me or does xxl live max blonde make your scalp feel like it on fire? I've recently used a max blonde on my hair and I had to wash it wash off straight away because my scalp felt like it was on fire has this happend to anyone else? Should I try again?
      One example: MY HAIR DRESSER DYED MY HAIR GREY. I've been crying for the last 2 hours, I want to kill that bish for destroying what was amazing bleach blonde hair. AND to make things worse, she cut my extensions WAY too short.
      And one from a hairdresser:
      There are spots ( level 8 & very orange) and they will not come off! This was accidental. Not a result from lifting as she has been a client of mine for 3 years. Her formula has never changed and I have nEver used bleach on her until today! I believe this was a result of left over color in the sink bowl. I tried bleach and 20 volume. Nothing. Bleach and 40 volume, still nothing. Any suggestions?

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.
      Example: "My hair is right about armpit length as it is, but I've severely damaged it by bleaching it all at once. As a student of cosmetology myself, I would have to say that it was probably one of the worst mistakes I could have ever made."
      Another example: ok i did my hair yesterday i DIDN'T bleach it ,but im not sure what its called but she took the color out of my hair and then dies it a blond color and my head was on fire it killed me so after that i hated my hair color so i colored it my self a darker color, it looked so ugly and it burned me again it rully hrt so after i washed it my mom checked it for me and found small spots of blood all over my top scalp like over 20 of em now im scared and don't know why its there is it from the color am i sick and something is wrong ??

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. 11-22-11. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND.

      Permanent black hair dye is linked to causing leukemia and lymphomas.

      A WOMAN was temporarily blinded when her face swelled up "like a football" following what she told was a severe reaction to hair dye.
      Carmen Rowe, 25, from Swansea was hospitalised for three days after using the Clairol 'Nice n' Easy' natural black colour. She said: "I lost my job, all for the sake of a glamorous hairstyle. I just want to warn parents what could happen." She claimed she carried out a skin test 48 hours before using the dye without a problem and has been colouring her hair since she was 13. March 3, 2012.
      Example of one who's hair is falling and stopped growing from YA!:
      "my hair had been bleached many times and can't grow past a certain length
      its also falling out . i stopped bleaching it.
      i just need to add lenght! but if i can stop it from falling out..that be great too"

  32. QUESTION:
    What is the blackest color hair dye i can buy?
    I'm planning on dying the under layer of my hair black, but i'm not really sure what the darkest color is.. Which is what i want to do. My hair is naturally brown, it's between Sun-kissed Brown and Brown Sable color. I just would like to know what the darkest black is to go with this color. Thanks for your help!(:

    • ANSWER:
      I do not recommend black.

      Permanent black hair dye is linked to causing leukemia and lymphomas.

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. 11-22-11. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND.

      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.

  33. QUESTION:
    What is the best treatment for my dog's dermatitis?
    He's a small dog and scratches most of the time.

    • ANSWER:
      it depends on whats causing the dermatitis. could be fleas, inhaled allergies, contact allergies, food, mites, dry skin...

      without knowing the cause of it its hard to say what the treatment would be. you could start with a good flea/ tick preventative, quality food, and a trip to your vet.

  34. QUESTION:
    What kinda damage can you have on hair if you dye it twice in a week ?
    Many tell me its bad to die it twice but I want to know what damage it does please help . I didnt use bleach js .

    • ANSWER:
      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND. The British woman who went into coma after a reaction to hair dye has died after a year. Updated 11-25-12. The woman suffered a heart failure, struggled for breath and became unconsciousness. Her family blamed paraphenylenediamine, a chemical found in hair colour. Her family has now called for paraphenylenediamine to be banned from home dye kits. In 2000, a 38-year-old Indian-origin woman from Birmingham, Narinder Devi, died after an allergic reaction to hair dye.

      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.
      Vanessa Minnillo Lachey: "I dated a guy once who wanted me to have blonde hair. Clearly, he was the wrong guy for me! I went to a lady who bleached my hair and it literally fell out. So, not only did I go back to my natural hair, I broke up with the guy!"
      Another example posted on YA! 8-20-12. Is it just me or does xxl live max blonde make your scalp feel like it on fire? I've recently used a max blonde on my hair and I had to wash it wash off straight away because my scalp felt like it was on fire has this happend to anyone else?

      A WOMAN was temporarily blinded when her face swelled up "like a football" following what she told was a severe reaction to hair dye.
      Carmen Rowe, 25, from Swansea was hospitalised for three days after using the Clairol 'Nice n' Easy' natural black colour. She said: "I lost my job, all for the sake of a glamorous hairstyle. I just want to warn parents what could happen." She claimed she carried out a skin test 48 hours before using the dye without a problem and has been colouring her hair since she was 13. March 3, 2012.

      Example of one who's hair is falling and stopped growing from YA!:
      "my hair had been bleached many times and can't grow past a certain length
      its also falling out . i stopped bleaching it.
      i just need to add lenght! but if i can stop it from falling out..that be great too"

  35. QUESTION:
    What is a good drug store dye to turn hair from naturally black to blonde?
    I have natural curly black hair and I want to dye it blonde myself to save money instead of going to a shop. Which dyes work the best with minimal damage?

    Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Without minimal damaged or hair loss? NONE that I recommend.
      Style meets chemistry meets biology: We're talking hair coloring.

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.

      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.
      Vanessa Minnillo Lachey: "I dated a guy once who wanted me to have blonde hair. Clearly, he was the wrong guy for me! I went to a lady who bleached my hair and it literally fell out. So, not only did I go back to my natural hair, I broke up with the guy!"
      Another example posted on YA! 8-20-12. Is it just me or does xxl live max blonde make your scalp feel like it on fire? I've recently used a max blonde on my hair and I had to wash it wash off straight away because my scalp felt like it was on fire has this happend to anyone else?

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND. The British woman who went into coma after a reaction to hair dye has died after a year. Updated 11-25-12. The woman suffered a heart failure, struggled for breath and became unconsciousness. Her family blamed paraphenylenediamine, a chemical found in hair colour. Her family has now called for paraphenylenediamine to be banned from home dye kits. In 2000, a 38-year-old Indian-origin woman from Birmingham, Narinder Devi, died after an allergic reaction to hair dye.

      A WOMAN was temporarily blinded when her face swelled up "like a football" following what she told was a severe reaction to hair dye.
      Carmen Rowe, 25, from Swansea was hospitalised for three days after using the Clairol 'Nice n' Easy' natural black colour. She said: "I lost my job, all for the sake of a glamorous hairstyle. I just want to warn parents what could happen." She claimed she carried out a skin test 48 hours before using the dye without a problem and has been colouring her hair since she was 13. March 3, 2012.

      Example of one who's hair is falling and stopped growing from YA!:
      "my hair had been bleached many times and can't grow past a certain length
      its also falling out . i stopped bleaching it.
      i just need to add lenght! but if i can stop it from falling out..that be great too"

  36. QUESTION:
    How does one become allergic to something?
    I know we inherit some allergies but how do they get allergic?

    • ANSWER:
      Dear KEEPER, this probably isn't the first time you've heard of them. Allergies are so stereotyped 20% of Americans have some kind of allergic reflex or another to certain external stimuli whether food, water, or air. But what are allergies? And why do we get them?

      Allergies (Stripe I Hypersensitivity) are very a malfunction of our not liable system so that our body becomes hyper sensitized and reacts immunologically to typically non-immunogenic mostlies. The substances that cause our bodies to become this way are called allergens.

      In 1906, Viennese pediatrician, Clemens von Pirquet, first traced the term "allergies" after he observed that certain indications of his patients might have been a response to outside allergens, like dust, pollen, or certain foods.

      SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS :-
      ``````````````````````````````````````````
      You can differentiate your allergies if you experience swelling in parts of your body. This is called local or systemic inflammatory response, caused by the potentiality of allergens. For example, if your allergies affect you in the nose, you will experience swelling of the nasal mucosa (allergic rhinitis). During this condition, you will plausibly find yourself performing the "nasal salute" more than unavoidable as itching of your nose will urge you to wipe your nose in an upward position.

      On the other hand, if the allergies hit you in the eyes, blooming and yearning of the conjunctiva ofttimes proceeds from. Other common signs of allergies are panting and dyspnoea, bronchoconstriction, and sometimes outright attacks of asthma. You may conjointly experience many rashes, such as eczema, series, and contact dermatitis.

      Systemic allergic responses are more serious compared to local symptoms. Depending on the severity of your response, allergies can cause cutaenous reactions, bronchoconstriction, edema, hypotension, coma, and even death.

      Hay fever is truly one example of minor allergies caused by airborne pollen. But beside from environmental factors, allergies may also be triggered by treatments.

      WHY DO WE GET ALLERGIES ?
      ``````````````````````````````````````````````````
      Our immune theory is a fit-trained and disciplined bio-weapon that arranges our bodies from harmful substances. Its mechanics are so amazing that it can determine and destroy many different invaders. However, as amazing as our immune system is, it makes mistakes at times. And so we have allergies, which, as we mentioned, results from a hypersensitive not affected system.

      The hyper sensitized immune system misidentifies an otherwise innocuous substance as harmful, and then attacks the substance with a degree of ferocity that is greater than required. As a result, we experience problems that can range from mildly inconvenient to uncomfortable to total failure of major organs of the body.

      HOW DOES THE IMMUNE SYSTEM GO INTO A HYPER SENSITIZED STANDING ?
      ``````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````````
      There are genuinely several thoughts on that. Some colleges are afraid that allergies are relatively always triggered by protein. Believing persons have faulty genetic codes so that their lymphocytes or the white blood cells (the raw material that your immune scheme is made of) are not able to property distinguish between the threatening and the non-threatening proteins.

      So, for sample, when you ingest protein from shellfish, your lymphocytes think that the gob is trying to invade the body. As a result, they produce large amounts of antibodies which leash themselves to mast cells and basophils throughout the body. This is known as the sensitizing exposure and this is the very reason why you suddenly develop allergies.

  37. QUESTION:
    Can a hairdresser dye my dyed red hair a light brown?
    My hair is naturally a mousy brown colour, I've been dying it a dark brown-red colour for about nine months and most recently dyed it a red mahogany colour about a month ago. I want to get my hair professionally dyed a more natural colour and keep it that way for a longer amount of time. Will a hairdresser be able to dye my hair a light brown/dark blonde colour from this? Also, if they can do it, will they be able to do it in one go?

    • ANSWER:
      Dyeing @ home or @ the salon is NOT GOING to make your hair a 'natural' color, it's chemical, and I have no idea the current condition of your hair now.

      But sure, hairdressers WILL and can do anything you want your hair done. ANYTHING. That's their job and you're paying them to do it. They also will not guarantee, what will happen to your hair, or guarantee your hair will look 'natural', nor will they keep it that way for a longer amount of time. Once you leave the salon, you'll be taking care of your hair, NOT THEM. It's up to you to keep the color on longer. If you're healthy, your hair will continue to grow and the new growth starts showing, while the dyed hair fades, but it won't be the same color as the new growth, also, since it's got layers & layers of dye.

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. 11-22-11. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND.

      Permanent black hair dye is linked to causing leukemia and lymphomas.

      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.
      Vanessa Minnillo Lachey: "I dated a guy once who wanted me to have blonde hair. Clearly, he was the wrong guy for me! I went to a lady who bleached my hair and it literally fell out. So, not only did I go back to my natural hair, I broke up with the guy!"

      One example: MY HAIR DRESSER DYED MY HAIR GREY. I've been crying for the last 2 hours, I want to kill that bish for destroying what was amazing bleach blonde hair. AND to make things worse, she cut my extensions WAY too short.

      "23 years old Rihanna is well known for changing her hairstyle and hair colour on a regular basis and it looks as though all those treatments have finally begun to take their toll on her mane and perhaps her common sense." US Showbiz 2-18-12 Rihanna has reportedly paid ,500 for an emergency haircut after hers was ruined in a sauna, to fly out hair stylist from L.A. to London..The Province 3-1-12.
      A WOMAN was temporarily blinded when her face swelled up "like a football" following what she told was a severe reaction to hair dye.
      Carmen Rowe, 25, from Swansea was hospitalised for three days after using the Clairol 'Nice n' Easy' natural black colour. She said: "I lost my job, all for the sake of a glamorous hairstyle. I just want to warn parents what could happen." She claimed she carried out a skin test 48 hours before using the dye without a problem and has been colouring her hair since she was 13. March 3, 2012.

      Sources:
      Google FDA.gov & search for Hair Dye & Relaxers.
      Google: Hair Dye FAQ's Are Hair Dyes Safe?

  38. QUESTION:
    Will John Frieda Brilliant Brunette bring out my natural highlights?
    I was originally a redhead and I have never dyed my hair. As I get older, my hair gets more and more brown. I would still be considered a redhead but definitly borderline brunette. I was planning on getting brown highlights but then I heard about this stuff(Brilliant Brunette) which is way cheaper. Im not looking to full on DYE my hair, but will it bring out the brown in my hair to make it more noticable?

    • ANSWER:
      No.

      "Natural highlights" doesn't COME from a bottle, if it does, until you wash it again.

      It comes from good hair care, good genes, good healthy foods.

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. 11-22-11. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND.

      Permanent black hair dye is linked to causing leukemia and lymphomas.

      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.
      Vanessa Minnillo Lachey: "I dated a guy once who wanted me to have blonde hair. Clearly, he was the wrong guy for me! I went to a lady who bleached my hair and it literally fell out. So, not only did I go back to my natural hair, I broke up with the guy!"

      One example: MY HAIR DRESSER DYED MY HAIR GREY. I've been crying for the last 2 hours, I want to kill that bish for destroying what was amazing bleach blonde hair. AND to make things worse, she cut my extensions WAY too short.

      Sources:
      Google FDA.gov & search for Hair Dye & Relaxers.
      Google: Hair Dye FAQ's Are Hair Dyes Safe?

  39. QUESTION:
    How can I persuade my mom to let me dye my hair?
    I have auburn hair, and I hate it. My mom paid for highlights and I've had them done about 5 times, so she's spent a fortune. I think that's why she won't let me dye it, but people at school call me ginger and I feel so ugly seeing these blondes and brunettes. How can I persuade my mom to let me dye it?

    • ANSWER:
      You just need to change your attitude. Positive people is what makes them BEAUTIFUL!

      The color of your hair does not make one beautiful, but your attitude needs changing.

      Hair today, what will you ask your mom tomorrow? You've already spent a fortune by doing highlights 5 times, that's more than I've dyed my hair in a year! When you start earning your own wages, then you can dye your hair 10 more times, if you want, but that means she had to work 5x harder more than to PLEASE YOU!

      This is WHY, and if I'm your mom, I won't let you dye your hair until you're 18.
      Style meets chemistry meets biology: We're talking hair coloring.

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.
      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND. The British woman who went into coma after a reaction to hair dye has died after a year. Updated 11-25-12. The woman suffered a heart failure, struggled for breath and became unconsciousness. Her family blamed paraphenylenediamine, a chemical found in hair colour. Her family has now called for paraphenylenediamine to be banned from home dye kits. In 2000, a 38-year-old Indian-origin woman from Birmingham, Narinder Devi, died after an allergic reaction to hair dye.

      Permanent black hair dye is linked to causing leukemia and lymphomas.

      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.
      Vanessa Minnillo Lachey: "I dated a guy once who wanted me to have blonde hair. Clearly, he was the wrong guy for me! I went to a lady who bleached my hair and it literally fell out. So, not only did I go back to my natural hair, I broke up with the guy!"
      Another example posted on YA! 8-20-12. Is it just me or does xxl live max blonde make your scalp feel like it on fire? I've recently used a max blonde on my hair and I had to wash it wash off straight away because my scalp felt like it was on fire has this happend to anyone else?

      A WOMAN was temporarily blinded when her face swelled up "like a football" following what she told was a severe reaction to hair dye.
      Carmen Rowe, 25, from Swansea was hospitalised for three days after using the Clairol 'Nice n' Easy' natural black colour. She said: "I lost my job, all for the sake of a glamorous hairstyle. I just want to warn parents what could happen." She claimed she carried out a skin test 48 hours before using the dye without a problem and has been colouring her hair since she was 13. March 3, 2012.

      Example of one who's hair is falling and stopped growing from YA!:
      "my hair had been bleached many times and can't grow past a certain length
      its also falling out . i stopped bleaching it.
      i just need to add lenght! but if i can stop it from falling out..that be great too"

  40. QUESTION:
    How do I get my jet black hair to fade faster?
    Right now my hair is jet black but I am trying to fade it so I could bleach my hair to a platinum blonde looking coloring with the least amount of damage as possible. Can anyone help or give advice on what I should do first ?

    • ANSWER:
      Call the 1-800# found on the box of dye or email them, (to find #, go online & search the brand if you don't have the box) they're the hair color experts they can advice you best.

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.
      Example: "My hair is right about armpit length as it is, but I've severely damaged it by bleaching it all at once. As a student of cosmetology myself, I would have to say that it was probably one of the worst mistakes I could have ever made."
      Another example: ok i did my hair yesterday i DIDN'T bleach it ,but im not sure what its called but she took the color out of my hair and then dies it a blond color and my head was on fire it killed me so after that i hated my hair color so i colored it my self a darker color, it looked so ugly and it burned me again it rully hrt so after i washed it my mom checked it for me and found small spots of blood all over my top scalp like over 20 of em now im scared and don't know why its there is it from the color am i sick and something is wrong ??

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. 11-22-11. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND.

      Permanent black hair dye is linked to causing leukemia and lymphomas.

      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) 
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.

      You can do one of two things, to remove most of that dye. Links have been moved, might have to type them out.

      1. By using Tide detergent with shampoo
      Google "How to Remove Dye from Hair"

      or

      2. By shampooing you hair mix with a bit of Dawn.
      Google "How to Use Dawn Dishwashing Liquid for Lightening Hair."

      Here's an example what hair stripping will do to your hair.
      It is worst than hair dyes. "I accidentally dyed my hair this awful black, stripped it, and now it is this crunchy crispy mess!"

      Hair strippers are chemical treatments which are intended to strip out artificial color pigment with less risk or damage to the hair. The chemicals used are called reducing agents.
      Certain 'metal' strippers containing sodium sulphoites are sold for reducing hair dyed with metallic dyes, as these dyes react violently with tint stripper containing hydrogen peroxide-the subsequent reaction may cause so much heat that the hair gets dissolved.
      Example: So i just put Colour B4 on my hair to try and remove my black dye so my hair it's natural colour which is dark blonde. so i've just dried my hair and there's still dark patches on it. and in some places it's gone ginger. i have garnier pre lightener. should i use it? there's no way my hair could look worse than it is now lol.

      Before bottled shampoo & hair products were invented, mid 60's, all we've ever used was a bar of soap for body, hair & laundry. Just make sure you rinse well. Try that if that works better!

  41. QUESTION:
    How can I bleach my hair with minimal damage?
    My hair's black. I want to dye it a darker blue. How can I do this with the bleaching and everything, with minimal damage? Are there any hair products that help? Also, I have another question. XD Would dark blue hair look weird with black extensions? Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Call the 1-800# found on the box of dye or email them, (to find #, go online & search the brand if you don't have the box) they're the hair color experts they can advice you best.

      Here's a new article I found re: henna, which is supposed to be better for you than reg. box dye. It's a good read!
      Google: Henna for Hair Warnings.
      Google: Warning-- Clairol Natural Instincts dye recall

      If you’re using Henna which says it’s going to turn your hair from black to blonde, then it seems like your using compound Henna, which is not 100% natural. Without getting too scientific, compound henna is when you mix the Lawson ia with a chemical like, metallic salts. The most commonly used ones are Copper, Lead acetate and Nickel. This can arguably damage your hair, leaving it dry, brittle and coarse.

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.
      Example: "My hair is right about armpit length as it is, but I've severely damaged it by bleaching it all at once. As a student of cosmetology myself, I would have to say that it was probably one of the worst mistakes I could have ever made."
      Another example: ok i did my hair yesterday i DIDN'T bleach it ,but im not sure what its called but she took the color out of my hair and then dies it a blond color and my head was on fire it killed me so after that i hated my hair color so i colored it my self a darker color, it looked so ugly and it burned me again it rully hrt so after i washed it my mom checked it for me and found small spots of blood all over my top scalp like over 20 of em now im scared and don't know why its there is it from the color am i sick and something is wrong ??

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. 11-22-11. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND.

      Permanent black hair dye is linked to causing leukemia and lymphomas.

      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.
      Vanessa Minnillo Lachey: "I dated a guy once who wanted me to have blonde hair. Clearly, he was the wrong guy for me! I went to a lady who bleached my hair and it literally fell out. So, not only did I go back to my natural hair, I broke up with the guy!"

      One example: MY HAIR DRESSER DYED MY HAIR GREY. I've been crying for the last 2 hours, I want to kill that bish for destroying what was amazing bleach blonde hair. AND to make things worse, she cut my extensions WAY too short.

      Sources:
      Google FDA.gov & search for Hair Dye & Relaxers.
      Google: Hair Dye FAQ's Are Hair Dyes Safe?

  42. QUESTION:
    How much times do u have to bleach your hair to get to platinum blonde?
    Ok so my hair is dark brow and i bleached it twice and it like a and orangey brow gold yellow color and uts already toned hheellpp

    • ANSWER:
      Before I answer read the following:
      Personality & health risks.
      There is a strong belief among some people that a person’s hair color can tell you some about their personality.  A new study out of Harvard suggests hair color can also tell you about a person’s health risks
      Top doctors say you can tell a lot about a person’s health from their hair color:
      -Blondes have a higher risk of melanoma, especially on their scalps, and should always wear a hat in direct sunlight.
      -Brunettes are more likely to suffer from hair loss, and can help prevent it by getting enough iron (dark leafy vegetables are high in iron).
      -And a Harvard study finds redheads may have a 90% greater chance of developing Parkinson’s Disease because of a specific gene mutation. Housecall for Health, I’m Colleen Cappon, FOX News Radio. 12-10-12

      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.
      Vanessa Minnillo Lachey: "I dated a guy once who wanted me to have blonde hair. Clearly, he was the wrong guy for me! I went to a lady who bleached my hair and it literally fell out. So, not only did I go back to my natural hair, I broke up with the guy!"
      Another example posted on YA! 8-20-12. Is it just me or does xxl live max blonde make your scalp feel like it on fire? I've recently used a max blonde on my hair and I had to wash it wash off straight away because my scalp felt like it was on fire has this happend to anyone else?

      A WOMAN was temporarily blinded when her face swelled up "like a football" following what she told was a severe reaction to hair dye.
      Carmen Rowe, 25, from Swansea was hospitalised for three days after using the Clairol 'Nice n' Easy' natural black colour. She said: "I lost my job, all for the sake of a glamorous hairstyle. I just want to warn parents what could happen." She claimed she carried out a skin test 48 hours before using the dye without a problem and has been colouring her hair since she was 13. March 3, 2012.

      Example of one who's hair is falling and stopped growing from YA!:
      "my hair had been bleached many times and can't grow past a certain length
      its also falling out . i stopped bleaching it.
      i just need to add lenght! but if i can stop it from falling out..that be great too"
      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND. The British woman who went into coma after a reaction to hair dye has died after a year. Updated 11-25-12. The woman suffered a heart failure, struggled for breath and became unconsciousness. Her family blamed paraphenylenediamine, a chemical found in hair colour. Her family has now called for paraphenylenediamine to be banned from home dye kits. In 2000, a 38-year-old Indian-origin woman from Birmingham, Narinder Devi, died after an allergic reaction to hair dye.

  43. QUESTION:
    What is the process and cost of going from dyed black hair with brown on top to light brown?
    My natural hair is black and a year ago my hair was dyed to a ash brown and then after 6 months I dyed it back to black. I tried dying my hair to a golden brown but it only made my roots brown. I was just wondering how much would it cost and what is the process just to get my whole hair dyed to a light brown?

    • ANSWER:
      Without seeing the condition of your hair, the salon specialist is best to consult from.

      Call the 1-800# found on the box of dye or email them, (to find #, go online & search the brand if you don't have the box) they're the hair color experts they can advice you best.

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.
      Example: "My hair is right about armpit length as it is, but I've severely damaged it by bleaching it all at once. As a student of cosmetology myself, I would have to say that it was probably one of the worst mistakes I could have ever made."
      Another example: ok i did my hair yesterday i DIDN'T bleach it ,but im not sure what its called but she took the color out of my hair and then dies it a blond color and my head was on fire it killed me so after that i hated my hair color so i colored it my self a darker color, it looked so ugly and it burned me again it rully hrt so after i washed it my mom checked it for me and found small spots of blood all over my top scalp like over 20 of em now im scared and don't know why its there is it from the color am i sick and something is wrong ??

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. 11-22-11. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND.

      Permanent black hair dye is linked to causing leukemia and lymphomas.

      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) 
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.

      Sources:
      Google FDA.gov & search for Hair Dye & Relaxers.
      Google: Hair Dye FAQ's Are Hair Dyes Safe?

  44. QUESTION:
    How many times will I need to bleach this?
    So my hair is basically a dark brown and is collarbone length - good condition and all. Under neath is a bright red and all that was needed was one brown dye over it in october and a toner last week because i have two inches of roots and the brown that was over the red had faded.
    Long story short - I have been doing deep conditioning treatments two times a week and taking biotin pills to kind of help repair and grow my hair.
    To all the cosmetologists out there - how many times is it going to take for this color to go to blonde? I plan on going to my stylist come Summer and get it bleached out so it'll be back to a light brown if anything a medium and an inch or two longer. Just want to get an idea of how long I'll be sitting around and all.
    Already talked to my salon chickie - just want second opinions.

    • ANSWER:
      Overlapping dye onto previously colored hair is what creates dullness and dryness. If you color your hair @ home, let your roots grow out as long as you can stand, so the line of demarcation is easier to spot. Only run color through the lengths for five minutes to refresh the ends. To extend the time between touch-ups, use a gloss and deep -conditioning treatments. They will help smooth cuticles roughed up by daily wear & tear, and the hair will look shinier. ~ Harry Josh, hairstylist of the celebrities.

      Celebrity wears two-tone hair dye all the time, trying to grow out their dye.

      Style meets chemistry meets biology: We're talking hair coloring.

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND. The British woman who went into coma after a reaction to hair dye has died after a year. Updated 11-25-12. The woman suffered a heart failure, struggled for breath and became unconsciousness. Her family blamed paraphenylenediamine, a chemical found in hair colour. Her family has now called for paraphenylenediamine to be banned from home dye kits. In 2000, a 38-year-old Indian-origin woman from Birmingham, Narinder Devi, died after an allergic reaction to hair dye.

      Permanent black hair dye is linked to causing leukemia and lymphomas.

      Google search: Salon hair dye horror stories. About 305,000 results (0.20 seconds) OR Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.

      Google: January Jones: "My Hair Is Falling Out In Clumps" http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/27… 1-28-13 To quote Joni Mitchell, "you don't know what you got till your thick hair is gone."

      Source(s):
      Google FDA.gov & search for Hair Dye & Relaxers.
      Google: Hair Dye FAQ's Are Hair Dyes Safe?

  45. QUESTION:
    Is it possible to have both eczema and psoriasis?
    I have flaky skin on my forehead and face that won't go away no matter what I do. My chest and neck are red and irritated. I have raised red bumps on my elbow crooks, forearms and triceps. I am diagnosed with eczema. Could I have psoriasis as well?

    • ANSWER:
      Is it possible to have psoriasis and eczema at the same time?
      The biology of skin limits the number of ways in which it can manifest a disease process—by redness, flaking, swelling, etc. Thus, many skin conditions can superficially resemble one another and a dermatologic examination is necessary to establish a diagnosis. Self-diagnosis of a troublesome skin condition can delay proper treatment.

      Psoriasis and eczema are two skin problems that seem to be mutually exclusive to a degree, although this is not a hard and fast rule. In persons with psoriasis the incidence of allergic contact dermatitis and atopic dermatitis—two major forms of eczema—appears to be substantially lower than in the general population. A suggested reason is that the immune system dysregulation believed to be a factor in psoriasis is not the same as dysregulation of immune pathways in these forms of eczema.

      Sorry you are plagued with this. : (

  46. QUESTION:
    My engagement ring around the platinum setting is causing a dry skin rash what can I do?
    The ring itself is gold and only around the platinum setting do I get the rash.

    • ANSWER:
      This sounds like contact dermatitis. The most common cause in a ring is nickel.
      I wonder if the junction of the two metals causes an electrolyis that let's nickel come out to the skin more.
      Anyway the treatment is stop the ring and apply cortisone cream for a few days. It will clear up.

  47. QUESTION:
    How much to bleach my hair professionally?
    I'm a guy with fairly long hair. I like to leave my bangs covering my forehead. How much would it be to bleach my hair at a salon. If I tell them to dye it another color after bleaching, how much would that be? I live in Canada, everything is pretty expensive. I wanted to achieve a light brown, dying over my naturally black hair, but it didn't work. I dyed it 4 times to get the color to show.

    • ANSWER:
      You dyed your hair 4x? That's more than I have in a year. Style meets chemistry meets biology: We're talking hair coloring.

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. 11-22-11. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND.

      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.
      Vanessa Minnillo Lachey: "I dated a guy once who wanted me to have blonde hair. Clearly, he was the wrong guy for me! I went to a lady who bleached my hair and it literally fell out. So, not only did I go back to my natural hair, I broke up with the guy!"
      Another example posted on YA! 8-20-12. Is it just me or does xxl live max blonde make your scalp feel like it on fire? I've recently used a max blonde on my hair and I had to wash it wash off straight away because my scalp felt like it was on fire has this happend to anyone else? Should I try again?
      One example: MY HAIR DRESSER DYED MY HAIR GREY. I've been crying for the last 2 hours, I want to kill that bish for destroying what was amazing bleach blonde hair. AND to make things worse, she cut my extensions WAY too short.
      And one from a hairdresser:
      There are spots ( level 8 & very orange) and they will not come off! This was accidental. Not a result from lifting as she has been a client of mine for 3 years. Her formula has never changed and I have nEver used bleach on her until today! I believe this was a result of left over color in the sink bowl. I tried bleach and 20 volume. Nothing. Bleach and 40 volume, still nothing. Any suggestions?

  48. QUESTION:
    Have I had an allergic reaction to bleach?
    I bleached my hair recently and now it's caused my scalp to blister. Is this normal or have I had and allergic reaction?

    • ANSWER:
      Store bought dye or salon dye, chemicals does NOT PLAY FAVORITES. They're all chemicals no matter how you SPELL IT. When I was dyeing & perming my hair, I had frequent migraines, the 1t one lasted 14 hours. I hardly get headaches.

      Style meets chemistry meets biology: We're talking hair coloring.

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. 11-22-11. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND.

      Permanent black hair dye is linked to causing leukemia and lymphomas.

      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.
      Vanessa Minnillo Lachey: "I dated a guy once who wanted me to have blonde hair. Clearly, he was the wrong guy for me! I went to a lady who bleached my hair and it literally fell out. So, not only did I go back to my natural hair, I broke up with the guy!"
      Another example posted on YA! 8-20-12. Is it just me or does xxl live max blonde make your scalp feel like it on fire? I've recently used a max blonde on my hair and I had to wash it wash off straight away because my scalp felt like it was on fire has this happend to anyone else?

      A WOMAN was temporarily blinded when her face swelled up "like a football" following what she told was a severe reaction to hair dye.
      Carmen Rowe, 25, from Swansea was hospitalised for three days after using the Clairol 'Nice n' Easy' natural black colour. She said: "I lost my job, all for the sake of a glamorous hairstyle. I just want to warn parents what could happen." She claimed she carried out a skin test 48 hours before using the dye without a problem and has been colouring her hair since she was 13. March 3, 2012.
      Example of one who's hair is falling and stopped growing from YA!:
      "my hair had been bleached many times and can't grow past a certain length
      its also falling out . i stopped bleaching it.
      i just need to add lenght! but if i can stop it from falling out..that be great too"

  49. QUESTION:
    How do I go from red to platinum with already dyed hair?
    I had brownish blondish hair awhile ago and it has been red for some time now. I have very thick healthy hair and wanted to go very light blonde so I bought a box. The problem is the red seems to stick in my hair no matter how light I go. How do I get the red to leave so I can be blonde and not strawberry blonde?

    • ANSWER:
      Call the 1-800# found on the box of dye or email them, (to find #, go online & search the brand if you don't have the box) they're the hair color experts they can advice you best. Style meets chemistry meets biology: We're talking hair coloring.

      Playing with chemicals is not like playing with clothes, or doing a manicure, there are penalties for playing chemicals in the lab. Even hair color experts at the salon are not rocket scientists, they do a bang up dye jobs to their clients or their own hair.
      Example: "My hair is right about armpit length as it is, but I've severely damaged it by bleaching it all at once. As a student of cosmetology myself, I would have to say that it was probably one of the worst mistakes I could have ever made."
      Another example: ok i did my hair yesterday i DIDN'T bleach it ,but im not sure what its called but she took the color out of my hair and then dies it a blond color and my head was on fire it killed me so after that i hated my hair color so i colored it my self a darker color, it looked so ugly and it burned me again it rully hrt so after i washed it my mom checked it for me and found small spots of blood all over my top scalp like over 20 of em now im scared and don't know why its there is it from the color am i sick and something is wrong ??

      Chemicals can enter the body through the skin.

      Google: Teen 'feared she would die' after reaction to hair dye
      The allergic reaction was caused by a well-known brand of semi-permanent hair dye Chloe used to turn her hair black for a Hallowe’en party. . . . . called for beauty bosses to ban hair dye chemical PPD (para-phenylenediamine) from the shelves. 11-04-11

      The chemical is not new and is present in a number of brands of dark hair colours, acting to help adhere the dye to the hair so that it doesn't wash out. It’s made from coal tar and is used in both permanent and semi-permanent hair colours. It’s well-known to be a cause of serious allergic reactions -- including something called contact dermatitis which can lead to rashes, blisters, and open sores.
      PPD is sometimes added to black henna tattoos and that using them is not safe. Allergic reactions usually begin within two to 10 days following application. One bad reaction can lead to sensitivities to other products such as hair dye, sunblock and some types of clothing dyes. Oftentimes, it's using the product a second or third time.

      Google: A 38-year old mother left in a coma after using hair dye. 11-22-11. SHE DYED HER HAIR MANY TIMES BEFORE, USING THE SAME BRAND.

      Permanent black hair dye is linked to causing leukemia and lymphomas.

      Google Salon Hair Dye Lawsuits. About 336,000 results (0.17 seconds) Dec. 2011
      When it comes to hair care treatments, product use or visits to a salon or spa, the consumer must take responsibility to do their homework and be aware of all the risks involved.
      Vanessa Minnillo Lachey: "I dated a guy once who wanted me to have blonde hair. Clearly, he was the wrong guy for me! I went to a lady who bleached my hair and it literally fell out. So, not only did I go back to my natural hair, I broke up with the guy!"

      One example: MY HAIR DRESSER DYED MY HAIR GREY. I've been crying for the last 2 hours, I want to kill that bish for destroying what was amazing bleach blonde hair. AND to make things worse, she cut my extensions WAY too short.

      "23 years old Rihanna is well known for changing her hairstyle and hair colour on a regular basis and it looks as though all those treatments have finally begun to take their toll on her mane and perhaps her common sense." US Showbiz 2-18-12 Rihanna has reportedly paid ,500 for an emergency haircut after hers was ruined in a sauna, to fly out hair stylist from L.A. to London..The Province 3-1-12.
      A WOMAN was temporarily blinded when her face swelled up "like a football" following what she told was a severe reaction to hair dye.
      Carmen Rowe, 25, from Swansea was hospitalised for three days after using the Clairol 'Nice n' Easy' natural black colour. She said: "I lost my job, all for the sake of a glamorous hairstyle. I just want to warn parents what could happen." She claimed she carried out a skin test 48 hours before using the dye without a problem and has been colouring her hair since she was 13. March 3, 2012.

      Sources:
      Google FDA.gov & search for Hair Dye & Relaxers.
      Google: Hair Dye FAQ's Are Hair Dyes Safe?


contact dermatitis treatment

A Keratosis

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    What are some home remedies for keratosis pilaris?
    I have keratosis pilaris on my arms, legs, and back. My mum won't let me see a dermatologist because she things I do not have to, but the little red bumps (not acne they are keratosis pilaris) and red patches are so embarrassing especially with summer coming. Plz help. Thanx!

    • ANSWER:
      I just googled this myself earlier today and found there is actually quite a lot of information online from other sufferers talking about what helped or didn't help them. Mostly they suggest using a moisturising body wash and a loofa in a circular motion. Pat the skin dry and follow up by using a good moisturiser. Others are suggesting eliminating dairy or wheat from your diet. Some people say tanning or steam baths or saunas have helped them. I know how embarrassing this is for you as it really bothered me too as a teenager, but it isn't the end of the world. I think you should just google keratosis and try some of the things that others have suggested for yourself.

  2. QUESTION:
    Does birth control make Keratosis Pilaris any better?
    I've heard Keratosis Pilaris gets worse with hormones, and birth control decreases hormones so... Any ideas on whether it could help decrease the sight of it?

    I'm 16, i have horrible Keratosis Pilaris, but i'm only planning on going on the pill if it will help my KP.

    • ANSWER:
      I'm not sure. I'm 18 and also have keratosis pilaris, but it usually gets better as you age, or completely goes away. I've noticed that mine has gotten a lot better. It used to be really bad on my arms when I was around 14; now it's not that noticeable.

  3. QUESTION:
    What are the most affective treatments for Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have a mild case of Keratosis Pilaris on my forearms & biceps. I know there's no permanent cure for this skin condition, but I would like to clear it up for the most part.

    • ANSWER:
      I have keratosis pilaris on my upper arms, and I use Aveeno Daily Moisturizing Lotion. It works better than anything else that I've tried, and it's much cheaper than prescription creams! Keeping KP moist is key to reducing the bumps and redness. It works for me!

  4. QUESTION:
    How can i get rid of keratosis pilaries?
    What are some home remedies? Im 13 and have had these bumps on my arms that are kind of pimple looking, i searched up what it was and it said it was keratosis pilaries. How can i get rid of them? They're on my arms and are a little red, does aloe Vera help fade it?

    • ANSWER:
      Bad news: 'keratosis pilaris usually disappears by age 30.'

  5. QUESTION:
    What are some Over the Counter treatments for Keratosis Pilaris?
    From doing some research, and looking at pictures, I believe I have keratosis pilaris (on my thighs). What are some over the counter treatments that work well to cure keratosis pilaris?

    • ANSWER:
      Because it is hereditary, there is no way to cure or prevent keratosis pilaris. However, it may lessen over time with age.

      In some patients, the condition clears up on its own. When it does not, patients may choose to seek treatment for cosmetic reasons. There are several treatments aimed at softening the keratin deposits in the skin to improve its appearance. They include:

      Moisturizing lotions. Dry skin makes the condition worse, so applying moisturizer twice daily is important. Lotions that contain urea help the skin retain moisture and products that contain lactic acid or salicylic acid help to dissolve and exfoliate the keratin. Moisturizer should be applied immediately after bathing.

      Loofah sponges or brushes. Rubbing the affected areas after a long soak in a hot bath may help to unclog the plugged hair follicles.

      Topical retinoids. Class of chemical compounds that are chemically related to vitamin A. These drugs regulate skin growth but can be very irritating.

      These are just a couple of the available treatment for keratosis pilaris. Take a look at this site for some additional information that I think you'll find helpful : ) It's great that you're educating yourself!

      http://skin.health.ivillage.com/acneblemish/keratosispilaris.cfm

  6. QUESTION:
    How can I get rid of the appearance of Keratosis Pilaris?
    Ok so I've had keratosis pilaris for practically all of my life. Its been bugging me ever since. So today I went to the doctor and they said I indeed have keratosis pilaris, and gave me a prescription to buy this special lotion. I don't know how else can I resolve this quicker and make the bumps go away and feel smooth.

    • ANSWER:
      keratosis pilaris isn't curable, but this will diminish it's visibility..

      There is this new popular cream that people have been talking about.

      It was even televised on TV.

      It prevents future and existing acne, diminishes scars, and lightens skin and blemishes. Fast results too! (It's been claimed that major results can be seen within a week and no later than two weeks)

      Before and After photos are available at the given ebay site.

      This person is providing 1-3 week trial samples (Only for ONE DOLLAR.. definitely a deal) on ebay at:

      Search up "Cee En's Acne Solution" or "best acne solution ever" on ebay.

      First 100 customers can get the item for for one week trial and up to 3 weeks. Or you can purchase 1 month supply for or 6 month supply for 0

      It's expensive, but the product DOES work.

      My sister and cousin who both have major acne have tried the product and they both give it thumbs up. I have also heard many great feedbacks about this cream.

      I don't have a problem with acne, but it seems to have great results on my sister who has moderate to severe acne. Her acne swelling went away overnight.

      check the seller's feedbacks on the cream

      I hope this helps. =)

  7. QUESTION:
    Can being in the sun a lot help reduce the appearance of Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have very pale skin and my skin condition shows a lot. Even more so now that its summer. I know there isn't a real cure for Keratosis but if any Dermatologists know of any ways that might help reduce the break-outs I will be so grateful.

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis Pilaris is caused by over growths of dead skin over the hair follicle. The quickest and easy fix is a chemical exfoliant (for example a Glycol based one that you would use on your face) or even a physical exfoliant will clear it up in as little as three weeks. Sun can help some (because it dries our the skin making the dead skin cells fall off more), but make sure you are using sun screen. Enjoy your clear skin!

  8. QUESTION:
    What is the best product for Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris on my buttocks and I have been researching different products. There are quite a few and I don't know which to go with. There's Glytone, KP duty, Biotreatment. Has anyone had success with any of these or a better product? I have dark olive skin and I scar very easily...even without picking, so I'm hoping for a product that helps with that as well.

    • ANSWER:
      I know how you feel. I had Keratosis Pilaris too and always wore long sleeves even when it was really hot. I started using Paula's Choice 2% BHA and it cleared up completely within a few weeks. I don't know if it works for everyone, but it seems to work for a lot of people. I've told several people about it and it has worked for everyone I've told. It is a fairly common thing.

      I started with their liquid formula but I also have used their 2% BHA body lotion. I recommend the liquid to start. You can find out a lot more about KP and the various treatments and products here: http://cosmeticscop.paulaschoice.com/keratosis-pilaris-solutions.aspx

      Good Luck!

  9. QUESTION:
    Are there any inexpensive and affective treatments for Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris (chicken skin) and I haven't been able to find anything that really works. I've gotten lotions from my doctor but that doesn't completely help.
    Is there any inexpensive and affective treatment that really helps or helped you?
    Thanks in advance!

    • ANSWER:
      Try a loofah to exfolitate:

      To treat keratosis pilaris patients can try several strategies to lessen the bumps. First, the patient can supplement the natural removal of dry skin and papules by using a loofah or another type of scrub showering or bathing. A variety of different over-the-counter (OTC) lotions, ointments, and creams can also be applied after showering while the skin is still moist and then several times a day to keep the area moist. Medicated lotions with urea, 15% alphahydroxy acids, or Retin A can also be prescribed by the dermatologist and applied one to two times daily. Systemic (oral) medications are not prescribed for keratosis pilaris. However if papules are opened and become infected, antibiotics may be necessary to treat the infection.

      I hope using a loofah, or something similar, helps you. As you no doubt already knew (and can read in the article), keratosis pilaris is difficult to treat. Good luck.

  10. QUESTION:
    How can i get rid of Keratosis pilaris on my upper arm?
    keratosis pilaris is a skin condition and is in my whole family. I have poped the spots and tgere are now scabs. How can i get rid of the scabs and the spots.

    • ANSWER:
      watch this it might help http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_5S3gmUrXk&feature=related

  11. QUESTION:
    What are good treatments for treating Keratosis Pilaris on your face and arms?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris on my face and arms. I already drink lots of water, use some baby oil on my arms, and use a face cream/scrub. What would be a better alternative instead of using baby oil and face scrub. What is your favorite treatment. Btw, water helps a lot.

    • ANSWER:
      Scrubs containing AHA (glycolic acid)

  12. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of Keratosis Pelaris with just lotion?
    I have Keratosis Pelaris (otherwise known as chicken skin) on my upper arms. It's like little red bumps. Similar to acne, but harder to treat. I've been using AmLactin on my upper arms but it isn't doing any good. Does anyone know any good lotions I can use to treat the bumps? Thank you very much!

    • ANSWER:
      I'm not sure if you can get rid of it without the help of a doctor.

      Moisturizing lotions are often soothing and may help the appearance of the skin. Skin creams with medications containing urea, lactic acid, glycolic acid, salicylic acid, tretinoin, or vitamin D may be recommended by your physician. However, improvement often takes months and the bumps are likely to come back.

  13. QUESTION:
    How long does it take a cancerous actinic keratosis to turn into cancer?
    10% of actinic keratosis may be pre-cancerous. How long would it take one to turn into cancerous spot?

    • ANSWER:
      For the 10% that does become cancer, the time it takes depends on a lot of things. It depends on the individual, their general state of health (immunocompromised people can't fight off cancer as well as others), and the other things they might do to increase their chances of getting cancer in general (like smoking, not exercising, not eating the right foods, exposing their skin to too much sun, etc).
      There are actuarial tables that estimate mortality when you take some of these things into account. Also, treatment makes a big difference.

  14. QUESTION:
    Does Acneticin really work for getting rid of Keratosis Pilaris?
    I'm 13 and have Keratosis Pilaris. I've heard of this pill called Acneticin. From the reviews all around the web, I guess it's like a miracle. How many of you have used this before and does it work?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, the Acneticin is an acne treatment that is for people that haven’t seen significant results from the many run of the mill topical treatments. Almost all of these topical treatments contain some form of ìcleansing agentî, usually benzoyl peroxide. These agents are very mild acids that ìburn awayî dead skin, allowing younger skin to rise to the surface and flourish.

  15. QUESTION:
    Are there any home cures for keratosis pilaris?
    Hi,
    My daughter (4) has keratosis pilaris. I would like to know if there are any home cures for that. My doctor told me it would go away on its own, but I would like to minimize it at least.
    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Try these...
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/keratosis-pilaris/DS00769/DSECTION=lifestyle-and-home-remedies
      http://beautyfashionandstyle.yuku.com/topic/937
      http://www.earthclinic.com/CURES/keratosis_pilaris.html
      I hope some of these can help her. Good-luck.

  16. QUESTION:
    How to cover keratosis pilaris on arms with makeup for a day?
    My girlfriend wants to wear a sundress for a photo shoot but she has keratosis pilaris on her arms...google it if you don't know what it is and would like to know.

    She is mostly concerned with the redness.
    She already uses lotions etc. Doesn't help.

    Is there like a body makeup she can cover it with that will last ?

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Try the Dermablend Leg Cover... You can use it on arms as well.

      I have found 'Sheer Color'. It is the best for covering redness and leaving skin looking natural. I think it is only available through mail order. It was developed by dermatologists to hide redness, scars, and birth marks. It comes with a concealer. The makeup itself is mineral and gives good coverage, but it is light and natural.

      If her arms flare up, I have found a product that contains Extra Virgin Coconut Oil helps calm the redness down.

      You can also trry Pulse Dye Laser treatment. It is a little radical but it is long-lasting and helpful.

      Palladio is NOTHING compared to bareminerals from bare escentuals. The only thing I have to say is that they have poor costumer service and organization. The makeup will cover redness in a very natural way. It will look like you have no makeup on.

      One month ago I started using the Herbal wet & dry foundation and it is great. They are not very expensive, either. Well, on Amazon.com it is dollars but I found it in Puerto Rico at . :D

      I use eucerin 10% Urea lotion on my skin twice a day.

      I also use Everyday Minerals makeup. They have a mint concealer that is great for covering redness. Also another concealer is Bisque; it is quite pink in color but it somehow manages to cover redness very well. These are used under mineral foundation. You can get free samples, although you have to pay a bit for the postage.

      I am ignorant about UO, but this makeup is great for my skin! I bought it from the Sally Beauty Shop in the U.S. I think the mildness by being talc and rice may have something to do with it and I have found that titanium dioxide makes all my KP worse, whether on my face or arms (sunscreen) or what. It even has chamomile which I suspect is an allergen for me but maybe it's so little or it's tempered by other ingredients. I have even used it on my arms and legs when needed. O:)

      Try Roc Skin Foundation.

  17. QUESTION:
    How can i make my keratosis pilaris go away?
    I'm 14 and have keratosis pilaris on my arms, chest, back, stomach, legs and really bad on my thighs and butt. What are the best non prescription things that you found to work for you. And i already know that there is not permanent cure and it's hereditary and only cosmetic but what are ways that you know work for you and are relatively easy?

    • ANSWER:
      Aveeno lotions help me out a lot. I have like the whole line of products and they have helped me keep it under control for the most part.

  18. QUESTION:
    I have Keratosis Pilaris, what kind of foundation do you recommend to cover redness?
    I have keratosis pilaris and I was wondering if anyone knows of a foundation that'll cover redness and will last throughout the day. Some brands work but after about an hour or so or when I get really hot the redness on my face shows through...I've tried max factor it works best so far. I've also tried mineral makeups they dont work at all for me. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      Do u get maybelline brands where u live??? Cos maybelline liquid to powder finish is xellent. It blends really well. Leaves skin flawless. Or else u buy a foundation which nearly matches ur skin tone or one which is a shade darker.This one is also gr8 for people with an oily complexion or a normal one.

  19. QUESTION:
    Hi i have a mild case of Keratosis Pilaris Is there any treatment for it?
    What is keratosis pilaris and how do you get it?

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis it is a genetic folicular condition which can be treated with the help of Forever Living Products. I know some one who has used these products successfully

      http://www.freewebs.com/aloe2you/

  20. QUESTION:
    What can I do to help my skin condition, keratosis pilaris?
    I have a skin condition called keratosis pilaris. I was born with it and I get little white bumps on my arms and legs. It looks like pimples/acne but it's not. I have tried every lotion and scrub, but nothing has worked. Does anyone have this skin condition who has had success in reducing the bumpy appearance?

    Also, because I have been picking at the bumps for years, I've gotten scars. Is there a good cream or lotion to make the scars fade away?

    • ANSWER:
      If you keep on scrubbing and loading on products with tons of chemicals it is only going to make your skin get more irritated. If I were you I would such to all organic products. Coconut and emu oil are wonderful for skin. Raw organic shea butter is wonderful also.

      Try going to a health store or look online..I get everything from rose mountain.

      There are many organic oils out there that help reduce inflammation, reddness, scars, etc.

  21. QUESTION:
    What would work better for keratosis pilaris scars: bio oil or maderma?
    I have scars all over my arms from picking and scratching at my bumps on my arms, also know as keratosis pilaris. I have heard good things about both, but before i go and spend on cream, i want to know whats better! And if anyone had keratosis pilaris and used a different cream to get rid of the scars, please let me know!!!
    thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      I would recommend using Bio Oil. Its natural and from what ive seen cheaper. But i would recommend exfoliating your arms with any thing that will remove any dead skin and then rub on the Bio Oil. only thing is its really sticky so don't put it on right before you go to bed it will get on everything.

  22. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of redness from keratosis pilaris?
    I know you cant cure keratosis pilaris but is there anyway to get rid of the redness?Beause the bumps dont really bug me that much.

    • ANSWER:
      You could try a steriod or anti-inflammatory cream, this should take the redness away within a week - good luck :)

  23. QUESTION:
    How can I heal my keratosis pilaris?
    I have keratosis pilaris on the backs of my upper arms and all around my upper legs. What can I do to improve my skin and help cure this? I have used a steroid base lotion prescribed by my doctor and I have also tried an over the counter lotion but they only help to a certain degree and then the improvement seems to plateau. Is there anything else I can try?

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately, there is no cure for keratosis pilaris. I have it too, and after meeting with a few dermatologists, I have discovered that all you can really do is wait for it to go away. Most people outgrow keratosis pilaris in their twenties or so. However it does help to keep the area moisturized, especially if you are using some sort of treatment on it.

  24. QUESTION:
    how do i get rid of redness in my arm from keratosis pilarsis?
    i am a teenager with keratosis pilarsis and am so self concious about the redness! how can i get rid of it?

    • ANSWER:

  25. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of keratosis pilaris?
    I have keratosis pilaris on my upper arms and its very noticeable (especially in the winter) are there any cures for it? Like to make it completely go away? I would really love to get rid of this! Thanks for your help!

    • ANSWER:

  26. QUESTION:
    How do you cure the skin condition Keratosis Pilairs?
    I have Keratosis Pilairs, and because of it i have rough bumps all over my arms and legs and stomach. My face is really bright red all over, but smooth. Its apparently genetic, but i hate it, how can i get rid of it?

    • ANSWER:
      I found that champori cream for psoriasis clears my kp better than anything else: takes just a few days and then my skin stays smooth for months on end. Try it: champori is available without prescription and comes with money back guarantee, so if it doesnt work for you - it's free.
      Best,
      Mol.

  27. QUESTION:
    how do you get rid of keratosis pilaris?
    i have eczema, and this keratosis pilaris came during my flareup and i have never ever had it and now my whole body is covered in these skin coloured bumps, is there a way to get rid of this?
    any cleansing baths? or scrubs or remedies? i really just want my skin to go back to normal!
    is it normal for keratosis pilaris to just come out of nowhere? is it curable? are there any prescriptions like betamethasone or any other steroids that can fix it?

    • ANSWER:
      Treatments, elixirs, etc. are just going to be a waste.

      The quickest and easy fix is a chemical exfoliant (for example a Glycol based one that you would use on your face) or even a physical exfoliant will clear it up in as little as three weeks. Enjoy your clear skin!

  28. QUESTION:
    How to diminish the look of keratosis pilaris?
    Well I think I have keratosis pilaris, people told me they might be ingrown hairs but it's not going away. I exfoliate with sugar and my dial body wash on my legs because that's where I have it. Does anyone know how to make the spots less noticeable and blend with my skin better.? Any products that help would be REALLY helpful. Thank you ☺

    • ANSWER:
      I have KP too... it IS the hair follicles, but not ingrown hairs, it's just that the skin cells from the follicles for some reason doesn;t shed in the normal way. The only think you can do is use a loofah or exfoliating sponge on the areas.... using products is expensive and a waste... all you need to do is get rid of the dead skin that is accumulating around the hair follicles, and then use just an ordinary light body lotion.

  29. QUESTION:
    Does Amlactin really work for Keratosis Pilaris?
    Hello everyone, I just bought a bottle of Amlactin lotion 3 days ago, and I was wondering if it really truely works for keratosis pilaris? Has it worked for you, and if so how long does it generally take to see improvements/results? Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      YES IT DOES!!!! I have really bad keratosis pilaris. Amlactin worked within the first two weeks. It didn't completely eliminate the condition, but it makes it less noticeable. I swear by Amlactin!! However, if you stop using it, the keratosis pilaris comes back.

  30. QUESTION:
    How do you recover from Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have severe Karatosis Pilaris on my legs. It's been such a long time since I've wore skirts. I've had it for almost 2 years and it won't go away. It's starting to bother me so much and the doctors don't know what to do...

    Does anyone know of any cures of Keratosis Pilaris? Does Laser Treatment work?

    • ANSWER:
      Try looking at these sites:
      http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/keratosis-pilaris/DS00769
      http://www.helpforkp.com/

      This site is by someone who also has KP:
      http://www.epinions.com/content_970694788

      Good luck!

  31. QUESTION:
    What's the best way to cover Keratosis Pilaris for a few hours?
    I have severe Keratosis Pilaris on my legs and it sucks that I cannot wear skirts, shorts, swim suits or anything short. Its been here for almost 2 years now and I don't know what to do.

    I was wondering if anyone knows how I could cover it for a couple hours or something. I wanna wear a nice skirt and sit by the lake :(...

    • ANSWER:
      You might try tanning once or twice a week, this has proved to be very effective. The use of tea tree oil and Lubriderm at night has also proved of benefit. When washing in the evening, try sulphur soap with a body scrubber. Clearasil vanishing cream and Lubriderm again in the morning. This should give you a continuing improvement.
      I add a link which discuses the condition.

      http://www.aocd.org/skin
      /dermatologic_diseases/
      keratosis_pilaris.html

      Hope this helps
      Matador 89

  32. QUESTION:
    Is it a good idea to use hair removal creams such as Veet or Revitol, on areas affected with keratosis pilaris?
    I found this idea on a keratosis pilaris message board:

    ttp://www.keratosispilaris.org/general-discussion/6182-maybe-answer-hair-removal-products.html

    So, anyone here think it would it work?

    • ANSWER:
      I would check with my doctor. You dont' want to make the problem worse.

      GL

  33. QUESTION:
    How to reduce sight of Keratosis Pilaris?
    I've had red bumps on my arms for years now, and after much online research, I've come to the conclusion that these bumps are Keratosis Pilaris.

    I'm wanting to know how to reduce the sight of them. I've heard using a scrub with a loofah helps, but what kind of scrub? Also, I heard lotion helps, but I'm not sure what kind...Cetaphil, Eucerin, AmLactin, etc.

    I'd appreciate any advice! Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      I have had KP for a very long time and I have tried everything to get rid of it. But I have recently discovered a lotion called KP Duty. After two days, the red bumps were gone completely and the redness was reduced. It has been a week and the redness has been greatly reduced. However, the lotion is a bit pricey () but it does spread easily so you don't need a lot of it. Hope this helps. :)

  34. QUESTION:
    How to reduce appearance of Keratosis A-K-A Chicken Skin?
    For anyone who knows how to treat or reduce the appearance of it please help. I've tried many expensive and cheap lotions and soaps specifically for Keratosis, but there's little to no improvement at all.

    I doubt it, but would a chemical peel work on this kind of a skin problem? Serious answers please.

    • ANSWER:
      I don't think that there is anything that can reduce the appearance.

      You will have to schedule a trip to your dermatologist. The dermatologist will inject each of them with a solution to shrink them. It is fairly inexpensive.

      You'll spend more money investing in other advertised product solutions!!!

  35. QUESTION:
    where can i find a Keratosis Pilaris Kit?
    i realized i have keratosis pilaris...but i was wondering if they have kits or lotions or something at stores nearby stores like cvs, walmart, target...those kind of stores? do you know? i tried looking online but its hard to findout if those stores have them.

    • ANSWER:
      I also have Keratosis pilaris for as long as i could remember (im 15 now ) , theres actually no cure for it whatsoever but there are creams that could lessen the redness and the bumps. I havent used any creams yet for mine so i cant recommend anything.
      I think theyre might be a cream called KPduty or something liek that you could look it up

      good luck

  36. QUESTION:
    How do you get rid of Keratosis Pilaris?
    Hey everyone. I have keratosis pilaris on the backs of my arms and right above my knees. I was just wondering if anyone had ever had them and actually had something done to cure them or to help them. I'm really self conscious of them so that's the worst part. I'm embarassed to wear shorts that show them and they just make me feel uncomfortable. Any help would be appreciated.

    Thanks! :)

    *I am a teenager*

    • ANSWER:
      I'm also a teenager who has keratosis pilaris. I haven't actually tried it, but I've heard a lot about a line of products by Derma Doctor called KP Duty. They make a lotion and an exfoliating scrub, which have both received consistent 5-star reviews on many websites. Many people say using a loofah everyday will help, but that hasn't worked for me. Hope I helped!

      (here is a link to KP Duty)
      http://www.dermadoctor.com/

  37. QUESTION:
    What lotion should i use for my Keratosis Pilaris?
    I heard that Amlactin or Eucerin works, but if you have used one which one was it and did it work?
    Or which lotion have you heard works best for keratosis pilaris.

    • ANSWER:

  38. QUESTION:
    If I have Keratosis Pilaris can I use shampoo with keratin in it?
    I have keratosis pilaris which is when my body creates too much keratin and leaves bumps all over my arms... I am wanting to use a shampoo and conditioner with keratin in it because it would make my coarse hair soft. Can I use it? Or would it make my skin condition worse? I would rinse it completely out and wash my body afterwards of course.

    • ANSWER:

  39. QUESTION:
    I was wondering about girls and keratosis pilaris?
    I know that 50% or so girls are affected by keratosis pilaris but at my school there is not one girl who I can see with it. At prom everyones arms were KP free. I am an 18 yr old male with KP and I know some fat guys who have it and I use to be fat. Do you have to be fat to get keratosis pilaris?

    • ANSWER:
      No, you don't have to be fat. And the KP is smaller on women than men, because we're smaller overall. And we spend a lot more time caring for our skin than guys do. We exfoliate, scrub, and moisturize. If you did that, your KP would be less visible too.

  40. QUESTION:
    Can Keratosis Pilaris disqualify you from the Air Force?
    I go to MEPS in about a week and was wondering if having Keratosis Pilaris on my arms is a problem. It doesn't bother me, it's not contagious, and I don't have any prescription for it.

    (Wikipedia: Bearing only cosmetic consequence, the condition most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy.)

    It shouldn't be a problem right? Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      It's actually a fairly common condition, my husband has it and it's never prevented him from anything. If it's bothering you, try exfoliating the area and applying a lotion with urea or lactic acid in it.

  41. QUESTION:
    Can you exfoliate on keratosis with sugar?
    I have keratosis pilaris on my arms and I don't have an exfoliant right now so can I use sugar?

    Btw keratosis is a skin condition that causes red bumps on the skin.

    • ANSWER:
      I've had it for years and I find that panoxyl is the only thing that really helps, ask your doctor about it.

      As for sugar, that would probably not be smart because it will clog the pores on ur skin causing further irritation and more red bumps.

      Do you have a loofa sponge of a pumice stone to rub on ur skin in the shower? That would be better.

  42. QUESTION:
    I got Keratosis Pilaris how can i get rid of them?
    I got Keratosis Pilaris how can i get rid of them?
    I got Keratosis Pilaris how can i get rid of them?
    i bought salt scrub bar it sais on it gently buff and smooth you skin with exfoliating sea salt ,loofah and softening sweet almond oil..will this help a little bit? can i use it everyday?

    • ANSWER:
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keratosis_pilaris <<<read this website and there are some treatments for it.

  43. QUESTION:
    I got Keratosis Pilaris how can i get rid of them?
    I got Keratosis Pilaris how can i get rid of them?
    i bought salt scrub bar it sais on it gently buff and smooth you skin with exfoliating sea salt ,loofah and softening sweet almond oil..will this help a little bit?

    • ANSWER:
      There is currently no known cure for Keratosis Pilaris (KP); however, there are effective treatments available in our forums.
      http://www.keratosispilaris.org/

      Moisturizing lotions are often soothing and may help the appearance of the skin. Skin creams with medications containing urea, lactic acid, glycolic acid, salicylic acid, tretinoin, or vitamin D may be recommended by your physician. However, improvement often takes months and the bumps are likely to come back.
      http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001462.htm

  44. QUESTION:
    How do you get rid of keratosis pilaris?
    I have keratosis pilaris and am desperate to get rid of it. Anybody that knows a way to get rid of it, has an idea or has experienced it themselves could u please help. this is making me very self conscious :(

    thx so much!!

    • ANSWER:
      I had this condition as well. The "permanent goosebumps" may not seem like a big deal to other people, but I understand how you feel! I have found KP will resolve once nutritional deficiencies are resolved.

      The two main things needed are:

      1. High quality omega-3 supplement like Neptune Antarctic Krill oil. You will also need to back off consumption of omega-6 rich foods because omega-6 competes with omega-3 for absorption.

      2. Adequate minerals. You will want to consider how mineral rich your diet is (probably a little low is my guess!) as well as how well you are absorbing the minerals you take in. Some things that helped me are Vital Earth fulvic minerals (results in just days), cultured foods and drinks (like kombucha, kefir and kimchee) and a Betaine HCl pill that helps me to break down and absorb the foods I eat. I tend to have low stomach acid (many if not most people do!) which makes it difficult to absorb nutrients, especially minerals and fats. No wonder I had KP!

      Try the recommended things above and see how your skin improves.

      CC

  45. QUESTION:
    What's the best way to get rid of keratosis pilaris?
    OK, so I worked out and got a really awesome body and the only thing stopping me from wearing a bathing suit is the keratosis pilaris on my legs. Does anybody know a GREAT way to cure them?

    • ANSWER:
      You should try "oil pulling" with coconut oil, take a look at this link
      http://www.keratosispilaris.org/showthread.php?t=4335
      It looks like it could be an answer, hopefully this helps!

  46. QUESTION:
    What is the keratosis pilaris treatment "oil pulling"?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris on my arms and I have been reading up on all kinds of treatments as there's no cure. "Oil pulling" is what most people have found to be effective treatment, I keep seeing it again and again but, one problem, nobody actually explains exactly what it is! Any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      Oil pulling means to swish a vegetable oil around in your mouth, kind of like mouthwash. I like using coconut oil because it tastes best. It kills germs in your mouth and is pretty effective (if you ever get a toothache, it really does help!). But it doesn't do much for skin conditions, unless those conditions are caused by too much bacteria in your mouth...
      If you want to try it, it wouldn't hurt, but honestly I don't see it doing much for you lol

      Try scrubbing the area gently with some wet brown sugar while in the shower, then rub a bit of diluted apple cider vinegar on the area. This is what I do and it helps

  47. QUESTION:
    how can I be cured from Keratosis pilaris?
    Keratosis pilaris is a skin condition in which keratin protein forms within hair follicles thus making the skin appear scaly or like chicken skin.Keratosis pilaris symptoms vary – it can be found on your face, arms or thighs. It can be very bumpy or very red or both.

    • ANSWER:
      Nothing helps except for carrot juice. Carrot juice has been shown to either cure and or significantly reduce the Keratosis Pilaris symptoms for some people. To get results however you will want to drink a pint of carrot juice daily until the Keratosis Pilaris symptoms begin to disappear. It is thought that the reason carrot juice is effective in treating Keratosis Pilaris is because of the high levels of vitamin A within the fresh juice. Vitamin A is one of the most important for the health of your skin, nails, and hair. You could buy it at Wal-Mart. You could also search on google for keratosis pilaris/carrot juice.

      Good luck!

  48. QUESTION:
    how can i get rid of keratosis pilaris?
    i have keratosis pilaris on my face, upper arms and upper thighs. ive been to a dermatologist and received creams, but they didnt work. how can i get rid of keratosis pilaris?

    • ANSWER:

  49. QUESTION:
    How do I know if I have Keratosis Pilaris, and will it fade over years?
    I have these little bumps on my arms and legs (they almost cover them entirely) and sometimes have dead skin attached to the end of the hair. Is this keratosis pilaris?

    I use exfoliating gloves all the time but it doesn't seem to be working.

    I'm only a teenager, so it might fade but is there a chance that it won't?

    Thank-you (in advance)

    :) 8D

    • ANSWER:
      It seems like you have Keratosis Pilaris because i used to have the same exact thing. It may fade away, but if it hasn't faded when your 16 or so, you might have it your lifetime.

      If you would like to get rid of them, i have solutions because i tried these and it definetly worked for me.

      From now on, Put lotion on the area where bumps are present.
      And try to keep this area mosterized.

      There is a lotion out there to treat Keratosis Pilaris. It's called Amlactin. Usually found in Costco. It should be gone if you used it everyday when the bottle is half empty.

      If that does not work, see a local dermatologists for they can give you prescribed medicine for it.

      Hope i helped =]]


a keratosis

Treatment For Chicken Skin On Arms

Derma roller treatment can provide you many benefits in rejuvenating your skin. It strategically damages your skin stimulating collagen and elastin production. The tool pierces your skin with tiny micro-needles which will give you a tingling sensation; it would reach deep enough to activate nerve endings sending signals to produce collagen. Since it makes thousands of pierced columns in your skin you will develop a new layer of collagen making your skin thick.

The new elastin produced after the treatment will help you to have a tight skin, reducing wrinkles and fine lines. It will also give you a supple skin. Though this instrument was first used to eliminate acne scars it also treats stretch marks, cellulite, stimulates hair growth and is used for hyper pigmentation treatments. What's more comforting is that you can use it to penetrate skin care products for optimal results. Especially moisturising creams which will make your skin look more hydrated.

Here are some testimonials that I gathered from reviews on Derma roller usage;

"I bought Derma roller for my crow's feet because they were getting pretty deep by my 50th birthday. After a few months, the lines around my eyes are lighter and thinner, not those deep groves I had before. "

"I love my derma skin roller! There is definitely a "breaking in" period for sensitive skin, but I eventually worked my way up to using it 2 times a week with no problem."

" I couldn't be happier. My hands look great (I've greatly reduced a scar on my arm and seen a real reduction in "age" spots). It doesn't hurt; some areas get red but look great the next day. "

"I never bleed but sometimes get a red spot or 2 (gone the next day). This is definitely one of the best things I've ever tried.My neck is more sensitive than my face but I have improved the skin texture (it was beginning to look like chicken skin"

As you see from the above testimonials you too can receive benefits by using the Derma roller. All you need to do is to consult a cosmetic physician and go ahead with the treatment. In general, if you have an imperfection of the skin, derma roller support, including stretch marks, acne scars, punches, burns, aging wrinkles, cellulite and so on. One thing you should keep in mind is that this is not just a matter of induction of collagen, dermis roller also act as a catalyst for the cream is placed on the treated area, the increased absorption of up to 2000x so it can also be used to treat hair loss and the lines of hair loss. If you are applying this to the skin, be sure to use a good vitamin cream, because that is the basis for most expensive creams, and it really is everything your skin needs to be made as in the scalp and hair loss in the terms, the use of minoxidil, even if you have tried with some results.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of Chicken Skin on arms and legs?
    I'm 15 years old, a girl, and I've had chicken skin for all of my life. It's only on my legs and arms, and it's really unattractive. I don't wear shorts or short sleeves because it's so embarrassing for me. I can't afford to go to a dermatologist, so what can I do at home? I've tried many lotions, and they never work. Any creams or anything that I can try?

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      What is sometimes referred to as Chicken Skin is actually a condition known as Keratosis Pilaris. (KP) It is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      Although KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured, it can be made less noticeable. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.
      - http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pil…
      - http://www.helpforkp.com/

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre…
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co…

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin.
      Check out this site for some great, inexpensive, homemade exfoliants you can try;
      - http://www.skinway.com/skincare_articles…

      The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers (Hot water tends to dry out the skin) and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when low humidity dries out the skin.

      Make sure to be drinking more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc… And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3’s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3’s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 – 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-…

      Hope this helps!

  2. QUESTION:
    Is there anyway to get rid of chicken skin from the back of my upper arms?
    I've got chicken skin on the back of my upper arms. Is there anyway to get rid of it?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello,
      This is due to keratosis pilaris. Keratosis pilaris occurs when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris, however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. Treatment includes tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream or Adapalene, a retinoid medication. Exfoliation, intensive moisturizing creams, creams and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      I sincerely hope that helps. Take care and regards.

  3. QUESTION:
    I have karatosis palarius aka chicken skin. How do i treat it?
    I have a skin condition called karatosis palirus. It is also known as chicken skin. I have had it as long as i can remember. It is very common. I've read that it mostly appears on the back of your arms and on your legs. Well i have it all over my legs and arms, my face, and a little on my stomach. My doctor did confirm what it was and i want to know how to get rid of it. It looks so ugly!

    • ANSWER:
      Research online. There are millions of websites dedicated to the treatment of KP.

      Exfoliate it and moisturize with DERMAdoctor KP Duty. It's the best treatment I've seen so far. Not prescription either, you can buy it at Sephora, though it's a little expensive. Moisturizers containing Alpha Hydroxy Acid or lactic acid definitely help.

      Don't pick on them.

  4. QUESTION:
    how do you get rid of chicken skin?
    i have ugly red dots all over my legs and arms and ive been told its called chicken skin...
    is there some sort of treatments or medication to remove it?

    • ANSWER:
      Try cocoa butter. I've heard it usually helps the problem.

  5. QUESTION:
    How do you treat Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have the condition KP (chicken skin) on my legs, upper arms and on the sides of my face. It's a condition where you get bumpy skin but is not itchy or irritated. Also wondering if I got it from the sun because it stops at my ankles and upper thigh. How do I get rid of it? Is there a type of cream or something? Please suggest products! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:

      1. How to prevent Sunburn* & scope for consequential skin cancer, Melanoma, etc: Expose Ur body and or the affected parts within 90 minutes from sunrise & within 60 minutes before sunset. Timely exposure of body ensures safe and sufficient production of Vitamin D by Ur body. During strong winds, no exposure to sunlight, please. Any extra exposure shall be @ Ur own risk for skin cancer/melanoma

      2. The symptoms cited---------an offshoot of blocked energy + accumulated toxins liver, lungs, Thyroid & Parathyroid, lymphatic system, Spleen, hormonal imbalance with a displaced solar plexus.

      ‘Target Therapy’ [Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies] proved to be effective for all types of cancer [including brain tumors, leukemia, melanoma, Crohn’s Disease, bone marrow cancer, breast cancer, etc., ] & all the most dreaded and incurable diseases.

      TARGET THERAPY* It is the God-given therapy communicated to the mankind through THE RIGVEDA, one of the Hindu scriptures.
      Target Therapy---Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies, [comprising Ayurveda, Homeopathy, Bio-chemic salts, Herbal Remedies, Yoga/Meditation, Magneto-therapy, Sidha, etc.,] U can have sizable & perceivable relief in 45-90 days. @ no/affordable costs, No side effects, and No Hospitalization.

      Dr.Vora designed it in such a way that the costs are the least for the survival/rescue of common man and the poor in villages, towns and metropolis on the globe; with NO insurance cover & NO money to bear the costs of chemo. It is most suitable to all the youngsters on this entire globe.
      U may study it, discuss with Ur family members/friends/acquaintances and slowly and steadily implement it for the best results.

      •No side effects and no risk. If it clicks, mostly possible, U shall have a cure. Lest, the therapy keeps mum. No extra risk. It is the most suitable line of treatment even for the terminally ill patients. Cancer cure/prevention is quite possible. U may try it for any incurable disease including cancer of any organ[s], post-surgical recurrence of tumors, Leukemia, HIV/AIDS, Crohn’s Syndrome, Gilbert’s Syndrome, colon cancer, Thalassemia, Alzheimer’s Syndrome, Muscular Dystrophy, Autism, bone TB., Tinnitus, all brain & spinal cord disorders, CLL, Crohn’s Syndrome, endometriosis, etc., ---it should aim @ [3] steps.
      1. Removal of toxins from all internal organs & purging through Normal Drainage systems, feces, urine, skin, lungs, menses [females].
      2. Activating all the internal organs to make each & every organ to function up to optimum levels, by purging out toxins.
      3. Supplying vitamins, nutrients, micro-nutrients, minerals, trace elements for invigorating the entire Immune system to produce antibodies.
      All items for a cure—available in Ur vicinity all over the globe.

      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse 'Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.

  6. QUESTION:
    I have a skin condition called Rosacia. Would appreciate if some one could give me a good home remedy ?
    Rosacia has made my skin on my cheeks, chin and nose become red. (really red). There is no real cure in allopathy it can only be controlled. DR adviced me to take Antibiotic for 6 months to reduce it but there is no guarantee that it will be cured. So would appreciate if any oen can give me a herbal /home remedy for this problem.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Ameena

      Here are some ideas to heal the issue.

      Quick Action Plan for SKin Issues

      1. Massage your skin, where needed, with bergamot, camphor, geranium, juniper, lavender, or neroli essential oils.

      2. Ayurvedic practitioners recommend making a paste of ½ tsp each of turmeric and sandalwood paste with enough water, and applying to pimples. Also, drink half a cup of aloe vera juice twice daily until skin clears.

      3. Eat an organic whole foods diet, with plenty of organic cooked and raw vegetables, and whole fruits. Reduce animal fats and stressor foods such as caffeine, refined sugars, and alcohol, as well as colas, candies, and frozen and processed foods. Include more high fiber foods.

      4. Drink eight glasses of pure, filtered water daily. Also, daily have two glasses of raw juice, combining carrot, beet, and celery juice, or, carrot, cucumber, and lettuce (not iceberg), and spinach, with carrot predominating.

      5. Add 3-5 drops of crab apple flower essence to pure water and drink during the day. Rescue Remedy® is good for stress.

      6. Combine the tinctures of herbs such as sarsaparilla, burdock, and cleavers in equal parts, taking ½ tsp three times a day. Drink an infusion of nettle several times a day and apply tea tree oil topically. An infusion of calendula mixed with equal parts of distilled witch hazel can be used as a cleansing wash. Steam sauna your face with red clover, lavender, and strawberry leaves.

      7. Useful homeopathy remedies are Pulsatilla, Silicea, Berberis, Ledum, Sulfur, Arsen alb., Belladonna, and/or Carbo veg.

      8. Enjoy full body immersion hydrotherapy treatments such as steam baths, saunas, sitz baths, colonic irrigation, hot and/or cold compresses, and steam sauna your face with red clover, lavender, and strawberry leaves.

      9. Useful supplements are vitamin A, beta carotene, vitamin B complex, vitamin B6, vitamin C, vitamin E, and zinc. Also include omega-3 fatty acids, brewer's yeast, chlorophyll, and pancreatic enzymes with meals.

      10. Expose your face to sun and air at least 30 minutes a day, and exercise daily. Keep your skin clean by washing your face three times a day with soap made from the herb calendula officinalis, or using other alternatives to soap. Rinse with warm water and pat dry. Keep the skin free of oil and use water-based products. Get sufficient sleep.

      11. Make facial masks from natural products; leave on overnight to help dry the skin if the issue is caused by excess oil.

      12. For long term relief and health be sure to do a colon cleanse. This clears out the toxins in the blood and excess waste in the body. Colon cleansing will healp clear up a lot of issue, expecially skin issues.

      Cause
      Skin Issues may be worsened at adolescence, during the pre-menstrual and/or mid-menstrual cycle due to hormonal action, and when under stress, on contraceptives, eating a poor diet that causes an over acidic system, or taking prescription and non-prescription drugs.

      Skin Issues may suggest the need for better hygiene, or magnesium and vitamin A. Also some skin issues are suggesting vitamin B1 deficiency or absorption problems. Consistent raised spots on the outside of the arms and sometimes even the thighs, resembling "chicken skin," may suggest need for magnesium, vitamin A, or essential fatty acids or the need to avoid foods that inhibit the absorption of these nutrients, such as trans-fatty acids found in margarine and hydrogenated oils, such as cottonseed oil and palm kernel oil.

      Food allergies, allergies to facial creams, soaps, shampoos, makeup, and excess intake of refined sugars, can all cause or contribute to skin issues. Certain foods can also aggravate skin conditions because of their high-acid forming effects on the body, especially fried foods, trans fats, iodized salt, alcohol, hot and spicy foods, all processed foods, chocolate, fruit juices, carbonated beverages, caffeinated beverages, and dairy products. Excessive long-term intake of seafood or other high iodine foods may also cause issues in some people.

      Coexisting gum problems suggest the need for folic acid. A separate skin condition may occur in women 30-40 years old due to physical exercising or working all day with face makeup, lowered resistance due to stress, or hyper-response to bacteria or hormone problems. Another skin problem, acne rosacea (reddish spots in a pattern over nose and cheeks), may be a sign of low B vitamins or low hydrochloric acid in the stomach.

      Best of health to you

  7. QUESTION:
    I have keratosis pilaris what can i use to help tame it?
    I have keratosis pilaris also known as chicken skin on my arms and other parts of my body but its one my thighs where its the worst I live in london and I was just wondering if there are any products that can help to make the condition less visible as I have been told there in no treatment that can get rid of the skin condition. Thanks x

    • ANSWER:
      Exfoliation is the key to getting rid of keratosis pilaris.

      Alpha Hydrox AHA Enhanced Lotion with 10% glycolic acid
      Glytone Body Lotion with 17.5% glycolic acid
      Any of Paula's Choice exfoliant will work

      Avoid heavy moisturizer, because they can exacerbate the condition.

      Cheers!

  8. QUESTION:
    CHICKEN SKIN aka KERATOSIS PILARIS, how do I get rid of these suckers?
    Does anyone know how to reduce the appearence of chicken skin or also known as keratosis pilaris. I hate having chicken skin, it's so embarassing. I hate showing my arms and legs or any part that has it. ARRRGH! Anyone else have this problem? Please help, I need some magic lotion or something to get rid of them somehow.

    • ANSWER:
      I have it too & it sucks!! I have previously used Am Lactin or Lac Hydrin, Retin-A based creams, and KP duty. The KP duty used to work for me, but doesn't any longer. It might work you you & is available at Sephora.

      Check out http://www.keratosispilaris.org/

      I found this online and am going to give it a try.

      - First I use a thick loofah sponge or buff-puff on the affected areas. I do this daily and I only use Dove Nutrium Body Wash with my sponge. I have tried several moisturizing body washes, and this one has proven to be the best for me. It is a dual formula that contains a gentle cleanser and a moisturizing lotion at the same time. It works great. When using the sponge, scrub as hard as you can on the affected area, and in a circular motion. Exfoliation is very important, especially since the affected areas are so dry. (Note: Dove has also recently come out with a Dove Nutrium Bar! So now I use both, and they are great. They make my skin so soft and silky, and the moisturizers are very good for the keratosis pilaris.)

      - After I exfoliate with this body wash, I then apply an over the counter lotion that has worked wonders for my keratosis pilaris. Neutrogena makes this lotion and it’s called “Multi-Vitamin Acne Treatment”. I know what you are thinking; keratosis pilaris is not acne. No it’s not, but for some reason this stuff works. In my reading and research on the subject, I ran across a treatment that recommended using a moisturizer that contained a small amount of salicylic acid. This product contains both. It is full of vitamins and moisturizers that are great for your skin, and it also contains this salicylic acid. If you apply this lotion right after you have scrubbed with the Dove Nutrium, it will give you results within 2 or 3 days. It did for me!

      - I also apply the Neutrogena Multi Vitamin Acne Treatment at night before going to bed. So I am applying it twice a day, once after showering and exfoliating, and once at bedtime.

      - Adding a humidifier in your bedroom will also help to clear your skin. The moisture will hydrate your dry skin while you sleep at night and help in clearing up the keratosis pilaris.

      - This next “treatment” is one I have found on my own and doctors do not recommend it. I am not telling anyone to do this, I am simply telling you what has worked in clearing up my skin condition. Tanning in the sun or in a tanning bed/salon. I like to tan anyway, so by trial and error I found that it cleared my skin. I started going to a tanning bed 2 or 3 times a week at first, and then dropped down to once a week. Each time I would tan for 12 to 15 minutes. That is not a lot of exposure, and it cleared my skin better than ANYTHING else I have ever done. I still have occasional problems with my arms, but my legs cleared right up and those bumps have never returned to this day, and I have not tanned in over 6 months. So I am very pleased with these results.

      Again, I am not recommending or condoning tanning or sunbathing, but I am telling you that it has helped to clear up my terrible case of Keratosis Pilaris.

      Doing these things consistently has helped me tremendously, but if you miss a day, you pay! Consistency is the key.

  9. QUESTION:
    How do you make the skin on your arms smoother?
    My upper arms seem normal, but they feel as though little itte-bitte pimples are covering the surface. How do you clear the skin and make it smoother?

    • ANSWER:
      i think i know what you're talking about. i have the same thing. it's little bumps, and they don't hurt, but they're sometimes dry and almost always annoying.

      Keratosis pilaris (KP, also follicular keratosis) is a very common genetic follicular condition that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin, hence referred to as chicken skin. It most often appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms (though the lower arms can also be affected), and can also occur on the thighs and tops of legs, flanks, buttocks, or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet). Less commonly, lesions appear on the face, which may be mistaken for acne.

      Classification
      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40% of the adult population and approximately 50%-80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men.

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faciei (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.

      Symptoms and signs
      Keratosis pilaris occurs when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore. This causes the formation of hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). The painless bumps are skin-colored, although they can become red and inflamed at times. Usually many plugs form in an area, causing patches of rough, bumpy skin. This gives the skin a sandpaper or goose flesh appearance. This may be more severe in the winter or times of low humidity, which causes the skin to become dry. It will eventually resolve on its own.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin's "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. The hair, then, grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated. The hair can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though removal can lead to scarring.

      Keratosis pilaris may be hereditary. It is present in babies and continues into adulthood, but is uncommon in elderly people. It is most obvious during the teenage years. KP is prevalent in those who are overweight, or have atopic dermatitis, ichthyosis, or descend from Celtic backgrounds. Keratosis pilaris occurs in otherwise healthy people.

      Treatment
      There is no cure for Keratosis pilaris, but treatment is available. One option is to use a loofa to remove the dead, dry skin. Another option is to use a dermotologist-prescribed cream or lotion that should be applied daily. The best lotions for this condition would have urea, 15% alphahydroxy acids, or Retin A in them. Over-the-counter lotions work as well and should be applied after showering, as well as several times a day. The lotions are often soothing and can help improve the appearance of the skin. Dermotologists also recommend mild peeling agents, or alpha hydroxy acids, that may open up the plugged follicles. Antibiotics may also help in some cases where the bumps are red and badly inflamed. To temporarily reduce redness but not roughness, pulse dye laser treatment or intense pulsed light (IPL) can be done.

      Although it may clear up with treatment, reccurance of KP is very likely. Therefore, treatment should be continued regularly. It may take several months to years for the condition to completely clear up.

      A dermotologist or physician can usually diagnose a patient for Keratosis pilaris by visually inspecting the patient's skin.

  10. QUESTION:
    Why do I have little bumps on my arm, between my elbow and my shoulder and how do I get rid of them?
    They are small un-noticeable (except to touch) bumps on my arm where the biceps are. They usually feel softer when I put moisturiser on them, except this does not get rid of them. How do I get rid of them completely?

    • ANSWER:
      I believe that you are talking about Keratosis pilaris and as far as I know its genetic. Here's what I found on the internet. Hope it answers your question:

      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a very common genetic follicular condition that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin and hence colloquially referred to as "chicken skin". It most often appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms (though the lower arms can also be affected), and can also occur on the thighs and tops of legs, flanks, buttocks or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet). Less commonly, lesions appear on the face and may be mistaken for acne.

      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40 to 50% of the adult population and approximately 50 to 80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. Varying in degree, cases of KP can range from minimal to severe.[citation needed]

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks) and related disorders.

      Many people with keratosis pilaris do not know they have it (if the condition is mild). While KP resembles goose bumps, it is characterized by the appearance of small rough bumps on the skin. As a result, it is often confused with acne.

      Keratosis pilaris occurs as excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin, accumulates within the hair follicles forming hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). Bearing only cosmetic consequence, the condition most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy. Though people with keratosis pilaris experience this condition year round, it’s during the colder months when moisture levels in the air are lower that the problem can become exacerbated and the “goose bumps” are apt to look and feel more pronounced in color and texture.

      [edit] Treatment

      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris, however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, Retin A and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to the lactic acid — a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may also be helpful but increases risk of skin cancer. Small amounts of vitamin A can be used orally but only with exteme caution due to potential for liver damage. Check with a Dermatologist or Family Doctor before taking extra vitamin A due to the vitamins' potential toxic effects.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden (if they do not already appear red), and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. Instead, the hair grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated, and can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though can lead to scarring.

      Food allergies may also exacerbate the condition, causing hyper-keratosis pilaris, gluten being a common culprit (source: physician's (MD) oral presentation).

  11. QUESTION:
    How do I get rid of these bumps on my legs that arnt razor bumps?
    On the tops of my thighs and leg I have these bumps. They are not red they are just little bumps on my legs that are the same color as my skin tone. I want to know how to go rid of them Because when I shave my legs they are never as smooth as they could be. I do not think it is keratosis pilaris. How do u get rid of it?

    • ANSWER:
      i have this problem too!!! it's very irritating.. not physically but just the fact that they're there..that's how i came upon you question. i was looking for an answer and i found this. It sounds accurate and reasonable. i hope it helps =] i'm going to try it.

      To eliminate leg bumps, aftershave, or razor bumps, you must understand what hair bumps are and where they come from. This will enable you to form a successful plan of attack. The bumps that appear on your skin are a direct result of ingrown hairs. Ingrown hairs develop at the end of the hair shaft. They have a sharpened edge and attempt to grow straight, however something prevents them from doing so. As a result, they curl back into the same hair follicle.

      People who want to know how to get rid of razor bumps often don't realize that rough, tough stubble that feels like it could cut glass is absorbent. The importance of this is simple: Hair that has absorbed water is much softer and easier to cut. Being able to easily cut the hair results in less skin irritation and a decreased chance of getting razor bumps due to the fact that the tip of the hair will be cleanly cut and smooth - not sharp and at risk of poking back into a neighboring follicle

      Allow it to continue growing and eventually free itself. This method works best when combined with daily moisturizing and gentile exfoliation to remove any dead skin that could be blocking the hair’s escape. If a pustule forms, gently squeezing it can cause the hair to pop up to the surface.
      Using a freshly sterilized pair of tweezers or a needle, you can fish the tip out from underneath this surface of the skin.

      The area of skin you have mentioned, the upper arms, legs and butt are often described as looking like chicken skin. The problem is that these areas are normally covered by our clothing and do not get as much exposure as the rest of our bodies. We also may not pay as close attention to these somewhat hidden areas when showering or moisturizing. These areas can tend to be dry. This dry skin can cause the bumps that you are seeing. In order to help get rid of these bumps you can try a stronger (alphahydroxy) moisturizing lotion.

      The best treatment is to let your leg hairs grow out to give your follicles a chance to recover.

  12. QUESTION:
    What are little red dots all over my skin?
    I have maybe a rash and I'm pretty sure it's not chicken pox. The red dots are showing up on my thighs, arms, and face and only a few of the red dots itch. Have any idea of what they are?

    • ANSWER:
      Well, it could be one of a few things. It could be a rash from something you come into contact with or are allergic to. Since it is all over including your face, I might guess soap or shampoo. If you've swam in a pool lately it could be because of chlorine - that can cause skin irritation. And, last it could be prickly heat - if it is hot where you are. Prickly heat comes from blocked skin pores from excessive heat, fluid builds up under the skin from sweat but it doesn't release because of the blockage and with that fluid buildup you get little bumps. What causes the redness and irritation is the natural salt in the body - it irritates and causes inflammation.

      So, options for treating. If it's been hot where you are, cool showers are the thing to relieve and cool down the body. You can purchase a product called Witch Hazel which is a liquid that eases skin irritations. It has alcohol and the herb witch hazel and you apply it with cotton balls to irritated skin. It might sting just a wee bit when you first apply but it absolutely brings relief.

      If it is allergy - consider all the products you are using on your skin. Detergent can be one, shampoo and soap. Most people, the only thing that contacts every part of their body would be clothing, sheets, shampoos, soaps. Or if you've purchased something new in the home, it could be offgassing an odor that is causing you to react - things like new carpet, furniture, pillows, a lot of new things smell new, but that smell comes from chemicals that can be irritating.

      A test would be to first take the cool shower and use the Witch Hazel (get at pharmacy - product name Dickinson's Witch Hazel - http://www.drugstore.com/t-n-dickinsons-all-natural-astringent-for-face-and-body/qxp86716

      If those don't work, purchase some over-the-counter allergy medicine - Benadryl is best for skin rashes. Only take one, and know that it will make you drowsy, so don't drive or plan to do anything after taking it. See if that helps. Whatever works in treatment will give you your answer. If it is the Benadryl that helps, you need to see what you've done differently in the last two or four weeks - it can take time for an allergy to build up so it might not be something that happened in the past few days. But if you'd changed something in the last week that would be the first thing to think of - and eliminate.

  13. QUESTION:
    How can I get rid of pimples on my arms?
    It's embarrassing to talk about, but I do have pimples on my arms and I want them gone. I have used acne treatments I have but they don't work! What can I do to get rid of them?

    • ANSWER:
      Those little rough red or white bumps that annoyingly plaque the backs of arms and sometimes the thighs are called "keratosis pilaris." They're not acne, it's actually a genetic follicular skin condition that's also known as "chicken skin".

      1. Go to a Dermatologist - (may prescribe Retin-A)
      2. Avoid hot showers and abrasive scrubs. Scrubbing the area only exacerbates the problem.
      3. Use unscented lotion after showering
      4. Invest in a humidifier in your bedroom when a furnace is in use in your home. More moisture in the air means less dry skin.
      5. Moisturizer with lactic acid or urea. Used twice daily, this treatment helps dissolve the thickened skin.

      Who does it affect? Kerastosis pilaris affects almost half of all adults and up to 80 percent of adolescents.

      What causes it? Keratosis pilaris develops when the skin produces excess keratin which traps hair follicles causing them to plug up. This can result in a thickening of the skin.

      YOU ARE WELCOME!

  14. QUESTION:
    How do I fix these appearance downfalls?
    I have all these little random bumps on my thighs are the top of my arms and I need to make them go away but I have no idea what they are! I've had them for years. You can't really see them but you can feel them. Does anyone know what they could be? Theyre really little. And they NEED to go away soon! Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      Here you go...

      Keratosis Pilaris
      Keratosis pilaris (commonly called KP) appears as "chicken skin bumps" on the skin. These bumps usually appear on the upper arms and thighs. They also can appear on the cheeks, back and buttocks. Keratosis pilaris, while unattractive, is harmless.

      What Are the Symptoms of Keratosis Pilaris?
      This disorder appears as small, rough bumps. The bumps are usually white or red, but do not itch or hurt. Keratosis pilaris is usually worse during the winter months or other times of low humidity when skin becomes dry. It also may worsen during pregnancy or after childbirth.

      How Is Keratosis Pilaris Treated?
      Although the condition may remain for years, it gradually disappears before age 30 in most cases. Treatment of keratosis pilaris is not medically necessary; but, individuals with this condition may want to seek treatment for cosmetic reasons.

      The initial treatment of keratosis pilaris should be intensive moisturizing. A cream such as Acid Mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 can be applied after bathing, and then re-applied several times a day. Other treatments may include:

      Medicated creams containing urea (Carmol-20) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily
      Efforts to unplug pores by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth or stiff brush.

  15. QUESTION:
    What do I do about these strange bumps on my arm?
    Okay, so as you can imagine, I have acne on my face. No big deal, I treat it daily, but that's not the problem.

    I have all these weird, acne-like bumps on my arm, and I can't get rid of them. They've been there forever. They are NOT mosquito bumps. Help!

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis Pilaris is a common skin condition that is mostly found on the upper arms, buttocks and thighs. Dry skin cells that normally flake off the skin, get caught in the hair follicles and clogs them up. This forms little pimples that have a dry rough texture. They are not painful or itchy but aren't very attractive and are known chicken skin.

      Keratosis Pilaris Treatment

      Keratosis Pilaris occurs mostly in teenagers on the upper arms. However, babies and adults can experience this condition on their faces, upper arms, legs and buttocks. It's a genetic follicular disorder that looks almost like "goose bumps" and are rather rough to touch.

      Primarily, it appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms, but can also occur on thighs and buttocks or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet).

      Worldwide, keratosis pilaris affects an estimated 40 to 50% of the adult population and approximately 50 to 80% of all adolescents, varying in degree from minimal to severe. It can last for a number of years but usual begins to disappear at the age of about 30 years old.

      Keratosis pilaris is a result of a process called hyperkeratinization. This is when there is an excess production of keratin (a natural fibrous protein of the skin, hair and nails) that builds up around the hair follicles. The skin becomes flaky and dry and if not removed from the skin it clogs up the hair follicles causing the small pimple like bumps that are visible on the skins surface.

      google 'oil pulling' - I have read that that can have dramatic effect and help the condition - reason is not well understood

  16. QUESTION:
    what is a really good skin care product for red bumps?
    Ive always had these little red bumps on the back of my arms and on my thighs, and aside from that my skin is dry and just never seems to look good! does anyone know of any good skin care products that could help?

    • ANSWER:
      Sounds like to me you have skin condition called "Keratosis Pilaris" commonly know as "Chicken Skin." Unfortunately, this is a genetic condition... so there's not much you can do for it. If you are still young, there's a chance of you outgrowing it. Here's some information on it and ways to keep it under control.

      http://www.keratosis-pilaris.org/
      http://www.helpforkp.com/keratosis_pilaris_pictures.html
      http://www.helpforkp.com/keratosis_pilaris_about_kp.html
      http://www.helpforkp.com/keratosis_pilaris_tips_index.html#anchor_87
      http://www.helpforkp.com/keratosis_pilaris_treatment_index.html

  17. QUESTION:
    I have a Condition on My Arms Called "Chicken Skin",What Can I Do To Get Rid of It?
    I'm 13 and I know break outs like this are normal but this condition is just awful. I appreciate it if you'd take the time to help me find a proactive solution to my problem.

    • ANSWER:
      never heard of that one -- will google -- Keratosis Pilaris : The Chicken Skin Condition : Help for KPkeratosis pilaris. Information on Keratosis Pilaris (KP), the chicken skin condition characterized by rough, bumpy skin on the back of the arms and thighs.
      http://www.helpforkp.com/ - 45k - Cached - Similar pages

      TeenHealthFX - Answers - I Have Chicken SkinI know that it's called chicken skin...I was wondering if you could help me...cause I don't know how to get rid of it...all I know is I wonder have to take ...
      http://www.teenhealthfx.com/answers/Health/2651.html - will also check with WebMD -- Cysts, Lumps and BumpsKeratosis pilaris (commonly called KP) appears as "chicken skin bumps" on the skin. .
      http://www.webmd.com/content/article/117/112605.htm ..... How Is Keratosis Pilaris Treated?

      Although the condition may remain for years, it gradually disappears before age 30 in most cases. Treatment of keratosis pilaris is not medically necessary; but, individuals with this condition may want to seek treatment for cosmetic reasons.

      The initial treatment of keratosis pilaris should be intensive moisturizing. A cream such as Acid Mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 can be applied after bathing, and then re-applied several times a day. Other treatments may include:

      Medicated creams containing urea (Carmol-20) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily
      Efforts to unplug pores by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth or stiff brush
      Prescription medicines including antibiotics (Erythromycin, Bactrim)

  18. QUESTION:
    Does anybody know how to get rid of excema for good?
    I have excema on my arms and legs (diagnosed by the docter) which is very dry skin and the doctor told me to put lotion on everyday but that's not making it go away!!! Help please! I wear a jacket everyday because I get teased at school. They say I have chicken pox. :(

    • ANSWER:
      Eczema cures and treatments are discussed below.

  19. QUESTION:
    What lotion is best for itchy skin while pregnant?
    Since being pregnant when I shave now I get really itchy, and am wondering what lotion to buy. I was thinking about those Gold Bond kinds, but have to go shopping still and check em all out.

    • ANSWER:
      i like the gold bonds itch creme - it isn't a lotion but a relief creme (like cortizon).

      i also like aquaphor (spellign i probably wrong) - i used it as a night treatment for my "chicken skin" arms - it is greasy but works.

  20. QUESTION:
    Why do the English relish so much making foreigners feel unwelcome in their land?
    I agree every country may have its fair share of xenophobes but the English really take the cake in alienating foreigners, almost making them feel guilty for breathing the same air as they do - the treatment gets progressively worse depending on whether you're a dark-skinned foreigner, Spanish-speaker or the Muslim who is universally loathed in England.

    What's wrong with you chaps? Did most of you grow up without your mum's love and breast-milk?

    • ANSWER:
      If you are rich, a banker or a gangster, then you'd be welcomed with open arms by the authorities. Indeed, they argue they must pay you millionaire bonuses to keep you here, or you simply just take them anyway. Helps boost the success feel-good factor, as well as the average wealth figures. We know the national property market is recovering because house prices are going up in London, thanks to rich foreigners.

      Also, if you come from a place in the EU with a favourable exchange rate, then you can work hard on minimum wage to take home, and we are under treaty obligations to make the hundreds of thousands of these folk feel welcome.

      I've been trying to get my Filipina girlfriend (a schoolteacher) here to visit me. I have not seen her for two years. This is a pretty sorry way to conduct a relationship, especially since we are both getting old and lonely. I recently celebrated my 56th birthday. She could not understand why I was alone on my birthday, eating leftover Chinese takeaway with just my neighbour's chickens to keep me company. Is this the right to family life we signed up for when we agreed the EU's Human Rights Act?

      The issue is this visa, for which the British Government charges the foreigner (often earning considerably less than the "average" British worker) £70 just for a tourist visa; the Philippines charged me a fiver for theirs, which they issued on the spot. The British require a trip to Manila and registration with a client agency. Iligan to Manila is about the same distance as London to Rome. Then they refuse the visa if the applicant cannot prove sufficient independent means to fund the trip using the "balance of probabilities" test, even though I have signed an undertaking to finance the trip along with all the necessary insurances.

      I heard from the Philippines Embassy that the British Embassy even refused visas to the Philippine national dance team, because they could not provide sufficient proof that they would not defect.

      Settlement visas are even harder. Rather than £70, the charge goes up to nearly £1000. The test here is that the couple must show that they can live without any State assistance. The amount the Government says a couple needs to live on is £105.95 per week, which is about £5500 pa. Not content with this definition, advisers are telling the Government that the amount a couple needs to live on if one of them is a foreigner is about £25,000 pa, and this should be secured in the form of an employer's letter stating the job is permanent and pensionable. How many jobs these days are this? Most of us who are not bankers or corporate executives are lucky to get minimum wage, and be thankful for it.

      Illegals, especially if they have criminal connections, get in scot-free, because the Border Agency is only strict with the law-abiding. It does not have the resources to catch up with the criminals, nor the clout to deport them when they are found out.

      So, I am afraid the authorities don't make it simple for us English people to welcome foreigners. And yes, we are not loved by our womenfolk, who are preoccupied with their careers and lifestyle choices, and with excluding men from their lives.

  21. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of Keratosis Pilaris (Chicken skin)!?
    I've got these horrible bumpy spots on my upper arms and I've had them for years and have never been able to get rid of them. I don't pick them but they're still there. Help!
    Also, I can't have any products with Hyaluronic Acid or Salicylic acid as I have been told I could be allergic to one of these.
    And Glycosaminoglycan is the same as Hyaluronic Acid

    • ANSWER:
      I am afraid it is a genetic condition one cannot cure. Do not believe anything else anyone says. the best treatment to control it are creams that soften the skin. Any cream that contains Urea is good for this. Speak to your local chemist as brands vary depending on which part of the world you are from

      Regards

      Dr.Sasi Attili
      Consultant Dermatologist

  22. QUESTION:
    What are the little bumps on the back of your arms called?
    I think that they are associated with hair follicles but I'm not sure.

    • ANSWER:
      They are called Keratosis Pilaris 40-50% of the adult population have this (including me!). They look like goosebumps, and is also known as "chicken skin" condition (which is not very flattering).
      The cause is a genetic follicluar problem (so you were right about the follicles)
      It is worse when the skin dries out - so is worse in winter, basically. Also gets worse for some people around pregnancy.

      There are various treatments, but no actual cure - so you can get it looking better, but it will never go away. Treatments include microdermabrasion, dry treatment creams for the skin, and skin moisturisers/treatments that contain:
      lactic acid or vitamin A, or glycolic acids.

      Other treatments and more information can be found at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keratosis_pilaris

  23. QUESTION:
    how to get rid of chicken skin under your eyes?
    its like bumps n stuff but not pimples. they have been there for as long as I can remmber and i want them gone. any ideas?

    • ANSWER:
      It could be keratosis pilaris which is a hereditary condition and there is no known cure.

      This condition usually affects backs of upper arms and forearms but also is known to affect thighs, buttocks and even face. The only place it cannot affect is palms of hands and soles of feet as there are no hair follicles for the build up of keratin (the same substance that is in your hair, skin and nails).

      You can try microdermabrasion but the under eye area is very delicate. All of the treatments used to make this condition better contain AHA's or lactic acid or Vitamin A.

      The eye area is such a delicate thing and I would recommend that you go to a dermatologist who is capable of assessing and diagnosing your problem and who may be able to suggest something to rectify it.

      Good luck.

  24. QUESTION:
    How can I get rid of these "red goosebumps" on my arms?
    I have these acne-looking pores on my arm, red and what not, how do i get rid of it? Sometimes they get itchy and they form the puss as well, but very small of course...and on my right arm near my shoulder blade, it seems permanent goosebumps formed because of the itching :( i was told from my sister it was because of a lot of SPAM in the past (lol) would scrubbing soap and applying lotion do the trick? please help!

    • ANSWER:
      when i was little, i used to have a lot of red bumps on my arms. Many of people get those.
      here is some info that might help you:
      Those little rough red or white bumps that annoyingly plaque the backs of arms and sometimes the thighs are called "keratosis pilaris." They're not acne, it's actually a genetic follicular skin condition that's also known as "chicken skin" because of it's resemblance to, well, chicken skin.
      Who does it affect? Kerastosis pilaris affects almost half of all adults and up to 80 percent of adolescents.

      What causes it? Keratosis pilaris develops when the skin produces excess keratin which traps hair follicles causing them to plug up. This can result in a thickening of the skin.

      How to get rid of it? Topical treatments are your best bet. Skip the acne creams, and apply one these topical treatments commonly used to treat keratosis pilaris:

      1. Moisturizer with lactic acid or urea. Used twice daily, this treatment helps dissolve the thickened skin, according to Jeannette Graf, a professor of dermatology at Mount Sinai Hospital, in Allure magazine. Graf recommends over-the-counter AmLactin 12% Moisturizing Cream.

      2. If the OTC product doesn't work, ask your dermatologist or family doctor for prescription Carmol 10 or Lac-Hydrin.

      3. Avoid hot showers and abrasive scrubs. Scrubbing the area only exacerbates the problem.

      4. Ask your doctor about topical retinol products such as Retin-A, Retin-A Micro, Evita or Adapalene. Retinols increase new cell turnover and help unclog pores.

      5. Topical corticosteroids are sometimes prescribed for a short time period. They provide temporary relief, but can only be used short term, because they have long-term health benefits.

      6. Invest in a humidifier in your bedroom when a furnace is in use in your home. More moisture in the air means less dry skin.

      good luck!!!

  25. QUESTION:
    How to Get Rid of Red Upper Arms?
    I have these red dots on the back of my upper arms (more so on my left arm than right) and I don't know how I should treat them. I don't remember when I first got them, but it's probably been a few years now.
    I'm 15 years old, and I don't know if it's acne, sun damage, or what. When I was younger, I used to go outside and play everyday but I never wore sunscreen or anything.
    What should I do to get rid of them? Would it be bad to use benzoyl peroxide?

    • ANSWER:
      It's keratosis pilaris [ chicken skin ].
      Buy some Dermadoctor KP treatment [ available at CVS, Sephora. Use as directed.
      {Peroxide will make it worse}.

  26. QUESTION:
    What are These red bumps that appear on the top of my arm that don't itchy and arn't dry?
    They also disseappear and reappear almost like they are stress related also I stay indoors all day.

    • ANSWER:
      That is called KP also known as chicken skin. I believe something like 80% of people have it and it is not any danger to people at all. In rare cases you can get it on the face which doesn't sound like its a problem for you.

      There is no actual 'quick treatment' to have them go away forever; however, with the use of continuous products can can keep them from appearing. With discontinued use of the products though the KP does come back. You want to use a scrub that has both physical and chemical exfoliators as well as a lotion that has chemical exfoliators. The ones that I have seen work the best is by DERMAdoctor. The KP Duty body scrub and lotion. http://www.dermadoctor.com/best-sellers/kp-duty-clinical-regimen.html

      Hope this helps!

  27. QUESTION:
    Chicken skin AKA Keratosis Pilaris: For those who know?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris and I dread it because it's just one more addition to my self-consciousness. I can't wear shorts because they're on my legs and thighs and my arms near the elbow. They're even on my breasts. I have tried the exfoliant wash (Glytone, which is expensive!) and moisturizers (AmLactin and Glytone moisturizer) for this condition and they are great with moisture and smoothing the roughness of the condition, but the appearance hasn't changed. My focus is to eliminate the appearance of the condition. What can I do, what should I use?

    • ANSWER:
      I, too have keratosis pilaris. You are doing the right thing by keeping it moisturized for the roughness. Unfortunately, there is little you can do about the appearance. You can get laser treatments, I believe but then you are dealing with a whole different set of issues, and it sounds like it would be extensive and certainly pricey.

      I have learned to just live with it and accept it as part of who I am. I wish I had a better answer for you!

  28. QUESTION:
    My dachshund is always licking HIS arm pits. What causes this, what can be wrong?
    I went to the vet...I was told to wash him with "special medicated shampoo" That didn't work. So I tried oatmeal shampoo for pets, he still licks. I was given another alternative to have him on meds and I didn't want steroids so he told me to use a medicated cream and he licks it off. I feed my dog Eukanuba for dachshunds in addition various meats, poultry and sometimes cheeses mixed with it.
    Any other suggestions?

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like an allergy, what did the vet say? Types of allergies are:
      Food Allergies- often will be itchy around the face, ears and feet, although can be itchy all over. Most common allergens include wheat products (found in most canned and dry foods), beef, and to a lesser degree chicken. Allergies will occur all year round.
      Contact Allergies- are quite uncommon, and usually affect areas with no or little fur cover eg. abdomen and feet. Allergens include grasses, plants, clothing/carpet fibres and many others. Often seasonal, but can be all year.
      Inhaled Allergies- are quite common, and affect all areas ie. skin, feet, ears, face, eye, nose etc.. Most common are grass pollens, plant pollens, dust mites, and moulds (found normally in most environments). Often seasonal, but can be all year.
      All allergies can cause itchiness anywhere, so it is impossible to tell just on appearances which allergen is causing the problem. Many dogs are allergic to several.
      TREATMENT
      If food allergy is suspected, trial dog on low allergy food diet, must be done for 8 weeks, The diet consists of:- Meat that the dog hasn't had before eg. fish, kangaroo, rabbit, - 30% of the meal. Rice- boiled -. 50% of meal. Vegetables -. 20% of meal.Give no other treats. After 8 weeks there should be improvement, if not an allergy test is next. This is a test for inhaled allergens, and tests plants, grasses, trees, dust mites and moulds. Done by blood samples. - if all of the above has been performed to no avail, then a contact allergy, or inhaled allergen not included in the allergy test is most likely. try change of bedding, send dog to a relatives place for 3-4 weeks.

      Medications that can help allergies.
      (a) Antihistamines-. these work better with evening primrose oil (1-4 capsules in food) antihistamines to try include:- Phenergan, Periactin, Polaramine, Teldane Contact your vet for dosage, determined by weight.(b) Anti-allergy shampoos and conditioners- There are many that help, eg. tea tree preparations, eucalyptus rinses, Quit Itch Lotion & Malaseb are good.

  29. QUESTION:
    how do i get rid of my acne?
    i have had acne for the past about 5 years and it fluctuates from ok, to bad, to really bad. I also have scaring and i have tried everything to stop it, proactive, all those other face washes and creams, and right now i am on benza clin which works kind of but i have been on it for about 1 1/2 years and it kills my skin leaving it dry, and bleached. i even did a diet thing where i only ate certain foods which sucked plus it didn't pay off! any ideas anyone?

    • ANSWER:
      HI Mandy

      Here are some ideas to heal the issue.

      Quick Action Plan for Acne

      1. Massage your skin, where needed, with bergamot, camphor, geranium, juniper, lavender, or neroli essential oils.

      2. Ayurvedic practitioners recommend making a paste of ½ tsp each of turmeric and sandalwood paste with enough water, and applying to pimples. Also, drink half a cup of aloe vera juice twice daily until acne clears.

      3. Eat an organic whole foods diet, with plenty of organic cooked and raw vegetables, and whole fruits. Reduce animal fats and stressor foods such as caffeine, refined sugars, and alcohol, as well as colas, candies, and frozen and processed foods. Include more high fiber foods.

      4. Drink eight glasses of pure, filtered water daily. Also, daily have two glasses of raw juice, combining carrot, beet, and celery juice, or, carrot, cucumber, and lettuce (not iceberg), and spinach, with carrot predominating.

      5. Add 3-5 drops of crab apple flower essence to pure water and drink during the day. Rescue Remedy® is good for stress.

      6. Combine the tinctures of herbs such as sarsaparilla, burdock, and cleavers in equal parts, taking ½ tsp three times a day. Drink an infusion of nettle several times a day and apply tea tree oil topically. An infusion of calendula mixed with equal parts of distilled witch hazel can be used as a cleansing wash. Steam sauna your face with red clover, lavender, and strawberry leaves.

      7. Useful homeopathy remedies are Pulsatilla, Silicea, Berberis, Ledum, Sulfur, Arsen alb., Belladonna, and/or Carbo veg.

      8. Enjoy full body immersion hydrotherapy treatments such as steam baths, saunas, sitz baths, colonic irrigation, hot and/or cold compresses, and steam sauna your face with red clover, lavender, and strawberry leaves.

      9. Useful supplements are vitamin A, beta carotene, vitamin B complex, vitamin B6, vitamin C, vitamin E, and zinc. Also include omega-3 fatty acids, brewer's yeast, chlorophyll, and pancreatic enzymes with meals.

      10. Expose your face to sun and air at least 30 minutes a day, and exercise daily. Keep your skin clean by washing your face three times a day with soap made from the herb calendula officinalis, or using other alternatives to soap. Rinse with warm water and pat dry. Squeezing pimples or whiteheads may cause infection. Keep the skin free of oil and use water-based products. Get sufficient sleep.

      11. Make facial masks from natural products; leave on overnight to help dry the skin if acne is caused by excess oil.

      12. For long term relief and health be sure to do a colon cleanse. This clears out the toxins in the blood and excess waste in the body. Colon cleansing will healp clear up a lot of issue, expecially acne.

      Cause
      Acne may be worsened at adolescence, during the pre-menstrual and/or mid-menstrual cycle due to hormonal action, and when under stress, on contraceptives, eating a poor diet that causes an over acidic system, or taking prescription and non-prescription drugs.

      Blackheads can form when the oil combines with skin pigments and gets trapped. Blackheads may suggest the need for better hygiene, or magnesium and vitamin A. Chronic, numerous whiteheads can also form during acne outbreaks, suggesting vitamin B1 deficiency or absorption problems. Consistent raised spots on the outside of the arms and sometimes even the thighs, resembling "chicken skin," may suggest need for magnesium, vitamin A, or essential fatty acids or the need to avoid foods that inhibit the absorption of these nutrients, such as trans-fatty acids found in margarine and hydrogenated oils, such as cottonseed oil and palm kernel oil.

      Food allergies, allergies to facial creams, soaps, shampoos, makeup, and excess intake of refined sugars, can all cause or contribute to acne. Certain foods can also aggravate acne conditions because of their high-acid forming effects on the body, especially fried foods, trans fats, iodized salt, alcohol, hot and spicy foods, all processed foods, chocolate, fruit juices, carbonated beverages, caffeinated beverages, and dairy products. Excessive long-term intake of seafood or other high iodine foods may also cause acne in some people.

      Coexisting gum problems suggest the need for folic acid. A separate acne condition may occur in women 30-40 years old due to physical exercising or working all day with face makeup, lowered resistance due to stress, or hyper-response to bacteria or hormone problems. Another acne problem, acne rosacea (reddish spots in a pattern over nose and cheeks), may be a sign of low B vitamins or low hydrochloric acid in the stomach.

      Best of health to you

  30. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know anything to help with light red marks left from acne?
    I have light red marks on my face from having pimples some time ago. It isn't that severe, just wondering if you guys had any advice. I know that it will go away with time probably. Are there any creams or anything that might help? They are on my cheeks, and in bright light are clearly visible... Doesn't look too good. lol

    • ANSWER:
      Hi John

      Here are some ideas to heal the issue.

      Quick Action Plan for Acne

      1. Massage your skin, where needed, with bergamot, camphor, geranium, juniper, lavender, or neroli essential oils.

      2. Ayurvedic practitioners recommend making a paste of ½ tsp each of turmeric and sandalwood paste with enough water, and applying to pimples. Also, drink half a cup of aloe vera juice twice daily until acne clears.

      3. Eat an organic whole foods diet, with plenty of organic cooked and raw vegetables, and whole fruits. Reduce animal fats and stressor foods such as caffeine, refined sugars, and alcohol, as well as colas, candies, and frozen and processed foods. Include more high fiber foods.

      4. Drink eight glasses of pure, filtered water daily. Also, daily have two glasses of raw juice, combining carrot, beet, and celery juice, or, carrot, cucumber, and lettuce (not iceberg), and spinach, with carrot predominating.

      5. Add 3-5 drops of crab apple flower essence to pure water and drink during the day. Rescue Remedy® is good for stress.

      6. Combine the tinctures of herbs such as sarsaparilla, burdock, and cleavers in equal parts, taking ½ tsp three times a day. Drink an infusion of nettle several times a day and apply tea tree oil topically. An infusion of calendula mixed with equal parts of distilled witch hazel can be used as a cleansing wash. Steam sauna your face with red clover, lavender, and strawberry leaves.

      7. Useful homeopathy remedies are Pulsatilla, Silicea, Berberis, Ledum, Sulfur, Arsen alb., Belladonna, and/or Carbo veg.

      8. Enjoy full body immersion hydrotherapy treatments such as steam baths, saunas, sitz baths, colonic irrigation, hot and/or cold compresses, and steam sauna your face with red clover, lavender, and strawberry leaves.

      9. Useful supplements are vitamin A, beta carotene, vitamin B complex, vitamin B6, vitamin C, vitamin E, and zinc. Also include omega-3 fatty acids, brewer's yeast, chlorophyll, and pancreatic enzymes with meals.

      10. Expose your face to sun and air at least 30 minutes a day, and exercise daily. Keep your skin clean by washing your face three times a day with soap made from the herb calendula officinalis, or using other alternatives to soap. Rinse with warm water and pat dry. Squeezing pimples or whiteheads may cause infection. Keep the skin free of oil and use water-based products. Get sufficient sleep.

      11. Make facial masks from natural products; leave on overnight to help dry the skin if acne is caused by excess oil.

      12. For long term relief and health be sure to do a colon cleanse. This clears out the toxins in the blood and excess waste in the body. Colon cleansing will healp clear up a lot of issue, expecially acne.

      Cause
      Acne may be worsened at adolescence, during the pre-menstrual and/or mid-menstrual cycle due to hormonal action, and when under stress, on contraceptives, eating a poor diet that causes an over acidic system, or taking prescription and non-prescription drugs.

      Blackheads can form when the oil combines with skin pigments and gets trapped. Blackheads may suggest the need for better hygiene, or magnesium and vitamin A. Chronic, numerous whiteheads can also form during acne outbreaks, suggesting vitamin B1 deficiency or absorption problems. Consistent raised spots on the outside of the arms and sometimes even the thighs, resembling "chicken skin," may suggest need for magnesium, vitamin A, or essential fatty acids or the need to avoid foods that inhibit the absorption of these nutrients, such as trans-fatty acids found in margarine and hydrogenated oils, such as cottonseed oil and palm kernel oil.

      Food allergies, allergies to facial creams, soaps, shampoos, makeup, and excess intake of refined sugars, can all cause or contribute to acne. Certain foods can also aggravate acne conditions because of their high-acid forming effects on the body, especially fried foods, trans fats, iodized salt, alcohol, hot and spicy foods, all processed foods, chocolate, fruit juices, carbonated beverages, caffeinated beverages, and dairy products. Excessive long-term intake of seafood or other high iodine foods may also cause acne in some people.

      Coexisting gum problems suggest the need for folic acid. A separate acne condition may occur in women 30-40 years old due to physical exercising or working all day with face makeup, lowered resistance due to stress, or hyper-response to bacteria or hormone problems. Another acne problem, acne rosacea (reddish spots in a pattern over nose and cheeks), may be a sign of low B vitamins or low hydrochloric acid in the stomach.

      Best of health to you

  31. QUESTION:
    How to remove black marks on arms?
    Hey,, I have so many blackspots on ma arms and it realy looks bad though I got nothing on ma face but obvsly I can't b comfortable wearing short sleeves
    Plz help me with any thing applying on them,,, without any injections

    • ANSWER:
      I m not sure ... May be something from these from home based tips can help you !!

      There are various treatments by which acne scar can be removed completely.

      The best treatment for reducing acne scar is the natural treatment which can be done at home without paying anything to the doctor.

      Some of the home remedies are:-
      Water is considered to be the best natural method to treat the acne scars and heal them naturally. Water sheds the dead skin cells and makes the new skin to grow and hydrated. So, one should drink lots of water.

      One should eat the fruits and vegetables daily to reduce acne scars.

      Lemon juice is a citric acid which is a part of AHAs group which is an effective home remedy for reducing the acne scars. This removes the dead skin cells, helps in the growth of new cells and gives elasticity to the skin.

      Balanced and nutritious diet should be taken to heal the acne scars. As the body needs protein to rebuild the skin cells and heals the acne scars naturally. Eating a good diet contains the essential nutrients which fight against the infection and any type of disease. Some foods which one should take in the diet include fish, soy beverages, chicken, tofu etc which are rich in protein.

      Rosehip seed oil is also another home remedy which reduces acne scars. This oil acts as an anti-aging agent and helps in the reduction of wrinkles, regenerates the skin and reverses discoloration. It is mostly used in the cosmetic products and used for acne scarring, facial scarring, surgical scars, sun damage, premature aging, burn marks etc. This oil should be massaged twice on the acne scars daily.

      Aloe Vera Juice or Gel is helpful in the fading of the scars and in their healing. Different brands of this gel are available in the market and the effect of each one is different.

      Lavender oil can also be applied on the acne scars as this oil is very gentle and contains regenerative characteristics.

      A paste of sandalwood and rose water can be applied on the acne scars and wash it with cold water the next day.

      One of the home remedy is that ice cubes can be rubbed on the acne scars for ten to fifteen minutes.

      Make a paste of Multani Mitti powder mixed with garlic, honey and carrot juice and apply on the acne scars for just 20 minutes which makes the skin glowing and reduces the acne scars
      4 years ago

  32. QUESTION:
    how do i get rid of these ugly red bumps on my legs and arms?
    sometimes they have little white things u can pull out they dont hurt or itch theyre just really unflattering lol. they come and go. more when its cold but when its hot they go away

    • ANSWER:
      Hey Hun, i have the same thing, its a skin disease.
      Don't worry, its harmless. Its called Keratosis Pilaris .
      Also known as KP, or Chicken Skin .
      Keratosis pilaris occurs when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin, which is cream colored, surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore.
      Don't worry, it'll go away after puberty or well in ur adult years.
      If you want them to go away, there are treatment creams avaliable, but i use baby cream, and it helps. There is no cure, and once again, its NOT harmful. Hope i helped .

  33. QUESTION:
    What is keratosis pilaris? and how can i get rid of it?
    someone said i have keratosis pilaris on my arms b/c i have had these pimple like things on my arms for about a year.
    whats it caused by and how can i get rid of it?
    its a real pain cus i don't like to wear sleeveless or short sleeve tops while i have it
    thanks

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (commonly called KP) appears as "chicken skin bumps" on the skin. These bumps usually appear on the upper arms and thighs. They also can appear on the cheeks, back and buttocks. Keratosis pilaris, while unattractive, is harmless.

      Although the condition may remain for years, it gradually disappears before age 30 in most cases. Treatment of keratosis pilaris is not medically necessary; but, individuals with this condition may want to seek treatment for cosmetic reasons.

      The initial treatment of keratosis pilaris should be intensive moisturizing. A cream such as Acid Mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 can be applied after bathing, and then re-applied several times a day. Other treatments may include:

      * Medicated creams containing urea (Carmol-20) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily
      * Efforts to unplug pores by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth or stiff brush

  34. QUESTION:
    Does deep acne scar disappear as time goes by?
    I have very bad acne scars on face and does it really disappear as time passes? or should i just get that laser acne scar treatment.

    If it disaapear as time goes, how long would it take?

    • ANSWER:
      Ok, i've never suffered with acne but there are three other types of scarring that I have had to deal with in my life that were fairly unpleasant. I'll talk to you about what those were and how I dealt with them and you can see what you think:

      1) I got bitten by a dog when I was seven years old and I had thirteen stitches on my face from five deep teeth-marks: four on my left cheek and one just above my left eye. It looked bad at the time and I remember my parents talking to each-other about it (I overheard): they were discussing whether or not I might need plastic surgery (perhaps a skin graft) when I was older. I remember my mum being very upset about my looks being 'ruined' and my father telling her that they would just have to wait and see what happened and what I needed.
      Basically as time has gone on the scars have really faded. The one above my eye is covered by my eyebrow and isn't visible at all now. The other four can be seen but they just look like small indents (like little dimples). They can't be seen at a distance and most people don't seem to notice them straight away: sometimes someone will suddenly say, on the third or fourth occasion of my meeting them, 'oh, what's that on your face' ... like they've just noticed, or sometimes people just don't notice at all and only become aware of it if and when I tell them.
      These scars were never treated so I guess what I'm trying to say here is that time really is a great healer: especially if the scars were caused when you were young. My dog-bite scars don't worry me at all.

      2) I caught chicken-pox when I was seventeen years old and I couldn't leave it alone (even though everyone told me I had too and warned me that it would scar, lol), because it itched so much. I was left with some minor scarring on my face (pock-marks) ... mainly around my mouth and chin area. Again, I think because these scars were caused when I was still young, and my skin still maturing, over time they have faded to insignificance. They don't bother me at all and I have never had to treat them with anything.

      3) I began self-harming when I was fifteen years old. At first the wounds I inflicted were more like scratches and didn't scar at all. I stopped self-harming until I was in my early twenties when some personal problems led me to start again. This time though I inflicted some much deeper wounds and a lot of them. The lacerations were all caused by a razor-blade - some of them required hospital treatment, but a lot of them didn't get it so I was left with scarring. At one time the scarring would go purple first thing in the morning or during winter (whenever it was cold basically) and it really stood out. It was quite bad.
      These scars were quite bad and didn't show any sign of getting better of going away on their own. Obviously because of the nature of the scars (where they were - on my left arm mainly, and how I got them - self-inflicted), I found these the most embarrassing and wanted rid of them.
      My mother bought me various lotions and potions to apply to the area.
      I used an Aloe Vera gel, which when used every day definately seemed to make a difference (although this isn't something that is going to just happen overnight - you have to be committed and keep applying the cream and not giving up hope).
      More recently I used Bio-Oil, which is a new oil specifically marketed for people with scars - it is very greasy and oily to apply, but it has a lovely smell and a lovely feeling when rubbed into the skin. I also reccommend this oil.
      Another product I would reccommend for scars is Coconut Butter - again, when used over time it really does work.
      I have been using these products for a couple of years now and I think the scarring has been reduced by at least 50%.
      Another great way of healing scars is by exposing them to sunlight. This last summer I was able to get a great tan and since my tan has faded I have noticed my scars fade significantly. Obviously you need to be careful not to burn in the sun (you don't wanna end up with skin cancer) ... but depspite all the negative publicity the sun gets, for scars the sun can really bring great benefits.
      The main thing is not to let your scarring get you down - there is plenty that can be done but you need time and patience to let it work. good luck.

  35. QUESTION:
    Why is chicken pox called chicken pox?
    And why was chicken pox mistaken for smallpox?

    • ANSWER:
      Chickenpox is a highly contagious and very common disease that is often described as one of the "classic" children's diseases, because so many people suffer from it during their childhood.

      However, chickenpox is not just a "child's disease". Adults can catch chickenpox if they have not had the disease when they were younger.

      According to one "history of medicine book", Giovanni Filippo (1510 - 80) of Palermo gave the first description of varicella (chicken pox). In the 1600s, Richard Morton, an English physician, described what he thought was a mild form of smallpox as "chicken pox". In 1767, an English physician named William Heberden, demonstrated that chicken pox was different from smallpox.

      There are many possible explanations for the origin of the name chickenpox. For example, the blisters on the skin made it look like the skin had been pecked by chickens. However, the simplest explanation is offered by Samuel Johnson, who said that the disease was "no very great danger" thus it was described as a "chicken" version of the pox.

      Chickenpox sufferers experience general mild flu-like symptoms, such as headache, fever, stomach ache, and also a loss of appetite, along with hundreds of itchy, fluid-filled blisters that burst and form crusts. These blisters mainly affect the face, arms, legs, torso, and scalp.

      Chickenpox is caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV), also known as human herpes virus 3 (HHV-3), which is a member of the herpes family and is known to cause herpes zoster (shingles) in adults.

      Usually chickenpox is usually a fairly mild disease, but a range of serious and rare complications can result in some cases, such as encephalitis, Reye's syndrome, pneumonia, myocarditis, and transient arthritis. Medical treatment should be obtained immediately if there is any sign of these occurring.

      Chickenpox can also cause serious complications for babies during pregnancy.

      In most cases, it is enough to keep the chickenpox sufferer comfortable while their own bodies fight the illness. Oatmeal baths in lukewarm water, calamine lotion, antihistamine lotions, and topical lotions can help ease the itching.

      Chickenpox virus is an airborne virus, which means that it spreads via the air. In addition, chickenpox can be spread by direct contact, and it is highly contagious even before the rash appears. As such, people often inadvertently spread the disease around before they even realise that they have it.

      The best way to avoid chickenpox is be immunized against the disease. Since the chickenpox vaccine was introduced, it has been a far less common disease.

      Although a severe chicken pox infection may be mistaken for smallpox, there are numerous differences between chicken pox and smallpox. For example, the smallpox rash usually first appears in the throat and mouth or on the arms, and then moves to the torso. The chicken pox rash usually first appears on the torso, and pustules in many different stages are present at the same time (while some are new, others are crusting over).

      Death
      Up to 30% of people infected with smallpox die.5 The infection can overwhelm the body's defences, leading to organ failure. However, all cases of smallpox took place before modern medical advances. So it is possible that less people would die if a smallpox outbreak were to occur today.

  36. QUESTION:
    HELP: How long does acne last for teenagers?
    My son has had acne sinse when he was 14. Now he is 17 and he still has them. He wanders when are they going to dissappear. He tried pro-activ and many other kinds of facial cleansers. They did not work. If anyone knows how to get rid of them it would be really helpful. Thank You.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Gelic

      Here are some ideas to heal the issue.

      Quick Action Plan for Acne

      1. Massage your skin, where needed, with bergamot, camphor, geranium, juniper, lavender, or neroli essential oils.

      2. Ayurvedic practitioners recommend making a paste of ½ tsp each of turmeric and sandalwood paste with enough water, and applying to pimples. Also, drink half a cup of aloe vera juice twice daily until acne clears.

      3. Eat an organic whole foods diet, with plenty of organic cooked and raw vegetables, and whole fruits. Reduce animal fats and stressor foods such as caffeine, refined sugars, and alcohol, as well as colas, candies, and frozen and processed foods. Include more high fiber foods.

      4. Drink eight glasses of pure, filtered water daily. Also, daily have two glasses of raw juice, combining carrot, beet, and celery juice, or, carrot, cucumber, and lettuce (not iceberg), and spinach, with carrot predominating.

      5. Add 3-5 drops of crab apple flower essence to pure water and drink during the day. Rescue Remedy® is good for stress.

      6. Combine the tinctures of herbs such as sarsaparilla, burdock, and cleavers in equal parts, taking ½ tsp three times a day. Drink an infusion of nettle several times a day and apply tea tree oil topically. An infusion of calendula mixed with equal parts of distilled witch hazel can be used as a cleansing wash. Steam sauna your face with red clover, lavender, and strawberry leaves.

      7. Useful homeopathy remedies are Pulsatilla, Silicea, Berberis, Ledum, Sulfur, Arsen alb., Belladonna, and/or Carbo veg.

      8. Enjoy full body immersion hydrotherapy treatments such as steam baths, saunas, sitz baths, colonic irrigation, hot and/or cold compresses, and steam sauna your face with red clover, lavender, and strawberry leaves.

      9. Useful supplements are vitamin A, beta carotene, vitamin B complex, vitamin B6, vitamin C, vitamin E, and zinc. Also include omega-3 fatty acids, brewer's yeast, chlorophyll, and pancreatic enzymes with meals.

      10. Expose your face to sun and air at least 30 minutes a day, and exercise daily. Keep your skin clean by washing your face three times a day with soap made from the herb calendula officinalis, or using other alternatives to soap. Rinse with warm water and pat dry. Squeezing pimples or whiteheads may cause infection. Keep the skin free of oil and use water-based products. Get sufficient sleep.

      11. Make facial masks from natural products; leave on overnight to help dry the skin if acne is caused by excess oil.

      12. For long term relief and health be sure to do a colon cleanse. This clears out the toxins in the blood and excess waste in the body. Colon cleansing will healp clear up a lot of issue, expecially acne.

      Cause
      Acne may be worsened at adolescence, during the pre-menstrual and/or mid-menstrual cycle due to hormonal action, and when under stress, on contraceptives, eating a poor diet that causes an over acidic system, or taking prescription and non-prescription drugs.

      Blackheads can form when the oil combines with skin pigments and gets trapped. Blackheads may suggest the need for better hygiene, or magnesium and vitamin A. Chronic, numerous whiteheads can also form during acne outbreaks, suggesting vitamin B1 deficiency or absorption problems. Consistent raised spots on the outside of the arms and sometimes even the thighs, resembling "chicken skin," may suggest need for magnesium, vitamin A, or essential fatty acids or the need to avoid foods that inhibit the absorption of these nutrients, such as trans-fatty acids found in margarine and hydrogenated oils, such as cottonseed oil and palm kernel oil.

      Food allergies, allergies to facial creams, soaps, shampoos, makeup, and excess intake of refined sugars, can all cause or contribute to acne. Certain foods can also aggravate acne conditions because of their high-acid forming effects on the body, especially fried foods, trans fats, iodized salt, alcohol, hot and spicy foods, all processed foods, chocolate, fruit juices, carbonated beverages, caffeinated beverages, and dairy products. Excessive long-term intake of seafood or other high iodine foods may also cause acne in some people.

      Coexisting gum problems suggest the need for folic acid. A separate acne condition may occur in women 30-40 years old due to physical exercising or working all day with face makeup, lowered resistance due to stress, or hyper-response to bacteria or hormone problems. Another acne problem, acne rosacea (reddish spots in a pattern over nose and cheeks), may be a sign of low B vitamins or low hydrochloric acid in the stomach.

      Best of health to you

  37. QUESTION:
    if ive conceieved this month will i be in danger?
    My little 2 year old son is covered in chicken pox. if i conceive this month will my baby be affected by the chicken pox? ive never had them before but i havnt got them yet.

    • ANSWER:
      If you've never had chickenpox before, you are at risk. So would a fetus be, if you catch them - the risks to the baby are different at different stages. The fetus would be at risk for congenital varicella syndrome which can cause scars on the skin, low birth weight and problems affecting the arms, legs, brain and eyes in early pregnancy.

      If you're exposed to chickenpox during pregnancy and you're not immune, contact your health care provider immediately. He or she might recommend an injection of an immune globulin product that contains antibodies to the chickenpox virus. When given within 10 days of exposure, the immune globulin can prevent chickenpox or reduce its severity. Unfortunately, due to the rareness of congenital varicella syndrome, it isn't clear if this treatment helps protect the developing baby.

  38. QUESTION:
    does eating apples and drniking water in 3 days really get rid of your acne?
    really i need helpl,because i want to enter a modeling career and acne is going to ruin it because of the scars it´s going to leave..HELP!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Alan

      It does help a lot becuase it gives the body a break form your normal eating habits and lets the body focus on your current health issues without digesting foods (most are probably processed wit lots of chemicals). But here are some other options, just in case.

      Here are some ideas to heal the issue.

      Quick Action Plan for Acne

      1. Massage your skin, where needed, with bergamot, camphor, geranium, juniper, lavender, or neroli essential oils.

      2. Ayurvedic practitioners recommend making a paste of ½ tsp each of turmeric and sandalwood paste with enough water, and applying to pimples. Also, drink half a cup of aloe vera juice twice daily until acne clears.

      3. Eat an organic whole foods diet, with plenty of organic cooked and raw vegetables, and whole fruits. Reduce animal fats and stressor foods such as caffeine, refined sugars, and alcohol, as well as colas, candies, and frozen and processed foods. Include more high fiber foods.

      4. Drink eight glasses of pure, filtered water daily. Also, daily have two glasses of raw juice, combining carrot, beet, and celery juice, or, carrot, cucumber, and lettuce (not iceberg), and spinach, with carrot predominating.

      5. Add 3-5 drops of crab apple flower essence to pure water and drink during the day. Rescue Remedy® is good for stress.

      6. Combine the tinctures of herbs such as sarsaparilla, burdock, and cleavers in equal parts, taking ½ tsp three times a day. Drink an infusion of nettle several times a day and apply tea tree oil topically. An infusion of calendula mixed with equal parts of distilled witch hazel can be used as a cleansing wash. Steam sauna your face with red clover, lavender, and strawberry leaves.

      7. Useful homeopathy remedies are Pulsatilla, Silicea, Berberis, Ledum, Sulfur, Arsen alb., Belladonna, and/or Carbo veg.

      8. Enjoy full body immersion hydrotherapy treatments such as steam baths, saunas, sitz baths, colonic irrigation, hot and/or cold compresses, and steam sauna your face with red clover, lavender, and strawberry leaves.

      9. Useful supplements are vitamin A, beta carotene, vitamin B complex, vitamin B6, vitamin C, vitamin E, and zinc. Also include omega-3 fatty acids, brewer's yeast, chlorophyll, and pancreatic enzymes with meals.

      10. Expose your face to sun and air at least 30 minutes a day, and exercise daily. Keep your skin clean by washing your face three times a day with soap made from the herb calendula officinalis, or using other alternatives to soap. Rinse with warm water and pat dry. Squeezing pimples or whiteheads may cause infection. Keep the skin free of oil and use water-based products. Get sufficient sleep.

      11. Make facial masks from natural products; leave on overnight to help dry the skin if acne is caused by excess oil.

      12. For long term relief and health be sure to do a colon cleanse. This clears out the toxins in the blood and excess waste in the body. Colon cleansing will healp clear up a lot of issue, expecially acne.

      Cause
      Acne may be worsened at adolescence, during the pre-menstrual and/or mid-menstrual cycle due to hormonal action, and when under stress, on contraceptives, eating a poor diet that causes an over acidic system, or taking prescription and non-prescription drugs.

      Blackheads can form when the oil combines with skin pigments and gets trapped. Blackheads may suggest the need for better hygiene, or magnesium and vitamin A. Chronic, numerous whiteheads can also form during acne outbreaks, suggesting vitamin B1 deficiency or absorption problems. Consistent raised spots on the outside of the arms and sometimes even the thighs, resembling "chicken skin," may suggest need for magnesium, vitamin A, or essential fatty acids or the need to avoid foods that inhibit the absorption of these nutrients, such as trans-fatty acids found in margarine and hydrogenated oils, such as cottonseed oil and palm kernel oil.

      Food allergies, allergies to facial creams, soaps, shampoos, makeup, and excess intake of refined sugars, can all cause or contribute to acne. Certain foods can also aggravate acne conditions because of their high-acid forming effects on the body, especially fried foods, trans fats, iodized salt, alcohol, hot and spicy foods, all processed foods, chocolate, fruit juices, carbonated beverages, caffeinated beverages, and dairy products. Excessive long-term intake of seafood or other high iodine foods may also cause acne in some people.

      Coexisting gum problems suggest the need for folic acid. A separate acne condition may occur in women 30-40 years old due to physical exercising or working all day with face makeup, lowered resistance due to stress, or hyper-response to bacteria or hormone problems. Another acne problem, acne rosacea (reddish spots in a pattern over nose and cheeks), may be a sign of low B vitamins or low hydrochloric acid in the stomach.

      Best of health to you

  39. QUESTION:
    How can you shrink pores?
    I have very big pores. On my face, legs, arms, stomach, everywhere. I was just wondering how I could shrink them. I also have a LOT of blackheads on my nose/chin. I was wondering if that had anything to do with it. I guess I have what people call "chicken skin" also...I don't know. I'm not sure if others can notice the giant pores, but it really makes me self conscious.

    • ANSWER:
      You never get rid of white/blackheads "for good". You have to get rid of them, then maintain a regimen to minimize their recurrence. You have a few options that I've used- Pore Strips, Blackheadmask-Before you use any method, I would recommend that you STEAM your face first. Be careful though. Get a pot, fill it half way with hot water, get it to boil. SHUT OFF the stove, and place your face above the steam. Again, be careful. You can also get a towel, soak it in hot water, and cover your face with it. Just make sure it's not hot enough to burn your skin. Then, do whatever treatment you want to do. After the treatment/strip/mask- Rinse your face with cold water, then close your pores with either 1.salicylic Acid, or 2. Benzoyl Peroxide/acne medication 3. Sulfur ( I use de la cruz 10% but it is very drying) 4.Tea Tree Oil (I'm going to be trying this one soon) to kill the bacteria that causes them in the first place. Go to www.blackheadmask.com if you'd like to purchase the mask (20$) but shipping takes a couple of weeks. Hope this helps. Good luck!!!

  40. QUESTION:
    how to get rid of chicken skin?
    i have had it all my life on my arms and legs and i would really like to have soft smooth skin not rough bumppy skin. any way to get rid of it thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (chicken skin), may improve with age and even disappear completely in adulthood; however, some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life.

      Treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden (if they do not already appear red), and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring.

      Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. Instead, the hair grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated, and can be removed if the bump is picked or squeezed (which can lead to scarring.)

  41. QUESTION:
    Is it ok to put on home remedies externally while on accutane?

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Slkfj

      Here are some of those ideas to heal the issue. You shouldnt need the drug, if you can follow most of these steps.

      Here are some ideas to heal the issue.

      Quick Action Plan for Acne

      1. Massage your skin, where needed, with bergamot, camphor, geranium, juniper, lavender, or neroli essential oils.

      2. Ayurvedic practitioners recommend making a paste of ½ tsp each of turmeric and sandalwood paste with enough water, and applying to pimples. Also, drink half a cup of aloe vera juice twice daily until acne clears.

      3. Eat an organic whole foods diet, with plenty of organic cooked and raw vegetables, and whole fruits. Reduce animal fats and stressor foods such as caffeine, refined sugars, and alcohol, as well as colas, candies, and frozen and processed foods. Include more high fiber foods.

      4. Drink eight glasses of pure, filtered water daily. Also, daily have two glasses of raw juice, combining carrot, beet, and celery juice, or, carrot, cucumber, and lettuce (not iceberg), and spinach, with carrot predominating.

      5. Add 3-5 drops of crab apple flower essence to pure water and drink during the day. Rescue Remedy® is good for stress.

      6. Combine the tinctures of herbs such as sarsaparilla, burdock, and cleavers in equal parts, taking ½ tsp three times a day. Drink an infusion of nettle several times a day and apply tea tree oil topically. An infusion of calendula mixed with equal parts of distilled witch hazel can be used as a cleansing wash. Steam sauna your face with red clover, lavender, and strawberry leaves.

      7. Useful homeopathy remedies are Pulsatilla, Silicea, Berberis, Ledum, Sulfur, Arsen alb., Belladonna, and/or Carbo veg.

      8. Enjoy full body immersion hydrotherapy treatments such as steam baths, saunas, sitz baths, colonic irrigation, hot and/or cold compresses, and steam sauna your face with red clover, lavender, and strawberry leaves.

      9. Useful supplements are vitamin A, beta carotene, vitamin B complex, vitamin B6, vitamin C, vitamin E, and zinc. Also include omega-3 fatty acids, brewer's yeast, chlorophyll, and pancreatic enzymes with meals.

      10. Expose your face to sun and air at least 30 minutes a day, and exercise daily. Keep your skin clean by washing your face three times a day with soap made from the herb calendula officinalis, or using other alternatives to soap. Rinse with warm water and pat dry. Squeezing pimples or whiteheads may cause infection. Keep the skin free of oil and use water-based products. Get sufficient sleep.

      11. Make facial masks from natural products; leave on overnight to help dry the skin if acne is caused by excess oil.

      12. For long term relief and health be sure to do a colon cleanse. This clears out the toxins in the blood and excess waste in the body. Colon cleansing will healp clear up a lot of issue, expecially acne.

      Cause
      Acne may be worsened at adolescence, during the pre-menstrual and/or mid-menstrual cycle due to hormonal action, and when under stress, on contraceptives, eating a poor diet that causes an over acidic system, or taking prescription and non-prescription drugs.

      Blackheads can form when the oil combines with skin pigments and gets trapped. Blackheads may suggest the need for better hygiene, or magnesium and vitamin A. Chronic, numerous whiteheads can also form during acne outbreaks, suggesting vitamin B1 deficiency or absorption problems. Consistent raised spots on the outside of the arms and sometimes even the thighs, resembling "chicken skin," may suggest need for magnesium, vitamin A, or essential fatty acids or the need to avoid foods that inhibit the absorption of these nutrients, such as trans-fatty acids found in margarine and hydrogenated oils, such as cottonseed oil and palm kernel oil.

      Food allergies, allergies to facial creams, soaps, shampoos, makeup, and excess intake of refined sugars, can all cause or contribute to acne. Certain foods can also aggravate acne conditions because of their high-acid forming effects on the body, especially fried foods, trans fats, iodized salt, alcohol, hot and spicy foods, all processed foods, chocolate, fruit juices, carbonated beverages, caffeinated beverages, and dairy products. Excessive long-term intake of seafood or other high iodine foods may also cause acne in some people.

      Coexisting gum problems suggest the need for folic acid. A separate acne condition may occur in women 30-40 years old due to physical exercising or working all day with face makeup, lowered resistance due to stress, or hyper-response to bacteria or hormone problems. Another acne problem, acne rosacea (reddish spots in a pattern over nose and cheeks), may be a sign of low B vitamins or low hydrochloric acid in the stomach.

      Best of health to you

  42. QUESTION:
    I have Keratosis Pilaris, what can I do to improve my skin condition?
    I have bought 2 Eucerin products : Waschenfluid 5% Urea mit Lactat and ph5 shower oil.. ... I was wondering which one would be better for my skin

    And what are some other things to help my skin.? Please help :)

    * If you don't know the condition, it's also know as KP or chicken skin.. Basicly my skin has little bumps and it's not nice to touch, it's also quite dry and the bumps tend to get red on my legs ( i have it on my arms and sides of my tummy also )

    • ANSWER:
      The first thing you need to do is intensive moisturizing with a good quality moisturizer such as a vaseline product and you need to do this a few times a day. That may help as a first step. Then you might also need to continue with long hot soaks in a tub and exfoliate the areas with a rough wash cloth or a brush. If those treatments don't help, then try the urea product which is one of the recommended products for keratosis pilaris. You may need some prescription treatments. The good thing is that it gets less as you get older. Read more here.

      http://www.aocd.org/skin/dermatologic_diseases/keratosis_pilaris.html
      http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pilaris/article.htm

  43. QUESTION:
    How do you get Rid of Razor Bumps ?
    I Really want to know who to get ride of razor bumps .
    Do you just leave them alone , or do you put something on it that will make it go away ? if so what do you use .

    • ANSWER:
      To eliminate leg bumps, aftershave, or razor bumps, you must understand what hair bumps are and where they come from. This will enable you to form a successful plan of attack. The bumps that appear on your skin are a direct result of ingrown hairs. Ingrown hairs develop at the end of the hair shaft. They have a sharpened edge and attempt to grow straight, however something prevents them from doing so. As a result, they curl back into the same hair follicle.

      People who want to know how to get rid of razor bumps often don't realize that rough, tough stubble that feels like it could cut glass is absorbent. The importance of this is simple: Hair that has absorbed water is much softer and easier to cut. Being able to easily cut the hair results in less skin irritation and a decreased chance of getting razor bumps due to the fact that the tip of the hair will be cleanly cut and smooth - not sharp and at risk of poking back into a neighboring follicle

      Allow it to continue growing and eventually free itself. This method works best when combined with daily moisturizing and gentile exfoliation to remove any dead skin that could be blocking the hair’s escape. If a pustule forms, gently squeezing it can cause the hair to pop up to the surface.
      Using a freshly sterilized pair of tweezers or a needle, you can fish the tip out from underneath this surface of the skin.

      The area of skin you have mentioned, the upper arms, legs and butt are often described as looking like chicken skin. The problem is that these areas are normally covered by our clothing and do not get as much exposure as the rest of our bodies. We also may not pay as close attention to these somewhat hidden areas when showering or moisturizing. These areas can tend to be dry. This dry skin can cause the bumps that you are seeing. In order to help get rid of these bumps you can try a stronger (alphahydroxy) moisturizing lotion.

      The best treatment is to let your leg hairs grow out to give your follicles a chance to recover. And we recommend picking up a couple of pints of Ben and Jerry’s Chunky Monkey and renting Season 1 of Grey’s Anatomy since you won’t be going out in public much. Just kidding. Really, you should get Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough.

      hope i helped u :)

  44. QUESTION:
    How can I tell if my child has chicken pocks?

    • ANSWER:
      What causes chickenpox?
      Chickenpox is caused by a virus, the varicella-zoster virus.

      How does chickenpox spread?
      Chickenpox spreads from person to person by direct contact or through the air by coughing or sneezing. It is highly contagious. It can also be spread through direct contact with the fluid from a blister of a person infected with chickenpox, or from direct contact with a sore from a person with shingles.

      How long does it take to show signs of chickenpox after being exposed?
      It takes from 10-21 days to develop symptoms after being exposed to a person infected with chickenpox. The usual time period is 14-16 days.

      What are the symptoms of chickenpox?
      The most common symptoms of chickenpox are rash, fever, coughing, fussiness, headache, and loss of appetite. The rash usually develops on the scalp and body, and then spreads to the face, arms, and legs. The rash usually forms 200-500 itchy blisters in several successive crops. The illness lasts about 5-10 days.

      How serious is chickenpox?
      Many cases of chickenpox are mild, but deaths from this disease can occur. Before the development of a vaccine, about 100 people died every year in the United States from chickenpox. Most of these people were previously healthy. Chickenpox also accounted for about 11,000 hospitalizations each year. Even children with average cases of chickenpox are uncomfortable and need to be kept out of daycare or school for a week or more.

      What are possible complications from chickenpox?
      The most common complication is bacterial infection of the skin or other parts of the body including the bones, lungs, joints, and blood. The virus can also lead to pneumonia or infection of the brain. These complications are rare but serious. Complications are more common in infants, adults, and persons with weakened immune systems.

      How do I know if my child has chickenpox?
      Usually chickenpox can be diagnosed by disease history and appearance alone. Adults who need to know if they've had chickenpox in the past can have this determined by a laboratory test.

      How long is a person with chickenpox contagious?
      Patients with chickenpox are contagious for 1-2 days before the rash appears and continue to be contagious until all the blisters are crusted over (usually 6-8 days).

      Is there a treatment for chickenpox?
      Most cases of chickenpox in otherwise healthy children are treated with bed rest, fluids, and control of fever. Children with chickenpox should NOT receive aspirin because of possible subsequent risk of Reye's syndrome. Acetaminophen may be given for fever control.

      Chickenpox may be treated with an antiviral drug in serious cases, depending on the patient's age and health, the extent of the infection, and the timing of the treatment.

      How common is chickenpox in the U.S.?
      Because it is so easy to catch chickenpox, almost every adult in the United States has been infected. Until a vaccine became available, there were an estimated four million cases/year. Since the vaccine was licensed in 1995, the number of cases of chickenpox had fallen 83%-93% by 2004.

      Can you get chickenpox more than once?
      Most people are immune to chickenpox after having the disease. However, second cases of chickenpox do occur. The frequency of second cases is not known with certainty, but this appears to be an uncommon event.

      If I think my child has been exposed to chickenpox, what should I do?
      If the child has had chickenpox or has been vaccinated, nothing needs to be done. It is recommended that a susceptible person (one who has never had chickenpox) receive the chickenpox vaccine as soon as possible after being exposed to the virus. There is evidence that the vaccine may prevent illness or reduce the seriousness of the disease, if given within 3 to 5 days following exposure. Even if the person was not infected with the chickenpox virus from the exposure, receiving the vaccination will prevent future disease.

      How are chickenpox and shingles related?
      Both chickenpox and shingles are caused by the same virus. After a person has had chickenpox, the virus rests in the body permanently, but silently. About 20% of all people who have been infected with chickenpox later develop the disease known as herpes zoster, or shingles. Symptoms of shingles are pain, itching, blisters, and loss of feeling along a nerve. Most cases occur in persons older than 50, and the risk of developing shingles increases with age

  45. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know a home-made, cheap way to get rid of acne?
    Please? It's so hard to keep down.

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Buru Inu Hippie

      Here are some ideas to heal the issue.

      Quick Action Plan for Acne

      1. Massage your skin, where needed, with bergamot, camphor, geranium, juniper, lavender, or neroli essential oils.

      2. Ayurvedic practitioners recommend making a paste of ½ tsp each of turmeric and sandalwood paste with enough water, and applying to pimples. Also, drink half a cup of aloe vera juice twice daily until acne clears.

      3. Eat an organic whole foods diet, with plenty of organic cooked and raw vegetables, and whole fruits. Reduce animal fats and stressor foods such as caffeine, refined sugars, and alcohol, as well as colas, candies, and frozen and processed foods. Include more high fiber foods.

      4. Drink eight glasses of pure, filtered water daily. Also, daily have two glasses of raw juice, combining carrot, beet, and celery juice, or, carrot, cucumber, and lettuce (not iceberg), and spinach, with carrot predominating.

      5. Add 3-5 drops of crab apple flower essence to pure water and drink during the day. Rescue Remedy® is good for stress.

      6. Combine the tinctures of herbs such as sarsaparilla, burdock, and cleavers in equal parts, taking ½ tsp three times a day. Drink an infusion of nettle several times a day and apply tea tree oil topically. An infusion of calendula mixed with equal parts of distilled witch hazel can be used as a cleansing wash. Steam sauna your face with red clover, lavender, and strawberry leaves.

      7. Useful homeopathy remedies are Pulsatilla, Silicea, Berberis, Ledum, Sulfur, Arsen alb., Belladonna, and/or Carbo veg.

      8. Enjoy full body immersion hydrotherapy treatments such as steam baths, saunas, sitz baths, colonic irrigation, hot and/or cold compresses, and steam sauna your face with red clover, lavender, and strawberry leaves.

      9. Useful supplements are vitamin A, beta carotene, vitamin B complex, vitamin B6, vitamin C, vitamin E, and zinc. Also include omega-3 fatty acids, brewer's yeast, chlorophyll, and pancreatic enzymes with meals.

      10. Expose your face to sun and air at least 30 minutes a day, and exercise daily. Keep your skin clean by washing your face three times a day with soap made from the herb calendula officinalis, or using other alternatives to soap. Rinse with warm water and pat dry. Squeezing pimples or whiteheads may cause infection. Keep the skin free of oil and use water-based products. Get sufficient sleep.

      11. Make facial masks from natural products; leave on overnight to help dry the skin if acne is caused by excess oil.

      12. For long term relief and health be sure to do a colon cleanse. This clears out the toxins in the blood and excess waste in the body. Colon cleansing will healp clear up a lot of issue, expecially acne.

      Cause
      Acne may be worsened at adolescence, during the pre-menstrual and/or mid-menstrual cycle due to hormonal action, and when under stress, on contraceptives, eating a poor diet that causes an over acidic system, or taking prescription and non-prescription drugs.

      Blackheads can form when the oil combines with skin pigments and gets trapped. Blackheads may suggest the need for better hygiene, or magnesium and vitamin A. Chronic, numerous whiteheads can also form during acne outbreaks, suggesting vitamin B1 deficiency or absorption problems. Consistent raised spots on the outside of the arms and sometimes even the thighs, resembling "chicken skin," may suggest need for magnesium, vitamin A, or essential fatty acids or the need to avoid foods that inhibit the absorption of these nutrients, such as trans-fatty acids found in margarine and hydrogenated oils, such as cottonseed oil and palm kernel oil.

      Food allergies, allergies to facial creams, soaps, shampoos, makeup, and excess intake of refined sugars, can all cause or contribute to acne. Certain foods can also aggravate acne conditions because of their high-acid forming effects on the body, especially fried foods, trans fats, iodized salt, alcohol, hot and spicy foods, all processed foods, chocolate, fruit juices, carbonated beverages, caffeinated beverages, and dairy products. Excessive long-term intake of seafood or other high iodine foods may also cause acne in some people.

      Coexisting gum problems suggest the need for folic acid. A separate acne condition may occur in women 30-40 years old due to physical exercising or working all day with face makeup, lowered resistance due to stress, or hyper-response to bacteria or hormone problems. Another acne problem, acne rosacea (reddish spots in a pattern over nose and cheeks), may be a sign of low B vitamins or low hydrochloric acid in the stomach.

      Best of health to you

  46. QUESTION:
    what will happen if i get chicken pox?
    im 18 and i haven't had chicken pox yet. i here it is worse if you get it when your an adult and im worried about getting it. what will happen if i get it? will it be really bad? can i die from it (ive heard)? if i do get it what can i do? will i get it because i know someone who is 45 and never had chicken pox. thanks

    • ANSWER:
      no i had them when i was a kid.there pretty much the same as an adult.you cant die from them unless your from a country like africa where there is no vaccinations.

      | health information | health factsheets

      Print-friendly version

      Chickenpox
      Published by BUPA's health information team, healthinfo@bupa.com, February 2008.

      This factsheet is for people who have chickenpox, parents of children with chickenpox and for people who would like information about it.

      Chickenpox is a common illness that gives you a rash and can make you feel generally unwell. Anyone can catch chickenpox but it mainly affects children under ten. Most people will have chickenpox by the age of 15. It's common at all times of the year, but especially in winter and early spring.

      About chickenpox
      Symptoms
      Complications
      Causes
      Treatment
      Prevention
      Special considerations
      Sources
      Related topics
      About chickenpox
      Chickenpox is an infection caused by the varicella-zoster virus, which is part of the herpes group of viruses.

      Once your chickenpox symptoms have cleared up, the virus stays dormant in your body. At any time later in life, but usually in adulthood, the virus can re-activate, causing shingles (For more information, please see Related topics).

      Symptoms
      You will start to get symptoms around 10 to 21 days after you catch the virus.

      The first symptoms of chickenpox can include:

      headache
      fever
      sore throat
      backache
      a general feeling of being unwell
      You may have these symptoms for up to six days before you get any spots. Chickenpox spots are usually very itchy. They vary in size and appear in clusters on your skin, forming a rash. You will usually get them on your face and scalp first, and then on your chest, arms and legs. You can also get spots inside your mouth and nose.

      The spots are fluid-filled blisters surrounded by reddened skin. They may develop into pustules (containing pus). The blisters or pustules then crust over to form scabs. The spots usually take around 16 days to heal completely.

      Chickenpox is usually worse in adults than children. Adults are more likely to have complications as a result of chickenpox and are more likely to be left with rounded, hollowed-out scars on the skin, known as "pockmarks".

      Complications
      In otherwise healthy children, chickenpox is usually a mild infection and serious problems are rare. The most common problem linked with chickenpox in children is a bacterial infection in the spots. This causes the surrounding skin to become more red and sore. Your child's GP may prescribe antibiotics to treat the infection. Rarely, chickenpox can cause encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) or pneumonia (an infection of the lungs). For more information, please see Related topics.

      Complications are more common in adults. The most common problem linked with chickenpox in adults is pneumonia. Another complication is liver inflammation (hepatitis).

      Up to eight days after the chickenpox rash develops, some children and adults may become clumsy and unable to walk properly. This is called ataxia. It's caused by inflammation in a part of the brain called the cerebellum. This usually settles down on its own but occasionally other parts of the brain become affected and can cause longer-term problems.

  47. QUESTION:
    Has anyone tried the product Scar Leaves?
    It's a product used to get rid of or lessen any type of scar? It works as a silicone based patch that you wear a few hours a day. It takes months to get the full effect (if any) but its suppose to work about 88% of the time. It's not expensive, seems easy enough, patches are reusable and definitely less invasive and expensive as laser treatments. I want to try it but need to get some feedback on it first.

    Thanks in advance.

    • ANSWER:
      As with all products sold, the buyer should always weigh all of the facts before buying. That being said, here are two testimonials from the 'Scar Leaves' Web Site.

      Good luck,
      D.S.

      Testimonials

      Dear Scar Leaves...

      Wearing Scar Leaves is the best thing that ever happened to me. Finally, no more pain from the keloids on my chest. Every time they were stretched they hurt - when I bent over, reached out, slept at night, or did nothing. Scar Leaves was easy to apply - tape on every morning - same sheet every day. Simple. Thank you for Scar Leaves.

      Betty Fernandes
      Coahomo, MS

      Dear Scar Leaves...

      I cannot say enough about your product....

      On July 14, 2003 I had a gastric bypass. I did not know what the out come would be...would I need more surgery for extra skin...would I luck out and not need the surgery? Well, being a chicken about surgery, I waited 2 years to make sure my weight loss of 100 pounds was enough and I would not gain or lose any more drastic pounds. I wanted to make sure I would not add or lose weight and stretch the new skin.

      Well, after a year of searching and much thought, I went to see Dr. G DeVita...he is just wonderful and so is the staff! We agreed to have my arms done in Feb.of 2006 and a body lift in June of 2006. After the arm surgery he told me not to use any creams on the scars. He gave me the Scar Leaves brochure and told me to order the items for my arms. He then reduced my 15 inch arms to 7 inches!

      I began wearing Scar Leaves. Well, at first nothing, but then after a month on my right arm, some of the scarring was gone! I continue to wear Scar Leaves...I can feel a difference. When I do not wear it, the scars are tight and uncomfortable.

      I will continue to wear it until I feel that all the scar tissue is gone. I can say it does make a difference and I am so glad I have Scar Leaves for my body scars, as I will start wearing them soon. Thank you for such a wonderful product!

      Yours truly,
      Doris Mackey

  48. QUESTION:
    Tiny bumps on arms? What are they and how can I get rid of them?
    1. How do I get rid of them?
    2. What exactly is it?
    my mom said i've had it since I was little. I got tiny bumps on my arms, a tiny bit on the legs, and a little bit on my cheeks. After showers I always put fragranceless lotion on my face (so it wont cause pimples) and lotion on my arms and legs and it works for awhile make them smoother on my face anyway.

    they are NOT pimples
    When cold wind blows against my face the bumps turn red on my cheeks. Also if I scratch the bumps, they'll itch for awhile.

    • ANSWER:
      It sounds like it might be Keratosis Pilaris (sometimes called chicken skin), a harmless but annoying skin condition that MANY people have. It's most common on the back of arms and legs, but can also be found on the face, butt, torso - basically anywhere except the palms and soles of your feet. Some of us have it forever, while the more fortunate will lose it as they get older.

      It is caused by keratin (the stuff your hair and fingernails are made of) building up around the hair follicles. Most people slough this off without any trouble, but some of us get little hard bumps. Picking them can cause scars (ask me how I know!). The best way to get rid of them is by using a lotion with an alpha hydroxy acid (AHA) or beta hydroxy acid (BHA). The most common BHA is salicylic acid, which is found in a lot of acne treatments. AHA's include lactic acid (found in milk) and glycolic acid. Look for lactic acid in the ingredient list on lotions. It's much milder than glycolic acid. If the lactic acid doesn't work, try lotions with glycolic acid, but be very careful, as it can cause your skin to peel. You also want to look for lotions that have Urea, which helps your skin retain moisture. Lotions with AHA or BHA can make your skin more susceptible to sunburn, so be sure to use sunscreen regularly.

      Check out the links below for more information on Keratosis Pilaris (KP).

  49. QUESTION:
    Getting rid of "chicken skin"?
    I have red bumps on my upper arm, the doctors told me it's often referred to as "chicken skin". As you could imagine, it's quite embarrassing. Especially if you want to sport a short sleeve shirt. I've tried a lot of treatments and nothing has worked yet. Since this condition is so common, I was wondering if anyone has found something that will take care of it?

    I would really appreciate any help!

    • ANSWER:
      Honestly allot of guys have it, friends of mine and boyfriends have had it. My best advice would be to get a lufa, its a softish scrubbing thing you use in the shower and just put soap on it and wash your arms, it will help to gently exfoliate your arms and will help the dead skin to wash off so it wont clog your pores. It will take some time, and you don't want to scrub too hard just gentle, but after a few weeks you should see a difference. Also try not to pick at it or irritate it as that can slow the healing process.


treatment for chicken skin on arms