Tag Archives: kp skin disorder

Kp Skin Disorder

To answer this question one has to understand what the term "natural" implies. Natural implies that the skin care product contains ingredients extracted from plants, earth, sea or animals. Examples would be essential oils extracted from botanicals, minerals such as mica, and zinc oxide which are found in mineral makeup, marine ingredients such as seaweed, or sea salt, or oils and other animal byproducts such as Emu oil which is made from the fat of an Emu bird.

Unfortunately, the term" natural" is not regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) and thus the term "natural" is often used very loosely in labeling and extensively in marketing ploys by the skin care industry. Additionally, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not define the term natural or organic. In fact the USFDA does not approve cosmetics before going to the market. The responsibility of the safety of the cosmetic lies with the manufacturer. Except for color additives and those ingredients which are prohibited or restricted by regulation, the manufacturer may use any ingredient in a cosmetic provided that they are safe and properly labeled and can coin numerous terms when marketing the cosmetic that may or may not be true. You can read more about the regulation of cosmetics at the Food and Drug Administration website.

If you are considering purchasing natural skin care products consider these tips:

Read the label - many skin care companies use the term "Natural" when in reality many products contain less than 1% of a natural ingredient such as aloe Vera, or other essential oils as an example. The most prevalent ingredient will be listed at the top of the ingredient list and the least amount of an ingredient will be listed at the bottom. Therefore if you are buying an aloe Vera gel and aloe Vera is not listed at the top of the ingredient list, you are more than likely buying a gel containing an enormous amount of synthetic ingredients versus the natural ingredient of aloe Vera.

Question the product - Is there scientific proof or clinical testing that can substantiate the product claims? Are you paying more because the product is labeled natural skin care? Is it really natural?

For those with sensitive skin it is best to avoid skin care product with fragrances, alcohol, FD and C colors, mineral oil and formaldehyde, however, mineral oil is in almost all skin care products and the more you use it the drier your skin becomes. Unfortunately many women continue to have irritated, dry, scaly, itchy or blotchy skin and jump from one chemical cosmetic to another trying to find the cure.

In short, always read the label on your skin care products and do a skin patch test to avoid topical dermatitis or an allergic reaction. Of all the chemicals used in cosmetics, the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health has reported that nearly 900 are toxic - although other groups attack that figure as being far too conservative. Again, understanding the ingredients in your skin care products will provide a great advantage when shopping for a new lotion or cream.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Is there a way to get rid of Keratosis Pilaris?
    So i know its a is a common skin disorder, typified by “chicken skin” bumps on upper arms, thighs, torso, buttocks and occasionally the cheeks. Excess skin forms around individual hair follicles, creating the characteristic minute, rough, grater-like bumps, but is there something you can do about it? Its really nasty and embarrassing!

    • ANSWER:
      get a product called KP Duty by DermaDoctor
      http://www.dermadoctor.com/

  2. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of Chicken Skin on arms and legs?
    I'm 15 years old, a girl, and I've had chicken skin for all of my life. It's only on my legs and arms, and it's really unattractive. I don't wear shorts or short sleeves because it's so embarrassing for me. I can't afford to go to a dermatologist, so what can I do at home? I've tried many lotions, and they never work. Any creams or anything that I can try?

    Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      What is sometimes referred to as Chicken Skin is actually a condition known as Keratosis Pilaris. (KP) It is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      Although KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured, it can be made less noticeable. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.
      - http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pil…
      - http://www.helpforkp.com/

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre…
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co…

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin.
      Check out this site for some great, inexpensive, homemade exfoliants you can try;
      - http://www.skinway.com/skincare_articles…

      The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers (Hot water tends to dry out the skin) and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when low humidity dries out the skin.

      Make sure to be drinking more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc… And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3’s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3’s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 – 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-…

      Hope this helps!

  3. QUESTION:
    Any anti-depressants that help with psoriasis and other skin conditions such as KP?
    I have seen in some reports that some anti-depressant medication helps with skin disorders.
    Does anyone know which specific medication?

    Thanks in advance

    • ANSWER:
      ive never heard of that before. try citalopram

  4. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of keratosis pelariis!?!?
    I've had KP my whole life I'm 14 And I have these bumps and acne on my upper arms and I'm afraid to wear tank tops outside. I know it's a hereditary skin disorder but I'm wondering if there's a treAtment, cure, ect. Pleazzzzzz help

    • ANSWER:
      I've tried lots of things personally, and none of them really work. I've tried prescription lotion even, per bottle with insurance did nothing. The best thing I have found (with doctors advise) is bathing in a hot bath at night and getting some sun on my arms. When it's summer time and I have a little tan the bumps go away pretty well. One last thing that works ok for me is Miracle II soap and lotion. You have to find that at a health food store or on the web. I used it for the first time this winter, and my bumps have been a lot less than past years. I hope you find a combo that works for you, and don't dispare cause my doctor said sometimes it goes away as we get older! Good luck!

  5. QUESTION:
    How do you treat Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have the condition KP (chicken skin) on my legs, upper arms and on the sides of my face. It's a condition where you get bumpy skin but is not itchy or irritated. Also wondering if I got it from the sun because it stops at my ankles and upper thigh. How do I get rid of it? Is there a type of cream or something? Please suggest products! Thanks!

    • ANSWER:

      1. How to prevent Sunburn* & scope for consequential skin cancer, Melanoma, etc: Expose Ur body and or the affected parts within 90 minutes from sunrise & within 60 minutes before sunset. Timely exposure of body ensures safe and sufficient production of Vitamin D by Ur body. During strong winds, no exposure to sunlight, please. Any extra exposure shall be @ Ur own risk for skin cancer/melanoma

      2. The symptoms cited---------an offshoot of blocked energy + accumulated toxins liver, lungs, Thyroid & Parathyroid, lymphatic system, Spleen, hormonal imbalance with a displaced solar plexus.

      ‘Target Therapy’ [Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies] proved to be effective for all types of cancer [including brain tumors, leukemia, melanoma, Crohn’s Disease, bone marrow cancer, breast cancer, etc., ] & all the most dreaded and incurable diseases.

      TARGET THERAPY* It is the God-given therapy communicated to the mankind through THE RIGVEDA, one of the Hindu scriptures.
      Target Therapy---Acupressure Techniques & Indian Natural Remedies, [comprising Ayurveda, Homeopathy, Bio-chemic salts, Herbal Remedies, Yoga/Meditation, Magneto-therapy, Sidha, etc.,] U can have sizable & perceivable relief in 45-90 days. @ no/affordable costs, No side effects, and No Hospitalization.

      Dr.Vora designed it in such a way that the costs are the least for the survival/rescue of common man and the poor in villages, towns and metropolis on the globe; with NO insurance cover & NO money to bear the costs of chemo. It is most suitable to all the youngsters on this entire globe.
      U may study it, discuss with Ur family members/friends/acquaintances and slowly and steadily implement it for the best results.

      •No side effects and no risk. If it clicks, mostly possible, U shall have a cure. Lest, the therapy keeps mum. No extra risk. It is the most suitable line of treatment even for the terminally ill patients. Cancer cure/prevention is quite possible. U may try it for any incurable disease including cancer of any organ[s], post-surgical recurrence of tumors, Leukemia, HIV/AIDS, Crohn’s Syndrome, Gilbert’s Syndrome, colon cancer, Thalassemia, Alzheimer’s Syndrome, Muscular Dystrophy, Autism, bone TB., Tinnitus, all brain & spinal cord disorders, CLL, Crohn’s Syndrome, endometriosis, etc., ---it should aim @ [3] steps.
      1. Removal of toxins from all internal organs & purging through Normal Drainage systems, feces, urine, skin, lungs, menses [females].
      2. Activating all the internal organs to make each & every organ to function up to optimum levels, by purging out toxins.
      3. Supplying vitamins, nutrients, micro-nutrients, minerals, trace elements for invigorating the entire Immune system to produce antibodies.
      All items for a cure—available in Ur vicinity all over the globe.

      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse 'Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.

  6. QUESTION:
    How do you make the skin on your arms smoother?
    My upper arms seem normal, but they feel as though little itte-bitte pimples are covering the surface. How do you clear the skin and make it smoother?

    • ANSWER:
      i think i know what you're talking about. i have the same thing. it's little bumps, and they don't hurt, but they're sometimes dry and almost always annoying.

      Keratosis pilaris (KP, also follicular keratosis) is a very common genetic follicular condition that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin, hence referred to as chicken skin. It most often appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms (though the lower arms can also be affected), and can also occur on the thighs and tops of legs, flanks, buttocks, or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet). Less commonly, lesions appear on the face, which may be mistaken for acne.

      Classification
      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40% of the adult population and approximately 50%-80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men.

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faciei (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.

      Symptoms and signs
      Keratosis pilaris occurs when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore. This causes the formation of hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). The painless bumps are skin-colored, although they can become red and inflamed at times. Usually many plugs form in an area, causing patches of rough, bumpy skin. This gives the skin a sandpaper or goose flesh appearance. This may be more severe in the winter or times of low humidity, which causes the skin to become dry. It will eventually resolve on its own.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin's "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. The hair, then, grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated. The hair can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though removal can lead to scarring.

      Keratosis pilaris may be hereditary. It is present in babies and continues into adulthood, but is uncommon in elderly people. It is most obvious during the teenage years. KP is prevalent in those who are overweight, or have atopic dermatitis, ichthyosis, or descend from Celtic backgrounds. Keratosis pilaris occurs in otherwise healthy people.

      Treatment
      There is no cure for Keratosis pilaris, but treatment is available. One option is to use a loofa to remove the dead, dry skin. Another option is to use a dermotologist-prescribed cream or lotion that should be applied daily. The best lotions for this condition would have urea, 15% alphahydroxy acids, or Retin A in them. Over-the-counter lotions work as well and should be applied after showering, as well as several times a day. The lotions are often soothing and can help improve the appearance of the skin. Dermotologists also recommend mild peeling agents, or alpha hydroxy acids, that may open up the plugged follicles. Antibiotics may also help in some cases where the bumps are red and badly inflamed. To temporarily reduce redness but not roughness, pulse dye laser treatment or intense pulsed light (IPL) can be done.

      Although it may clear up with treatment, reccurance of KP is very likely. Therefore, treatment should be continued regularly. It may take several months to years for the condition to completely clear up.

      A dermotologist or physician can usually diagnose a patient for Keratosis pilaris by visually inspecting the patient's skin.

  7. QUESTION:
    How do i get rid permanently of red dry bumpy skin?
    ever since i was little i have had this type of skin on the sides of my face, all over my arms, and some parts of my chest and i want it gone. ive tried everything, can someone plz recommend something to make it go away

    • ANSWER:
      You might have Keratosis Pilaris.

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris:
      1. Keratosis pilaris rubra: red, inflamed bumps
      2. Keratosis pilaris Alba: rough, white, bumpy skin
      3. Keratosis pilaris rubra faceii: reddish rash over the cheeks

      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris. However, there are effective treatments available that make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Most of the available treatments are purely symptomatic; the one thing they all have in common is need for repetition and ongoing commitment. Some seeking treatment with the disorder may be prescribed Tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream, often by request.

      Triamcinolone, most commonly sold under the trade name Aristocort, is a synthetic corticosteroid medically approved as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of eczema, which also reduces the amount of keratin in pores. It may be of most help to those with keratosis pilaris by reducing red, inflamed bumps. Triamcinolone is typically applied three times a day.

      Tretinoin, most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by causing the outer layer of the skin to grow more rapidly, which decreases the amount of the protein keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. As keratosis pilaris is manifested through excess keratin in the skin, Tretinoin forms a more effective and core approach to treatment than Triamcinolone, which forms a largely symptomatic approach. Tretinoin is typically applied once a day before bed.

      An alternative treatment is Adapalene, a retinoid medication that is a more stable compound, is less sunlight-sensitive, has fewer general side-effects, and may be just as effective as Retin-A. Treatment of KP with Adapalene would be considered an "off-label" use of the medication.

      As with Triamcinolone, Tretinoin or any other treatment, once therapy is discontinued, the condition reverts to its original state. However, skin treated with Tretinoin may take several weeks or more to revert to its pre-treatment condition, but may, at the same time, take several weeks or more to show optimal results, with the condition commonly worsening initially, as underlying keratin is brought to the surface of the skin. Tretinoin is considerably more expensive and dispensed in smaller quantities than Triamcinolone and other treatments. Although it may be the most effective treatment for keratosis pilaris, it is not considered the first line of treatment.

      Keratosis pilaris has not been clinically researched for treatment in an unbiased manner, with all claims of success or improvement being purely marketed or anecdotal. The condition is often dismissed outright by practitioners as being presently untreatable, giving mere moisturizing suggestions or reassurance that the condition will improve or cease with age, typically after 30. General practitioners are often unable to identify the condition. Ignorance, accompanied with the price, availability, quantity dispensed, time taken for optimal results to be achieved, more serious side-effects, adverse reactions, and worsening of the condition in the initial treatment phase - coupled with the cheaper, safer, and easier availability of other treatments - has hindered Tretinoin from showing its potential in the treatment of this condition.

      exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, creams, and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Beta hydroxy acids may help improve the appearance and texture of the afflicted skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to their containing lactic acid, a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may be helpful in moderation. Coconut oil may also be helpful if applied to afflicted areas while in the shower. Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, and, in many cases, will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing, such as tight-fitting jeans, is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

  8. QUESTION:
    My medicine is drying my skin out terribly?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris (a skin disorder), so I went to my dermatologist to see if he could help me. He gave me some cream for it, and it helps with the KP, but it dries my skin out terribly. Like imagine dry skin x100. Lotion is a bit harsh for my skin, because the skin on my face is extremely sensitive, and I don't know if using lotion will mess with the medicine. Will the dry skin get better, or what can I use that will help?

    • ANSWER:

  9. QUESTION:
    What are the bumps on my skin that look like goose bumps?
    they're on my arms and tummy and they look like little white bumps (not red) and they wont go away. they're not spread out they are in groups and are small. i want to get rid of them but idk how. does anybody know what they are and how to get rid of them?plz help.

    • ANSWER:
      ?Keratosis pilaris...
      Keratosis pilaris (KP) describes a group of disorders.1 It is a very common condition in which there is hyperkeratosis around hair follicles. KP is often described in association with other dry skin conditions. the bumps can be white, pinkish brown or red.
      Treatment
      * Avoid excessive dryness of the skin but emollients and moisturisers are of limited value. That is not to say that they have no value.
      * Creams with salicylic acid, lactic acid or urea may be of value.
      * Expensive cosmetic or vitamin creams are not helpful.
      * An abrasive pad may be helpful.
      * Take tepid showers rather than hot baths.

  10. QUESTION:
    I have red dots on my arms and legs. Do I have a skin disease?
    I have these little red dots on my arms and legs all over. It isn't chicken pox or anything, it doesn't itch. Sometimes it isn't that bad, but when i get uncomfortable or nervous it gets really bad. I've had it most of my life, but these past couple of years it has gotten worse. So do I have some kind of a skin disease, and if I do, can I treat it or get rid of it somehow?

    • ANSWER:
      It could be Keratosis Pilaris, it's a hereditary skin disorder that a lot of people have. I have it, and it sucks because there is no cure. Fortunately for some, though, it can improve with age. It is the most prominent during adolescence and during the teen years, but for some it starts to clear up a little later on.(some have said that when they entered their mid twenties they noticed that it was less noticeable) There is some really useful information about it on this site that can help you determine whether or not that is the problem:
      http://www.helpforkp.com/

      You can find some info and the symptoms here:
      http://www.helpforkp.com/keratosis_pilaris_about_kp.html

      And pictures in case you want to compare:
      http://www.helpforkp.com/keratosis_pilaris_pictures.html

      If you do have it one thing you can do is try to moisturize it with lotion (it helps) One really good moisturizer is Eucerin Plus Intensive Repair Cream. Don't try to physically exfoliate the skin with things like lofa sponges. Those can be too abrasive and can make it worse. The Eucerin lotion I mentioned has things in it that exfoliates the skin for you, which will give you good results.

      If it's not Keratosis Pilaris, thank your lucky stars and be sure to see a dermatologist to see what the problem is and what you can do about it. I had a doctor tell me I was ZINC deficient, but even after taking Zinc for 6 months there was very little improvement. It's actually better in the summer time. In the winter there is less moisture in the air and dryness can make Keratosis Pilaris look worse (which is why moisturizing the skin is a good idea, it’s better to put lotions and creams on right after a shower)

      Good luck!

  11. QUESTION:
    What is the name of injection to prevent chilblains?
    Hello
    I am suffering from chilblains. My fingers are getting red , swollen. And it is itched too much at night. I tried to put my legs into hot water with some salt and another items but its still the same. Even at that time itched are not bearable. I heard so many people that there is some injection to prevent this, but don't know the name, If anybody knows please let me know.

    • ANSWER:
      Safer than injections. You can, not only prevent, but also have permanent cure.

      1.Chilblain— Inflammation of the skin over the toes or some portion of the feet, the hand or ears, caused by sudden alternations of temperature. The skin becomes red in patches, slightly swollen and there is much irritation and itching, specially in the evening. NS 3x alone, failing which mixture of CP 3x or 12x, FP 12x, KM 3x, KP 3x, NM 3x, NS 3x and S 12x both internally and locally mixed with vaseline, failing which mixture of CS 3x, KS 3x and NP 3x.

      •Dosage*: 2 grains t.d.s.
      •All these biochemic salts/homeo medicines available @ local Homoeo shops, are safe and with side benefits. Don’t swallow medicine. The medicine to be dissolved on/under the tongue. Don’t take any thing 10 minutes before and 10 minutes after medication. You can take water.

      2.CAUSE; The endocrine glands produce hormones to regulate human traits, namely, Kama [desire], Krodha[anger], Lobha[Selfishness and greed]Moha[[love], Mada[lust] and matsaryas[affections]. Hormonal Imbalance is the root cause of all the chronic and dreaded diseases/syndromes.
      Prevention* & Cure* of any Disease/Syndrome/Disorder/Hormonal Imbalance:---
      In any ailment [acute as well as chronic] and emergencies, Acupressure techniques come to Ur rescue, not only for instant diagnosis, but also for giving some prevention of any disease[s] and perceivable relief/cure. No medication/hospitalization/side effects. Most suitable to the poor masses who can’t afford insurance, nor ability to pay the bills.
      1. Acupressure techniques--- Utility—Blocked energy + toxins shall be moved from all Ur internal organs to purge in the normal drainage system, i.e., urine, feces, sweat, cough, menses[ladies], vomitting and all the organs shall function up to optimal levels
      Acupressure Techniques—NO MEDICATION. NO SIDE EFFECTS. NO HOSPITALIZATION. NO COSTS. IT IS SAFE ALSO.
      With Ur thumb, press ur/his/her palms and soles, wrists and ankles on both sides. Suppose pain is felt while pressing a particular point in the palm/sole, u have to press the surrounding area—just like u r pumping out air from that painful point. The blocked energy in any internal organ, be it lungs, heart, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, liver, etc., shall be released along with toxins if any. As a last point u must press middle part of each palm/sole; so that toxins, if any, shall be excreted/purged through urine without affecting the kidneys.
      It should be done in an empty stomach or 2 hours after meals. With this, all the endocrine glands and their hormonal secretions shall be regulated. All internal organs shall function up to optimal levels. Ur entire immune system gets invigorated to produce antibodies.

      PS:If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse ‘Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.

  12. QUESTION:
    Why do I have little bumps on my arm, between my elbow and my shoulder and how do I get rid of them?
    They are small un-noticeable (except to touch) bumps on my arm where the biceps are. They usually feel softer when I put moisturiser on them, except this does not get rid of them. How do I get rid of them completely?

    • ANSWER:
      I believe that you are talking about Keratosis pilaris and as far as I know its genetic. Here's what I found on the internet. Hope it answers your question:

      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a very common genetic follicular condition that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin and hence colloquially referred to as "chicken skin". It most often appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms (though the lower arms can also be affected), and can also occur on the thighs and tops of legs, flanks, buttocks or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet). Less commonly, lesions appear on the face and may be mistaken for acne.

      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40 to 50% of the adult population and approximately 50 to 80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. Varying in degree, cases of KP can range from minimal to severe.[citation needed]

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks) and related disorders.

      Many people with keratosis pilaris do not know they have it (if the condition is mild). While KP resembles goose bumps, it is characterized by the appearance of small rough bumps on the skin. As a result, it is often confused with acne.

      Keratosis pilaris occurs as excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin, accumulates within the hair follicles forming hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). Bearing only cosmetic consequence, the condition most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy. Though people with keratosis pilaris experience this condition year round, it’s during the colder months when moisture levels in the air are lower that the problem can become exacerbated and the “goose bumps” are apt to look and feel more pronounced in color and texture.

      [edit] Treatment

      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris, however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, Retin A and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to the lactic acid — a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may also be helpful but increases risk of skin cancer. Small amounts of vitamin A can be used orally but only with exteme caution due to potential for liver damage. Check with a Dermatologist or Family Doctor before taking extra vitamin A due to the vitamins' potential toxic effects.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden (if they do not already appear red), and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. Instead, the hair grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated, and can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though can lead to scarring.

      Food allergies may also exacerbate the condition, causing hyper-keratosis pilaris, gluten being a common culprit (source: physician's (MD) oral presentation).

  13. QUESTION:
    There should be a cure for Keratosis Pilaris by now?
    You would think that if 40% of the WORLD population, about 2.4 BILLION people, have KP, that's a good enough reason to research a cure for it am I right? Come on, it's not like we're trying to cure cancer here, KP is just a skin disorder...

    • ANSWER:
      I have found a cure that works for me!! Other people need to try it to see if it works for other people too... I've been applying pure coconut oil for a few days (the stuff you eat) and my arms are completely smooth for the first time EVER!!! So excited

  14. QUESTION:
    How to treat my keratosis pilaris?
    I've had this condition for a very long time. It is located on my arms, above the elbows. I never really cared about them, but I'm just so sick of them and want to treat it. I know it's not curable but I just need some kind of home treatment to lessen it. It is so unflattering when I wear strappy dresses or tank tops, and with spring coming up and all. Plus I always scratch them when I'm stressed and pick at them, which isn't good, because now there is scarring to go along with the bumps.

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      You're right that KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured, although it can be made less noticeable. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre…
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co…

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture in, such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin.
      Check out this site for some great, inexpensive, homemade exfoliants you can try anywhere on your body;
      - http://www.skinway.com/

      Do not scrub the affected areas too harshly. It's not the amount of pressure you apply to the area that matters, as much as it's the consistency of gently exfoliating those affected areas daily. Also, you would not want to bruise your sensitive skin.

      The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers (Hot water tends to dry out the skin) and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when the lower humidity tends to dry out the skin.

      Vaseline and other such petroleum-based products are NOT generally recommended as a moisturizer, because petroleum-based products actually suffocate the skin. Skin needs to breathe to heal. As well, if there's any bacteria on your skin when the Vaseline is applied, it makes a perfect breeding ground for the bacteria to grow.

      The moisturizers you've mentioned are good. You could also add olive oil to that list. Olive oil is a natural oil that will help moisturze but will not clog your pores.

      Make sure to be drinking more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc… And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3’s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3’s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 – 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-…

      Check out the sites below for more information....

  15. QUESTION:
    How do I fix these appearance downfalls?
    I have all these little random bumps on my thighs are the top of my arms and I need to make them go away but I have no idea what they are! I've had them for years. You can't really see them but you can feel them. Does anyone know what they could be? Theyre really little. And they NEED to go away soon! Please help!

    • ANSWER:
      Here you go...

      Keratosis Pilaris
      Keratosis pilaris (commonly called KP) appears as "chicken skin bumps" on the skin. These bumps usually appear on the upper arms and thighs. They also can appear on the cheeks, back and buttocks. Keratosis pilaris, while unattractive, is harmless.

      What Are the Symptoms of Keratosis Pilaris?
      This disorder appears as small, rough bumps. The bumps are usually white or red, but do not itch or hurt. Keratosis pilaris is usually worse during the winter months or other times of low humidity when skin becomes dry. It also may worsen during pregnancy or after childbirth.

      How Is Keratosis Pilaris Treated?
      Although the condition may remain for years, it gradually disappears before age 30 in most cases. Treatment of keratosis pilaris is not medically necessary; but, individuals with this condition may want to seek treatment for cosmetic reasons.

      The initial treatment of keratosis pilaris should be intensive moisturizing. A cream such as Acid Mantle, Vaseline or Complex 15 can be applied after bathing, and then re-applied several times a day. Other treatments may include:

      Medicated creams containing urea (Carmol-20) or alpha-hydroxy acids (Aqua Glycolic, Lacticare) applied twice daily
      Efforts to unplug pores by taking long, hot soaking tub baths and then rubbing the areas with a coarse washcloth or stiff brush.

  16. QUESTION:
    Why do I have these small bumps all over my upper arms?
    Ever since I can remember I have had small bumps on my arms. Mostly light in color and only on the upper part of the arm. If I go to the tanning bed a lot, it seems like a lot of them go away, but there are always some there. What does this mean???? Do I have a vitamin deficiency? Do I need to use a certain type of cleanser?

    • ANSWER:
      That could be keratosis pilaris.

      According to one website it is described as this: Keratosis Pilaris (KP) is a common skin disorder, typified by "chicken skin" bumps on upper arms, thighs, torso, buttocks and occasionally the cheeks. Excess skin forms around individual hair follicles, creating the characteristic minute, rough, grater-like bumps.

      To me they look like a bunch of ingrown hair bumps.

  17. QUESTION:
    shower gel that will help keratosis pilaris?
    I'm using coconut oil as a moisturiser and a generic moisturising shower gel which I'm not all impressed with. Any suggestion?

    Also is there any other advice people have for my skin? Worst area is my bum, thighs and just under my shoulder blades.

    • ANSWER:
      HELP HAS ARRIVED!!!!!!!!!!!

      I had this for years, my mom told me it was eczema. Most people say eczema is a name used for tons of different dry skin conditions that doctors can’t diagnose. I used eczema creams all through Jr. High and High School, all that did was make me feel greasy and uncomfortable with zero results.

      Keratosis pilaris is a common, genetic follicular condition that causes the appearance of rough bumps on the skin. It most often appears on arms, thighs, hands, legs, sides, buttocks, or face (which on the face are often mistaken for acne). Worldwide, Keratosis pilaris affects an estimated 40% of the adult population and approximately 50%-80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. There are several different types of Keratosis Pilaris, including Keratosis Pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), Keratosis Pilaris Alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), Keratosis Pilaris Rubra Faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.

      Keratosis Pilaris is caused by Hyperkeratosis: when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin, which is cream colored, surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore, resulting in rough clogged pores. The openings are often closed with a white plug of encrusted sebum, the oily, waxy substance produced by glands in the skin to keep it from drying out. Hyperkeratosis is most likely caused by your body having a vitamin A & E deficiency.

      I started taking vitamin A & E pills at dinner every night and 90% of my white bumps on my cheeks, arms, and legs cleared up. My boss also had white bumps on her arms and tried taking the vitamins too, it worked nicely for her. You could try taking the vitamins, but if you stop taking them, your body will go back to being deficient in them unless you start eating more foods naturally containing vitamins A & E:

      Vitamin A: Liver, Red Pepper, Cayenne, Sweet Potatoes, Carrots, Dried Apricots, Cantaloupe, Spinach, Squash, Dried Herbs, Papaya, Mangoes, Green Peas, Tomatoes.

      Vitamin E: Sunflower Seeds, Almonds, Pine Nuts, Peanuts, Dried Apricots, Pickled Green Olives, Cooked Taro Root, Wheat Germ/Flax Seed/Corn/Canola/Soybean Oils, Hazelnuts, Broccoli.

      Both A & E: Paprika, Red Chili Peppers or Powder, Spinach

      If the bumps (clogged dry rough crusty pores) have a red or pink ring around them, it could just be that they are inflamed, or it could be some sort of skin infection, such as yeast, which lives on the skin naturally but could become an infection, or bacterial. If they are a little pink or red I would try an antibacterial soap.

      Antibacterial soaps are full of chemicals and poisons, some are so harmful they cause muscle weakness, such as in the heart and tongue, and should not be in stores. A natural alternative is a soap or lotion containing Tea Tree oil. Tea Tree oil has natural antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, and antiseptic qualities. It also has beneficial cosmetic properties. Tea Tree oil has a faint medicinal scent to it like eucalyptus, which is why I would suggest a soap instead of a lotion. Products containing Tea Tree oil can be found in abundance at health and natural and heath stores, but is also available in main stream store such as Wal-Mart for as low as around .

      So in short, vitamin A, vitamin E, soap, and you should be good (: I wish you luck

      Also, ontop of everything listed above, oils like (yes coconut) sunflower, extra virgin olive, jojoba, almond, and argan oil wont clog pores, I would try moisturizing for a few days with lotions containing some of those to soften the KP, then one day of thorough exfoliating to scrape the KP build up on your skin away

  18. QUESTION:
    How do i get rid of these red dots on my arms?
    they are not freckles!!
    ive had them since i was little.
    my brother and sisters have them too.
    i forgot what its called but theyre not freckles.
    theyre red, sometimes they stick out like pimples. but they cover my arms. what is it and how do i get rid of it? (i use uncented lotion)

    • ANSWER:
      It may be keratosis pilaris.
      For an accurate, professional diagnosis you would need to consult your doctor or a certified dermatologist.

      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.
      - http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pil…
      - http://www.helpforkp.com/

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre…
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co…

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin.
      Check out this site for some great, inexpensive, homemade exfoliants you can try;
      - http://www.skinway.com/skincare_articles…

      The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers (Hot water tends to dry out the skin) and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when low humidity dries out the skin.

      You should drink more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc… And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3’s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3’s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 – 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-…

      Hope this helps!

  19. QUESTION:
    My feet feel so cold even under a blanket?
    When it's cold, my feet just do as mentioned and feel so damp and sweaty and I'm starting to get chillblains. I'm 18 I get enough activity in my day. Would this just be because of poor circulation?

    • ANSWER:
      1. Chilblain— Inflammation of the skin over the toes or some portion of the feet, the hand or ears, caused by sudden alternations of temperature. The skin becomes red in patches, slightly swollen and there is much irritation and itching, specially in the evening. NS 3x alone, failing which mixture of CP 3x or 12x, FP 12x, KM 3x, KP 3x, NM 3x, NS 3x and S 12x both internally and locally mixed with vaseline, failing which mixture of CS 3x, KS 3x and NP 3x.

      •Dosage*: 2 grains t.d.s.
      •All these biochemic salts/homeo medicines available @ local Homoeo shops, are safe and with side benefits. Don’t swallow medicine. The medicine to be dissolved on/under the tongue. Don’t take any thing 10 minutes before and 10 minutes after medication. You can take water.

      2. Prevention * & Cure* of any Disease/Syndrome/Disorder:---
      In any ailment [acute as well as chronic] and emergencies, Acupressure techniques come to Ur rescue, not only for instant diagnosis, but also for giving some prevention of any disease[s] and perceivable relief/cure.
      Acupressure techniques--- Utility—Blocked energy + toxins shall be moved from all Ur internal organs to purge in the normal drainage system, i.e., urine, feces, sweat, cough, menses[ladies], vomiting and all the organs shall function up to optimal levels.
      Utility—Blocked energy + toxins shall be moved from all Ur internal organs to purge in the normal drainage system, i.e., urine, feces, sweat, cough, menses[ladies], vomitting and all the organs shall function up to optimal levels
      Acupressure Techniques—NO MEDICATION. NO SIDE EFFECTS. NO HOSPITALIZATION. NO COSTS. IT IS SAFE ALSO.
      With Ur thumb, press ur/his/her palms and soles, wrists and ankles on both sides. Suppose pain is felt while pressing a particular point in the palm/sole, u have to press the surrounding area—just like u r pumping out air from that painful point. The blocked energy in any internal organ, be it lungs, heart, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, liver, etc., shall be released along with toxins if any. As a last point u must press middle part of each palm/sole; so that toxins, if any, shall be excreted/purged through urine without affecting the kidneys.
      It should be done in an empty stomach or 2 hours after meals. With this, all the endocrine glands and their hormonal secretions shall be regulated. All internal organs shall function up to optimal levels. Ur entire immune system gets invigorated to produce antibodies.

      Remote control Acupressure points given by the God. For Treatment, hard-pressure is to be applied on & around these points with Ur thumb and middle finger.
      Palms/soles:
      Point Nos.1-10 -----1 [brain], 2 [Mental Nerves], 3 [Pituitarygland], 4 [Pineal gland], 5 [Head Nerves], 6 [Throat], 7 [Neck], 8 [Thyroid & Parathyroid], 9 [Spine], 10 [piles-constipation], , Point Nos.11-16, No.11 [Prostrate gland], 12 [Penis], 13 [Vagina], 14. Testes & Ovaries], 15 [Uterus], 16 [Lymph], 17 [Hip], 18 [Urinary Bladder], 19 [intestines], 21 [appendix-front side], and 21 [allergy-back side]; 22[gall bladder], 23 [liver], 24[Shoulder], 25[Pancreas], 26[kidney], 27[Stomach], 28[Adrena gland], 29[Solar Plexus-Nabhi Chakra-Umbelicus], 30[Lungs], 31[Ear], 32[Energy], 33[Nerves of ear], 34[Cold], 35[Eye], 36[Heart], 37 [spleen]. 38[Thymus].

      If the particular point is tender on pressure by Ur thumb, U can note that that particular organ[s] is/are affected. U can indulge in instant diagnosis of any disease and or the affected organ[s].
      http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.2304961665160.2103840.1282822997&type=1&l=0a6bb63dd0

      Dorsal side of Palms & soles to diagnose & treat ailments of eyes, spine, breast cancer, etc., :

      http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.2306802071169.2103895.1282822997&type=1&l=38eadce9df

      PS. If satisfied/benefited with, inform others to browse 'Yahoo Answers’ on any health issue.

      Source: ‘HEALTH IN UR HANDS’ Vol.I & II available in all Indian Languages all over the globe---by Dr.Devendra Vora, DSc.,MD.,FRCP.,---an octogenarian & the pioneer in Acupressure in India.

  20. QUESTION:
    I have kp scars on my arms, what type of cream is best at getting rid of scars, a bleaching cream perhaps?
    my upper arms are covered with scars from when i had bad keratosis pilaris and i would scratch and pick at the bumps, i have the kp under control but the scars are still there. i exfoliate and moisturize but what can i use to get rid of these brown spots?
    i recently tried a skin fade cream which had hydroquinone as the main ingredient along with vitamin c and spf 15, it was working great but after 2 weeks or so it started making me itch and my arms began to turn red so i stopped.
    is there a good well known bleaching cream out there that i should try?
    AFRICAN BEAUTY WHERE CAN I FIND FAIR&WHITE PRODUCTS??????
    IVE ACTUALLY HEARD A LOT ABOUT THEM BUT CANNOT FIND THEM, I HEAR SOME PEOPLE SELL FAKES WHICH ARE DANGEROUS.

    • ANSWER:
      please use fair and whote. this is by far the best product i have ever ever used. i had a skin disorder called Pityriasis rosea it left my skin a messed uo. I had dark veins all over my legs. I also pick at my skin at times and i had scars from mosiquito bites on my arms and legs. i was running out of options. i dreaded the summer months because i knew it would be too hot for me to cover up with long sleeve clothes. i began using this product a year ago. it works so well. i saw reults within the first 2-3 weeks. everyday i thouroughly wash my face then apply sunscreen regardless of the weather. the fair and white product line includes lotions,creams, sprays. and soaps. i had some minor acne scarring on my face after washing my face i apply palmers ambi cream then fair and white lotion. i simpathize for you and i know exactly what you are going though. please use this product if you want an improved appearance in your skin.

  21. QUESTION:
    What genetic diseases/skin conditions occur in association with keratosis pilaris?

    Please... anyone with a REAL answer?

    • ANSWER:
      KP is a genetic skin disorder and it is hereditary. There have been suggestions made that KP might be linked with a deficiency in Vitamin A.
      "Follicular keratosis refers to orthokeratosis involving the follicular ostium and infundibulum. It may be isolated [as in standard keratosis pilaris (KP)] or associated with other pathologic processes, including follicular inflammation, atrophy, scarring, and alopecia [keratosis pilaris atrophicans (KPA)]. These are reaction patterns that occur alone or as part of a wide variety of syndromes"
      The disorder may be associated with eczema (dermatitis).

  22. QUESTION:
    How can i get rid of Keratosis pilaris?

    • ANSWER:
      There is currently no known cure for keratosis pilaris, however, there are effective treatments available which make its symptoms less apparent. The condition often improves with age and can even disappear completely in adulthood, though some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life. Most of the available treatments are purely symptomatic, the one thing they all have in common is need for repetition and ongoing commitment. Some who seek treatment with the disorder may be prescribed Tretinoin or Triamcinolone cream, often by request.

      Triamcinolone, most commonly sold under the trade name Aristocort, is a synthetic corticosteroid medically approved as an anti-inflammatory agent in the treatment of eczema and also reduces the amount of keratin in pores. It may be of most help to those with keratosis pilaris by reducing red, inflamed bumps. Triamcinolone is typically applied three times a day.

      Tretinoin, most commonly sold under the trade name Retin-A, is a topical retinoid medically approved in the treatment of acne. This medicine works by causing the outer layer of the skin to grow more rapidly, which decreases the amount of the protein keratin in the skin. As a result, the surface layer of the skin becomes thinner and pores are less likely to become blocked, reducing the occurrence of symptoms related to acne. As keratosis pilaris is manifested through excess keratin in the skin, Tretinoin forms a more effective and core approach to treatment than Triamcinolone which forms a largely symptomatic approach. Tretinoin is typically applied once a day before bed.

      An alternative treatment is Adapalene, a retinoid medication which is a more stable compound, less sunlight sensitive and has less general side effects and may be just as effective as Retin-A. Treatment of KP with Adapalene would be considered an "off-label" use of the medication.

      As with Triamcinolone, Tretinoin or any other treatment, once therapy is discontinued, the condition reverts back to its original state. However, skin treated with Tretinoin may take several weeks or more to revert back to its pre-treatment condition, but may at the same time take several weeks or more to show optimal results with the condition commonly worsening initially as underlying keratin is brought to the surface of the skin. Tretinoin is considerably more expensive and dispensed in smaller quantities than Triamcinolone and other treatments. Although it may be the most effective treatment for keratosis pilaris, it is not considered the first line of treatment.[citation needed]

      Unfortunately keratosis pilaris has not been clinically researched for treatment in an unbiased manner, with all claims of success or improvement being purely marketed or anecdotal. The condition is often dismissed outright by practitioners as being presently untreatable,[citation needed] giving mere moisturizing suggestions or reassurance that the condition will improve or cease with age, typically after 30. General practitioners are often unable to identify the condition.[citation needed] Ignorance accompanied with the price, availability, quantity dispensed, time taken for optimal results to be achieved, more serious side effects, adverse reactions and worsening of the condition in the initial treatment phase, coupled with the cheaper, safer and easier availability of other treatments has hindered Tretinoin from showing its potential in the treatment of this condition.[citation needed]

      Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, creams and lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids and urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Beta hydroxy acids may help improve the appearance and texture of the afflicted skin. Milk baths may provide some cosmetic improvement due to the lactic acid, a natural alpha hydroxy acid in milk. Sunlight may be helpful but increases risk of skin cancer. Coconut oil may also be helpful if applied to afflicted areas while in the shower. Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden, and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring. Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing, such as tight fitting jeans, is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

  23. QUESTION:
    what are these little bumps on the back of my legs?!?
    I have little pimple like bumps on the back of my thighs, ive considered heat rash but im not sure, when you try to squeeze them all you get it blood, they're really embarrassing as they're bright red. DO you ahve any idea. What can i do to get rid of them??

    • ANSWER:
      That is actually an extremely common skin disorder called Keratosis Pilaris (normally found on the tops of arms & the back of thighs.) Never pick at these bumps as it will only make things worse, however good measures to take would be to use a wash with glycolic acid such as MD Formulations, but the greatest product which is literally a wonder cream is Karin Herzog Oxygen body cream.It is great for all kinds of lumps & bumps, such as KP & Milia,spots, wounds,burns & lines/wrinkles as well as for scar tissue.
      Put Keratosis pilaris into Google & you will find plenty of information.
      The Karin Herzog website is: www.karinherzog.com

      Good luck & take care

  24. QUESTION:
    How can I get rid of kp?
    I hate having kp.
    I have it on my arms, legs, butt, and stomach. I never wear short sleeve shirts or show my legs because of this. I am a teenager and I never show skin due to my kp. I hate it! I don't even let people touch me. I never go to beater or swimming either.
    What can I do to get rid of it?? :(
    When I do wear short sleeves I always see people staring at my arms.

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured, although it can be made less noticeable. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.
      - http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pil…
      - http://www.helpforkp.com/

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre…
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co…

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin.
      Check out this site for some great, inexpensive, homemade exfoliants you can try;
      - http://www.skinway.com/skincare_articles…

      The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers (Hot water tends to dry out the skin) and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when low humidity dries out the skin.

      Make sure to be drinking more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc… And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3’s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3’s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 – 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-…

      Hope this helps!

  25. QUESTION:
    How can I remove these bumps on my arm?
    I have had these small bumps on my upper arm for almost all of my life and I just recently found out that what I have is called Keratosis Pilaris. Is there any way I can remove these bumps on my arms? thanks

    • ANSWER:
      I also have them, and suffer from the same thing.

      the cure i have found is very simple.
      a little sunlight on the arms.
      less dairy & mainly less milk.
      more fresh produce
      more water.

      mine have faded dramatically, and are almost gone!
      when i have a tran, they are hardly there at all!
      good luck!

      Classification

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faciei (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.[3]

      [edit] Symptoms and signs

      Keratosis pilaris occurs when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore. This causes the formation of hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). The painless bumps are skin-colored, although they can become red and inflamed at times. Usually many plugs form in an area, causing patches of rough, bumpy skin. This gives the skin a sandpaper or goose flesh appearance.[4] This may be more severe in the winter or times of low humidity, which causes the skin to become dry. It will eventually resolve on its own.[5]

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin's "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. The hair, then, grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated. The hair can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though removal can lead to scarring.[6]

      Keratosis pilaris may be hereditary. It is present in babies and continues into adulthood, but is uncommon in elderly people. It is most obvious during the teenage years. KP is prevalent in those who have atopic dermatitis, ichthyosis, or descend from Celtic backgrounds. Keratosis pilaris occurs in otherwise healthy people.[7]

      [edit] Treatment

      There is no cure for Keratosis pilaris, but treatment is available. One option is to use a loofa to remove the dead, dry skin. Another option is to use a dermotologist-prescribed cream or lotion that should be applied daily. The best lotions for this condition would have urea, 15% alphahydroxy acids, or Retin A in them. Over-the-counter lotions work as well and should be applied after showering, as well as several times a day.[8] The lotions are often soothing and can help improve the appearance of the skin. [9] Dermotologists also recommend mild peeling agents, or alpha hydroxy acids, that may open up the plugged follicles. Antibiotics may also help in some cases where the bumps are red and badly inflamed.[10] To temporarily reduce redness but not roughness, pulse dye laser treatment or intense pulsed light (IPL) can be done.[11]

      Although it may clear up with treatment, reccurance of KP is very likely. Therefore, treatment should be continued regularly. It may take several months to years for the condition to completely clear up.

      A dermatologist or physician can usually diagnose a patient for Keratosis pilaris by visually inspecting the patient's skin.[12]

  26. QUESTION:
    Dry skin brushing and keritosis pilaris?
    i think i may have kp on my upper thigh area and i always seem to get ingrown hair on the back of my elbow forearm area, can dry brushing only these areas of my body help? with my problem anyone else suffer from this unsightly skin disorder i don't like wearing shorts or swimsuit cus of it its been awful for me. any tips thanks

    • ANSWER:
      I have that on the back of my upper arms.

      They sorta look like red goose bumps right?

      Try this stuff..it works wonders!! This is what I use.

      It's sorta expensive..but it last a really long time because all you use is a pea sized amount.

      So here's the link:
      http://www.sephora.com/browse/product.jhtml?id=P73509&categoryId=B70

      Good luck and hope this helps!

  27. QUESTION:
    How do i get rid of these things?
    So ive had like pimples or something on my butt for like a year now and i cant seem to get rid of them i dont even know if there pimples just assuming. and its super embarrassing and i need to know how to get rid of it. do i use baby oil or lotion or whaat? and i wash and loofah it everynight

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis Pilaris is a very common genetic follicular disorder manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin. Primarily, it appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms, but can also occur on thighs and buttocks or any body part except palms or soles.

      An excess of the protein known as Keratin, accumulates within the hair follicles forming numerous tiny rough bumps on the skin. Sometimes, these bumps can become irritated causing the follicles to redden excessively. KPR

      KP is often misdiagnosed and treated as acne. Most types are more evident during teen years.

      Some products that have worked for others:
      # Neostrata lotion AHA 15
      # Amlactin 12% Moisturizing Cream
      # Lac-Hydrin 5 Lotion, With Alpha Hydroxy Acid for relief of Dry Skin
      # AVON MOISTURE THERAPY Skin Bump Minimizer
      # Glytone Keratosis Pilaris 3 Piece Kit
      # Hydro Foam 40 (Urea)
      # KP DUTY

      Over exfoliating can aggravate it and make it worse, so be careful.

  28. QUESTION:
    I have little redish bumps on my arms. What are they?
    i am a female, and ever since 4th grade i have had these little red bumps above my elbow on my arms. they don't hurt but the just look odd. Does anyone else have these?, know what they are? or know how to get rid of them?

    • ANSWER:
      I have little redish bumps on my upper arms as well. My dermatologist said they are called "keratosis pilaris rubra". Here is a picture of it http://keratosispilaris.org/images/kp/arm_01.jpg

      This is from their website
      "Why KP occurs?

      The bumps of KP result from the way in which scales are shed from the outer skin around KP affected hair follicles. In these follicles, the outer skin scales are excessively adherent and do not shed easily. This phenomenon is known as abnormal keratinization or hyperkeratinization. The fact that it is localized to the individual follicles and occurs in each and every one in a certain area, explains its characteristic "millions of bumps" appearance.

      Sometimes, this hyperkeratotic buildup entraps the hair within the follicle. The trapped hair gets bunched up and may lead to a red irritated bump that may fill with pus. These pus filled red bumps are often confused with bacterial folliculitis or acne.

      People with a history of skin allergies are most susceptible to this condition. The papules tend to occur in association with allergic dermatitis and several types of xerotic (dry) skin disorders. Both of these conditions have a strong hereditary link.

      Keratosis pilaris tends to be more severe during the winter months or other times of low humidity when skin dries out. Areas where relative humidity is low have a higher incidence of Keratosis Pilaris."

  29. QUESTION:
    AmLactin for kp gives me a rash?
    I have a very annoying case of kp and am currently using the lotion "AmLactin". I use it every night as i was directed and it works! But as soon as it begins to work and show a difference, i start breaking out in more, smaller bumps, over small areas of where i applied the AmLactin. Then if I stop applying the lotion, the rash goes away, but the kp returns. I'm not sure what to do. If i should just continue using the AmLactin, hoping that the new rash will just go away, or is there is another solution?

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured, although it can be made less noticeable. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre…
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co…

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture in, such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin.
      Check out this site for some great, inexpensive, homemade exfoliants you can try anywhere on your body;
      - http://www.skinway.com/

      Do not scrub the affected areas too harshly. It's not the amount of pressure you apply to the area that matters, as much as it's the consistency of gently exfoliating those affected areas daily. Also, you would not want to bruise your sensitive skin.

      The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers (Hot water tends to dry out the skin) and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when the lower humidity tends to dry out the skin.

      Vaseline and other such petroleum-based products are NOT generally recommended as a moisturizer, because petroleum-based products actually suffocate the skin. Skin needs to breathe to heal. As well, if there's any bacteria on your skin when the Vaseline is applied, it makes a perfect breeding ground for the bacteria to grow.

      Olive oil is a natural oil that will help moisturze but will not clog your pores.

      Make sure to be drinking more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc… And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3’s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3’s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 – 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-…

      Check out the sites below for more information....

  30. QUESTION:
    I have small bumps on my legs. sort of like rashes. theyre not red. their just bumps. what do i do?
    I have small bumps on my legs. i dont really know how to explain it. I have more on my right leg than my left leg.
    Its not noticeable to the eye. but once you stroke your hand on my leg.. you can definately feel the bumps.
    I recently just shaved and im not sure if its a razor burn? or if its something that has to do with that.
    When i didnt shave, it never had bumps.
    what should i do to take them away?

    • ANSWER:
      You might have developed KP (skin disorder, doesn't harm you juss makes your skin bumpy and not red) on your legs. I recommend moisturizing them a couple times a day for a little while and see if they go away. If they do, keep using the lotion or aloe Vera, it's good for you to moisturize your whole body after showering or swimming!! (:

  31. QUESTION:
    how can i get rid of chicken skin? (KP)?
    Ok so I have chicken skin on my CHEEKS which really sucks and I have it on my thighs and arms so is there any way to get rid of it? Please help

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.
      - http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pil…
      - http://www.helpforkp.com/

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre…
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co…

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin. The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when low humidity dries out the skin.

      You could make sure to be drinking more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc… And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3’s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3’s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 – 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-…

      For the redness on your cheeks, there are products you can buy that are specifically made to help reduce redness:
      - LaTherapie Paris has a fortifying skin cream that is supposed to help soften high colour (reduce redness)
      - There is a cream called ROSACURE which is an anti-redness cream formulated to reduce redness for rosacea-prone skin types. (even if it's not rosacea)
      - Guinot has a cream called RED LOGIC which claims to neutralize the appearance of red blood vessels.

  32. QUESTION:
    raised red and itchy bumps on my arms only?
    last month I started having raised red itchy bumps on both of my upper arms only, I thought maybe insect bites but no they come and go, I'm taking metatoprol for high blood, I do have a app with my doctor next week I do have allergies can anyone help?

    • ANSWER:
      I have that too Its called Keratosis Pilaris.
      All you have to do to get Rid of It Is Exfoliate with a Loofah Brush.
      If you have a Walgreens near you there is also Vanicream Soap that Helps Me When Im using the Loofah.You can also buy Lubriderm i heard which I will have to do.Heres a little about KP:

      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40% of the adult population and approximately 50%-80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men.

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks), and related disorders.

      While KP resembles goose bumps, it is characterized by the appearance of small rough bumps on the skin. As a result, many people with keratosis pilaris do not know they have it, and it is often confused with acne.

      Keratosis pilaris occurs when the human body produces excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin. The excess keratin, which is cream color, surrounds and entraps the hair follicles in the pore. This causes the formation of hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). Bearing only cosmetic consequence, the condition most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy. Though people with keratosis pilaris experience this condition year-'round, it is during the colder months, when moisture levels in the air are lower, that the problem can become exacerbated and the goose bumps are apt to look and feel more pronounced in color and texture.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin's "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. The hair, then, grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated. The hair can be removed, much like an ingrown hair, though removal can lead to scarring.

  33. QUESTION:
    Does exfoliation really help with KP?
    Well, for my KP, I exfoliate with Apricot Scrub and then I pat my legs dry. Next, I rub Clindamycin lotion on them, and every other night I use Tretinoin cream. My legs are SMOOTH right now, and the bumps seem to be going away somewhat, but do you really think this will help my KP?

    • ANSWER:
      Physical exfoliation is not helpful for KP, rather chemical exfoliation. Yikes, you use apricot scrub?! That stuff can cause micro tears on your skin.

      The CAUSE(S):
      The exact cause is unknown, but keratosis pilaris (KP) is developed because of hyperkeratinization (disorder of inner lining of hair follicle). Excessive keratin (tough protein) blocks the opening of hair follicles, thus, leads to hyperkeratosis (thickening of the stratum corneum of epidermis). KP is observed as benign bumps that are usually white, sometimes red, and generally do not hurt or itch. KP affects 50-80% adolescent and 40% adults.

      To CORRECT KP:
      1)Wash the affected area with a gentle cleanser
      2)Use an over-the-counter topical exfoliant/keratolytic product with one or a combination of the following ingredients: glycolic acid, lactic acid, malic acid, mandelic acid, resorcinol, salicylic acid, sulfur, and urea.
      3)Use an over-the-counter topical corticosteroid like 1% hydrocortisone cream. This should only be used short-term because it can thin the skin if you use it too frequently.
      4)Moisturizer with a well-formulated lotion or cream.

      To PREVENT KP:
      Since the exact cause is still unknown, there is no way to prevent that particular cause from occurring in the future. You can control the conditions of KP, however:
      1)Avoid harsh soaps like bar soaps
      2)Avoid scrubs
      3)Take a warm shower, pat dry, and then apply topical products.

      Improvement can take a few weeks to a one month with diligence, compliance, and patience depending on the severity of KP. If the over-the counter therapies are ineffective, then you should visit a board-certified dermatologist and request a prescription-strength retinoid, keratolytic agent(s), or immunomodulators. Or, you can pay for a series of chemical peels or microdermabrasion. Chemical peels are better than microdermabrasion unless your skin is too sensitive with the acids. Microdermabrasion is a waste of money in my opinion, but it is still an option.

  34. QUESTION:
    Does anyone know anything about Keratosis Pilaris?
    What can i do to make it go away? I am using AmLactin Cream and it is not working!!!

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a very common genetic follicular condition that is manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin and hence colloquially referred to as "chicken skin". It most often appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms (though the lower arms can also be affected), and can also occur on the thighs and tops of legs, flanks, buttocks or any body part except glabrous skin (like the palms or soles of feet). Less commonly, lesions appear on the face and may be mistaken for acne.

      Worldwide, KP affects an estimated 40 to 50% of the adult population and approximately 50 to 80% of all adolescents. It is more common in women than in men. Varying in degree, cases of KP can range from minimal to severe.[citation needed]

      There are several different types of keratosis pilaris, including keratosis pilaris rubra (red, inflamed bumps), alba (rough, bumpy skin with no irritation), rubra faceii (reddish rash on the cheeks) and related disorders.

      Many people with keratosis pilaris do not know they have it (if the condition is mild). While KP resembles goose bumps, it is characterized by the appearance of small rough bumps on the skin. As a result, it is often confused with acne.

      Keratosis pilaris occurs as excess keratin, a natural protein in the skin, accumulates within the hair follicles forming hard plugs (process known as hyperkeratinization). Bearing only cosmetic consequence, the condition most often appears as a proliferation of tiny hard bumps that are seldom sore or itchy. Though people with keratosis pilaris experience this condition year round, it’s during the colder months when moisture levels in the air are lower that the problem can become exacerbated and the “goose bumps” are apt to look and feel more pronounced in color and texture.

      Treatment

      There is no known cure for Keratosis pilaris, though it may improve with age and even disappear completely in adulthood; however, some will show signs of keratosis pilaris for life.

      Treatments are largely symptomatic and must be repeated. Regardless, exfoliation, intensive moisturizing cremes, lac-hydrin, and medicated lotions containing alpha hydroxy acids or urea may be used to temporarily improve the appearance and texture of affected skin.

      Scratching and picking at KP bumps causes them to redden (if they do not already appear red), and in many cases will cause bleeding. Excessive picking can lead to scarring.

      Wearing clothing that is looser around the affected areas can also help reduce the marks, as constant chafing from clothing (such as tight fitting jeans) is similar to repeatedly scratching the bumps.

      Many KP bumps contain an ingrown hair that has coiled. This is a result of the keratinized skin "capping off" the hair follicle, preventing the hair from exiting. Instead, the hair grows inside the follicle, often encapsulated, and can be removed if the bump is picked or squeezed (which can lead to scarring.)

  35. QUESTION:
    Help: I have been diagnosed with keratosis pliaris?
    I was recently diagnosed with keratosis pilaris on the back of my arms by a family doctor. They prescribed some cream for it and it has helped a bit, but with summer coming up I am embarrassed to show my arms. It is minimal but there :( and the doctor said it could be worse. Is there any cure for it? Can a peel help? Help please.

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis Pilaris (KP) is a common skin disorder, typified by “chicken skin” bumps on upper arms, thighs, torso, buttocks and occasionally the cheeks. Excess skin forms around individual hair follicles, creating the characteristic minute, rough, grater-like bumps.
      As seen in
      Health Magazine

      Keratosis Pilaris affects almost 50% of the world’s population and is particularly likely to affect anyone prone to eczema, asthma or hayfever.

      It’s never a chore to attain flawless, smooth skin. KP Duty™ effectively eliminates crustiness, flaking, and dry, rough chicken skin – no prep work or scrubbing required.

      KP Duty™ is a concentrated treatment with potent antioxidant Green Tea, moisture replenishing Hyaluronic Acid and texturizing Dimethicone.

      Contains:
      Glycolic Acid - Powerful AHA
      Sodium Glycolate – Glycolic Acid salt with buffering action
      Green Tea – Botanical antioxidant with soothing anti-redness action
      Urea - Humectant
      Algae – Soothing botanical
      Sodium Hyaluronate –Potent hydrating agent
      Dimethicone – Barrier agent – reduces moisture evaporation

      • Dermatologist Tested & Approved
      • Non Comedogenic
      • Non Irritating
      • Allergy Tested
      • Fragrance Free
      • Dye Free
      • pH Balanced
      • No Animal Testing

  36. QUESTION:
    DERMAdoctor KP Duty Dermatologist Moisturizing Therapy For Dry Skin ?
    i have this skin disorder calle Keratosis Pilaris.. and i found this product called DERMAdoctor KP Duty Dermatologist Moisturizing Therapy For Dry Skin and i would like to know if this product really works for keratosis pilaris

    • ANSWER:
      i have the same skin problem and i use the kp duty. but it doesn't work like really fast. you have to use it for a while like a few months before results really show. also, don't stop using it until your skin is all better or else you won't get the best results.

      hope this helps. :]

  37. QUESTION:
    I am a thirteen year old girl and i suffer from keratosis pilaris please help?
    I am a thirteen year old girl and i suffer from keratosis pilaris please help?
    ok for those of you who don't know, kp is a skin disorder that causes your upper arms to get dry itchy bumps. i am 13 and i just cant take it anymore everyday i go to school with a sweater on and i hate it even when its hot like 90 degrees hot i keep my sweater on ashamed of my kp.sometimes i wanna cry because i hate this it makes me feel ugly. so i just wanted to know if there was any one else out there like me

    • ANSWER:
      ive never heard of KP, but i must say my heart goes out to you darlin :) I hope you find something to help you with this. I know that there are other people out there that do have skin disorders. Just keep your head up my dear, i know its hard but it can only get better :)
      XO

  38. QUESTION:
    Do you REALLY CARE if you LOVE HER?
    Girls are welcome to answer this one too.

    I was just wondering would you guys even care if the girl you really like/love has a certain skin condition such as keratosis pilaris (kp)?
    Or would you just accept her and still love her the way she is?

    This question includes the rest of the imperfections we girls are insecure about out there. Thanks. =)

    • ANSWER:
      Ofcourse! There are people with MUCH more extreme skin disorders out there, and they find/keep love. If someone doesn't want to accept you for who and how you are, you DON'T need him in your life. Period. He is not mature enough to be in a relationship anyway, if he is so concerned about shallow things like that. Seriously. =)

  39. QUESTION:
    Does birth control reduce "chicken skin" ?
    I'm gettin on birth control and I know that some pills help and reduce acne immensely, can it reduce my "chicken skin" as well? If not, what's a way to get rid of it

    • ANSWER:
      Birth control pills are hormones and help to balance the hormones in your body. "Chicken Skin" (Keratosis Pilaris) is not due to hormones, so "No"... Sorry, but it is highly unlikely you'll notice any difference with your "chicken skin" when taking the birth control pill..

      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured, although it can be made less noticeable. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.
      - http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pil…
      - http://www.helpforkp.com/

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre…
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co…

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin.
      Check out this site for some great, inexpensive, homemade exfoliants you can try;
      - http://www.skinway.com/

      The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers (Hot water tends to dry out the skin) and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when low humidity dries out the skin.

      Make sure to be drinking more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc… And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3’s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3’s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 – 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-…

      Hope this helps!

  40. QUESTION:
    i am a thirteen year old girl and i suffer from keratosis pilaris please help?
    ok for those of you who don't know, kp is a skin disorder that causes your upper arms to get dry itchy bumps. i am 13 and i just cant take it anymore everyday i go to school with a sweater on and i hate it even when its hot like 90 degrees hot i keep my sweater on ashamed of my kp.sometimes i wanna cry because i hate this it makes me feel ugly. so i just wanted to know if there was any one else out there like me

    • ANSWER:
      I had the same problem.
      So I told my mom and then we got an appoitment with our doctor and he gaves us perscription cream and it went away in like a couple days or a week

  41. QUESTION:
    how do i treat Keratosis Pilaris?
    i'm 14 and i just found out that the little white bumps on my arms, cheeks, and, embarisingly, butt, are a condition called keratosis pilaris. i don't have a lot of money to spend on treatments, probably at most. is there anything i can do on my own to get rid of the bumps?

    • ANSWER:
      Okay i know basically everything about Keratosis Pilaris. KP (chicken skin) is a skin disorder passed down from genetics which disappears at the age of +30. half of the worlds population suffers and had suffered from KP. unfortunately KP can NOT be cure but CAN be treated. 1. never pick, itch, squeese, or touch KP because it will bleed. 2. let your affected skin breathe air so dont cover your skin. 3. cleanse ur skin with a loofah sponge. 4. apply lotion such as amlactin or try the dermadocter KP duty cream () or use the dermadocter scrub wash () 5. let ur skin see sunlight. 6.be proud of it because ur not alone. i also (14) have KP and .....acne =,= crap.....and they are everywhere..butt.cheek.arms.legs.back. but dont worry :D people who are good people would never mind these little flaws and wont really care.

  42. QUESTION:
    Starting swimming late?
    ok im 15 and i wanna learn to swim :( i dont know that well lol i cant even go in the deep and im kinda chubby like 150 pounds lool i was wondereing if i could still make it to like swim meets and stuff? and also lose weight and getting that perfect body lol ( big chest small waist kinda like micheal phelps ) but im starting in beginners thats what worries me which is probably like 1 day a week of swimming ! and also what disturbs me is i have KP which is a skin disorder and im afraid ppl will laugh the hell outa me and be like wtf is that shit ! and the girls will see it and wont like me :( i have kp on my chest and arms grrrrrrrrr anyways ppl plz comment back thx i appreciate it :)
    TY:) yes i have a friend who swims professionally and he said i have a long way to go till i reach his level :) but im hopin to get tonedup by the time this year is finished :D thx for the answer
    also my kp just looks like goosebumps but permenant and it gets red sometimes :(

    • ANSWER:
      okay, well its never too late. but before joining a team you need to be in a clinic. this is how i did it, i went every friday to learn the technique and a trainer taught me. look for one in your community. swimming will stretch you out but you will not lose all of that fat. but its alright it will become muscle when you join the team. Listen, kp, or any other skin disorder is normal, it happens and whoever laughs at it, so what? are you really gonna not swim and get in shape and get stronger because of what other people think? its not like you have bleeding puss and crazy bumps on your skin. and never swim with a shirt on, and if you swim get TIGHT jammers, its the only way you can swim good, trust me. if i were you 1. i'd join a clinic, then 2.join a team... its really hard to swim for a team, they push you non-stop you wont be able to handle it, and you need to be in shape for a long time... so im telling you experience wise dont join a team yet. you have to learn at your own pace.

  43. QUESTION:
    KP issues... Socially and mentally.?
    I have had KP since I was born and everybody made fun of me at school and it really lowered my self esteem, and I don't have any. I constantly agree with all the bad things people say about me and it helps me, in a way, feel safer. I haven't felt good about myself in a positive manner since before I entered school. I've been constantly picked on and put down and felt like shit because of my skin disorder and it really has taken a toll on me. I began experimenting in drugs and alcohol; I fear it'll only get worse. I don't see myself living because it is of course a very shallow world, and if you don't look good, you're not... Liked. And all my life, that's all I wanted. Now, I met a guy outside of school and I really, really like him. He's the first person I've ever really liked and he likes me too, but I hide my skin, so if he sees it, it might scare him away. And I know no one will ever want me because of my skin, but I really like him, like I said. He really makes me happier and optimistic and without him, I'd be a pessimistic b/itch, to be honest. He invited me to a party and it's a swimming pool one. I feel so bad about it. I don't know how to hide my skin and I don't want to feel ugly like I usually do. I really want to have clear skin. How do I make it go away so that it isn't noticeable?

    • ANSWER:
      I know how you feel. The first step to a better self is too realise that you have these issues and you can't change them. As soon as you realize to forget about what you can't change and focus onwhat you can and life will be so much better. Also you got to take a chance and just be your self. Don't hide it, because it is best to be yourself.

  44. QUESTION:
    Small, painless, flesh-colored bumps on backs of upper arms?
    Anyone know what that is? I can't really give much more info than what I put in the 'question.' Sometimes I can scratch a part of a bump off, and there are about, I dunno, forty VERY small bumps on each arm? It's only on the upper arms, mainly the backs.

    I remember seeing three or four of these five years ago, and since then, they've multiplied. My oldest brother had this, and I know quite a few friends have it, too. Does anyone know the name of this and/or treatments for it?

    • ANSWER:
      This might be Keratosis Pilaris (KP).

      Here is a quote from www.medicinenet.com

      "Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a very common skin disorder seen in many people of all ages. It is a benign condition that presents as numerous small, rough, red, or tan bumps primarily around hair follicles on the upper arms, legs, buttocks, and sometimes cheeks. KP creates a "goose bumps," "gooseflesh," or "chicken skin" appearance on the skin. A majority of people with KP may be unaware that the skin condition has a designated medical term or that it is treatable. In general, KP is often cosmetically displeasing but medically completely harmless. KP is frequently noted in otherwise healthy people."

      Check out the info here: http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pilaris/article.htm

  45. QUESTION:
    How can I reduce redness in my skin?
    I have something that my friends call "chicken skin." The scientific term is KP or Keratosis Pilaris. Both my mom and dad have it. It's apparently a skin disorder that makes the upper half your arms and legs really bumpy and red. I'm fine with my bumps but I want to reduce the redness caused by it. Another effect from KP is that I get red really easily throughout my whole body when I get fatigued or emotional. I would really like to stop all this reddening. I would really appreciate any remedies or products you recommend. Thank you! :)

    • ANSWER:
      Heal yourself from within either by opting for homeopathy or ayurvedic treatment.
      Homeopathy is cheap and Ayurveda is costly.
      The first and foremost organ that actually causes redness and other skin related problems is none other than "LIVER"

      Drink Milk thistle.
      Drink body cooling agents like Butter Milk, Coconut water, Cucumber juice.
      Avoid alcohol and heat inducing food like beef and pork.
      Do not smoke or do drugs.
      Drink 20-25 glasses of water daily.
      Eat green leafy vegetables more often.
      Eat chicken and fish in real moderation.
      Always take shower with cool water (not cold). Never use hot or warm water.
      Sleep well at night and do YOGA, breath exercises especially.
      Whenever you feel stressed out, just take deep breathes and relax.
      Avoid sun and Avoid doing strenous tasks.
      Sleep in cool rooms and always try to be in cool rooms.

  46. QUESTION:
    how do you get rid of keratosis pilaris???
    i get em on my face, and arms...ughhhhh

    • ANSWER:
      Hi Roostew

      Here is an unusual but effective method to draw toxins from the body/skin.

      INTRODUCTION TO OIL PULLING ("OP")
      REPORTED CURES WITH OIL PULLING:

      Mouth & Gum Disease; Stiff Joints; Allergies; Asthma; Acne, High Blood Sugar; Constipation; Migraines; Bronchitis; Eczema; Heart, Kidney, Lung Diseases; Leukemia; Arthritis; Meningitis; Insomnia; Menopause (hormonal issues); Cancer; AIDS; Chronic Infections; Varicose Veins; High Blood Pressure; Diabetes; Polio; Cracked Heels,.

      Here's are a few paragraphs from Bharat Savur's article on The Hindu Business Online

      ..."When Dr Karsch examined the gargled milk-white oil under a microscope with 600 magnification, he saw live organisms swimming in it. It's poisonous, so never swallow it, he warns. These poisons are bacteria-embryos, which, if not eliminated, cause diseases. Apparently, Dr Karsch cured his own chronic blood disease and 15-year-old arthritis.

      The first sign of improvement is in the teeth-they become firm and white, he says. Other healing indications: fresh, relaxed feeling on waking up, disappearing dark pouches below the eyes, anew appetite and energy, better memory and deep sleep.

      Dr Karsch swears by the mouth oil-wash for anything from organ-disorders, skin-diseases, menstrual problems, paralysis to every ache and it is in the human anatomy. You can gargle even when you have fever, he says, adding, it takes anything from two days to a year to cure a disease.

      And if these claims sound exaggerated, he told a conference of Ukrainian cancer specialists, try out the process yourself.

      Interestingly, Ayurveda advises oil gargling "to purify the taste-buds and the entire system", as explained by Dr Deepak Chopra in Perfect Health.

      According to this life science, the tongue is mapped by organ-locations — that is, each section of the tongue is connected to the kidneys, lungs, spleen, liver, heart, pancreas, small intestines, stomach, colon, and spine.
      Thus, an oil-mouth-massage soothes and stimulates the key meridians where taste meets organ. Simultaneously, as in any skin-massage, the inner skin and lining of the mouth, palate and tongue become warm and supple and the lubrication prevents dryness (the vatic effect).
      In modern dietetics too, dryness is discussed.

      For example, lack of Vitamin A (retinal) causes the outer lining of the eyeball to dry and wrinkle, and affects vision.
      And as any dietician would tell you, all oils contain 960 micrograms of vitamin A per 10 gm (the recommended daily allowance of vitamin A per adult is 600 micrograms). So, it's possible that oil gargling helps in reaching the required retinal to the eyeballs and keeps them elastic and smooth.
      Likewise, the Ayurvedic `purification of taste-buds' also has its equivalent in dietetics as `antioxidants'. Oxidation literally means `the putrefaction of body-tissues'.

      And oil-soluble vitamins, A, C, D, and E are antioxidants that protect and prevent the decaying process and help maintain the integral functioning of cell membranes. That's why, many people are ingesting vitamin E pills to stem `aging' (oxidation). "

      Here is the link to learn more about OP

      http://www.earthclinic.com/Remedies/oil_pulling.html

      testimony on KP

      http://curezone.com/forums/fm.asp?i=1030891#i

      Best of health to you

  47. QUESTION:
    home remedies for Keratosis Pilaris?
    I have Keratosis Pilaris and I hate it. If anyone has (or preferably had) then please tell me how on earth you can get rid of this. I don't want anything that's really expensive but I'd really appretiate any and every suggestion you have. PLX HLP!!!
    it's on my arms and thighs not face.

    • ANSWER:
      Keratosis pilaris (KP) is a chronic skin condition periodically becoming worse and/or better.
      KP is a skin disorder that cannot be cured, although it can be made less noticeable. It is hereditary, and the severity varies from person to person.
      - http://www.medicinenet.com/keratosis_pil…
      - http://www.helpforkp.com/

      Treatment options for keratosis pilaris focus on exfoliating or softening the skin to reduce keratin clogged pores. Most commonly, lotions that contain 2% lactic acid or salicylic acid will help to break down the keratin plugs over time.
      - http://www.skintreatmentcream.com/kp-tre…
      - http://www.keratosispilaristreatments.co…

      An important first treatment step is to use a gentle cleansing agent with light abrasive properties, (often termed "scrub"), but one that keeps moisture such as an exfoliant for sensitive skin.
      Check out this site for some great, inexpensive, homemade exfoliants you can try;
      - http://www.skinway.com/

      The goal is to clean and open the pores of the skin without over drying. Other measures to avoid excessive dryness include taking lukewarm, brief showers (Hot water tends to dry out the skin) and using a humidifier, particularly during the winter months when low humidity dries out the skin.

      Make sure to be drinking more water and avoid all alcohol & caffeine products (coffee, tea, pop, etc..) Alcohol & caffeine will actually dehydrate your skin. Water re-hydrates from the inside out. As well, drinking water helps to wash out the toxins in the body.

      I would also suggest you increase your omega 3 fatty acids by taking supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil, fish oils, etc… And by eating walnuts, hazelnuts, or pecan nuts (if you're not allergic)
      Ground Fennel seeds and Flax seeds, as well as Flax seed Oil supplements (omega 3’s) also act as anti-inflammatories. (reduce redness)
      Omega 3’s aid in proper digestion and healthier skin.

      You could try increasing your intake of vitamin D through supplements (1000 – 4000 IU/day) and B-complex to aid in healthier skin and maintaining a healthier immune system.
      http://www.healthy-skincare.com/vitamin-…

      Hope this helps!

  48. QUESTION:
    How to get rid of kp?
    on arms and face??
    its kerosis pilaris

    • ANSWER:
      angie, I believe you mean "keratosis pilaris" LOTS of info can be found on the web site KeratosisPilaris.org and Mayo Clinic +keratosis pilaris (search)

      KP is a very common genetic follicular disorder manifested by the appearance of rough bumps on the skin. Primarily, it appears on the back and outer sides of the upper arms, but can also occur on thighs and buttocks or any body part except palms or soles. An excess of the protein known as Keratin, accumulates within the hair follicles forming numerous tiny rough bumps on the skin. Sometimes, these bumps can become irritated causing the follicles to redden excessively.
      KP is often misdiagnosed and treated as acne. Most types are more evident during teen years.

      The Mayo Clinic advises that no single treatment universally improves keratosis pilaris. Most options, including self-care measures and medicated creams, focus on softening the keratin deposits in the skin. Treatment of keratosis pilaris can include the following medications:

      Topical exfoliants. Medicated creams containing alpha-hydroxy, lactic or salicylic acid or urea moisturize and soften dry skin while helping to loosen and remove dead skin cells. Depending on their strength, certain creams are available over-the-counter and others require a prescription. Your doctor can advise you on the best option for your skin. The acids in these creams may cause redness, stinging or skin irritation, and therefore they aren't recommended for young children.
      Topical corticosteroids. These anti-inflammatory drugs help decrease cell turnover by suppressing the immune system. Low-potency corticosteroid ointments, such as hydrocortisone or derivatives, are usually recommended for sensitive areas such as your face and for treating widespread patches. Doctors usually prescribe corticosteroids for short-term treatment or for temporary relief of symptoms. They aren't used as long-term treatment due to potential side effects from absorbing stronger corticosteroid creams or thinning of the skin. Topical corticosteroids may also cause local burning, itching or irritation.
      Topical retinoids. Derived from vitamin A, retinoids work by promoting cell turnover and preventing the plugging of the hair follicle. Retinoids may be an effective treatment, but they can cause bothersome skin irritations, such as severe dryness, redness and peeling. Tretinoin (Retin-A Micro, Avita) and tazarotene (Tazorac) are examples of topical retinoids.
      Using a medication regularly may improve the appearance of your skin. But if you stop, the condition returns. And even with medical treatment, keratosis pilaris tends to persist for years.
      Best wishes for satisfactory improvement.

  49. QUESTION:
    How to know if I have Celiac disease - without insurance?
    I no longer have insurance which is terrible timing. Please if you know anything about Celiac's PLEASE read!!! Sorry this is so long but any resources or directions other than a simple "symptoms list" would be great!

    I recently had a gallbladder attack and docs thought it was non-functioning and diseased, but it was tested and my gallbladder is actually OVER-active and the doctor saw no alarm for this other than stress (finishing my Master's degree and car broke down in same week). However, this also occurs in people with Celiac's, finding this out after doing my own research. I also have a huge tendency to form calcium kidney stones (2 surgeries and over 10 stones, I'm in my early 20s), and I also have KP, keratosis pilaris, which is a skin disorder thought to be caused by a vitamin A deficiency. I have been eating healthier and it has helped but only somewhat... I can't hardly drink beer anymore, even 2 of them cause pain and I used to be able to drink quite a few! Sometimes after I eat I can feel my gallbladder twitching. My CBC blood tests were normal, liver function good, white blood cell count slightly high, slightly low bilirubin (whatever that is) but overall everything looked good.

    Then why do I feel like crap!!?!? I feel as though I have a malabsorption problem, or could it be a simple food intolerance? Its hard for me to tell if I have a food intolerance because I feel really full after not eating much, and then feeling really hungry a few moments later... because of my gallbladder :( . Are there any "over the counter" or at home tests that can test for Celiac?

    Add'l info: I eliminated most of my kidney stones by cutting down on fast food, soda, and meat. I have always drank a lot of milk, and was actually told to drink more but I'd get sick if I did!

    I have been to 4 doctors all who raise their eyebrows, poke and prod, and then just tell me I'm "just stressed". I am already being treated for anxiety...

    • ANSWER:
      The simple no cost method to figure it out is to go on a gluten free diet for 3 months and see how you feel as the diet goes along. This won't be definitive for celiac disease but if you feel better then you are either allergic to wheat or gluten or intolerant of them.

      An easy way to start a gluten free diet is to eat fresh fruits, vegetables, non processed fresh beef, pork, chicken, fish, egg and cheese. Add in rice and potatoes for starches. Don't try to learn how to read labels and find substitutes for pastas and breads although they are available until the three months are up. Also avoid commercially prepared sauces, gravies and anything with a long list of ingredients that you don't know what they are.

      After the three months are up, figure out if the gluten free diet has helped you or not and if it has, then learn all the ingredients that contain gluten and start finding gluten free substitutes for the things you miss the most.


kp skin disorder